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Severely vitamin D deficient

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Hi Everyone,

I know I've seen stuff here and there about vitamin D recently but I've never really paid attention.

I just had a ton of lab work done and one of the tests was my vitamin D level. According to my dr., I'm "severely deficient." She actually recommends a prescription strength supplement.

Can someone point me in the right direction with regards to dealing with this? What types of things does it impact? What might be some connections with other things going on in my body? Etc.

I'm dealing with extreme fatigue due to (I'm pretty sure) another new medication (that I'm going to tell my dr. I can't handle if it makes me this tired) and can hardly think straight to sort out the vitamin D thing.

TIA for any input you can give me. :)

 

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Edited by jcmaihcxs

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Take Vitamin D3 - often prescribed vitamin D is D2 and is not as bioavailable.  Jarrow makes a good vitamin D3.  My son (who is also severely deficient) takes one 5000 iu capsule a day.  Do you know what your actual level is?  https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/am-i-deficient-in-vitamin-d/

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It can cause fatigue and mental fuzziness/forgetfulness for sure, among other things. My doctor said my levels were extremely low too and put me on supplementation. It has made a world of difference. I seriously felt like I had early onset Alzheimer's or something before. I'm taking 5,000 a day and I could tell a difference in less than a week I want to say. My levels are probably low because I have colitis which can cause absorption problems- it's a common issue in that case- but other issues can effect it as well. I'm sure you will get a lot of good info from others here. Just wanted to chime in that it's worth trying the supplement! 

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Low levels affect my mood.  I am more depressed when my levels are low and people around me start asking if I haven't taken supplements in just a few days.

 

It also builds the immune system. 

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They're finding links between vitamin D and lots of different things - immunity, energy/mood, cancer (which is in many ways a failure of the immune system)...and apparently one explanation for there being so much vitamin D deficiency is th at people stay out of the sun so much now. Depending on what else runs in your family or is in your personal history, it might be worth getting some low level sun exposure.

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My DS21 has also tested as severely deficient in Vit D (more than once). Within days of taking the prescription he is like a new person - more energy, better mood, better skin complexion, quicker thinking, and just all-around easier to be around.

 

DH has also tested as severely deficient, but he wouldn't take the prescription. You can tell by his mood and energy levels whether he's gotten more or less sun exposure (and, therefore, more or less Vit D).

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Here's a side question to that, in case anyone knows:  My dd has been deficient in the past, went on the prescription dosage to get her levels up, and then went down to a lower over the counter dosage after that.  Then her levels went down.  So now she's on the prescription amount again which will bring them back up.  But she can't stay on the high dosage prescription amount forever.  Is there something you should be taking at the same time as vitamin D in order for it to be absorbed well?  Or do some people just always need a very high dosage?

 

 

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Some people need more in supplement form. I'm one of them. I do go in the sun but I live in a northern area that doesn't always have sun. And my body doesn't retain it very well. As long as you don't go over the maximum level it won't hurt you. I personally do better on the higher end of normal.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I have perpetual vitamin d issues...I am very very fair skinned and because sun screen also affects vitamin d absorption I have to be careful to get sun witbout sunscreen and still not burn. Vitamin d is also fat soluble so take with a teaspoon of coconut oil, and, take some morning and some night. Fish oil helps as well...your fatigue and brain fog could very well be vitamin d deficiency!

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I just need tons of it, all the time. My psych recommended a well-established phototherapy light brand, plus piles of supplement.

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I was convinced I was at death's door for five years.  I had heart palpitations, severe anxiety, memory loss, exhaustion, problems with focus, hair loss, nerve and muscle spasms. My current doc prescribed vitamin D at 50,000 units a week for three months and I am now taking 1000 units a day.  Symptoms are all gone.

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Depending on what else runs in your family or is in your personal history, it might be worth getting some low level sun exposure.

 

That's definitely the best way to get your vitamin D, but it can be hard to do in the winter :)

 

(Or for dark-skinned people further from the equator at any time of year.)

 

In addition to a supplement (and sunshine!), I strongly recommend you also try adding more vitamin-D rich foods to your diet. Every little bit helps, right? Most OJ and milk (including non-dairy milks) is fortified with vitamin-D, something which dramatically reduced the incidence of rickets in the West. Vitamin D also occurs naturally in fatty fish like tuna, mackerel, and salmon, in beef liver, and in egg yolks.

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Just remember sun exposure can not include sunscreen and many facial moisturizers contain an spf. My kids also take a vitamin D supplement, as it can be genetic and kiddos are susceptible too. 

 

I had similar symptoms as rdj2027 above--and I have a heart condition so I really thought it was the end. I could tell I was low again this fall and recently increased it ad started taking fish oil again as well (I had run out and forgot to buy more). We eat very little fish, as wild game is readily available here and fish is expensive, so fish oil is a must.

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Hi Everyone,

 

I know I've seen stuff here and there about vitamin D recently but I've never really paid attention.

 

I just had a ton of lab work done and one of the tests was my vitamin D level. According to my dr., I'm "severely deficient." She actually recommends a prescription strength supplement.

 

Can someone point me in the right direction with regards to dealing with this? What types of things does it impact? What might be some connections with other things going on in my body? Etc.

 

I'm dealing with extreme fatigue due to (I'm pretty sure) another new medication (that I'm going to tell my dr. I can't handle if it makes me this tired) and can hardly think straight to sort out the vitamin D thing.

 

TIA for any input you can give me. :)

 

ama supercross 2017 entry list live streaming

Thanks

 

If your doctor recommends prescription-strength supplement, take that. That's how you deal with it. :-)

 

Which tests did she order for thyroid? Presumably Free T3, Free T4, and Reverse T3 in addition to TSH. Did you see those results? Hypothyroid can also cause extreme fatigue and fuzzy thinking.

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What do your b12 numbers look like? The us range is set for survive, not thrive. Doctors here recommend higher.

 

Are you a healthy weight? Fat is metabolically active, and grabs D out of circulation. Work with a nutritionist if overweight, and if not read up on 'skinny fat'.

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For those who noticed a big difference in how you felt after upping your vitamin D dosage/levels, how long it take before you felt better?

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For those who noticed a big difference in how you felt after upping your vitamin D dosage/levels, how long it take before you felt better?

 

I felt better surprisingly fast.  I'd say within a few days, which doesn't seem possible.

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Within a week my anxiety, heart palpitations, spasms and exhaustion were remarkably better (not gone, but much better).  Improvement of hair loss took about six months.

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I felt better surprisingly fast.  I'd say within a few days, which doesn't seem possible.

 

That's what I'm thinking for me, too.  Definitely I feel less well in just days if I stop taking 5000mg a day.  I just started ds on D again bc he was showing the mood signs he had when he was low and in 3 days of 4000mg he is much more stable. 

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Here's a side question to that, in case anyone knows:  My dd has been deficient in the past, went on the prescription dosage to get her levels up, and then went down to a lower over the counter dosage after that.  Then her levels went down.  So now she's on the prescription amount again which will bring them back up.  But she can't stay on the high dosage prescription amount forever.  Is there something you should be taking at the same time as vitamin D in order for it to be absorbed well?  Or do some people just always need a very high dosage?

 

Make your child (or yourself) go out and play in the sunshine every day. This is how the body makes Vit D (which isn't really a vitamin). Unless you live at an extreme latitude, sunshine should be sufficient. Boosting regular dietary sources can help, too. 

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Make your child (or yourself) go out and play in the sunshine every day. This is how the body makes Vit D (which isn't really a vitamin). Unless you live at an extreme latitude, sunshine should be sufficient. Boosting regular dietary sources can help, too.

Sources I have read suggest that any latitude north of Los Angeles won't provide the necessary strength of sunlight during fall/winter months.

 

And then there are lots of places with more overcast days than not that time of year!

Edited by maize
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http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/time-for-more-vitamin-d

 

"Except during the summer months, the skin makes little if any vitamin D from the sun at latitudes above 37 degrees north (in the United States, the shaded region in the map) or below 37 degrees south of the equator. People who live in these areas are at relatively greater risk for vitamin D deficiency."

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If you get plenty of sun in summer, regular dietary sources are enough to make it up in winter for most people, but it really depends. DH was recently told by the doctor he's deficient. We live in the desert and he does his best to avoid the sun entirely pretty much all the time, so it's no surprise. DD gets plenty of sun, but I've been supplementing her Vit D to see if it makes a difference with her poor focus, low energy, etc. So far so good. 

 

If the goal is to reduce the need for supplemental Vit D, getting plenty of sunshine, at least in summer, is a good first step.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3897598/

 

 

https://intermountainhealthcare.org/blogs/2013/01/getting-vitamin-d-during-the-dead-of-winter/

 

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/heart/articles/2008/06/23/time-in-the-sun-how-much-is-needed-for-vitamin-d

 

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/Pages/vitamin-D-sunlight.aspx

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http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/time-for-more-vitamin-d

 

"Except during the summer months, the skin makes little if any vitamin D from the sun at latitudes above 37 degrees north (in the United States, the shaded region in the map) or below 37 degrees south of the equator. People who live in these areas are at relatively greater risk for vitamin D deficiency."

My psych decided she didn't even need me to get a test before telling me to supplement for Vit D. She said she had sent many, many clients to have the testing done and only one had ever come back with levels in the normal range. That one was a professional landscaper.

 

I don't even live all that far above the line on the map.

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Hi Everyone,

 

I know I've seen stuff here and there about vitamin D recently but I've never really paid attention.

 

I just had a ton of lab work done and one of the tests was my vitamin D level. According to my dr., I'm "severely deficient." She actually recommends a prescription strength supplement.

 

Can someone point me in the right direction with regards to dealing with this? What types of things does it impact? What might be some connections with other things going on in my body? Etc.

 

I'm dealing with extreme fatigue due to (I'm pretty sure) another new medication (that I'm going to tell my dr. I can't handle if it makes me this tired) and can hardly think straight to sort out the vitamin D thing.

 

TIA for any input you can give me. :)

 

ama supercross 2017 entry list live streaming

Thanks

 

Vitamin D3 is actually a hormone. From what I understand low levels of Vitamin D can be interrelated with all sorts of other endocrine/hormone issues like hypothyroidism and other matters.

 

There is a vitamin rating organization called "Labdoor" that rates Vitamin D3 supplements by both quality and value. Often checking higher dose variations will get you a better "daily deal" (like getting 5000 or even 10,000 IU tablets vs 1000 IUs).

 

Extreme fatigue is something related to low Vitamin D, but there many be multiple (and inter-related) things going on.

 

Bill 

 

ETA: There is a war in the medical community over the minimum range and what should be considered "normal," with some as low as 30 units and others advocating a minimum of 60 as optimal. 

Edited by Spy Car
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Make your child (or yourself) go out and play in the sunshine every day. This is how the body makes Vit D (which isn't really a vitamin). Unless you live at an extreme latitude, sunshine should be sufficient. Boosting regular dietary sources can help, too. 

 

I agree that natural sunshine is best.  For myself, I generally only take it/need it in the winter.  Our winters are sooo cold!  It is -15 today (wind chill -25  :sad: )  So winters are when we notice vitamin D deficiency most.

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If you get plenty of sun in summer, regular dietary sources are enough to make it up in winter for most people, but it really depends. DH was recently told by the doctor he's deficient. We live in the desert and he does his best to avoid the sun entirely pretty much all the time, so it's no surprise. DD gets plenty of sun, but I've been supplementing her Vit D to see if it makes a difference with her poor focus, low energy, etc. So far so good. 

 

If the goal is to reduce the need for supplemental Vit D, getting plenty of sunshine, at least in summer, is a good first step.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3897598/

 

 

https://intermountainhealthcare.org/blogs/2013/01/getting-vitamin-d-during-the-dead-of-winter/

 

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/heart/articles/2008/06/23/time-in-the-sun-how-much-is-needed-for-vitamin-d

 

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/Pages/vitamin-D-sunlight.aspx

 

Interesting that just 15 minutes of sunlight is actually needed!  Wow!

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Vitamin D3 is actually a hormone. From what I understand low levels of Vitamin D can be interrelated with all sorts of other endocrine/hormone issues like hypothyroidism and other matters.

 

There is a vitamin rating organization called "Labdoor" that rates Vitamin D3 supplements by both quality and value. Often checking higher dose variations will get you a better "daily deal" (like getting 5000 or even 10,000 IU tablets vs 1000 IUs).

 

Extreme fatigue is something related to low Vitamin D, but there many be multiple (and inter-related) things going on.

 

Bill 

 

ETA: There is a war in the medical community over the minimum range and what should be considered "normal," with some as low as 30 units and others advocating a minimum of 60 as optimal. 

 

I like Labdoor.  I've used it many times.

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The "just go outside in the sunshine" advice upsets me because it can keep people who need it from getting tested and from getting the supplementation that they need to get and stay healthy.  It is too simplistic and doesn't work for too many people. 

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The "just go outside in the sunshine" advice upsets me because it can keep people who need it from getting tested and from getting the supplementation that they need to get and stay healthy.  It is too simplistic and doesn't work for too many people. 

 

I understand what you're saying Jean, but on the flip-side such advice has made me mindful of taking off my shirt on temperate days when I'm working out back to get natural Vitam D via sunlight as well.

 

I do agree that if there were Vitamin D issues going on that seeing a doctor to see if there are inter-related issues and/or supplementing is probably wise.

 

Bill

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For what it's worth, I recently purchased a four month supply of Vitamin D3 at 10,000 IU per day made by Solgar (Labdoor A-rating) for $11 with free prime delivery.

 

That's the by far the best value I've seen if one is doing a 10,000 IU dose. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Solgar-Vitamin-Cholecalciferol-000-Softgels/dp/B004TBXGS4?th=1

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I understand what you're saying Jean, but on the flip-side such advice has made me mindful of taking off my shirt on temperate days when I'm working out back to get natural Vitam D via sunlight as well.

 

I do agree that if there were Vitamin D issues going on that seeing a doctor to see if there are inter-related issues and/or supplementing is probably wise.

 

Bill

I'm not against going out in the sun! But I don't think that most people get to the level of severe deficiency without some other things going on and/or needing more treatment than sitting out in the sunshine for 15 minutes. For example, my son just was tested and has a vitamin d level of 5. He's outside for a minimum of 15 minutes a day and often more. Not coincidentally, his thyroid levels are also off. It would be irresponsible of me to just tell him to go sit outside and not take the supplements he needs to function. Too many of these hormones are interconnected.

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Vitamin D3 is actually a hormone. From what I understand low levels of Vitamin D can be interrelated with all sorts of other endocrine/hormone issues like hypothyroidism and other matters.

 

There is a vitamin rating organization called "Labdoor" that rates Vitamin D3 supplements by both quality and value. Often checking higher dose variations will get you a better "daily deal" (like getting 5000 or even 10,000 IU tablets vs 1000 IUs).

 

Extreme fatigue is something related to low Vitamin D, but there many be multiple (and inter-related) things going on.

 

Bill 

 

ETA: There is a war in the medical community over the minimum range and what should be considered "normal," with some as low as 30 units and others advocating a minimum of 60 as optimal. 

 

The answer is probably "depends on the individual."

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I'm not against going out in the sun! But I don't think that most people get to the level of severe deficiency without some other things going on and/or needing more treatment than sitting out in the sunshine for 15 minutes. For example, my son just was tested and has a vitamin d level of 5. He's outside for a minimum of 15 minutes a day and often more. Not coincidentally, his thyroid levels are also off. It would be irresponsible of me to just tell him to go sit outside and not take the supplements he needs to function. Too many of these hormones are interconnected.

 

I agree with you Jean. I know I had low Vitamin D with my last physical (when I complained of fatigue).

 

My Internist said "normal." It was 29. Not normal according to many, and certainly not optimal.

 

He said thyroid was "normal" too. I figured out what's called "normal" can leave one flat on their backs and started educating myself and pushing. I'm now a couple weeks into taking Levothyroxine and it's helping.

 

In my limited experience, low Vitamin D and thyroid issues seem to be strongly associated.

 

I still think its a good idea for all forum members to get out and do a little yard work bare-breasted :D

 

Bill

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I still think its a good idea for all forum members to get out and do a little yard work bare-breasted :D

 

Bill

Wouldn't I cause a stir in my neighborhood if I took your advice!!

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Wouldn't I cause a stir in my neighborhood if I took your advice!!

 

It would help get the blood flowing :D

 

Bill

Edited by Spy Car
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Yard work in my neighborhood at the moment involves coat, hat, gloves, and a snow shovel.

 

I dare you to do it with a bare torso Bill!

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Yard work in my neighborhood at the moment involves coat, hat, gloves, and a snow shovel.

 

I dare you to do it with a bare torso Bill!

 

Don't kid yourself, it was brutally cold here today (barely got into the 60s) and we went to "Stormwatch" on the news (due to the gentle rains).

 

I almost didn't wear shorts today :D

 

Bill

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Bottom line, I would go with trial and error on D3 supplementation.

 

I haven't read the whole thread, but there are a few other things I'd keep in mind.  We have learned through 23andme testing that myself and three of my kids have a homozygous mutation for the Vitamin D receptor (VDR taq).  This raises a question of whether D3 supplementation would even be effective and what happens to the supplemental D3 that the VDR cannot take up.  I know I get a little energy boost with the occasional D3 supplement, but more than a few days in a row or too late in the day, and I end up with insomnia.  One of my kids has an immune deficiency and an otherwise messed-up immune system (who also has this mutation) has low vitamin D but high calcitriol, which is sort-of-but-not-really the flip side of the low D; that combination of bloodwork is said to be indicative of inflammation (duh, in his case).  That also raises the question IMO whether the low vitamin D is perhaps more correlation and less causation of various symptoms (probably both).  For my ds, D3 supplementation increases an autoimmune response.  So, we don't do it.

 

Even further out on the edge of the epigenetic frontier, IIRC there are some questions about synthetic folic acid and what indirect, complex interactions there might be between methylation and methionine cycles and the VDR that might affect the immune system, particularly in cases where there are certain MTHFR and other polymorphisms present (such persons can have difficulty processing synthetic folic acid as opposed to natural folate).  In particular, the VDR has something to do with dopamine.  It gets extremely, extraordinarily complex pretty quickly, but it's interesting stuff.

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The "just go outside in the sunshine" advice upsets me because it can keep people who need it from getting tested and from getting the supplementation that they need to get and stay healthy.  It is too simplistic and doesn't work for too many people. 

 

It just doesn't work for everyone.  Either some condition or a medication (the docs aren't sure) mean I can't make it from the sun.  So in the summer in Georgia with a kid I took to the park regularly (and no sunscreen use because I'm allergic), I had a Vitamin D level of 9.7!  I have to take 5000 IU a day just to keep it in the 30 range.

 

In general, autoimmune diseases correlate with low Vitamin D (even with good sun exposure).  There doesn't seem to be a consensus about cause and effect, but if anyone has autoimmune issues, it's a good idea to have the Vitamin D checked.

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It just doesn't work for everyone.  Either some condition or a medication (the docs aren't sure) mean I can't make it from the sun.  So in the summer in Georgia with a kid I took to the park regularly (and no sunscreen use because I'm allergic), I had a Vitamin D level of 9.7!  I have to take 5000 IU a day just to keep it in the 30 range.

 

In general, autoimmune diseases correlate with low Vitamin D (even with good sun exposure).  There doesn't seem to be a consensus about cause and effect, but if anyone has autoimmune issues, it's a good idea to have the Vitamin D checked.

 

That's super interesting.  My dd who can't seem to keep up her vitamin D levels is possibly on the cusp of having an autoimmune disease (many symptoms), though hasn't actually been diagnosed with one yet. Her doc is working on increasing her vitamin D levels.  I'd be really interested in the cause and effect aspect, but it sounds like it's not known. 

 

Do you take 5000 regularly, year-round?  

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Bottom line, I would go with trial and error on D3 supplementation.

 

I haven't read the whole thread, but there are a few other things I'd keep in mind.  We have learned through 23andme testing that myself and three of my kids have a homozygous mutation for the Vitamin D receptor (VDR taq).  This raises a question of whether D3 supplementation would even be effective and what happens to the supplemental D3 that the VDR cannot take up.  I know I get a little energy boost with the occasional D3 supplement, but more than a few days in a row or too late in the day, and I end up with insomnia.  One of my kids has an immune deficiency and an otherwise messed-up immune system (who also has this mutation) has low vitamin D but high calcitriol, which is sort-of-but-not-really the flip side of the low D; that combination of bloodwork is said to be indicative of inflammation (duh, in his case).  That also raises the question IMO whether the low vitamin D is perhaps more correlation and less causation of various symptoms (probably both).  For my ds, D3 supplementation increases an autoimmune response.  So, we don't do it.

 

Even further out on the edge of the epigenetic frontier, IIRC there are some questions about synthetic folic acid and what indirect, complex interactions there might be between methylation and methionine cycles and the VDR that might affect the immune system, particularly in cases where there are certain MTHFR and other polymorphisms present (such persons can have difficulty processing synthetic folic acid as opposed to natural folate).  In particular, the VDR has something to do with dopamine.  It gets extremely, extraordinarily complex pretty quickly, but it's interesting stuff.

Can you tell me more about this or tell me where to find out more? 

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"Bottom line, I would go with trial and error on D3 supplementation.

 

I haven't read the whole thread, but there are a few other things I'd keep in mind.  We have learned through 23andme testing that myself and three of my kids have a homozygous mutation for the Vitamin D receptor (VDR taq).  This raises a question of whether D3 supplementation would even be effective and what happens to the supplemental D3 that the VDR cannot take up.  I know I get a little energy boost with the occasional D3 supplement, but more than a few days in a row or too late in the day, and I end up with insomnia.  One of my kids has an immune deficiency and an otherwise messed-up immune system (who also has this mutation) has low vitamin D but high calcitriol, which is sort-of-but-not-really the flip side of the low D; that combination of bloodwork is said to be indicative of inflammation (duh, in his case).  That also raises the question IMO whether the low vitamin D is perhaps more correlation and less causation of various symptoms (probably both).  For my ds, D3 supplementation increases an autoimmune response.  So, we don't do it.

 

 

Even further out on the edge of the epigenetic frontier, IIRC there are some questions about synthetic folic acid and what indirect, complex interactions there might be between methylation and methionine cycles and the VDR that might affect the immune system, particularly in cases where there are certain MTHFR and other polymorphisms present (such persons can have difficulty processing synthetic folic acid as opposed to natural folate).  In particular, the VDR has something to do with dopamine.  It gets extremely, extraordinarily complex pretty quickly, but it's interesting stuff."

Can you tell me more about this or tell me where to find out more? 

 

I'd be interested in knowing more too.  My dd was recently told that her body can't seem to break down folic acid due to a MTHFR factor.  She has just started taking a folic acid supplement that has been partially broken down already, so it will bypass the problem area.  I don't really understand it all, just that so many things are inter-related.

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Can you tell me more about this or tell me where to find out more? 

 

Which part?  LOL, that's about the limit of my understanding (as if I understand).  The complexity is overwhelming and even practitioners who understand it all would be hard to find.  Have you ever done 23andme?  There are a lot of things to google, but on the genes like the VDR taq, I'd look at http://www.heartfixer.com/AMRI-Nutrigenomics.htm and Yasko at  https://www.knowyourgenetics.com/media/pdf/Genetic%20Bypass.pdf (not all these people agree on whether Yasko is correct, though she may be at least in part)

 

As for supplementing D3, this is controversial, but your googling will be as good as mine.  It does tend to increase activity of the immune system as opposed to modulate, so it can be dicey in autoimmune situations, IME.  You may come across the Marshall protocol - the guy is widely regarded as quacky and I tend to agree with that assessment, but some of his ideas are really interesting and fit with what I have read about other various processes (e.g. with Ca2+ influx, hexosamine biosynthesis pathway, etc.).  In other words, maybe he was onto something.  Each process is ridiculously complicated in and of itself and then the processes affect each other.

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I'd be interested in knowing more too.  My dd was recently told that her body can't seem to break down folic acid due to a MTHFR factor.  She has just started taking a folic acid supplement that has been partially broken down already, so it will bypass the problem area.  I don't really understand it all, just that so many things are inter-related.

 

This is another area in which I'd go with trial and error.  Methylcobalamin hasn't proved to be useful for my two who are compound heterozygous for MTHFR.  Hydroxycobalamin is a non-methylated option and 5-MTHF can be added, but how much is another question, whether it needs to be ramped up or ramped down, etc.  You might also look at the Walsh protocol as a simpler way to avoid trying to figure out the optimal amount of b12 and folate, but that depends more on the person's symptoms.

 

Some of this is the basis for prescription Deplin, which for some people is way, way too much folate.  But I don't really have a clue on that, except that perhaps for those who find it helpful, it can jump-start methylation with tons of folate available.

 

My only piece of advice is to look at intake of synthetic folic acid as it may impede reception of natural folate (plug up receptors or simply hang out).  Note how extremely difficult it is to avoid - it is in all major brands of flour, all major brands of cereal, pasta, bread.  The only way to avoid it is to go organic on processed items and look for specific brands of flour that do not enrich with folic acid.  In particular, cereal is a HUGE offender - one of our old favorites, Quaker oat squares, has 100% of the RDA of synthetic folic acid in a single, small serving!  How much synthetic folic acid is the average person getting over the course of a day?  Sorry this is a rant...  I use Blue Bird flour and organic cereals, pasta and bread, where my family will let me get away with it.  (I have deduced that my dh is probably compound heterozygous as myself and one ds are homozygous for A1298C only, but he is Mr. Processed Food.)  Check labels carefully.  Even some major brands of white rice have synthetic folic acid added, cuz we need more.

 

ETA, be on alert if you are googling and reading random articles.  Even "scientific" studies at pubmed sometimes fail to differentiate between synthetic folic acid and natural folate and may simply refer to "folate" as if it's all the same.  (It isn't.)

Edited by wapiti
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I take vitamins specifically for those with the MTHFR gene.  I also take an immunoregulator (low dose naltrexone).  I hadn't heard of the vitamin D gene.  This is all so complicated and yet interesting.  And of supreme interest to me for obvious reasons! 

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This is another area in which I'd go with trial and error.  Methylcobalamin hasn't proved to be useful for my two who are compound heterozygous for MTHFR.  Hydroxycobalamin is a non-methylated option and 5-MTHF can be added, but how much is another question, whether it needs to be ramped up or ramped down, etc.  You might also look at the Walsh protocol as a simpler way to avoid trying to figure out the optimal amount of b12 and folate, but that depends more on the person's symptoms.

 

Some of this is the basis for prescription Deplin, which for some people is way, way too much folate.  But I don't really have a clue on that, except that perhaps for those who find it helpful, it can jump-start methylation with tons of folate available.

 

My only piece of advice is to look at intake of synthetic folic acid as it may impede reception of natural folate (plug up receptors or simply hang out).  Note how extremely difficult it is to avoid - it is in all major brands of flour, all major brands of cereal, pasta, bread.  The only way to avoid it is to go organic on processed items and look for specific brands of flour that do not enrich with folic acid.  In particular, cereal is a HUGE offender - one of our old favorites, Quaker oat squares, has 100% of the RDA of synthetic folic acid in a single, small serving!  How much synthetic folic acid is the average person getting over the course of a day?  Sorry this is a rant...  I use Blue Bird flour and organic cereals, pasta and bread, where my family will let me get away with it.  (I have deduced that my dh is probably compound heterozygous as myself and one ds are homozygous for A1298C only, but he is Mr. Processed Food.)  Check labels carefully.  Even some major brands of white rice have synthetic folic acid added, cuz we need more.

 

ETA, be on alert if you are googling and reading random articles.  Even "scientific" studies at pubmed sometimes fail to differentiate between synthetic folic acid and natural folate and may simply refer to "folate" as if it's all the same.  (It isn't.)

Wow, very interesting.  We are learning that my dd's body can't seem to take in/absorb a lot of things in the same way that is quite natural for most other people.  She is now on a very restrictive diet for a month that includes no gluten, so I guess she won't be getting any of that synthetic folic acid.  Interesting that so much is added to products these days.  Even bread products are given additional gluten, as though what it has is not enough.  

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