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YsgolYGair

I really need to simplify...

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But I seriously don't know how.

 

Three languages, plus all the regular stuff. My son's only 7, and while he handles it fine because he's super easy going, it's just a load of work. We use first language resources for all three languages, and with spelling, grammar, reading, writing - it's overwhelming! How do multilingual cultures do this? (Anyone from Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg???) Do they just not study all the disciplines of each language? Do they combine things? How can I cut down some of the time and workload, or am I just being unrealistic, and this is what it takes??

 

 

 

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My son's bilingual school trades off years--this year is math and science in Chinese, language arts in English. In a couple of years they will switch to math and science in English, Language arts in Chinese. There are reinforcement lessons in the non-focus language for a subject (so maybe one math lesson in English each week).

 

If your primary home language is English, I would personally cut back on formal academic work in English for now and focus on your Welsh and French lessons since I am assuming those are second languages to the child.

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Basically, no you can't do everything all the time; language learning is an intensive undertaking and there have to be some trade offs.

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We change intensity different years. We are doing Spanish, Latin and German this year (and this year only!). Spanish and Latin get the full treatment, but more time on Spanish (60 minutes a day) than Latin (40 minutes a day). German is really conversational and probably 20 minutes a day.

 

One thing that Nan in Mass suggested, was to teach a content subject in the language that is in "maintenance mode". I think she did high school French using a French middle school text. It would depend on what you and your student are ready for, but I like it as a way to keep a language going fresh even while it is not being intensely studied.

 

I agree that cycling through at least a subset of the languages is probably necessary. I've also found that add the years go by the grammar and spelling are more easily picked up by my students, usually referring to our solid English grammar and (less solid) spelling skills. Perhaps you have a language that would make sense to maintain casually with read alouds to expand vocabulary, and then in a few years (or during summer) you could do a grammar, spelling, writing intensive.

 

Some people do a good job of having all media in a second language. I've failed there, but that would be another way to keep a language going even when it isn't being focused on.

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We are doing three as well. En, Sp & Fr. all first language using native curriculum, just like you. However, we don't focus on grammar in every language. We do a complete language arts in French. Just writing and reading for English and Spanish. The grammar structure gets transfer in my son's brain. No need for extra lessons. Just a quick stop if something is slightly different. Then social studies, science, math, etc... it's done in units, switching between languages frequently. Writing and reading is integrated in those units, so at the end, we are only adding one extra class: the French.

Avoid workbooks, those became busy work. Place your attention in writing small reports and journal entries. Read and do oral reviews, mix the languages and be confident about it. Your kids will naturally transfer knowledge. Trust them to do so and your days will get much easier.

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You all are brilliant! Just knowing that folks don't do it all is a relief in itself, but of course, the ideas are wonderful. My biggest problem is that my husband is the one who's fluent in all three languages, and I can only get by in Welsh. French... well, I have a few phrases. My son's spoken French is far superior to mine, though. We work through the assignments fairly well, and I even managed to teach him to read French, but it's very much a learn-together thing.

 

I think I will begin to cut down on the English, though, since it does seem to dominate too much of our time, and start spend more time on Welsh and French. Even if I can't do everything in Welsh, I can do more than I am. 

 

I am learning as I go, though, so maybe by the time my youngest (due in July) is ready for school, I'll be able to start teaching classes through Welsh or French.

 

Thank you all so much. This is quite a relief!

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Congratulations on the new baby on the way!

 

I keep telling myself maybe I'll actually learn enough along the way to do things right with my youngest :tongue_smilie:

Edited by maize
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Congratulations on the new have on the way!

 

I keep telling myself maybe I'll actually learn enough along the way to do things right with my youngest :tongue_smilie:

 

 

Is that why we homeschoolers have so many children?? :) Eventually we'll get it right with someone, lol!

 

ETA: Oh wait! Congratulations to you too! :) 

Edited by YsgolYGair
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Oh sorry, one more question just came to mind: do you all do full curricula for the content subjects? Or do you tend to keep things lighter than a single-language family would?

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Oh sorry, one more question just came to mind: do you all do full curricula for the content subjects? Or do you tend to keep things lighter than a single-language family would?

 

 

We do a more Charlotte Mason approach for content- almost entirely reading (living books if possible) and experience based.  

 

For reading, I tend to choose at least one book in each language in each content area for their reading baskets.  They read these independently, then narrate back to me.  

 

I feel like we are doing two languages really well- English and French.  But the kids are learning German as a "second" language and it's HARD to give it the time it deserves.  I don't speak a word of German, which doesn't help matters.  lol.  

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But I seriously don't know how.

 

Three languages, plus all the regular stuff. My son's only 7, and while he handles it fine because he's super easy going, it's just a load of work. We use first language resources for all three languages, and with spelling, grammar, reading, writing - it's overwhelming! How do multilingual cultures do this? (Anyone from Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg???) Do they just not study all the disciplines of each language? Do they combine things? How can I cut down some of the time and workload, or am I just being unrealistic, and this is what it takes??

 

I am not fluent in any other languages, so take this with a grain of salt. My 12th grader is fluent in French and is functional in Russian.  She didn't have to be taught how to read French.   Once she could deal with the phonics of Russian, she didn't need to be taught to read Russian.  Spelling doesn't have to be studied the same way as with little kids.  She can learn how to spell large groups of words quite easily.  

 

I would think focusing on the language acquisition via books, movies, music, etc would carry them a long way until they are older.  Our oldest ds was completely fluent in Portuguese was when he was 7.  We lived in Brazil until he was 10. While there, he could read Portuguese without ever having been taught.  He never wrote in Portuguese (but he is dyslexic and he couldn't write well in English at that point in time, either, and I never even attempted to have him write anything. 

 

I would think grammar could be studied a deeper level and more easily when he is around 10 if he has mastered grammar in his primary language. 

 

Just my random thoughts from observing my dd.  (Her mastery of French and Russian grammar is superb and she didn't start Russian until 9th grade.)

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But I seriously don't know how.

 

Three languages, plus all the regular stuff. My son's only 7, and while he handles it fine because he's super easy going, it's just a load of work. We use first language resources for all three languages, and with spelling, grammar, reading, writing - it's overwhelming! How do multilingual cultures do this? (Anyone from Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg???) Do they just not study all the disciplines of each language? Do they combine things? How can I cut down some of the time and workload, or am I just being unrealistic, and this is what it takes??

 

We don't do spelling seperate.

We did a little for Dutch (mothertongue) in elementary

Passive use of the language (listening, reading) comes earlier then active use (talking, writing)

We don't do writing exercises for every language in every week.

I try to plan that.

 

We do science in English but not in Dutch.

For the moment we do Hisotry and Geography in Dutch, but these subjects we have done in English in the past.

Math we change sometimes too from language.

 

Educating several languages is time (and money) consuming.

So we are less heavy in math and sciences.

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Congratulations with your new baby coming ..

 

Thanks for this topic ! I really have the same problem and 4 kids :) We do Dutch, English , Arabic and also French now . I also feel overwelmed . All 4 languages are important for us , so I dont know how to cut down on this . 

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