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Bible for Early Elementary


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We are a non-denominational Christian family. What could I do for daily devotions/Bible study for a 2nd grader and 1st grader (with a Pre K'er who tags along a bit)? Any resources to use with them, or books I could read that discuss the subject?

 

We've done a children's doctrine book published by Moody called Devotions for the Children's Hour, and The Children's Book of Virtues, and we've read through Luke and Matthew and most of Proverbs. We sing a couple hymns and pray together but haven't found a good rhythm since we finished our doctrine book.

 

Christian families, what do you do? Read straight from the Bible, or a children's Bible, or use another book or curriculum?

 

Also, when do you start having your kids read a Bible on their own? Do you require it?

 

TIA. ☺ï¸

 

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I have assigned my kids daily Bible reading on their own when they are about 10. Sometimes we all just listen to it on BibleGateway instead of reading.

 

When my oldest was about first grade I used a workbook from Christian Liberty Press. Now we use God's Great Covenant from CAP Just the teachers manuals, not the student books...we do it all orally. We have devotions every day but they aren't specifically geared toward the little ones. I guess I rely on our church Sunday School for my youngest, mostly.

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We REALLY like The Child's Story Bible by Vos as a read aloud. Leading Little Ones to God is a good devotional. My kids also like The Miller series from Rod and Staff. The NIrV is a nice Bible for young readers.

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An Evangelical friend gave us a copy of The Jesus Storybook Bible. We love it! The illustrations are colorful and engaging, and ALL the stories bring it back to Jesus and God's salvation plan. Even though it's written in a storybook style, they do reference the particular scripture passages (by book and chapter) so you can go back to them. We read that every night to our daughter from the time she was 2 to 4; she knew those stories backwards and forwards. 

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The Jesus Storybook Bible is fabulous. The CD is very well done, too.

 

We also like the Mighty Acts of God by Meade.

 

When the boys were younger, we did Bible as part of family time in the evenings. Now that they're older and family time is harder to come by, we all read from the same reading plan on our own and post in a private group Facebook message each day. When we can, we get together and discuss our thoughts and questions.

 

As soon as they could read, they got their own real Bible and we start teaching them to read daily.

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I used Leading Little Ones to God for both my girls around age 5 and the eldest listened in again at age 8. At first and second grade level I used The Bible made Easy for Kids. I also use devotionals with both of them reading from the Bible. My eldest is now 9 and is reading the NIV Bible alone sometimes with a devotional. My nearly 6 year old will start the NIV Early Reader Bible (with my help as she finds the amount of small print a bit overwhelming) once we finish The Bible made Easy for Kids.

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We're agnostic/atheists, but I've been using DK's Children's Illustrated Bible (we've got the 3rd edition from 2000):

 

https://www.amazon.com/Childrens-Illustrated-Bible-Selina-Hastings/dp/0892213329/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

 

We've just started the new testament (as in, we've recently finished the old testament). Now, my youngest has only recently turned 6yo, and some of the stories were not that exciting for a 5yo (and probably not that exciting for a 6yo either), but it has little details about history, and some maps, and stuff like that, so that's neat. I've supplemented by borrowing the occasional picture book from the library for some of the famous stories that appeal to little kids (for example Noah's ark, etc). What's nice about this children's bible is that it doesn't push a particular religious perspective... it just has bible stories with some historical factoids.

Edited by luuknam
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Jesus Storybook Bible is our favorite read-aloud.

 

Bible Road Trip is our favorite way to study the Word in context at a child-appropriate level. The curriculum outline for Bible Road Trip is free, but you can purchase a download so that you don't have to download each week individually. Also, it requires that you purchase resources in order to use the curriculum as it has been written. My kids have stayed engaged and learned quite a bit. I love that they are learning to see that each book and story is a connected part of the whole story about God.

 

One note: it can be quite time-intensive if used as written. I set aside 20-30 min of our day for Bible, and we get through whatever we get through in the plan, and pick up again the next day. Sometimes we get through a week's worth of Bible Road Trip in a week, but often, it takes us closer to two. That's ok with me! :) https://www.thinkingkidsblog.org/bible-road-trip-frequently-asked-questions/

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