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If you use a paper planner and have independent students . . .


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I write it down on the weekly assignment sheet I use. I have a bunch of preprinted ones in my binder. When I complete it I hand her a copy of her own for the week and file the original in my binder. She checks off as she goes. That's it.

 

I use Pam Barnhill's Plan Your Year weekly templates. She has several and we switch between block scheduling and regular schedules. She saved me from reinventing the wheel and made it attractive to boot so it was worth buying the file for me. She updates the calendars etc every year and you get updates for free yearly so win win for me.

 

ETA- I give her 1-2 weeks at a time assignment wise.

Edited by texasmom33
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I had a three-ring binder for our kids. They would look to see what the assignment was on their own - they could choose the order of subjects they did that day. When an assignment was completed, they'd put it (either the workbook, paper, etc) in a pile on my desk/table for me to correct and/or mark off.

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I bought a couple of Lesson planners from the Target Dollar Spot at the beginning of the year to try them out with the kids.  They have columns for each day and rows for subjects. I didn't want to pay a bunch of money for planners and have them not work out, so I went cheap.  So far it's going okay.

 

Periodically, I set up about 2-3 months worth of their daily work in packets.  Then I write ALL of it into their planners.  What book they are to read (assigned), extra-curriculars, and Misc. sections are left blank.  We don't always do written work every day of the week but when I set up each day, I'll cross off the day at the top and write in the actual day and date.  I didn't want a bunch of blanks and it's not always the same day that we don't do written work.

 

Each night (theoretically, sometimes I do it in the morning), I put an X (with a highlighter so I can see through it) through the day they just completed, and circle with the same highlighter the next days work.  I write the day and date at the top of the column, write in any extra-curriculars we have going on that day, what book they are working on or the next book for them to read if they finished one, and add anything they can do independently for history, science, etc. under the Misc. category.

I am trying to encourage them to use the planners so they can learn about managing their work and scheduling, plus we are using more textbooks (like Mosdos) at this point and not just workbooks.  At first, they weren't even looking at them.  They are used to just doing everything that is in their "binder" (actually storage clipboards these days) so that's what they did.  A few times they did too much work and I pointed it out to them.  After that, they actually read their planners.   :laugh:

 

The planners serve to tell them what to do and also serve as a record for me of what was done.  There's room for me to take notes if I need to.

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Each of my girls has a Well Planned Day student planner. Every Sunday I fill out a week's worth of assignments for my fifth grader and help my seventh grader do the same based on the schedules of her online classes and the work I have assigned her myself. She is learning how to schedule and estimate the time needed to complete her own work, with the goal that by high school she will be able to manage her planner independently.

 

Other than this, I might do some simple calculations and write them on a sticky note in the front of each of my teacher's manuals/resource book so I have a rough idea of how many lessons I need to assign per week to get done in x weeks, and/or note lessons that will need more time or that I plan to skip.

 

I don't keep my own planner.

Edited by lovelearnandlive
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Each of my girls has a Well Planned Day student planner. Every Sunday I fill out a week's worth of assignments for my fifth grader and help my seventh grader do the same based on the schedules of her online classes and the work I have assigned her myself. She is learning how to schedule and estimate the time needed to complete her own work, with the goal that by high school she will be able to manage her planner independently.

 

Other than this, I might do some simple calculations and write them on a sticky note in the front of each of my teacher's manuals/resource book so I have a rough idea of how many lessons I need to assign per week to get done in x weeks, and/or note lessons that will need more time or that I plan to skip.

 

I don't keep my own planner.

This is almost exactly what we do at my house.

 

I can tell you that it has worked wonderfully well for my older girls. They both went to PS for high school (after homeschooling through middle school) and oldest has completed her first semester of college. Both of them are dedicated, expert planner-users. My college girl would sometimes text me a picture of her color-coded, detailed planner on Sunday nights because she knew it would delight me! She went so far as to detail where she was going to eat (they have multiple options on campus), when/how she was going to exercise, study times/locations, project due dates, classes/labs, etc. I think it is very worthwhile to develop these habits while still young and malleable! My 12 year-old has started moving things around on her planner because it suits her preferences, etc. I like to transfer this responsibility in dribs & drabs to ensure they feel some control, but to continue to set high-standards of organization and record-keeping.

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My kids had student planners.  I'd try and write a week's worth of lessons in it at a time.  They'd simply look it up each day, and check off each subject when done.  They always had the option of going ahead to the next day too, but I don't think they ever did, not even once.  :)

 

 

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I make a list of goals for the year and give it to my high-schooler who uses it to plot out one week at a time. He is responsible for adding online class assignments as well. 

 

When he was in middle school, I made a goal list every six weeks (so it was more broken down than a year list) and I helped him plan each week from that. It took all of middle school to get him trained in, and even in high school, we have to check over the planner every week or two to make sure bases are getting covered.

 

My elementary students use My Student Logbook, which I fill out only once, until the schedule changes. It is a nifty system, which sort of runs itself. I only need to add a note here and there.

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I use spiral notebooks and write their assignments either daily or weekly depending on how much time I have...and if we have a super busy week, I do it daily, so I can adjust based on how each previous day went. 

 

Some of their assignments are things they complete daily, so I can just write, "daily work," and they know what to do, which saves me a lot of time!

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We do this.

I have a school planner & the kids each have a planner of their own. For the youngest, at this stage I write out his plans {he'll be learning to do this himself over this year..} & he just takes it & does his work, checking in with me after each item is done.

The eldest is an old hat with his planner & can fill it out on his own. A meeting at the end of the week {either Friday afternoon or Saturday morning} where we go over things happening in the new week & then he fills it in.. Sometimes I do it for him, but not always. He's use to a particular pattern from the years I've filled it in for him.

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Most of the things my kids do are "do the next thing"--the next math or history lesson, the next chapter or two, the next section in science...what to do is pretty much automated here because we discussed to either do the next section or to work for X amount of time.

 

They give me a box at the end of the day and I check their work if it needs checking, or I jot down a page or chapter number they are on. We do a 30 minute daily meeting to go over anything we need to or to discuss some of their subjects. 

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My kids aren't totally independent, but I just pull out their planners in the morning and write in the work with little checkboxes next to each item. They work and check off. If something specifically needs me, it says "math lesson with Farrar" and they still check it off. I'm generally around to help with anything that comes up and to keep them on track and not distracted or wasting too much time.

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Last year I used the spiral notebook method, but I found myself writing the same things over and over and over. So this year I made up a simple weekly checklist in Excel that I hand write page numbers on. This has the benefit of being just one page for the whole week and the repetitive parts are taken care of for me, but I still have flexibility to cross stuff off if we're having a weird week.

 

I put five columns, Mon to Fri, and then have math page _____, copy work _____, piano, etc. They get to decide what order to do them in. I also put the books they need to read on there. My 6&9yo kids I assign specific chapters to be read each day. My 11yo I assign books/chapters to be read for the week and he decides which ones and how much to read each day.

 

I'm trying to decide how to work him up to more responsibility in this, but I don't want to give him a checklist of all his week's work to go thru as he likes because I just see that leading to Fridays with a week's worth of math still to do. Lol. But maybe next year I'll include him in the making up the weekly checklist process. Give him a list of what needs to be done each week (math 5x, typing 3x, etc) and let him divvy them up.

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