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What subjects are you not going to require

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What subjects are you not going to require (though you may mention in passing and would explore if child is interested)?
Sort of the opposite to http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/562388-what-unusual-subjects-do-you-require-or-make-compulsory-for-your-kids/
 
Some I probably won't require:
latin (but they be fluent in a modern language)
cursive
 
Note: I do not want this to turn into a thread arguing why it is important to teach any subjects - there are other threads for that. Right now I am thinking more about opportunity costs.

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All I can think of right now is art (actually 'doing' art... we will cover art appreciation along with history). I'm just not artsy. If they show interest (pretty sure my 4yr old will want it) I will farm it out to a tutor.

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For me it's proabaly art as well. We look at art and learn about artists and art history. But none of us are super artsy. I try to get to art but it doesn't always happen.

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So many! IMO, the primary curriculum here isn't broad enough, and then the high school curriculum doesn't allow for specialization at all. 

 

So K-6 we have done a zillion and one subjects. Ds has tasted of many things, kwim ?

 

But going forward (he's in Year 8 next year) we're beginning to focus on maths, science, writing, German and PE. We'll read plenty of books as well, go to the theatre, galleries, musuems, concerts, watch documentaries etc. 

 

But all the other things will either get some box ticking or no attention at all. 

 

 

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So many! IMO, the primary curriculum here isn't broad enough, and then the high school curriculum doesn't allow for specialization at all. 

 

So K-6 we have done a zillion and one subjects. Ds has tasted of many things, kwim ?

 

But going forward (he's in Year 8 next year) we're beginning to focus on maths, science, writing, German and PE. We'll read plenty of books as well, go to the theatre, galleries, musuems, concerts, watch documentaries etc. 

 

But all the other things will either get some box ticking or no attention at all. 

 

Your focus year 8 and beyond is interesting to me. So do you mean by box ticking that you will call something that wasn't work equaling a full course, say economics or US history, done just to fulfill expected graduation requirements?

 

I really do like the idea of prioritizing the important stuff--and I have, with one, some pretty heavy work to do in special needs areas. But how do you issue a transcript in high school if you haven't met the hours?

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Your focus year 8 and beyond is interesting to me. So do you mean by box ticking that you will call something that wasn't work equaling a full course, say economics or US history, done just to fulfill expected graduation requirements?

 

I really do like the idea of prioritizing the important stuff--and I have, with one, some pretty heavy work to do in special needs areas. But how do you issue a transcript in high school if you haven't met the hours?

 

I am in AU, and we don't have graduation requirements the same way you do in the US. I don't have to issue a transcript either.

 

Ds' pathway to uni (if he wants to go) will be through TAFE, which is a bit like your community college. At 15/16 he'll complete a qualification there which can be used as an alternative university entry. 

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I didn't require cursive with my second after finding it pointless for my first.

 

I did not require foreign language.  It's not that I think it is unimportant, but I can't really pull it off and I won't spend money on it unless there is a serious interest in it (because I myself learned nothing in my foreign language classes so the way they are traditionally done I think is generally pointless unless someone is highly motivated).

 

I didn't/don't require formal/specific music and art.  That has been more unschooled where I let my kids follow whatever interest they have in that area.  We also do related things as a family.

 

I did spelling with my first and found that pointless, but didn't have the confidence to let it go.  With my second kid he was showing the same abilities in spelling from the start so I stopped doing formal spelling with him after the first 2 years.  No regrets there.  He has no difficulties with spelling. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I require music lessons and art lessons. . Two of my kids are actually playing two or more instruments.

 

I don't require Latin or some of the high school courses, not needed to graduate (physics, calculus etc)

 

Other than that, we just keep plugging away.

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We probably won't do "health."

 

This is required in my state...I think there is value to learning the topics, but it can happen (and usually does) in normal family conversations (eat your veggies! Don't do drugs!).  But, I need to "document" it for the state, so I usually have something more formal just to make the documentation easier. 

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I don't require any specific "classes" for art, music, health, or social studies. What DD knows of them, she has learned through living life or through her own choosing.

 

I require foreign language, but the particular language is DD's choice within some accessibility limits.

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I have no plans to require Latin (beyond roots) or other foreign language prior to high school. I'm kinda meh on formal logic. I feel like it might be simply assigning a name to processes that a math-intuitive kid does anyway. No formal health because I've found that we always covered the standard scope and sequence informally. Health is required in my state, but I don't need to submit lesson plans or log hours, so I am good with calling it covered via living life. My art requirement exists, but the bar is low. My oldest will never be an artist, but I want to get him to a level of competence in drawing at which he can sketch something in a lab notebook. Then we'll call it done. Oh, and we won't be doing "self-esteem class." I'm not sure if most schools are still subjecting kids to that bs, but it definitely won't be happening here.

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Health. Music.  Art.  Personal Finance.  

 

In our family there was ample exposure to those things without making them a class.  

 

We also approached government, civics, and economics in a much more relaxed manner than many.  (ETA, although I don't require a "class" in those subjects, I did make sure that all of my kids had the knowledge) Again, in our family, they had more than enough exposure/discussion.  (my young adult kids often know more than the adults in my age range about these subjects) I do tend to have books on hand that will satisfy the need to account for a text for their graduation requirements in our umbrella school.  Also, I don't give credits for anything that they can't hold a decent conversation about or have a working knowledge of.  

 

 

Edited by The Girls' Mom

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I'm still trying to make a decision on some of these things. We are pretty 'basics' oriented: I will do everything in my power to get them up to speed on the '3Rs' and have them continue to make progress in those areas throughout their education. Also I require music, not negotiable, because that's a basic to me.  Pretty much everything else will be up for negotiation,  eventually. For instance, right now I am making Mr. 13 learn history despite that fact that he has no interest in 95% of it, but at some point I will decide that it's 'enough' and let him drop it. It's a matter of deciding how long to insist on things.  Right now, I have asked them all to pick a LOTE to study at an introductory level. Ds isn't interested in any languages, ancient or modern, nor is he interested in sign language. He is currently suggesting I let him do 'computer language' instead. Should I get him started on coding and be happy that he is (sort of) willing to do something?  Or should I insist he try a year of an actual language before deciding to be a monoglot? 

Edited by IsabelC
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I'm still trying to make a decision on some of these things. We are pretty 'basics' oriented: I will do everything in my power to get them up to speed on the '3Rs' and have them continue to make progress in those areas throughout their education. Also I require music, not negotiable, because that's a basic to me.  Pretty much everything else will be up for negotiation,  eventually. For instance, right now I am making Mr. 13 learn history despite that fact that he has no interest in 95% of it, but at some point I will decide that it's 'enough' and let him drop it. It's a matter of deciding how long to insist on things.  Right now, I have asked them all to pick a LOTE to study at an introductory level. Ds isn't interested in any languages, ancient or modern, nor is he interested in sign language. He is currently suggesting I let him do 'computer language' instead. Should I get him started on coding and be happy that he is (sort of) willing to do something?  Or should I insist he try a year of an actual language before deciding to be a monoglot? 

 

Without getting off topic too much... I didn't mention that I would skip a foreign language except for the fact that I live in a foreign country (so it's not really "foreign"). I'm also a computer programmer and I think learning to program is awesome but it is nothing like a foreign language (more like an extremely simplified English with more punctuation).

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Between my state's requirements and college entrance requirements, there's not much I can skip. We tried Latin, but it never took off. I guess that's the one thing that lots of classical homeschoolers do that we never did.

 

I taught the kids cursive because I like it. We did art classes because the boys liked it even though they're not necessarily artistically bent.

 

I can't think of anything else to skip. Well, sort of health. My state requires health sometime between 7th and 12th, so we did it in 7th to get it out of the way so we wouldn't have to do a high school level course in health, which I feel is a waste of time in a household where the parents are on top of things. I always figured health was to catch the kids whose parents were somewhat neglectful and never taught their kids the basics.

Edited by Garga

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