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RosieCotton

1st grader bored -- independent work or suggestions? Fairy people?? lol

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Looking for suggestions to give my 7 year old girl a few more things to work on for school each day.

 

I feel bad for her it seems I'm always looking over when working with the olders and she is just bored and feels left out or just left.

 

Today she asked if she could go to school. I know this can come and go but she is getting really bored of being home all the time, getting done with school and wandering around the house.

She has 2 outside activities at night per week which I feel is plenty and a room full of toys. She plays cards with her stuffed animals and reads aloud to them.

 

LA is covered.

She is flying thru Rod and Staff spelling 2. Retaining. She is working thru MCP Phonics B -- 5 pages a day limit or she would have the whole book done already.

She writes short stories, and letters to people. Last week she wrote a Christmas Hymn.

She reads 3rd grade or higher level so only work phonics once a week to touch on like ci,si, and harder sounds on my list. We check out 20-30 books per week and she reads them all. Current fav are the Rainbow Magic Fairy books. Fairies are HUGE here. Luckily there are ALOT of them. 70-90 pages each depending. Now there's a website but I can't get it to run on my laptop for her.

 

I WOULD like to get her a few audio books PLUS the real book so she could read along, or stop and play if she wants. Need to make a list of titles.

 

She has completed her ZB print handwriting book for the year already. The whole thing. She needs some practice with cursive but she is doing well with that too. I could order her the cursive book now.

 

Math is covered.

 

We are working thru Evan Moor Geog and she enjoys that. Making the landform book now.

 

I need to add history back in for her, the olders are studying a time period in depth and she tries to hang in with them but it doesn't last.I guess I need a plan for history for her that is a good place to add.

I am trying to add the timeline sprial books in January and get all the figures she would love that.

 

We have just finished Abeka Fables and that was really nice. She got it out everyday and asked for it. We read one or two per day, Then she narrated it back, I write it out for her and she copies it in her writing book.

The TE set the scene with questions before and after and we discussed the character themes. I'm not a huge Abeka fan but this WAS nicely done. I should check for other things they have like it.

 

I feel like we are hitting the 3 R's and not getting much else done and it's not enough for her or I.

Even the school down the road hits science 3 times a week. Why can't I??

 

We have online art once per week she loves, she would do it every day but I need to sit there and stop the videos so she can work at her pace. One lesson can take awhile. Maybe I can get her brother to do this with her more often.

 

Happy to look at anything books or online.

She likes Sheppard Software, but even that is getting old now.

 

She has chores, she has piano, she just needs more.

 

Maybe I should start teaching her latin early. I have French and Latin maybe we could do that 15 min a day.

 

I have some Mindware maze books in my cart, but I need more ideas. !

Something substantial that will take more than 5 minutes and TRANSLATE to something later on. ?? KWIM? Not just a coloring book or word find. . . .

 

Maybe CODING actually. Why not. I saw some neat things for her age group on code.org. I need to go back and check.

 

Thanks for listening to my vent and frustration. And to any ideas you may have.

I just wish I had more time and energy, and don't want her year to slip away.

 

Can't one of you just come over and help?? :001_smile:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You could fill the cursive gap with some homegrown copywork.

 

Mystery Science would require very little prep from you, and she could probably do the lessons largely independently. This is working well as an almost independent activity for my newly 7yo.

 

Big yes to more audiobooks.

 

You could pull the narration questions from a SOTW AG, have her listen to SOTW on audiobook then answer the questions in a notebook, if her writing is up to the task. If not, she could at least listen independently then do narration with you. Or she could colour pictures whilst listening.

 

Assign documentaries and discuss over supper. It might be nice for her to have novel information to share with older siblings.

 

Let her paint or play with air-drying modelling clay whilst listening to stories or music.

 

Can she make little films using puppets or toys to tell stories? Or dress up and tell stories to the camera herself? Interview plushies or pets.

 

Teach her to prepare morning tea to share and ask her to choose a readaloud to share among attendees (take it in turns reading).

 

Print and bind a heap of free mazes, logic puzzles, etc. Call it her private study book and assign her 10 min private study time each day.

 

Just a few ideas! HTH

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You could fill the cursive gap with some homegrown copywork.

 

Mystery Science would require very little prep from you, and she could probably do the lessons largely independently. This is working well as an almost independent activity for my newly 7yo.

 

Big yes to more audiobooks.

 

You could pull the narration questions from a SOTW AG, have her listen to SOTW on audiobook then answer the questions in a notebook, if her writing is up to the task. If not, she could at least listen independently then do narration with you. Or she could colour pictures whilst listening.

 

Assign documentaries and discuss over supper. It might be nice for her to have novel information to share with older siblings.

 

Let her paint or play with air-drying modelling clay whilst listening to stories or music.

 

Can she make little films using puppets or toys to tell stories? Or dress up and tell stories to the camera herself? Interview plushies or pets.

 

Teach her to prepare morning tea to share and ask her to choose a readaloud to share among attendees (take it in turns reading).

 

Print and bind a heap of free mazes, logic puzzles, etc. Call it her private study book and assign her 10 min private study time each day.

 

Just a few ideas! HTH

Great suggestions here.  :)

 

Also, is she very social?  Maybe she is getting lonely.  My DS is highly social.  Homeschooling has been very hard for him because he learns better and is generally more engaged overall if he has other people to hang out with, discuss with, play with, learn with, etc.  He does not do well without a lot of interaction.  

 

I don't suppose there are any kids in your neighborhood or from an outside activity that could come over sometimes to play in the afternoon?  Or maybe you could sign her up for Girl Scouts or something else along those lines?

 

Or might she enjoy doing some independent lessons through something like Time for Learning?  DS liked being able to log on and do as many lessons as he liked (within reason...one day he did 17 and his eyes were crossing so I realized I had to pay a lot closer attention to his screen time while working with his sibling) and because the characters on the screen were "talking" to him, he felt less lonely.  The lessons weren't all terribly rigorous but he definitely learned and since we used it as a supplementary program I wasn't worried that he was missing important information.

 

https://www.time4learning.com/homeschool/elementary_k_5.html

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A few ideas:

 

- teach her to start and stop the art videos herself.  Throw a piece of saran wrap over the keyboard if you're worried about mess.  All of my kids, including the 4yo, can pause and start videos.  

 

- Scratch.mit.edu coding

- A subscription to Brainpop 

- My 7yo does DuoLingo and has been doing it since the start of the school year with now problems.  The app version is easier on younger kids than the website version.

- Lego Ideas Book + Legos

- Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding is always my science recommendation.  But if you don't have time, just an age-appropriate scientific encyclopedia she could read through.  My dd is reading through an Animal encyclopedia and then doing a written narration each week.

- SOTW on audio is the easiest way to do history exposure.  

- polymer clay + youtube tutorials for creating figures from movies or books or cartoons she likes.  This is something my kids LOVE and their creations have improved dramatically after seeing how other do things on youtube.  

- Exercise DVD or similar

- Simple meal prep while you're finishing up with older kids- things like washing the apples, slicing cheese, whatever she can competently do.  

- Stop motion.  If you have an iPad, get the iStop Motion app and prepare to not see her again for a few weeks.  

 

 

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She may need an art skill she can do herself- such as finger knitting or crocheting. Then she could be occupied making things. Or use modeling clay and make things for the home etc.

 

Depending on her personality maybe have her make puppets and write plays to perform.

 

But first thing reading your post made me think more chores, and something like knitting skills. It takes a while to learn and develops over time with endless possibilities.

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She may need an art skill she can do herself- such as finger knitting or crocheting. Then she could be occupied making things. Or use modeling clay and make things for the home etc.

 

Depending on her personality maybe have her make puppets and write plays to perform.

 

But first thing reading your post made me think more chores, and something like knitting skills. It takes a while to learn and develops over time with endless possibilities.

 

This.  My 6yo took up knitting this year and his little basket stays in a prominent spot so he gravitates to it.  Skill work at this age is invaluable for them. 

Knitting

shell mosaics (using bags of miniature shells and cardboard boxes from the dollar store)

wood working (we buy children's kits, but this is more of a summer activity in our house)

braiding (like those friendship bracelets)

paint by number

 

And so on.  We tend to introduce 2-3 a year, and set aside time each week that is skill time. It's usually on Sundays because that's when the house is quiet.  I'll work on a project next to him, helping him as he needs, and then the rest of the week he's on his own.

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Thank you all SO MUCH for the suggestions. So many good ones thank you I don't have time to respond to each right now but I am reviewing all the ideas. 

 

She is super interested in sewing new outfits for her Calico Critters, but my hand sewing skills have been LOST. Haven't done it in 20 years.

 

Are there any good youtube channels that teach hand sewing for kids?

 

I can take her to Grandmas to learn to knit, I do not know how but could learn along side her.

 

I have a bracelet kit I can get out, the friendship bracelet set that is good.

 

Keep the ideas coming! I am starting to have hope!!! :)

 

Links to youtube channels you have used in the past for clay and sewing would be great!

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She can watch through my online phonics lessons, then she will be able to read anything and be a lot more independent. For the ones over 15 minutes, watch half each school day.

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If she likes workbooks you could get one of those grade level Brain Quest workbooks or similar and have her work for 10-15 minutes a day in that. It would provide some review of basic concepts and give her something to complete. We've had one of these each year that we just use for road trips and to help develop independent working skills. 

 

Khan academy? 

 

I was also going to suggest time4learning as a pp did. Independent and you could require her to do something from science or social studies before math or LA so you'd be getting that in, too. 

 

Lapbooks. Hands of a child has full lapbooks sets that you print out and it has everything right there. Once you teach her how to use the guide and what to do, she could probably be mostly independent on it. It would take her some time because of all the cutting and pasting. Lots of science and ss topics to choose from, too. 

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This.  My 6yo took up knitting this year and his little basket stays in a prominent spot so he gravitates to it.  Skill work at this age is invaluable for them. 

 

 

Does your son finger knit or use knitting needles? I think my 7yr old would like to learn to knit - I think it would be good for getting him to sit and focus.

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Maybe read Project Based Homeschooling and get some open ended inspiration for encouraging her during her free time?

 

You could hit science more, sure... but it's likely that what they're doing for science and history and so forth at the school isn't that great. I mean, occasionally, probably, but occasionally you probably do something really fun and amazing too. Maybe line up some science and history videos and audiobooks for her. That's something short and independent that might make you feel like you did it.

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Does your son finger knit or use knitting needles? I think my 7yr old would like to learn to knit - I think it would be good for getting him to sit and focus.

 

He uses basic bamboo needles about a size 6 or 8 - pencil sized for comfortable grip.  I do have other options in the house like a knitting nail (for making cord) and a lap loom (more of a stringing pattern/crochet feel to it), but he gravitated more to the plain needles. 

 

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One thing that I did when mine were younger was to do 'continent books' and 'ecosystem books', but you could modify this for countries, musical instruments, historical periods or characters, or anything else that is interesting for your daughter. I would hole-punch cardstock, but you could use a notenbook. Write, or have her write, the 'title' at the top of the page (Rain Forests, South America, Finland, etc) and then have her read about the topic in kid books or magazines and draw, write words, or cut out pictures from magazines that fit the topic. It's fun, educational, and easier for younger kids who aren't up to writing reports.

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She sounds gifted. I'd encourage higher level books or audio books and a generic assignment (after reading this chapter/book, set up your toys to explain the most important part of the chapter).

 

If she doesn't play an instrument, probably pick up something that will take practice daily.

 

ITA with helping her learn to pause art lessons so she can DIY.

 

Consider online learning so she can zip through independently: prodigy is free math online. Moby max is free every subject, and there are great subjects for paid subscriptions. If she's "done" with some curriculum for the school year, start the next year's curriculum or consider a gifted supplement to last the rest of the year.

 

Gifted kids can be a challenge to keep challenged. They usually need higher intellect curriculum, or quick progression. They need thoughtful hobbies, they need mental stimulation often.

 

I'd also try to incorporate more exercise in the day.

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Does your library have a Hoopla subscription? Mine allows me to stream 10 videos a month. They have Bill Nye the Science Guy.

 

The whole set of 5 seasons of Magic School bus videos is on sale for $40.00.

https://www.amazon.com/Magic-School-Bus-Complete/dp/B007I1Q4MM/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1481985523&sr=8-5&keywords=Magic+school+bus

 

Do you know about Whispersync for Voice? The Kindle app reads the text of the book aloud with professional audio.

https://www.amazon.com/b/ref=nav_shopall_aud_wfv?ie=UTF8&node=5744819011&mkwid=s2fx8hGft_dt&pcrid=78920321529&pmt=p&pkw=whispersync&cvosrc=ppc.google.whispersync&cvo_campaign=98573409&cvo_crid=78920321529&Matchtype=p&gclid=CjwKEAiA4dPCBRCM4dqhlv2R1R8SJABom9pHhSQgFCoRGhrqiXMzFpoEP-xuza0UEwW5BRb0R3ky0xoC3uTw_wcB

 

99 cent Whispersync deals

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=lp_5744819011_nr_n_1?fst=as%3Aoff&rh=n%3A133140011%2Cn%3A%212334093011%2Cn%3A%212334124011%2Cn%3A5744819011%2Cn%3A6522096011&bbn=5744819011&ie=UTF8&qid=1481984848&rnid=5744819011

 

Learning to cook and craft sounds like a good idea. Waldorf has great stuff for knitting.

 

Maybe a Mark Kistler subscription to drawing lessons?

https://draw3d.com

 

The "crayon paintings" in New Augsburg Drawing in the backs of books 1-3

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/359033-augsburg-drawing-free-and-awesome-and-complete-1-8/

 

.

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Dover educational coloring books and paper dolls.

http://store.doverpublications.com/by-subject-coloring-books-history-coloring.html

 

Sea Monkeys

 

Ant farm

 

Grow house plants from garbage

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/children/garbage-gardening-ideas.htm

 

The history of sourdough breads, learning to care for a starter, and bread baking.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sourdough

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And yes I have SOTW on audio, so I need to look for a good player she can have with headphones. GREAT IDEA!

The last 2 CD players I bought broke within a month. :(

I end out repeatedly giving them away to students before they break, but sometimes I buy portable DVD players at Best Buy and put insurance on them. The DVD players also play CDs. A portable DVD player would be awesome for the Magic School Bus science videos if she hasn't seen them yet.

 

I haven't had any way to play CDs or DVDs in awhile now. It is annoying. Yes, I have access to lots of downloads when I get to public wifi, but my library has a lot of nice stuff on disk.

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Thanks for all the thoughtful responses everyone.

 

I'm not sure if she is gifted or not.

She is super sharp yes, but I thought phonics just came more easily for many girls rather than boys.

 

She has just taken advantage of the one room school house, absorbing so much of what we do everyday.

I think that is a great part of it.

 

Which test would you all recommend??

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