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Proof of state residency for underage kid?


Dmmetler
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DD is registered just fine for the CC for the Spring-except that right now her residency is listed as "not verified"-which means she automatically gets charged out of state tuition (a difference of about $500/credit hour-taking the cheap local CC to being pretty darned expensive!).

 

So, what can I use to prove that she is a state resident? She has a non-driver's photo ID, and a birth certificate issued in state, both of which admissions already has on file. She isn't on the mortgage, car registration, utility bills, phone bills, etc.  I am, and I can prove, via her birth certificate, that I am her mother-does that count??

 

 

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BTW I had to do it for 2 different schools.  The one that is local accepted my license as proof (and me saying he lived with me).  The other one he had the non driver ID.  That worked.  But the point is they have the ID and info on file as well, but here that's not good enough. Basically there is an official procedure.  They should have info at the CC for how that is done.

 

 

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Vaccination records? My kids California vaccination record is from birth to most current vaccination and TB tests.

 

Our tax returns have our kids SSN/ITIN as well since we get child tax credits. Even though showing up with tax returns would be my last resort if they don't take vaccination record as proof.

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They actually already have her vaccination record on file, too, since she has to show proof of MMR and Hep B or a legal exemption to register.  Which kind of makes me wonder if Admissions missed checking a box on their computer. All her documents show as complete, but her paperwork comes up as "Residency not verified", even though every single piece of paper lists the same in-state address.

 

Yeah, I think call tomorrow morning, ask what they want, and camp out with a box of documents until I get the piece of paper signed. I'm trying to let DD handle as much as possible of this process, but the money, ultimately, comes down to my being the one who is paying the bills.

 

 

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Residency for school purposes in my state means showing a bill from a utility service that comes directly to your house, such as garbage, electricity, cable TV, gas, etc. plus the child's birth certificate. The way dual enrollment works for my state, I prove district residency to my school district, not directly to the college.

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She's not doing dual enrollment. There are state requirements for that as far as age and official grade level. After talking with the school, she applied directly and was accepted as a non-traditional student, based on proof of college readiness. From their point of view, she is essentially a high school drop out with high ACT scores :). 

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When we enrolled at the community college (for dual enrollment), DSs' did not yet have a state-issued ID (which you can get through the Motor Vehicle Dept.). We used a copy of the previous year's STATE tax return that had the in-state address on it AND had the child's name on it as a dependent. We scanned the forms, removed the Soc. Sec. numbers (and any other sensitive info), and printed a "clean" copy for the school's files.

 

I'm amazed that DD's state issued ID is not enough for them. Is the date of issue too recent for proof of in-state residency? Because what they're looking for is proof that you've lived in the state for the 12 months (or 18 months, or 24 months -- whatever is the school's particular policy) prior to enrolling. If the ID issue date is too recent, it might not count towards in-state residency. That's where you'll need the address and the tax return from far enough back to prove she has lived in the state long enough to meet the school's requirement for resident.

 

And that's also why a birth certificate won't work, because it proves nothing about her state of residency for the past 12 (or 18 or 24) months). Because she could have been born in the state, lived until yesterday in a different state, and moved to your state a day ago, which would not meet state residency policy.

Edited by Lori D.
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I would assume they want proof of parental residence for the preceeding 12 months, and would provide a year-old utility bill, last year's tax return, or similar. Even for regular undergrad students over the age of 18, residence for tuition purposes is usually based on parental residence.

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I would assume they want proof of parental residence for the preceeding 12 months, and would provide a year-old utility bill, last year's tax return, or similar. Even for regular undergrad students over the age of 18, residence for tuition purposes is usually based on parental residence.

 

Our college's policy required the student's name be on the documentation that proved state residency, so a utility bill wouldn't fly here. :(

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If you are going to bring a whole box, other documents that may work

- her cheer team receipts (my kids sports lessons receipts have their names)

- dental checkup bills (ours is every 6 months and each kid gets a bill)

 

My community college asked for minimum two year residency for me to be able to get state resident discount.

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Are you in Tennessee? If so, then proof of parental residence is what they're looking for:
 

The State of Tennessee establishes student residency regulations.
Basically, the regulations state that:

  1. Students receiving parental support are classified according to parental domicile.
  2. An emancipated student independent of parents may establish in-state classification by producing clear and convincing evidence of Tennessee domicile. Proof must be provided that the move to Tennessee was not primarily for obtaining educational opportunities for themselves, dependents, or spouse.

     

 

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In AZ it's all about parents' residency.  My husband is a resident of one state and I'm a resident of another.  We have to write a letter for every child detailing our situation because he earns income and I don't.  The fact that we own a home here and don't in IL has no bearing.  I have to send in a copy of my AZ driver's license, a copy of my homeschooling affadavit and a sworn statement that I claim full time AZ residency.  

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Yes, I think you might need documents like utility bills, state ID (even if they have it on file) and then her birth certificate showing you as parent. I've found that different departments (and different people within the same department) sometimes don't speak to each other about these things. Frustrating and inefficient but usually cleared up quickly with a face to face meeting with someone in admissions. Good luck! Just bring everything you can to save yourself some trips but show only utility bills, state ID and birth cert first and dig other stuff out only if they say it's not adequate. Another thing we learned is we don't want to create too obvious a paper trail when the kid is taking classes as a regular student but still wants a shot to apply as a freshman. The way we are doing it is legal according to CA law and he can still apply as a freshman but not all of the CC folks are familiar with this and can create trouble if we provide too much info so we've only given them documentation on a need to know basis.

Edited by quark
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I would bring a copy of your 2015 federal tax return that lists your home address and that your daughter is your dependent. That proves she is your dependent and that you are a state resident. I don't think her birth certificate or an old state ID card proves either. I would have one copy that blacks out your SSN and another one that is unaltered. Try submitting the copy without your SSN's first.

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I am guessing that just because one office has her non-drivers' license on file for their purposes, doesn't mean that another office realizes it is there.  I would call, ask what they need, explain where they can find it (admissions file), email a copy anyway, and follow up in a week.  It's not uncommon for a 17-year-old college student to be in more or less the same boat - chances are good that the things they need will work for your dd despite her younger age.

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My guess is that we skipped whatever piece of paper was required by skipping the FAFSA and it's paperwork. This school is organized enough and walks kids through the process enough that it seems unlikely they would have omitted it, and we did skip step 3 "File for financial aid" because DD isn't eligible since she will not graduate high school between now and January.

 

I'm glad DD is going through this at the CC, which seems to have hired the nicest people to ever grace a college administration office, vs at the state U here (which seems to require proof of misanthropy as a condition of hire).

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There is no heads up on it here either, and the CC doesnt quite understand the rules. It is printed on the website and form that the County uses that residents dont need a certificate, just nonresidents. We had to do one anyway, because the supervisor was out at the CC, and the employee wouldnt fix it. Here the rule for an under 21 living at home with parent is different than for 21 and over....the CofR is issued to the parent, who then vouches for the child verbally. The PIA is that it has to be notarized.

 

For summer classes, its not needed, but they dont have signups until after spring break.the bill is then issued with the out of county megafee, and can only be cleared when the student returns from his home college, and shows some mail addressed to his home address, and only if he does it before the second day of classes.

Edited by Heigh Ho
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Verification complete-and painless, since DD's state ID was issued more than 12 months ago. She now has her really awful student ID, her textbook (really code for an e-book/website), and her official planner and parking pass :). And I have more credit card bills (who set second semester registration to be the same time as Christmas shopping season?)

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Verification complete-and painless, since DD's state ID was issued more than 12 months ago. She now has her really awful student ID, her textbook (really code for an e-book/website), and her official planner and parking pass :). And I have more credit card bills (who set second semester registration to be the same time as Christmas shopping season?)

 

Can you pay for classes later? I used to be so careful about paying everything upfront and then we had a couple of semesters where DS dropped classes before they began in order to take something else and the refund was not immediately processed (I think they processed only after 6-8 weeks). They should have a class payment deadline a few weeks after class begins if I am not wrong or just before class begins (assuming this is for a spring semester that starts mid Jan).

 

ETA: I have faithfully bought the parking pass every semester just in case (it's $45/ semester for us). But in the last few semesters, I've barely parked for over 2-3 minutes at the campus because I drop him off and go off to do other things. I'm planning not to buy one next semester. If you are not waiting at the campus for her after this semester, you might not need a pass. Just a thought!

Edited by quark
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I just caught that this is for a CC.  Are they needing proof of state residency or proof of residency within the county (or other CC jurisdiction)?  Where I live, community colleges are funded at a county level and there are three categories of tuition--in county, in state, and out of state.

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Honestly, I'm not sure-we are definitely in county. If it weren't for having to cross an interstate and some other pedestrian unfriendly roads, DD could practically walk-it's maybe 5 miles from home.

 

Right now, I'm just glad we got the state ID for the SAT last fall after hearing horror stories of people who had trouble with proctors not accepting that under 13 yr olds don't have to have photo ID. Not only did she need it for in-state tuition, but to get her student ID (which is then required for everything else on campus).

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Here parking is rolled into student fees, so you're stuck paying for it regardless. It actually may be helpful. There is another CC campus downtown, and parking there is usually a minimum of $10 (and can be more like $25 if there is an event going on)-so I figure that if we visit downtown a few times each semester, we'll make a profit on parking at the CC campus using DD's pass :).

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Nice they don't charge extra for parking here. They also include a bus pass so my kid takes the bus there himself which he loves being able to do.

DD can ride the city busses free with her student ID, except that I'd probably have to drive her to the CC campus to catch the bus. We live in a suburb, and the busses largely stop at the city limits.

 

She's enjoying going through the long list of student discounts that were in the packet she got when she got her student ID.

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