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Moxie

Friend just had a baby and named her.....

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There's a 3 month old sleeping on me atm, and we chose who to name him after before knowing what that name was. That is, my dh's great uncle died in the Battle of the Bulge. He was purportedly an amazing man and never had children of his own. His sister recently passed, and she was the last to have known him well. We didn't want him forgotten, but we only knew his nickname, "Buddy." I was pretty worried that we were going to find out that he went by his nickname because his real name was Hazel or Mortimer or something. Imagine my relief when it was actually one of our favorite names.

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See? It's always like this! Those of you with children in abundance have no names, while those of us with just a few kids have to depend on having dogs and cats for the next several decades in order to make a dent in all the great names I have saved up! :D

 

P.S. I just got a book out of the library about Rosemary Kennedy, so this is at the top of my would-be girl name list ATM. (Rosemary, not Kennedy.)

So true! My problem is that I really like family names, and I hope my children will use family names too. I don't want to name the dog something that might have been a contender for a grandchild's name.
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There's a 3 month old sleeping on me atm, and we chose who to name him after before knowing what that name was. That is, my dh's great uncle died in the Battle of the Bulge. He was purportedly an amazing man and never had children of his own. His sister recently passed, and she was the last to have known him well. We didn't want him forgotten, but we only knew his nickname, "Buddy." I was pretty worried that we were going to find out that he went by his nickname because his real name was Hazel or Mortimer or something. Imagine my relief when it was actually one of our favorite names.

 

You dodged a bullet there.  My grandfather was Morris and had brothers named Urban (first name) and Clyde.  All of which are awful but they also had a sister named Zera (pronounced exactly as spelled) which is worse.  They all went by their given names except their sister, Ophelia, who went by Sissy. Seriously, the only one with a nice name and she didn't use it.  Not that it really mattered because they were from a part of The South and from a poor uneducated family which in combination resulted in pronouncing it "Oh-FAY-yuh." Sometimes fantastic, amazing people like Grandad have crappy names.

 

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You dodged a bullet there. My grandfather was Morris and had brothers named Urban (first name) and Clyde. All of which are awful but they also had a sister named Zera (pronounced exactly as spelled) which is worse. They all went by their given names except their sister, Ophelia, who went by Sissy. Seriously, the only one with a nice name and she didn't use it. Not that it really mattered because they were from a part of The South and from a poor uneducated family which in combination resulted in pronouncing it "Oh-FAY-yuh." Sometimes fantastic, amazing people like Grandad have crappy names.

 

One of my grandfathers was an Elwood. Yeah, we are leaving that one in the annals of history :D

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Japanese people are always having to clarify names as well--identical sounding names can be written with entirely different characters, and many characters can be read with multiple (entirely different) pronunciations. Additionally, many characters used for names are not used anywhere else--so they're not ones everyone is used to reading or writing.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_name

Edited by maize

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My name is Rebecca. Way before the creative spellings became popular, I had to clarify that is was -cca and not -kah. Both have been accepted spellings for a long time and who is to say which is *right*?

 

I also have a Stephen and a Sarah. Both have to clarify spellings on a regular basis. Stephen gets pronounced like Stefan a lot. A lot a lot. Which surprises me since it's certainly a common name and an accepted spelling. These two have to clarify at least as often as the ones below that actually do have creative type alternate spellings.

 

Then I have kids with two other names (one middle, one first) that wouldn't pass the muster of those annoyed with creative/alternate spellings. But both were carefully chosen and named for significant people (but blends or added an ending to a name). One of my kids is too little to care but the other is 18 and LOVES her name. I've asked her after hearing how much people despise these trends and she insists that she loves it. I have had to remind her a few times that she isn't allowed to be annoyed when it gets spelled wrong though. People really just don't know.

 

The other name isn't common at all. I've only heard it once or twice and really there is no standard spelling so we went with the closest to the two women she was being named for. I love it and it has deep deep meaning for me.

 

So yeah, I get it why people get annoyed with so much different spellings but I do think being so highly critical of those around you while not knowing their story and such is not really a harmonious way to live. To each their own :)

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You dodged a bullet there.  My grandfather was Morris and had brothers named Urban (first name) and Clyde.  All of which are awful but they also had a sister named Zera (pronounced exactly as spelled) which is worse.  They all went by their given names except their sister, Ophelia, who went by Sissy. Seriously, the only one with a nice name and she didn't use it.  Not that it really mattered because they were from a part of The South and from a poor uneducated family which in combination resulted in pronouncing it "Oh-FAY-yuh." Sometimes fantastic, amazing people like Grandad have crappy names.

 

 

I kind of like Urban, though I've never considered it before.  Though I guess people might just think "inner-city".

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Urban's an OK name. Rural would be a tough name. 

Remember on 30 Rock, someone was in a movie called The Rural Juror and no one could pronounce it.  Kind of ruined that word for me forever.

 

On topic, I had a grandfather Merle.  I don't see that name coming back as a girl name.

I like Morris. 

I'd like to see Sylvester come back.

 

 

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I understand wanting to use family names, but I also totally get not wanting to. I hate that people are pressured to name every male the same name generation after generation and such.

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I understand wanting to use family names, but I also totally get not wanting to. I hate that people are pressured to name every male the same name generation after generation and such.

I think I had a post on here when I was pregnant about fil strongly suggesting we use his name if baby was a boy. I just don't care for the name and I didn't like the pressure. He wanted to name one of his boys after himself but mil wouldn't let him. It wasn't my responsibility to make up for that.

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I kind of like Urban, though I've never considered it before. Though I guess people might just think "inner-city".

He'd never have anything to lose with a name like that. ;)

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Urban's an OK name. Rural would be a tough name.

Remember on 30 Rock, someone was in a movie called The Rural Juror and no one could pronounce it. Kind of ruined that word for me forever.

 

On topic, I had a grandfather Merle. I don't see that name coming back as a girl name.

I like Morris.

I'd like to see Sylvester come back.

Rural Juror! Whenever I get words jumbled up DH says it to me. LOL.

 

Sylvester is a lovely name, if you think about it and if you can separate it from Stallone and Puddy Tat. I prefer Sylvain, though.

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He'd never have anything to lose with a name like that. ;)

 

 

Urban's an OK name. Rural would be a tough name. 

Remember on 30 Rock, someone was in a movie called The Rural Juror and no one could pronounce it.  Kind of ruined that word for me forever.

 

On topic, I had a grandfather Merle.  I don't see that name coming back as a girl name.

I like Morris. 

I'd like to see Sylvester come back.

 

It just makes me think of popes, there were four or five called Urban, a few saintly and at least one very bad one.

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It just makes me think of popes, there were four or five called Urban, a few saintly and at least one very bad one.

Yup, my first thought is popes as well!

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It just makes me think of popes, there were four or five called Urban, a few saintly and at least one very bad one.

 

 

Me too. 

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Japanese people are always having to clarify names as well--identical sounding names can be written with entirely different characters, and many characters can be read with multiple (entirely different) pronunciations. Additionally, many characters used for names are not used anywhere else--so they're not ones everyone is used to reading or writing.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_name

 

Chinese sounds can also be written with many different characters, although some characters are more likely to be used in names than others.  Because Chinese has more-or-less one written language but many mutually unintelligible dialects, you will often see people sketching characters on their hands if there is a misunderstanding.

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I certainly don't consider it a privilege to have our dd's name pronounced correctly - I really don't care & we laugh at it when it happens.  BUT, I can see where other people may want to avoid that problem by spelling their child's name phonetically.  

 

Our dd's name is not a celebrity name and I have no idea why people mispronounce it.  To give another example of what happens with her name, I'll use another example.  It would be like naming your son 'Mason', but having people pronouce it 'Ma (like the sound in MAN) - son'.  Doesn't make sense to me, but it happens.  

 

I never said our dd's name pronunciation caused 'an issue' (I bolded the above) - I think you read into what I wrote.  

 

Must make sense to those who named the child. And / or in other languages.

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I understand wanting to use family names, but I also totally get not wanting to. I hate that people are pressured to name every male the same name generation after generation and such.

I've had my turn at naming and will happily accept whatever names my future grandchildren are given. I will keep my opinion to myself unless asked! No pressure.
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eta: I have a common spelling for my name.  I regularly get asked how I spell it, and even have people mispronounce it.  I can tolerate a lot - just do NOT drop the "t" and add an "eee" to the end of my name.  I loath that.

 

My name is similar to yours. I will answer to your name or my name with an "a" sound at the end. I just despise being called only the first syllable, if anyone calls me that, I correct them.

 

 

it becomes automatic and you don't think about it.

 

I have a straight forward last name.  you'd think.  people misspell it so often, I automatically spell it.   I've even had people who've known us for years - mispronounce it.   sigh.

 

it's not like it's some polish or Czechoslovakian name ...  . (like some of the girls I went to school with.)

 

My maiden name was a very unique Eastern European name. It was usually pronounced correctly.  My married name is fairly common, and about 50% of the population cannot pronounce it (much less spell it). I don't get it.

 

 

As far as spelling goes, I have noticed that many people just cannot spell names, no matter how simple, common or straightforward they seem.

 

. . . 

 

I suspect that even if a kid is Bob Smith, people would be uncertain of spelling. 

 

:iagree: :iagree: :iagree:

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Urban's an OK name. Rural would be a tough name.

Remember on 30 Rock, someone was in a movie called The Rural Juror and no one could pronounce it. Kind of ruined that word for me forever.

 

On topic, I had a grandfather Merle. I don't see that name coming back as a girl name.

I like Morris.

I'd like to see Sylvester come back.

I was going to say Urban and Clyde sounds like a great novel title.

 

I cannot say "rural" properly. I always feel like I'm just gargling or something. Or growling. There is also the city name "Marlboro." I cannot say it. I used to joke that I couldn't take up smoking in the 80s because I couldn't pronounce the word Marlboro. I would have had to go into a store and point at the cigarette display. :D

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I was thinking about this thread and how people get really worked up over names and spellings. It isn't really that hard to just ask someone how to spell their name. I think there's a limit, though. If you ask every. single. time. then I think that's a bit rude not to learn it properly after a few times. And, if you're a relative, it's pretty awful not to know how to spell (and pronounce) your grandkid's name or niece's or cousin's names.

 

But in a day-to-day situation, I think most people are used to having to spell their name and pronounce their name whether its a common pronunciation/spelling or an unusual one. I live in a bilingual area (Fr./Eng.) and there are two entirely different ways to pronounce my name. Now, I've always hated my name (another issue entirely) which to me sounds guttural and very ugly, but I am no longer bothered by whether or not people call me by pronouncing my name the English way or the French way. It doesn't matter. I know they mean me. That's fine. I don't mind (anymore) when people misspell my name either. It used to annoy the crap out of me to have people misspell my maiden name even while I stood there and spelled it for them, but meh... It doesn't seem to matter anymore -- maiden or married name. If it's important, like an official, then I will correct them. Otherwise, I really don't bother anymore. It's just not a big deal if they use a double t or not, or insert a vowel combo or two.

Edited by Audrey
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I was thinking about this thread and how people get really worked up over names and spellings. It isn't really that hard to just ask someone how to spell their name. I think there's a limit, though. If you ask every. single. time. then I think that's a bit rude not to learn it properly after a few times. And, if you're a relative, it's pretty awful not to know how to spell (and pronounce) your grandkid's name or niece's or cousin's names.

 

 

Whoa, some of us struggle to remember spellings for common everyday words; I mess up spellings all the time. It's not a matter of not caring or not trying--some brains are just not good at remembering spellings.

 

Also, some of us have an awful lot of relatives--I have fifty nieces and nephews alone, scattered around the country and the world. I do well to remember all their names, nevermind spellings!

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...

 

 

I've got a kid missing a vowel in one syllable. I tried to get my wife to go with Dimitri, and I lost, so the kid's name starts with Dm. In my defense, if that hadn't been a commonly accepted spelling as well, I would've fought harder. Depending on how you say it it's sort of a half syllable anyway.

 

That's really interesting!

 

I can't remember the name now, but it was an american one. It needed a vowel! lol.

 

I also tried to talk with a mom about the spelling she wanted for her baby to be born.  She started the very American name with Ch making the /sh/ sound. I tried to tell her that is a French thing. She insisted it didn't matter, even though she couldn't think of one English word as an exception. Honestly, I really was trying to be helpful and didn't want to go there, but for the babe's sake, I tried. Ha!

 

I didn't last the whole 9 months on that baby board. Just too much crazy.

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That's really interesting!

 

I can't remember the name now, but it was an american one. It needed a vowel! lol.

 

I also tried to talk with a mom about the spelling she wanted for her baby to be born. She started the very American name with Ch making the /sh/ sound. I tried to tell her that is a French thing. She insisted it didn't matter, even though she couldn't think of one English word as an exception. Honestly, I really was trying to be helpful and didn't want to go there, but for the babe's sake, I tried. Ha!

 

I didn't last the whole 9 months on that baby board. Just too much crazy.

We use a lot of names in English that start with the soft ch. Sure, many derive from French, but most folks don't know or care about that. Charlotte, Chaundra, Chalice, Chantelle, and Cheryl are all people I know with soft Ch names.

 

I really don't see why someone wanting to spell their baby's name this way would be a problem.

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We use a lot of names in English that start with the soft ch. Sure, many derive from French, but most folks don't know or care about that. Charlotte, Chaundra, Chalice, Chantelle, and Cheryl are all people I know with soft Ch names.

 

I really don't see why someone wanting to spell their baby's name this way would be a problem.

 

Yes, they are French derivatives. The name was no where near a French one! Different strokes, I just felt like she should make an informed choice.

 

Seriously, this board was full moms trying to make the craziest name spellings and insisting that the English language made no sense and all the rules get broken, so it doesn't matter the spellings. Many of these names were just really not gonna fly phonetically, made by ladies who had absolutely no idea about phonics and spelling rules.

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I REALLY hope this comparison isn't offensive, but my dog growing up was named Tanya, pronounced like your sister does. I've never heard anyone else pronounce it that way!

Lol. Not offensive at all.

 

It's the common pronunciation in my part of the world. I know several Tanyas. The names all sound like they've been out in the sun or like the singer, Tanya Tucker.

 

I know one Tawnya, and this is how her named is spelled to differentiate her from all the sun-dwellers. :)

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Yes, they are French derivatives. The name was no where near a French one! Different strokes, I just felt like she should make an informed choice.

 

Seriously, this board was full moms trying to make the craziest name spellings and insisting that the English language made no sense and all the rules get broken, so it doesn't matter the spellings. Many of these names were just really not gonna fly phonetically, made by ladies who had absolutely no idea about phonics and spelling rules.

I don't see that traditional names always follow spelling and phonics rules. Stephen is the only word I can think of where ph is pronounced "v", ar in Sara is commonly pronounced "er", Matthew has an extra t... Edited by maize
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I don't see that traditional names always follow spelling and phonics rules. Stephen is the only word I can think of where ph is pronounced "v", ar is Sara is commonly pronounced "er", Matthew has an extra t...

 

I agree. 

 

Again, I'm not talking about creative spellings that can make sense phonetically. I'm talking about syllables not having vowels and made up phonograms or sounds for existing ones that do not exist. I'm talking about putting an apostrophe in a name. No it wasn't for a permanent possessive or to take the place of missing letters even. LOL. 

 

 

I don't want to argue. Just giving my thoughts and experience. I guess you'd have to experience it to understand. 

Edited by ifIonlyhadabrain

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Again, I'm not talking about creative spellings that can make sense phonetically. I'm talking about syllables not having vowels and made up phonograms or sounds for existing ones that do not exist. I'm talking about putting an apostrophe in a name. No it wasn't for a permanent possessive or to take the place of missing letters even. LOL. 

 

 

I don't want to argue. Just giving my thoughts and experience. I guess you'd have to experience it to understand. 

I posted above but maybe it got missed. Apostrophes in names are often used  in African American culture.  

 

Our Evolving Black American Naming Traditions

"Because of the vibrant Creole culture in Louisiana, there is also a French influence in some African-American names. This includes not only French surnames but also given names beginning with “La,†(e.g. Lawanda), “De†(e.g. Deandre’) and with the use of apostrophes (e.g. Andre’, Mich’ele)"

 

When you LOL at these names, you may be mocking an African American mom for whom it is culturally significant. 

 

"From Tayshaun to Rau'shee, Olympic athletes have been a reminder of distinctive African-American names. Before you poke fun, here's a history lesson."

 from Salon. http://www.salon.com/2008/08/25/creative_black_names/

 

 

Edited by hornblower
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My sister almost goes apoplectic when people mis-pronounce her name that is spelled phonetically correct.

 

It's Tanya. Like sunTAN - yeah.

 

Americans almost inevitably call her TAWNya. It pisses her right off. Lol

 

In South Africa, she would be TUNyah (TUN to rhyme with SUN).  It was a very popular late 60's name and we had a Tania, Tanja and Tanya in my class - all pronounced the same wah.

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I posted above but maybe it got missed. Apostrophes in names are often used in African American culture.

 

Our Evolving Black American Naming Traditions

"Because of the vibrant Creole culture in Louisiana, there is also a French influence in some African-American names. This includes not only French surnames but also given names beginning with “La,†(e.g. Lawanda), “De†(e.g. Deandre’) and with the use of apostrophes (e.g. Andre’, Mich’ele)"

 

When you LOL at these names, you may be mocking an African American mom for whom it is culturally significant.

 

"From Tayshaun to Rau'shee, Olympic athletes have been a reminder of distinctive African-American names. Before you poke fun, here's a history lesson."

from Salon. http://www.salon.com/2008/08/25/creative_black_names/

 

 

Again, these weren't traditional names and spellings or even names with educted applications. These were names that were made up and their own creations. I'm not making find of actual cultures or names. This was on several threads for made. up. names. Totally. I was there. Obviously you don't believe that can happen. Just that I am mocking cultures. Okay. Edited by ifIonlyhadabrain

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Again, these weren't traditional names and spellings or even names with educted applications. These were names that were made up and their own creations. I'm not making find of actual cultures or names. This was on several threads for made. up. names. Totally. I was there. Obviously you don't believe that can happen. Just that I am mocking cultures. Okay.

 

As explained in the articles I linked, that is the point:  African American names sometimes ARE totally made up. Inventing names & spellings is literally part of the culture. 

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I was thinking about this thread and how people get really worked up over names and spellings. It isn't really that hard to just ask someone how to spell their name. I think there's a limit, though. If you ask every. single. time. then I think that's a bit rude not to learn it properly after a few times. And, if you're a relative, it's pretty awful not to know how to spell (and pronounce) your grandkid's name or niece's or cousin's names.

 

But in a day-to-day situation, I think most people are used to having to spell their name and pronounce their name whether its a common pronunciation/spelling or an unusual one. I live in a bilingual area (Fr./Eng.) and there are two entirely different ways to pronounce my name. Now, I've always hated my name (another issue entirely) which to me sounds guttural and very ugly, but I am no longer bothered by whether or not people call me by pronouncing my name the English way or the French way. It doesn't matter. I know they mean me. That's fine. I don't mind (anymore) when people misspell my name either. It used to annoy the crap out of me to have people misspell my maiden name even while I stood there and spelled it for them, but meh... It doesn't seem to matter anymore -- maiden or married name. If it's important, like an official, then I will correct them. Otherwise, I really don't bother anymore. It's just not a big deal if they use a double t or not, or insert a vowel combo or two.

 

I'm relaxed about my name.  I do correct people if they call me 'Lorna', but it doesn't make me cross.  I often have to spell it for people who write 'Lora', but it's no big deal.  Otherwise, if they pronounce it Larra (my MIL), Laora (other languages) or Law-ruh (how I pronounce it) they are still referring to me.  It's fine.

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As explained in the articles I linked, that is the point: African American names sometimes ARE totally made up. Inventing names & spellings is literally part of the culture.

Is that a positive thing though? I read the article and all I could think was "those poor kids".

 

I have a made up name and made up spelling and detest it, so maybe I'm biased. But new and unique names or funky spellings are a societal negative to me, like starting the poor kid out with one strike against them already. That might just be my baggage speaking though, and I feel that way about the weirdo celebrity names too,

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Well, it's a good thing I only gently pointed out a few things to women who were *seeking advice* on that birth board thread and just vented a bit here 10 years later. Several of the moms appreciated my thoughts, because the had no clue that ie doesn't say ow or whatever. They weren't trying to be cultural. They were just genuinely clueless and appreciated knowing. Again, do what you will, but seeing things from someone else's perspective, especially when asking for it, helps you make an informed choice.

Edited by ifIonlyhadabrain
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My grandma's name was Hazel.

 

It doesn't matter much in the big picture, but I got tired of seeing this thread and not saying this. :0)

 

Carry on.

Me too :-)

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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I'm cool with whatever you bane your kid BUT if you spell Brain instead of Brian and then get peeved at me for "mispronouncing" it I may have unkind thoughts about you. (True story from the annals of rural public health lived by me, not a "friend" )

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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Well, it's a good thing I only gently pointed out a few things to women who were *seeking advice* on that birth board thread and just vented a bit here 10 years later. Several of the moms appreciated my thoughts, because the had no clue that ie doesn't say ow or whatever. They weren't trying to be cultural. They were just genuinely clueless and appreciated knowing. Again, do what you will, but seeing things from someone else's perspective, especially when asking for it, helps you make an informed choice.

Yup. When I worked in a law form, there was a lead paint case in which the daughter's name was supposed to be "Monique," but the mom without a firm grasp of spelling order named her "Monquie." I think we can all agree a spelling that people think is Monkey is a very unfortunate error. "Girl...I hate to tell you this, but you done name your girl Monkey!"

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Yup. When I worked in a law form, there was a lead paint case in which the daughter's name was supposed to be "Monique," but the mom without a firm grasp of spelling order named her "Monquie." I think we can all agree a spelling that people think is Monkey is a very unfortunate error. "Girl...I hate to tell you this, but you done name your girl Monkey!"

 

IDK, when nobody complains about Favre being pronounced FARVE or Roy being prononced WAH, I think Monquie can be Monique & we'll all be just fine.

Edited by 8circles
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Really since we live in an increasingly international and multicultural world, I can't see a reason to get worked up over how traditionally English a spelling or pronunciation is. If my kids can learn that their dance teacher's name is spelled Niamh but pronounced Neev and that the Korean Jung family has a "j" sound at the start of their name but the German Jung family has a "y" sound at the start, they shouldn't have trouble accepting a Hayzel or two in their lives.

 

Maybe creative spellings can be seen as a way of helping all of us to think more flexibly.

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I have THE fad name of 1970's Australia - Danielle. I was born in the last weeks of the 60s and named after my grandfather, Daniel. Daniel is a family name and occurs in every generation. I was the last child born in mine and there were no boys, so I got it in feminine form. I think my parents thought they were very clever. Over the next two decades, there was an explosion of Danielles. There were three in my class at school and it was unheard of to go to the shops and not encounter some snotty Danielle in an aisle. The Australian accent can do truely horrible things to French words, and the ability of nasal Strine to turn Danielle into Dan YELL is just dreadful (hold your nose and really drag out that second syllable so that it makes a third, like you have a very bad pain). The spelling has been butchered so many times that I now routinely have to spell it, even though mine is the original, boring spelling. Mostly I get Dannielle which I hate, sometimes I get Daniele or Daniela which are fine, but the worst is Dan-yell. I met a Danyell the other day who told me she loves it because that is just the way its pronounced. No, no it isn't!!!!! Arghhhh!

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As explained in the articles I linked, that is the point: African American names sometimes ARE totally made up. Inventing names & spellings is literally part of the culture.

I know you've been here a long time; these type of threads that mock names cycle through regularly, there may be hope with this one, because they used to innocently start with " odd" ones then jump to laughing at AA names within a couple posts. Same old same old mockery.
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Is that a positive thing though? I read the article and all I could think was "those poor kids".

 

I have a made up name and made up spelling and detest it, so maybe I'm biased. But new and unique names or funky spellings are a societal negative to me, like starting the poor kid out with one strike against them already. That might just be my baggage speaking though, and I feel that way about the weirdo celebrity names too,

I think the societal negative is how so many people get their jollies off on making fun of names. Although I do sort of feel about like what you said in your first sentence. There are many times I read comments from parents and think " God, those poor kids. "
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After many years of fascination with names and naming trends, I have concluded that there is simply no accounting for taste, and there will never be agreement on what is best or most appropriate. 

 

As far as spelling goes, I have noticed that many people just cannot spell names, no matter how simple, common or straightforward they seem. My son is called George, and people ask how to spell that; I mean, seriously, isn't 'George' the only way to spell it in English? Unless we went for 'Jorj' for that extra special alternate (or Duggar family!) spelling? My daughter Elizabeth gets asked whether it's Elizabeth with a Z or an S. She has also had people assuming that Beth must be short for Bethany (which it can be, of course, but surely everybody knows it can also be short for Elizabeth?) And my Amelia gets all kinds of spellings, as well as queries about whether her nickname (Milly) stands for Millicent or Mildred. I suspect that even if a kid is Bob Smith, people would be uncertain of spelling. 

 

My maiden name was Hill, and I still had to spell it ridiculously often. 

 

I actually really like many traditionally boy names as girl names. But like the Evelyn Waugh discussion earlier, it gets tricky when people with the same name fall in love. I know two Michaels who are married to each other. I also have a BIL who shares the same name as me. DH and I refer to him as Little Sammish, because he was a young kid when I first met him. But now that he's older, taller, and could easily bench press me, it's just funny. Also, family Christmas is so tricky! I can't tell you how many of his presents I've accidentally opened, because gift tags are confusing!

 

I'm starting to believe there's no such thing as an "easy" name. Our last name is Polish and ridiculous, so we deliberately went with an easy to spell and pronounce name for DS: Asher. How hard could that be? At our very first pediatrician appointment, the nurse came out to the waiting room, looked at her chart, and called out "Ash-eer?" I also have a relative who reliably spells his name Ascher.  :confused1:  Sigh...

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I'm starting to believe there's no such thing as an "easy" name. Our last name is Polish and ridiculous, so we deliberately went with an easy to spell and pronounce name for DS: Asher. How hard could that be? At our very first pediatrician appointment, the nurse came out to the waiting room, looked at her chart, and called out "Ash-eer?" I also have a relative who reliably spells his name Ascher.  :confused1:  Sigh...

 

Yup.  How hard is it to pronounce "Amos"?

 

AH-moos

AH-mohs

Ah-MOHS

Ah-MOHZ

 

Long A, stress on the 1st syllable: A-muhs.

 

I had no idea it would be so confusing.  

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I think the societal negative is how so many people get their jollies off on making fun of names. Although I do sort of feel about like what you said in your first sentence. There are many times I read comments from parents and think " God, those poor kids. "

 

It would be really great if people didn't make fun of someone for something as small as a name.  But, I think we have to accept that it happens.  If someone names their kid Adolf Hitler, that kid is going to have a really rough time going through life.  I would feel really sorry for the kid, and I would think the parents didn't think all that hard about their kid at all.  When someone gives their kid a name with a really "unique" or "creative" spelling, I think those parents didn't think much about how that's going to affect the kid.  How their kid named Auhndhreah is going to be constantly having people look at her name and ask "how do you say that?" and people hearing her name and constantly telling them that it's NOT spelled Andrea. 

 

If you give your kid a name that you like, that has meaning for you, etc, and you accept that the name you chose might be difficult for people to pronounce or might require that you spell it out all the time, AND you help your kid understand that their name is unusual and might throw people off so just be patient...then that's fine.  But, when you go getting all irritated and mad when someone hears "Danica" but doesn't automatically know that you spell it "Dannyka,"  That's when it's a problem.  And yes, I do think a parent who does something like that wasn't thinking ahead. 

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