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where can i buy a hedgehog


lynn
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They're rare in this area, you usually have to go through a breeder.

 

I'm not expert, the first place I'd go is a hedgie fancier site and begin research.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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They come into rescue and shelters or are handed off on craigslist etc. frequently....mostly because they're pretty difficult pets ime. 

Do tons of research before deciding to get one. The ones we get in our rescue usually require much vet care & coddling before they're adoptable. They're prone to infections of the mouth and also foot sores. 

Finding a vet that is knowledgeable in treating them is not always easy. 

If they're scared and not handled properly and have become wary of humans, they will spend their entire time curled up. They can bite. They spend a lot of time anointing themselves (essentially grooming themselves like a cat) and the smell is one that some people find unpleasant. 

If it sounds like I'm trying to talk you out of it, I'm doing a good job. 

The rescue I volunteer for gets them in & helps them but I personally think they're a very specialized animal which probably should not be kept as a pet.

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I had one. It gave me a rash when I held it, and they have gross poop, which they tend to do while running on their wheel all night. So every morning you need to scrub all the poop off the wheel. They eat cat food usually, from what I remember. 

 

And after a long while, my dog got ahold of it somehow, and killed it. 

 

I will never have another. 

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We had a hedgehog for six years.  They are interesting little creatures that look like something out of a fairy tale, but they have very specific care requirements and can be a lot of work.

 

They are solitary (don't usually tolerate other hedgehogs) and nocturnal, and as others have already mentioned, they are not the type of pet that you can expect to hold and cuddle.  Ours did not enjoy being picked up or handled, so we left her alone and just enjoyed observing her.

 

For starters, they need a big cage.  Ours was 4' x 2'.  They can only tolerate a few types of bedding.  We used aspen shavings, but some people use fleece bedding, which needs to be washed frequently.  Since they're nocturnal, they need a hut or snuggle sack to hide in during the day and sleep.  They absolutely must have a wheel to run on, and it has to be a wheel specifically made for hedgehogs, not a wheel for rodents.  And yes, they do poop all over the wheel, so it needs to be scrubbed every single day (which is gross and gets very tiresome).  They also have to be kept warm.  Our cage had two heat lamps that were controlled by a thermostat.

 

They can eat dry cat food but it has to be a certain type that meets their specific nutritional needs.  They also eat live mealworms, small chunks of cooked chicken or fish, and vegetables and fruits.  

 

I would definitely not let a cat or dog near a hedgehog, as they could hurt or kill it.  We never let ours out of her cage unless our other pets were out of the room and we were right there to closely supervise her.

 

Ours lived to an old age and was blind for the last year of her life.  We're huge animal lovers and it was a fun experience for us, but I would not get another one because of the amount of work involved in caring for her.

 

Oh, one other thing - since they're nocturnal, they can make a LOT of noise at night.  Ours lived in my son's room and he never minded hearing her run on her wheel and play with her toys all night, but I could see how it could really bother someone who is a light sleeper. 

 
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We have a cat that would definitely view any such small animal as interesting prey. Unless your cat is known to be friendly with other and smaller animals, I'd assume stalking and killing it would be the main interest, lol. 

 

One of my Facebook friends has an adorable hedgehog that she seems to enjoy a lot. She doesn't have young kids, though. 

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There is a breeder at the farmer's market near my mother's house in NC. He brings them and shows them off and takes orders. Apparently they're litter-trainable, which really surprised me. The ones he had were cuddly and liked to be held and to climb on your clothes and such. I had like two seconds of thinking about it... but when I researched, it felt like the downsides weren't worth it - especially the nocturnal thing.

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There is a breeder at the farmer's market near my mother's house in NC. He brings them and shows them off and takes orders. Apparently they're litter-trainable, which really surprised me. The ones he had were cuddly and liked to be held and to climb on your clothes and such. I had like two seconds of thinking about it... but when I researched, it felt like the downsides weren't worth it - especially the nocturnal thing.

 

I have NEVER heard of one that didn't poop on it's wheel. Ever. And it has to be a solid wheel, so they don't hurt their feet, and they keep running while pooping, so you can imagine how packed on and gross it is. Ugh. 

 

Now, when NOT running on the wheel they poop in one area from what I remember, but that's not much consolation. And their poop is more like cat poop, not like hamster poop. 

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When I was in college it was common for students to sneak small pets into the dorms. One friend of a friend had a hedgehog. It was a cute little thing, but didn't like crowds. Like large, drunken parties. I asked to hold it, and it did fine for a while, then bit me. I had enough alcohol in me that I didn't really feel it, but I do remember declaring happily, with blood spurting out of my hand, "I can't believe I was just bitten by a hedgehog! A hedgehog bit me!" and then cracking up while the poor sober hedgehog owner bandaged up my hand. 

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What is the biological advantage to pooping while running? 🤔

Mechanical motility? Our cavies did the same thing and it was equally vile :lol:

 

I do recommend them or ratties above hedgies, but yeah, research the pants off them all before taking the dive!

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I guess hedgehogs are one thing you can't buy on amazon.

 

We have a friend who has one. In addition to the gross poop activites, they also like to take their food and smear it (and saliva) all over their face and upper body. I think it's called self annointing, and it makes their hedgehog smell really disgusting. Then, bath time, which is fun because they have quills. :ack2:

Edited by trulycrabby
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When I was in college it was common for students to sneak small pets into the dorms. One friend of a friend had a hedgehog. It was a cute little thing, but didn't like crowds. Like large, drunken parties. I asked to hold it, and it did fine for a while, then bit me. I had enough alcohol in me that I didn't really feel it, but I do remember declaring happily, with blood spurting out of my hand, "I can't believe I was just bitten by a hedgehog! A hedgehog bit me!" and then cracking up while the poor sober hedgehog owner bandaged up my hand. 

 

I had to go to an ER after getting bit by a prairie dog once.  I was a docent at a zoo (and yes, we had hedgehogs too) and someone dropped the prairie dog and in an attempt to keep it away from visitors, I got bit.  It was pretty funny going to an ER in New Jersey and telling them I was bit by a prairie dog.  I'm sure a hedgehog would have gotten a similar reaction.  All I wanted was a tetanus shot but I had to tell about a dozen people all about it first.

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I guess hedgehogs are one thing you can't buy on amazon.

 

We have a friend who has one. In addition to the gross poop activites, they also like to take their food and smear it (and saliva) all over their face and upper body. I think it's called self annointing, and it makes their hedgehog smell really disgusting. Then, bath time, which is fun because they have quills. :ack2:

 

I guess we got lucky with ours because she would only occasionally self anoint and only with saliva and not food.  

 

She kept herself very clean and never smelled bad.  The only time we ever had to bathe her was once when she got dry skin and we gave her an oatmeal bath.

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