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Book a Week 2016 - BW 49: Delectable December


Robin M
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Never say never, right? Last night dh and I were in a bookstore. I had coupons. Me in a bookstore with coupons is a dangerous combination. ;) I bought a cookbook! This one.

Since gave in to the hype and bought an Instant Pot (I love it) and I enjoy the show America's Test Kitchen, so I couldn't pass it up.

This is one of the books I have on hold in my Overdrive. I am 4th in line so am looking forward to hearing what you think. I am still making rice. ;) I haven't had time to experiment and it seems to be easier just to make the quick meals that I know how to make right now. I also have a Emeril instant pot cookbook on hold. Closer to the top with that one.

 

I finished Discount Armageddon https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11402002-discount-armageddon by the same author as the Rosemary and Rue series. It took a while to get into the world that the author created but I am now waiting for the next one to arrive off holds.

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:laugh:

 

What sorts of flours do the recipes use? Do they all use GF all-purpose flour? I'd love to find one that uses a variety of flours. Recipes without xanthan gum would be an added bonus.

 

 

 

 

The book does not call for all purpose gf flour, however rice flour (brown, sweet, white, etc.) are used a lot in combination with other flours such as almond, amaranth, and oat. This is not a book for you if you avoid xanthan gum or rice or starches. One recipe, Brazilian Sugar Cookies, uses only cornstarch and sugar for the dry ingredients! Yes, they are delicious. 

 

There is a chapter with candy recipes and those don't have flour. If you avoid sugar this book is not for you. 

 

Like I said this is not a healthy dessert book. If you want healthy recipes look elsewhere. This book is pure sinful indulgence with lots of sugar, starches, butter, and cream. I  :001_wub: this book. 

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My life is currently nothing but :nopity:  :driving:  :willy_nilly:.  

 

At least I got through two of the PD James Mistletoe Murder stories and have started listening to Neil Gaiman read Neverwhere. He's a great narrator except that his voice sometimes gets suddenly very quiet for dramatic effect, and I can't hear it over the car engine! I can't hit the 30 second rewind button on my phone, either, because I'm driving. On the freeway. And people are crazy this time of year! 

 

 

 

 

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Here's a problem that is probably common among BaWers...

 

Busy time of year. I returned some library books, but somehow, some way, I ended up with even more on my shelf to read! (Like I have time to do that right now!) Why do I do this??? There is no way I can get through these in the next couple of weeks....

 

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Your official assigned reading:  The Nest, Mister Monkey, and The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August.  Because those are all on my TR list, and if you read them first and tell me if they are worth it, I will be happy!  So get right on that  :toetap05:  ;)  :D

 

Here's a problem that is probably common among BaWers...

 

Busy time of year. I returned some library books, but somehow, some way, I ended up with even more on my shelf to read! (Like I have time to do that right now!) Why do I do this??? There is no way I can get through these in the next couple of weeks....

 

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I have been waiting a long time for His Bloody Project, and it arrived today at the library, and I'm devouring it. I like it very much so far. Stacia, I want to say you would like this book, not because it's your normal fare, but because you like Hyde and Lighthousekeeping and a few others that this is reminding me of, a bit. It's not a retelling or twist on a famous story like those are, but there is something about it that is similar. I'm not that far into it, but I'm hooked.

Edited by Chrysalis Academy
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Looking at the spines on Stacia's shelf, I found myself creating a small poem from three titles:

 

Golden Delicious

Spectacle:

Complication.

 

Or should that be a title of one of Kareni's romances?  Or would that just be Golden Delicious Complication?

 

For those wondering what is going on with nature, we have Backyard Birds Nix the Nest.

 

Any others want to play with Stacia's titles?

 

I finished reading The Black Tulip which was a bit of a meh for me.  No swashbuckling in this Dumas but a melodramatic tale set in 17th century Holland with its political intrigue explained in the introduction and endnotes. Does anyone want this Oxford University Press annotated edition?

 

Like many of you, I am unsure how much reading will be accomplished in this busy holiday season.  Nonetheless I started reading a book that may occupy me for the remainder of the year, Dorothy Dunnett's To Lie with Lions, the sixth book in the House of Niccolo series.  Dunnett's historical novels are so satisfying for me and it has been a while since I have danced with Niccolo.

 

A lighter book also came out of the dusty stack, Margaret Powell's Below Stairs, the memoir that inspired Julian Fellowes, the creator of Downton Abbey.  This looks like a quick read.  When I am finished, I'll be happy to pass it along in case any of you have been wanting to read this or are in the mood for a sort of Downton fix.

 

On a non-book note, it is 28 degrees here at the moment, Pretty Darn Cold for those of us in coastal North Carolina.  Hallelujah!  I think the remains of the ragweed and goldenrod will be officially dead after last night.

 

 

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I finished The Cat Who Came For Christmas and am working in Stories of Your Life and Others by Ted Chiang. It is a book of sci-fi short stories. I started in the middle with the one I was most interested in "Story of Your Life." It reads like old school science fiction, which I prefer. I hope this means I will like the rest of the book as well.

 

My reading time is also curtailed. Along with our school routine, I decided to do redwork embroidery tea towels for female relatives. Why did I wait til December? Because I like a challenge? I finished one last night. Two more are essential, two more are optional, a couple more after that would be nice. Every woman I know IRL may get a tea towel, if my energy holds out.

 

Edited: I hate auto correct.

Edited by Onceuponatime
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Nameless Monkey Lives would make a good news story.

 

Jenn, I like your icons and sympathize with your volume level problem. That is exactly why I prefer less dramatic readers. My French Harry Potter audio book is unlistenable as a going to sleep book for this reason. BladeeblablaBLAbladeebla and I am awake. It doesn,t work doing chores. It doesn,t work in the car. It is a far less useful book than its price needs it to be.

 

Nan

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I just downloaded this book for only $1.99. 

 

Floodpath: The Deadliest Man-Made Disaster of 20th Century America and the Making of Modern Los Angeles

 

Its regular digital price is $19.99.. It sounds fascinating and I know very little about the history of Southern California (or the rest of the state) beyond some Spanish missionaries, the Gold Rush, Chinese immigrants, some earthquakes, and a fire. It seems that's all that's really taught. John Steinbeck's fiction taught me more about California history than any school lessons ever did. 

 

Amy - I hope it pleases you to know that I'm really enjoying The Grand Sophy. It doesn't read like a romance IMO, but seems very Jane Austen-ish. 

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Amy - I hope it pleases you to know that I'm really enjoying The Grand Sophy. It doesn't read like a romance IMO, but seems very Jane Austen-ish. 

 

It certainly pleases me! The Grand Sophy is my favorite GH, and I agree that it reminds me very much of Jane Austen. I know you have another one from Amy - Cotillion, I think? Which I haven't read in a long time and don't remember off the top of my head. But if you do keep liking Sophy, I recommend Venetia, it's my 2nd favorite and another very Austen-esque type of plot and characters.

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Yes, I really paid close attention to Emma's character development this time, and you are right, the closer you read, the more you are struck by her snobbery. Emma learns a lot about herself over the course of this book, and she learns some humility and how to be a better friend. For sure. 

 

I read Lear for the first time a few years ago while embroiled in the midst of a crisis with my parents. Which is ongoing, but not as crisis-y as it was. It was an interesting headspace to be in to read the play, I found myself more sympathetic to Regan and Goneril than I think I would have been otherwise. Yes, yes, they are villains, but didn't you feel for them, a little bit? Dealing with a manipulative, entitled and delusional parent who pretended that things would be one way while always intending something different?  Not the majority reading of the play, I'm sure! But it is all about conflict between adult parents and children, a very mature play, for grown-ups. 

Definitely yes to Emma!  I'll have to read King Lear again to get a better feel.  I did not feel sympathetic to Regan and Goneril.  I sympathized for Cordelia and her honesty.  I'm an only and that poses it's own interesting parental challenges? but I admire Cordelia's love and honesty.  Watching my dh's sibling's interactions with his parents, well it leaves me a bit sour on telling people what they want to hear  :glare:

I love Kafka on the Shore, but I'm not sure if you would like it.

 

I think A Wild Sheep Chase might be a good place for you to start if you want to give one of his novels a try.

 

It would be cool if you did the Murakami read-along in January! I think we're reading Norwegian Wood (?). I haven't read that one yet but I know it is one of his most popular books. I would also like to read his non-fiction work Underground.

 

Thanks!  I'll have to look into it!

 

Looking at the spines on Stacia's shelf, I found myself creating a small poem from three titles:

 

A lighter book also came out of the dusty stack, Margaret Powell's Below Stairs, the memoir that inspired Julian Fellowes, the creator of Downton Abbey.  This looks like a quick read.  When I am finished, I'll be happy to pass it along in case any of you have been wanting to read this or are in the mood for a sort of Downton fix.

 

I read and enjoyed this a couple years ago!  It was certainly interesting!

 

It certainly pleases me! The Grand Sophy is my favorite GH, and I agree that it reminds me very much of Jane Austen. I know you have another one from Amy - Cotillion, I think? Which I haven't read in a long time and don't remember off the top of my head. But if you do keep liking Sophy, I recommend Venetia, it's my 2nd favorite and another very Austen-esque type of plot and characters.

The Grandy Sophy is certainly my favorite but Cotillion and Venetia are other favorites, as well as Sylvester!

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It certainly pleases me! The Grand Sophy is my favorite GH, and I agree that it reminds me very much of Jane Austen. I know you have another one from Amy - Cotillion, I think? Which I haven't read in a long time and don't remember off the top of my head. But if you do keep liking Sophy, I recommend Venetia, it's my 2nd favorite and another very Austen-esque type of plot and characters.

 

 

 

The Grandy Sophy is certainly my favorite but Cotillion and Venetia are other favorites, as well as Sylvester!

 

Yes Rose, Cotillion is the other one she sent me. If I end up enjoying both, I'll have to take a look at Venetia. Amy you might have made a Heyer fan out of me after all. :D

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Definitely yes to Emma!  I'll have to read King Lear again to get a better feel.  I did not feel sympathetic to Regan and Goneril.  I sympathized for Cordelia and her honesty.  I'm an only and that poses it's own interesting parental challenges? but I admire Cordelia's love and honesty.  Watching my dh's sibling's interactions with his parents, well it leaves me a bit sour on telling people what they want to hear  :glare:

Thanks!  I'll have to look into it!

 

The Grandy Sophy is certainly my favorite but Cotillion and Venetia are other favorites, as well as Sylvester!

 

I'm an only also, so I agree about the interesting challenges there. But my parents both have issues that make me sympathetic to the challenges of being manipulated by an elder parent who is struggling with their own loss of control/power over their own life.  Hence I can find sympathy with all 3 sisters, but definitely agree that Cordelia handled the challenge more honorably. Although look where it got her!  I find that play probably the most challenging of all Shakespeare's plays just because of all the buttons it pushes for me.

 

I will have to pull Cotillion out next time I need a GH fix!

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Fill up your stacks before the beginning of the year with Amazon's 80% off Kindle travel books   and the greatest science books of 2016 highlighted on Brainpickings

 

Dylan a no show for Nobel Prize banquet --- what a surprise

 

Check out Simon and Schuster's christmas coloring books.

 

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:lol:  You gals are cracking me up with your poetry slam using my library titles. (Except the bird book, which is mine.)

 

Couldn't sleep in the middle of the night, so I picked up various books & read the first chapter or two to see if I want to read them or if they will go back to the library. The results?

 

No-go:

 

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Sorry to report, Rose, that Mister Monkey by Francine Prose did not pull me in at all within the first ten pages. And, I didn't like the writing style where italics were sometimes used to indicate what the character is thinking rather than saying out loud. I don't know. Just zero interest on my part. I think those who have kids in drama might like it, though. Or at least want to give it a try.

 

Down Among the Dead Men by Michelle Williams is also a no-go for me right now. Too much detail about eviscerating a body. Not really my thing to know that level of detail.

 

Go:

 

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The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break by Steven Sherrill is interesting &/or odd enough after the first chapter that I will continue with it & see where it goes.

 

Complication by Isaac Adamson is definitely intriguing & I plan on finishing it.

 

Still working on The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North. I really like it but it is slow reading for me for some reason. Maybe it's just one of those books that doesn't lend itself to speedy reading?

 

Haven't flipped through the others yet on my shelf. The Nest is not normally one I would pick up, but my book club is reading it, so I'll probably try to start it soon.

 

ETA: And that's why I love libraries. I can get all these books & it's ok to decide *not* to read them if they don't pique my interest. No harm, no foul.

Edited by Stacia
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Ok, there is no time like the present. I pulled out Cotillion out and started reading it. I actually had to tape the cover back on before I could start, it's so dusty. I remember now, it's very funny! It has a similar plot to Friday's Child, which was one of the first I ever read - the one that my mom read aloud funny excerpts from, that made me want to read GH the first place. So I always considered Cotillion a little bit of a recycled plot. But still very funny, I'm enjoying it.  If you like Cotillion you'd like Friday's Child too.  

 

These books - Cotillion, Friday's Child, Arabella, all belong to the category of the young,naive heroine - think Catherine Morland, rather than Ann Elliot.  There is another category of GH books, among them The Grand Sophy, Venetia, Frederica, Lady of Quality, which have a more mature heroine. I like the latter category better. But they are all delightful.

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Stopping by to check in with you guys. I played with Stacia's book shelf too.....Complication was the one that ended up on a hold list. I feel pretty honoured that Stacia decided to keep reading that one. :lol: I await the review. Fun poetry!!!!

 

I have been busy playing with a new to me quilt technique that I incorporated into a small wall hanging for Christmas. Almost finished. While stitching I finally finished listening to The Secret Place https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/21859254-the-secret-place by Tana French. I normally love her books but this was my third go at this one after trying to read it twice. I liked the narration so it wasn't that. I think it's the fact that this book was average and I have given most of her books 5 stars. It simply wasn't as good as the others. The Trespasser (book 6) has been released and I am waiting for it. I ended up putting a hold on it for both the audio book and the print form.

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I have simplyfied my cookbooks over the year and went mostly to online recipes but now I find I'm shifting back to cook books.  I don't know why.  I guess it's just easier to open up Joy of Cooking to custard and use that recipe than research recipes for an hour to just decide on one.  I've been pleased with every recipe I've made from Joy of Cooking so it's become my go-to book.  They also tend to be pretty simple which is good for my current stage of life. 

 

I'm a bit of a cookbook junkie. I love beautiful cookbooks with easy, yet elegant recipes. I loved Martha Stewart's Everyday Food magazine and the coordinated cookbooks. Nigella Lawson and Ina Garden take up a lot of room on my shelves (yes, plural).

My go-to cookbook is America's Test Kitchen 1000 Best Recipes. They're good recipes, and I like the explanations as to how they came together. I've learned much from that cookbook.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

 

Yes!  I love all things from America's Test Kitchen.  I love to read Ina Garden's cookbooks but rarely make anything from them.  I use them more as cooking inspiration. 

 

That would be lovely! I wish it could happen...

I finished Holy Terror in the Hebrides by Jeanne Dams. This cozy series is a good one! :) Amy, you may want to read this one as research....

 

Thank you!  Added it to my to-read list. 

 

I have way too many cookbooks even though I've culled them down over the years. For dinner, I usually go straight to the internet, but for baking I like to use my cookbooks.

 

Most of my cookbooks are in my bookshelves, but these are the ones I keep in the kitchen:

 

  • Cook's Illustrated. I've subscribed to this magazine for over ten years. The editors don't accept advertisements and there's only a few recipes per issue. Each one is simplified, as uncomplicated as can be, and explained in detail. I keep them close, because I love to browse them. It recently lost the founding editor Christopher Kimball so I'm nervous about its future direction.
  • Cook's Country. A similar philosphy to Cook's Illustrated with an emphasis on quicker home cooking, I've subscribed since its founding. I love the USA regional recipe discussions. The writer visits an area, tastes a specialty dish, and attempts to recreate it for the home. There's usually a sidebar with a historical overview.
  • How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. My go-to for quick recipes. I usually modify his recipes as he doesn't seem to spend as much time on the best recipe, but most are adequate for my needs.
  • The New Best Recipe from Cook's Illustrated. A collection of tested recipes. The editors go into sometimes painful detail, but the recipes are specific and they work. I learned so much about the science of cooking from this cookbook.
  • Baking Illustrated from Cook's Illustrated. Like the above cookbook, but with an emphasis on baked goods.

 

Just casually mentioned to my DH that Baking Illustrated just got added to my wish list.  Let's see if it ends up under the tree! 

 


Are books from our own shelves or from a used book store acceptable?

 

My circle of friends does a book exchange at Christmas (white elephant style) and we insist on used books.  There's such a charm to knowing someone before you had read a book. 

 


aggieamy, I haven't given up on When Christ and His Saints Slept. It's getting better, but still doesn't have the appeal of The Sunne in Splendour.

 

I'm glad I have to you pre-read books for me! 

 

I'm mostly overwhelmed these days--my days are always beyond full, then add Christmas preparations on top and I'm just sinking. Stuff gets added to my list of things to do faster than I can get anything done. So, not a lot of reading getting done. And while Secret Santa sounds lovely, I think February would be a better month for it! Can't handle one more thing in December.

 

((HUGS)) I hope things calm down.

 

Amy's birthday? I thought it was back in September. Guess you are twice as nice and twins. ;)

 

It is September!  How strange.  I don't think I want two birthdays a year ... LOL

 

Well, I now realized I finished a book before Smiley's People but forgot to write it on my list.

 

43. McNally's Gamble by Lawrence Sanders.  Set in south Florida, Archy McNally is Chief of DIscreet Inquiries at his father's law firm.  A well to do widow is encouraged to buy a Faberge egg as an investment.  Point is that she has only seen a photo of it and is supposed to give the money to the investment advisor and he will buy the egg in Paris for her at a ridiculously low price of half a million dollars while the egg is worth three million.    It had good descriptions of food and that added to my pleasure in reading this mystery.

 

Since I am leaving tomorrow night to drive to Nashville for our early morning flight to Phoenix where we are going to see our middle daughter graduate and also enjoy Phoenix and then the Grand Canyon, I stocked up with kindle books (Free prime readers) and hopefully they will keep me interested on the flights and when I have down time. 

 

I read some of the McNally books when I was a preteen/early teen and pulled them off my mom's shelves.  I remember them being a bit risque but lots of fun.  Are they risque or just to shy awkward 13 year old?

 


 

Any others want to play with Stacia's titles?

 

 

Mister Monkey Nix the First Fifteen Lives of Harry August

 

Yes Rose, Cotillion is the other one she sent me. If I end up enjoying both, I'll have to take a look at Venetia. Amy you might have made a Heyer fan out of me after all. :D

 

Yay!  That makes me so happy!

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Ok, there is no time like the present. I pulled out Cotillion out and started reading it. I actually had to tape the cover back on before I could start, it's so dusty. I remember now, it's very funny! It has a similar plot to Friday's Child, which was one of the first I ever read - the one that my mom read aloud funny excerpts from, that made me want to read GH the first place. So I always considered Cotillion a little bit of a recycled plot. But still very funny, I'm enjoying it.  If you like Cotillion you'd like Friday's Child too.  

 

These books - Cotillion, Friday's Child, Arabella, all belong to the category of the young,naive heroine - think Catherine Morland, rather than Ann Elliot.  There is another category of GH books, among them The Grand Sophy, Venetia, Frederica, Lady of Quality, which have a more mature heroine. I like the latter category better. But they are all delightful.

 

Now that is an interesting comparison.  I don't see that at all.  I'll wait until you finish your re-read and then we shall discuss! 

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Your review was interesting to read in contrast to the book I finished this morning. The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace. Author Lynn Povich was one of those who originally signed on to the lawsuit. While fashions do change, some things probably become symbols and therefore casualties of a movement. 

 

Before she gets to the late sixties and the women who eventually filed the suit, she talks about the early sixties, the Mad Men time. They were the women who lived on the cusp of huge coming social changes and they were confused. Hats and gloves may have been among the casualties.

 

-bolding in the quotes is mine

 

"We were at the tail end of the old generation," explained Jane Bryant Quinn, who worked briefly at Newsweek in the early 1960s. "We wore hats and gloves. We couldn't go to prom and parties without dates - and the men had to do the asking. We also didn't have many role models in the working world."

 

 

 

 

I've got to add this to my to-be-read list! Another book along these same lines is by the late Nan Robertson (who was my neighbor!). She wrote Girls in the Balcony - an account of women reporters at the New York Times and how they were treated. Robertson won the Pulitzer Prize for her article on toxic shock syndrome in the NYT.

 
 

All this talk of hats and gloves. I can remember wearing a hat and gloves to church on Easter Sunday when I was a little girl. I can remember my mother always having gloves, too. My brother's date at prom in 1969 wore long white gloves with her dress. And I had an elementary school teacher, who didn't allow girls to wear "dungarees" in her classroom!!  Can't remember if she meant all pants or not, but my recollection is we had to wear dresses all that year. 

 

Am going to have to Good Girls Revolt....

 

VC -- I have a very old pair of lined isotoner driving gloves in my car. Not sure if they were my mom's or not, but they are fantastic. No it doesn't get very cold in Southern California, but it is cold enough at 7am to wear gloves when I'm driving to church and need fingers functional enough to play violin!!

I remember those Easter hats and gloves as a kid! So glad we don't have to do that now!

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Has anyone read the J.R. Lover vampire books? I'm trying to decide if they would be a good gift for someone who likes vampire books.

 

Is it possible you mean the Black Dagger Brotherhood books by J. R. Ward?  I read the first few but stopped reading the series after that.  Many MANY readers love them.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Has anyone read the J.R. Lover vampire books? I'm trying to decide if they would be a good gift for someone who likes vampire books.

I read the whole series of Black Dagger Brotherhood and enjoyed them all. Fell in like with all the characters and enjoyed each individual couples story with in the whole series storyline. Mature themes involved so just as long as they like r or m rated romances as well as vampires, it would be good.

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I've been reading Ngaio Marsh's Artists in Crime... but could not get into it. This happened with one other of hers that I read recently. The story just did not draw me; the characters were not engaging, and I found myself skipping to the end... and once there, I did not believe the mechanism for how the murder happened. It's too bad since I wanted to give her another chance.

 

I've also been reading Kahlil Gibran's The Prophet. I hesitated to read it for years. As soon as I read "he was his own dawn" I liked it and wanted to read more. Now more than half-way through, I can't understand whether I think he is extremely deep and meaningful, or whether I think he is shallow and pretentious. ? It's a puzzle. I'm familiar with a middle eastern or Lebanese style, but this is not quite the same. Will keep reading to the end.

 

Also have been reading Madwoman in the Attic- what a splendid book! So much research. I am so impressed, even though I don't always agree with their conclusions. I've been inspired to read or re-read many of the works they examine: on rereading The Yellow Wallpaper, I was surprised to find that writing would have been the cure for the woman's insanity: it was her being prevented from writing that made things worse; as a teen/young adult I was influenced by Sylvia Plath to think that writing & insanity necessarily feed off each other- so rereading the Yellow Wallpaper with this new understanding was very healing!

 

Was inspired by the same book to reread Ursula Le Guin's short story The New Atlantis- so different from when I read it as a teen! The scene of the girl playing viola, the friends discussing the solar generator, the references to a 1984-type society... really very nicely done. But there are these fantastical interludes which just seem childish to me... not up to Le Guin's usual standards.

Edited by Little Nyssa
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To quote Mom-ninja: "we lost the respect we once had for staying home. Once it became a choice to stay home or work outside the home it was viewed a waste of a woman's mind and talent to stay home. I was born in the height of the change, and I was taught nothing of taking care of a home or family. I was taught that if I didn't have a career I was wasting my life. I was taught that cooking, sewing, and caring for kids was beneath me and that I could do more "valuable" things. Because of this I knew nothing when I moved out on my own. I couldn't cook. I still can't sew or knit. I believed that a career was the only worthwhile goal. This caused a lot of struggle for me."

 

I absolutely agree with this. It was just the same for me.

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I read "The Aviary" by Kathleen O'Dell. I got it from the Scholastic Book Fair in our area. I met her at a writer's conference a while ago and was happy to see her name so I grabbed the book. My 10yo read "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" again - she really likes that book. 😊

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Hey Rose, aren't you a fan of Jeanette Winterson?  She has a short story collection called Christmas Days out this month.  She talked about the book on BBC Radio 4's program Woman's Hour.  It might be your cup of tea--or is that cup of cheer?

 

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Oh, thank you! That looks great. I just ordered it, hope it will arrive before Xmas.

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