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chiguirre

WTH! Do these people not have jobs?

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My middle daughter has spent $0 since we dropped her off at college in late August. I budgeted $50 per month for her, and it sits unused. We bought about $200 of books and supplies at the beginning of the semester, and I send her some snacks from time to time. She has an unlimited meal plan, and she attends university activities which cost nothing. In an attempt to get kids not to drink, the university has great activities on the weekend with free food and giveaways.

 

She has a job as a research assistant for 10 hours per week, and she transfers every penny to my account to pay tuition payments. Other students use uber instead of the bus, because they don't want to wait or take the time, but she has become a pro at the free bus system.

 

She has an app that tells what events on campus are giving out free food, and she loads up on free t-shirts, flash drives, and pens at engineering fairs.

 

My older dd spent almost nothing her first two years, despite having an on-campus job transcribing music for the orchestra (she used that for tuition.) After this past summer, where she made a ridiculous amount per hour for a college student :D and lived rent free, she has been a little more free about eating out and traveling. She paid her own tuition this year and had plenty left over, so she feels like it's okay to spend some.

 

Neither daughter has ever spent the amount their colleges estimate for "expenses" and books. I think the article shows one side. I hope potential college parents aren't scarfed by it; if you raise them not to spend like that, they won't.

 

 

Edited by angela in ohio
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The one thing I have to say is that participating in Greek life CAN be one of the most valuable opportunities at college in terms of post-graduation networking. Maybe less so in medicine like your son, but definitely in business whom the person knows can be more important than what he/she knows. A lot of positions these days are never advertised publicly so the only way to even compete for them is to know the right people.

 

I wouldn't pay for Uber rides or Spring Break trips to Cabo but I would consider paying fraternity/sorority dues as an investment in my child's post-graduation future.

 

Whether one wants Greek life or not really depends upon the student.  My oldest (business major) son had no problem at all getting a job (using his major) prior to graduation via networking - no Greek life needed at all.  He just had to know the right connection - as with any networking.

 

Those who don't care for Greek life also won't care for the jobs that networking via Greek life brings, but there are plenty of options within the business world.

 

Even my youngest son (who is just a junior now) already has two options for jobs after he graduates.  Networking has gotten him both offers.  No Greek life at all, nor any desire for it.

 

We (parents) haven't had any hand in the networking - it's all theirs via their college connections.

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The one thing I have to say is that participating in Greek life CAN be one of the most valuable opportunities at college in terms of post-graduation networking. Maybe less so in medicine like your son, but definitely in business whom the person knows can be more important than what he/she knows. A lot of positions these days are never advertised publicly so the only way to even compete for them is to know the right people.

 

 

 

It can be a valuable opportunity to help someone get started in their field, sure, but it isn't the only opportunity. In business, after the initial post college job, contacts come from within the field and experience and talent are more important in landing the job than who your college friends were. Even if you know people, if you don't have a good professional reputation, you aren't going to find out about the good jobs through contacts. The more highly someone is regarded in their field, they are necessarily stingier about recommending people apply for jobs and providing references. After all, their professional reputation is at stake, so they aren't going to be putting in a good word for the random sorority sister/fraternity brother that calls them looking for openings. 

 

Internships and professional organizations provide opportunities for college students to prove their talent in their fields, and that includes business fields as well. In the face of that, Greek organizations are falling lower and lower on the priority list of many students. 

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Well, I hope Greek life isn't all that important as DS chose not to pledge this year. He's remaining independent.

 

Then again, I've struggled with FT employment my entire adult life. Maybe I should have joined a sorority instead of Phi Beta Kappa.

 

Edited:

I guess this is something else to add to the list to worry and fret over. Not only did my kids chose majors that require grad school for well-paying employment but neither went Greek. 

Edited by Scoutermom

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The one thing I have to say is that participating in Greek life CAN be one of the most valuable opportunities at college in terms of post-graduation networking. Maybe less so in medicine like your son, but definitely in business whom the person knows can be more important than what he/she knows. A lot of positions these days are never advertised publicly so the only way to even compete for them is to know the right people.

I'm quoting this because I wanted to point out that Crimson Wife said that Greek life CAN be valuable for networking. She did not say it was the ONLY path to obtaining employment in business or elsewhere. Just that it CAN be valuable. There are many ways to network. And, I think any of those ways tends to diminish in value the further removed one gets from that first job.

 

My dh was Greek. Had nothing to do with his getting his first job. My alma mater doesn't even have Greeks! It's just one way to network.

Edited by Hoggirl
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It can be a valuable opportunity to help someone get started in their field, sure, but it isn't the only opportunity. In business, after the initial post college job, contacts come from within the field and experience and talent are more important in landing the job than who your college friends were.

 

Actually, we've found that the first job straight out of college/grad school was the easiest to land because recruiting was done via the campus career services office. The higher-level jobs are the ones that are not openly advertised but found through one's network. Experience, talent, and education are necessary but not sufficient. There are tons of similarly talented and well-educated professionals all competing for the same handful of positions. The difference between getting referred to the hiring manager or not can and often does boil down to things like being members of the same Greek organization.

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  Maybe I should have joined a sorority instead of Phi Beta Kappa. 

 

You do realize that they are not mutually exclusive organizations? Several of my sorority sisters were PBK and one was a Rhodes Scholarship finalist.

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Ds has an award that pays for room/board, but because he's not in a dorm this year they just gave him the meal-plan amount in cash. He feels rich, and is determined to eat as cheaply as possible. Every once in a while I'll get these strange texts saying things like "found that 7-11 has ginormous burritos for only $2!...spent the afternoon reading a book on the toilet." " got a huge box of day old donuts cheap. Ate them all day, then tossed out the rest for the birds. Now have several pigeons staring at me outside my window."

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Experience, talent, and education are necessary but not sufficient. There are tons of similarly talented and well-educated professionals all competing for the same handful of positions. The difference between getting referred to the hiring manager or not can and often does boil down to things like being members of the same Greek organization.

 

Your world is definitely different than mine.  Networking remains the same, but IME, it boils down to what one has done and how good their people skills are - not any organization.  Oldest son is on his second (better) job post college.  It required a move.  He got it due to who he knew from his previous job (and college).  Hubby often gets headhunters calling him - all due to what he's done.  His name gets passed to them from folks happy with his work, not any organization he happened to belong to in college.

 

IME college provides networking opportunities, along with the education.  The specifics of what one does in college (extra curricular giving one extra contacts) isn't that important, but that supposes one is doing what they can in their field - making contacts with profs via labs or TA or whatever - as well as friends they make (who have their own contacts they share).

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You do realize that they are not mutually exclusive organizations? Several of my sorority sisters were PBK and one was a Rhodes Scholarship finalist.

Yes, I realize that.

 

I simply stated I chose one over the other. Actually, sororities were never an option because I attended an all women's college that didn't offer Greek life.

 

Edited: Now that I've gone back and read the rest of the thread, I would like to add to my post. The part of your (Crimsonwife) post that Creekland quoted, those first few words about what is or is not sufficient...that's what I was thinking about. I think there is more to employment and success than just earning a college degree, academic honors, leadership, etc. I think both you and Creekland are correct. It comes down to talent, ability, people skills, and who is in your network. I think being in a sorority and listing that on a resume (do people do that? I honestly don't know) would be just like listing if one is an Eagle Scout. It probably opens doors with the right person.

 

I apologize to those who thought I was demeaning the sorority experience. That's not what I meant at all.

 

Edited Edited: I think this conversation is an indication of how convoluted job seeking really is. There is no formula that will guarantee success. What works for one person will not work for another. I think the best we can do for our children is provide educational and growth opportunities, give them a strong foundation in knowing who they are, and encourage good social skills.

Edited by Scoutermom
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Your world is definitely different than mine. Networking remains the same, but IME, it boils down to what one has done and how good their people skills are - not any organization. Oldest son is on his second (better) job post college. It required a move. He got it due to who he knew from his previous job (and college). Hubby often gets headhunters calling him - all due to what he's done. His name gets passed to them from folks happy with his work, not any organization he happened to belong to in college.

 

IME college provides networking opportunities, along with the education. The specifics of what one does in college (extra curricular giving one extra contacts) isn't that important, but that supposes one is doing what they can in their field - making contacts with profs via labs or TA or whatever - as well as friends they make (who have their own contacts they share).

Yep, it's a sad world where getting a job could all depend on which club you belonged to. I know it's common in certain areas, but it still is disgusting.

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Edited Edited: I think this conversation is an indication of how convoluted job seeking really is.

This past year I had been seeing internships and jobs postings in my Facebook closed groups. One of the closed groups is actually for local expats and being expats lots of networking events get posted. Before Facebook, I received job postings by friends and acquaintances in my closed groups emailing lists. So convoluted as it is, job seeking is also about who your relatives know.

 

There is no sorority at my alma mater. I was however a pub crawler with my law, medicine, dentistry undergraduate friends. I get discounts when I needed their service years later. Most of the time they paid for me too as I was the only female and my drinks cost more as they were mostly non alcoholic (designated caller for backup drivers, we had friends who would study until 2am and come drive us back to dorm after a 2:30 am supper). Most of my cousins are business owners and it is all about networking. I learned about lobbying for govt contracts from the cradle from my cousins and uncles.

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THat list strikes me very odd.

 

The required costs, like the fee to the sports center, were always right on the expenses listed by the university.

 

And what person doesn't realize they need to budget for pocket money for pizza, clothes, or trips home if you want them?  Those are just things everyone will need money for.

 

A lot of the things they list were totally unnecessary - people do not need to have terms overseas.  I had friends at university that didn't go home for breaks to save.  These are things that should be budgeted for if there is money.

 

I worked throughout university.  I had an on-campus reception job at about 10 hours a week, and usually a second job too - I was a hotdog vendor, I worked in a pizza shop, I worked in a bakery, in a doctors office.

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I find it odd that nobody has spoken to the kid about a budget.

I found this article both horrifying and fascinating:

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/colleges-hidden-costs-what-the-admissions-office-doesnt-tell-you/2016/11/25/5531a0e8-b02a-11e6-be1c-8cec35b1ad25_story.html?wpisrc=nl_rainbow&wpmm=1

 

I was a pretty pampered kid. I didn't work during high school per my parents' wishes and they gave me money for any outing that I wanted to go on. But, I got a job by the second week at college and funded my own eating out, school sweatshirt and off campus parties. I even bought my own Amtrak tickets home. I didn't have work study, but there was never a shortage of on campus or near campus jobs available even without financial aid. Is this no longer true? Are kids not able to earn their own spending money? Do jobs require that you work at least 20 hours a week instead of 10? Or do parents discourage work because it might interfere with grades?

 

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I find it odd that nobody has spoken to the kid about a budget.

 

IME, college has been a great place to truly learn about budgeting.  Food & lodging are covered.  We pay for books and travel home.  My guys figure out how to make their paycheck cover all other wants/needs.  They learn to find inexpensive options and/or that not all wants are needs.  They also learn that the more they earn, the more they can spend.  As a bonus, they learn how to start saving if they want something larger.

 

Granted, they started this some at home, but once on their own covering more expenses and having unlimited choices out there with no mom & dad looking over their shoulder, they learn how to really set limits.

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I find it odd that nobody has spoken to the kid about a budget.

Yes. My kids started learning at home. Among other things, we don't pay for social activities at home so they haven't asked at school.

 

We did have an issue with ds running through his meal plan. Dh added money, but the next break he had a chat with ds about paying attention to meal plan dollars. Ds was going to the closest fast kiosk. The cafeteria gives more food on a swipe than the convenient kiosks. So, ds figured out how to watch that. Ds also goes to various campus ministry weekly events. Ds is not religious, but he says the Methodists have the best food.

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I wonder how many parents and kids are a bit shocked by food service costs because their kids have been getting subsidized school lunch? Here, a full pay, not reduced, school lunch is only about $3/day, and breakfast is free, largely because of USDA subsidies that keep the costs low. In comparison, at our local college a buffet style, all you can eat meal is $15 if you don't have a meal plan. Food court choices (chick-fil-a, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, etc) are comparable to what you'd pay at restaurants.

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I wonder how many parents and kids are a bit shocked by food service costs because their kids have been getting subsidized school lunch? Here, a full pay, not reduced, school lunch is only about $3/day, and breakfast is free, largely because of USDA subsidies that keep the costs low. In comparison, at our local college a buffet style, all you can eat meal is $15 if you don't have a meal plan. Food court choices (chick-fil-a, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, etc) are comparable to what you'd pay at restaurants.

 

I don't think so. Anyone who has a teen boy knows their supermarket bill hurts, whether or not they are getting five meals a week at school. That ought to translate into "kid is going to have to eat at college and it's going to cost."

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I wonder how many parents and kids are a bit shocked by food service costs because their kids have been getting subsidized school lunch?

My hubby and other exchange students from my alma mater (not US) were shocked that meal plans were compulsory and costly at the U.S. and Canadian universities hosting them. Meal plans are not compulsory where we were from even if you stay at university dorms. He did his exchange program in 1996 but still remember meal plan as a rip off. He ended up selling meals sometimes and getting the maximum refund allowed back at the end of the semester.

The exchange students in my cohort all can cook or heat up microwave meals. So grocery shopping was cheaper than the meal plan. My nephew finished his exchange program at Georgia Tech in June. He can cook very well for cheaper than meal plan.

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We were surprised costs were so high because the workers are mostly min wage students with no benefits, and the volume of meals should mean volume discounts on bulk purchase. Instead its stadium pricing. One can eat a grocery store hot lunch and do much better for less.

.

My sons did sports in high school. They brown bagged to get the nutrients they needed so they could last through practice. People that did not brown bag bought two lunches.

Edited by Heigh Ho

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  I think being in a sorority and listing that on a resume (do people do that? I honestly don't know) would be just like listing if one is an Eagle Scout. It probably opens doors with the right person.

 

 

College leadership positions typically go on the resume at the beginning of someone's career and get left off later. At this point, neither my DH's nor my resumes list the fact that we were officers in our fraternity/sorority chapters.

 

Regular membership without holding an office most likely wouldn't go on the resume.

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Yep, it's a sad world where getting a job could all depend on which club you belonged to. I know it's common in certain areas, but it still is disgusting.

 

It's fairer than nepotism since anyone can participate in Rush and most of those who do will wind up getting a bid from SOME chapter (colleges that have too many Rushees left bidless generally invite additional organizations to colonize at the school). The individual can't pick his/her parents but he/she can decide whether to participate in Rush and whether to accept a bid.

 

You want to get disgusted by something? Get disgusted by the fact that the difference between keeping a job and having it eliminated in a company restructuring can come down to whose daddy is CEO of a major client :glare:

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My hubby and other exchange students from my alma mater (not US) were shocked that meal plans were compulsory and costly at the U.S. and Canadian universities hosting them. Meal plans are not compulsory where we were from even if you stay at university dorms. He did his exchange program in 1996 but still remember meal plan as a rip off. He ended up selling meals sometimes and getting the maximum refund allowed back at the end of the semester.

The exchange students in my cohort all can cook or heat up microwave meals. So grocery shopping was cheaper than the meal plan. My nephew finished his exchange program at Georgia Tech in June. He can cook very well for cheaper than meal plan.

 

I think they are usually compulsory because to keep costs down, they need to sell a certain amount of plans.

 

I wonder what the cost per meal comes out to for most?  It doesn't make sense to me that they should be so much more expensive than cooking for oneself.  While you are paying people (badly) to do the washing up and cooking, I would think there would be a lot of efficiencies in buying and cooking in larger amounts.

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The only thing that I think is unavoidable, for some, is that boys can often eat a lot more than allotted by the meal plan. Basically they can go broke on food really easily, even if its not good food. My brother had that problem EVERY SEMESTER in college. He'd only have about 75% of what he needed. He says he'd look for the skinniest girl there and start dating her, and she'd buy him lunch since she was losing most of the money at the end of the semester anyway. Sometimes I try to convince myself he is joking. 

 

Nice thing about the plan I had was it was all you can eat.  They did not limit it. 

 

I don't see how I could have really managed without it because I think the only thing within walking distance was a Dunkin Donuts.  We weren't even allowed to have a microwave in our dorm room either.  So what would I have eaten?  Donuts everyday? 

 

My broke friends who went without also tended to have cars.  So I guess they chose to have a car rather than buy the meal plan.  They also had to live off campus to have a car because we weren't allowed to have a car for the first two years (unless we paid to park it elsewhere).

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I think they are usually compulsory because to keep costs down, they need to sell a certain amount of plans.

 

I wonder what the cost per meal comes out to for most?  It doesn't make sense to me that they should be so much more expensive than cooking for oneself.  While you are paying people (badly) to do the washing up and cooking, I would think there would be a lot of efficiencies in buying and cooking in larger amounts.

 

The meal plan we had was quite expensive, but I ate better than I had my entire life up until that point.  They had really really good food.  Tons of choices.  They had a huge salad bar.  I remember eating some dishes and wondering what that fantastic thing was.  And then I'd figure out wow...these herb things...rosemary...and stuff are so tasty! 

 

And you know the freshman 15 stuff...I actually lost weight.  I wasn't overweight to begin with, but I think the good food improved my health. 

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The meal plan we had was quite expensive, but I ate better than I had my entire life up until that point.  They had really really good food.  Tons of choices.  They had a huge salad bar.  I remember eating some dishes and wondering what that fantastic thing was.  And then I'd figure out wow...these herb things...rosemary...and stuff are so tasty! 

 

The food at DD's school is really bad. She ate much much better at home, and is eating much better now again that she moved off campus and is cooking.

 

One reason schools require meal plans is probably to make sure students do have access to food.

For most students, cooking is not an option since dorm rooms do not have kitchens and often do not allow microwaves either.

Plus, time. During a busy quarter, DD had barely time to make it to the dining hall for a meal - she would not have had any time to shop and cook.  So, I see why there are meal plans. If only the food were not so abysmal - DD spent a lot of money eating off campus because of the low quality of the food. (And bugs and foreign metal objects in food are not exactly an endorsement either.)

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I wonder what the cost per meal comes out to for most? It doesn't make sense to me that they should be so much more expensive than cooking for oneself. While you are paying people (badly) to do the washing up and cooking, I would think there would be a lot of efficiencies in buying and cooking in larger amounts.

At GATech which my nephew went for an exchange program this year, the cheapest supposedly comes up to $6.25 per meal https://www.gatechdining.com/dining-plans/index.html

 

At U of Waterloo where hubby was, the village meal plan is $2200 but there is no all you can eat. When we visited in October, a meal portion each for my preteen kids would cost around $8. The dining services also take away half the amount of the meal plan upfront for overheads.

"Why is half of my meal plan money gone?

 

We need to pay for things like utilities, labour, repairs, and renovations – in order to do so, we take 50% of your meal plan dollars upfront to cover these costs.

In return, you receive a 50% reduction off all food purchases. So, if a sandwich costs $6.00, when you go to pay for it, you only pay $3.00 at the register.

Because of this reduction, you still get the full value of your meal plan dollars, however the discount only applies in the term you purchase the meal plan for. " https://uwaterloo.ca/food-services/meal-plans/village-1-v1-and-ron-edyt-village-rev

 

My relatives and friends are used to cooking for themselves from an early age due to being picky eaters. The university dorms I stayed in had a full service kitchen per floor/level, portable electric stove, microwave, gas stove, refrigerators, so cooking was convenient and economical.

Edited by Arcadia

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My relatives and friends are used to cooking for themselves from an early age due to being picky eaters. The university dorms I stayed in had a full service kitchen per floor/level, portable electric stove, microwave, gas stove, refrigerators, so cooking was convenient and economical.

 

 

my dorm 30 years ago had a full service kitchen on the first floor. I think all the dorms did. The dorms my kids are in do not. Cooking for themselves is not an option. 

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We discourage anything that isn't flexible and limited in terms of work. This is because our guys have GPA based merit aid and that money is way more than a campus job is going to provide. They do tutoring and some TA work which is very flexible.

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My guys have had decent food.  We tend to eat with them in their dining halls sometimes when we visit because the food options are plentiful (esp with younger two - not quite as much where oldest went) and reasonably priced compared to eating out.

 

Personally, I like when dining halls offer decent food with plenty of options and I prefer if their employees are paid well, so I'm not a complainer about cost in that area.  My kids don't have to take time to shop, cook, or clean up and that leaves them time to participate in other activities or studying while still getting decent nutrition.

 

Whether this happens or not will depend upon the school and what they offer, of course.  We've lucked out.  

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My son chose to live in a dorm freshman year that didn't require a meal plan.  His floor had a kitchen, and he had a fridge in his room that he kept stocked with fruit and breakfast items.  He still ate often in the dining halls - the selection and quality of food was great and the dining halls are "all you can eat", so they are a very economical choice for him.

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My college had a meal plan that was three meals a day, but you could eat as much as you wanted.  The food was ok - some things better than others. Breakfast was great, the salad bar was good, some other meals were a little blah.

 

There was one kitchen for the women's residence and one for the men's residences, but they weren't especially well equipped.

 

They have changed it now, you can get a plan that includes fewer meals per week, and it can be used toward meals at other places on campus - food places that have contracts like Subway or Tim Hortons.

 

I suspect that it's more expensive though.  And it always seems to be a temptation for students to get the cheaper pplans to save money.

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We supplement ds's food plan because his scheduling is such that he can not always eat when the dining commons is open. He actually due to this has not had much bang for the buck and is doing a lot of cooking in the dorm kitchen.

 

He and four other friends are going to go with the smallest meal plan they can next semester and pool cooking skills/share clean up. I do think that if they are mature about it and diligent, they will eat better and save some money. We will see how it goes.

 

As for "the LA Lifestyle" oh just NOOOOOOOOO! I am with SWB on this and wish I could like her post. Big merit money or stay in state. And for highet cost in state schools, merit money still better be sought. The kids have been great though. We have never had an issue, complaint, or inappropriate request.

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So Regentrude, the food is still really bad.  There were so many days when I would just eat salad and bread for lunch and dinner.  I wasn't so worried about those two foods.

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My middle daughter has spent $0 since we dropped her off at college in late August. I budgeted $50 per month for her, and it sits unused. We bought about $200 of books and supplies at the beginning of the semester, and I send her some snacks from time to time. She has an unlimited meal plan, and she attends university activities which cost nothing. In an attempt to get kids not to drink, the university has great activities on the weekend with free food and giveaways.

 

She has a job as a research assistant for 10 hours per week, and she transfers every penny to my account to pay tuition payments. Other students use uber instead of the bus, because they don't want to wait or take the time, but she has become a pro at the free bus system.

 

She has an app that tells what events on campus are giving out free food, and she loads up on free t-shirts, flash drives, and pens at engineering fairs.

 

My older dd spent almost nothing her first two years, despite having an on-campus job transcribing music for the orchestra (she used that for tuition.) After this past summer, where she made a ridiculous amount per hour for a college student :D and lived rent free, she has been a little more free about eating out and traveling. She paid her own tuition this year and had plenty left over, so she feels like it's okay to spend some.

 

Neither daughter has ever spent the amount their colleges estimate for "expenses" and books. I think the article shows one side. I hope potential college parents aren't scarfed by it; if you raise them not to spend like that, they won't.

Shampoo? Toothpaste? I don't see how one can pay zero, although I guess you could have paid earlier and thus not need to pay now.

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The one thing I have to say is that participating in Greek life CAN be one of the most valuable opportunities at college in terms of post-graduation networking. Maybe less so in medicine like your son, but definitely in business whom the person knows can be more important than what he/she knows. A lot of positions these days are never advertised publicly so the only way to even compete for them is to know the right people.

 

I wouldn't pay for Uber rides or Spring Break trips to Cabo but I would consider paying fraternity/sorority dues as an investment in my child's post-graduation future.

This is the first I've heard of Greek life being a factor in employment.

I have to say before starting reading here I didn't know what Greek life was. Well besides Monsters University. :) This must be specific to undergrad recruiting. I will ask DH who has hired undergrads before and hires interns each summer if he sees these things on a resume. I can't imagine honestly, but you learn everyday!

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This is the first I've heard of Greek life being a factor in employment.

I have to say before starting reading here I didn't know what Greek life was. Well besides Monsters University. :) This must be specific to undergrad recruiting. I will ask DH who has hired undergrads before and hires interns each summer if he sees these things on a resume. I can't imagine honestly, but you learn everyday!

 

Before my son joined a fraternity, my only knowledge of Greek life was from Animal House.  I wonder if the connections CW is referring to would even require that a resume be submitted. 

 

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There are quite a lot of people in charge of hiring who are not Greek connected. Most people are not. It's really about building a network. Greek life is one aspect that can help with that network, but it's not overwhelmingly required.

 

My brother heads a small firm. He looks at schools attended. However, after he'd had a few graduates of a nationally recognized engineering school, he completely wrote anyone from that school off. He did the same for one of the military academies. He's really been impressed with a regional school that is not so recognized in engineering. He thinks it's like an underdog thing. The school and the students are try harder to be good in the field because they do have the top dog name. He doesn't consider Greek involvement at all.

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Before my son joined a fraternity, my only knowledge of Greek life was from Animal House. I wonder if the connections CW is referring to would even require that a resume be submitted.

 

I asked DH and he says he has seen it listed. I don't think it's making the resume stand out with my particular sample of one, but as you say, perhaps these connections are the sort a resume is not needed. Not our world :)

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There are quite a lot of people in charge of hiring who are not Greek connected. Most people are not. It's really about building a network. Greek life is one aspect that can help with that network, but it's not overwhelmingly required.

 

My brother heads a small firm. He looks at schools attended. However, after he'd had a few graduates of a nationally recognized engineering school, he completely wrote anyone from that school off. He did the same for one of the military academies. He's really been impressed with a regional school that is not so recognized in engineering. He thinks it's like an underdog thing. The school and the students are try harder to be good in the field because they do have the top dog name. He doesn't consider Greek involvement at all.

 

I agree.  There are many ways to accomplish that network building.  

 

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There are quite a lot of people in charge of hiring who are not Greek connected. Most people are not. It's really about building a network. Greek life is one aspect that can help with that network, but it's not overwhelmingly required.

 

My brother heads a small firm. He looks at schools attended. However, after he'd had a few graduates of a nationally recognized engineering school, he completely wrote anyone from that school off. He did the same for one of the military academies. He's really been impressed with a regional school that is not so recognized in engineering. He thinks it's like an underdog thing. The school and the students are try harder to be good in the field because they do have the top dog name. He doesn't consider Greek involvement at all.

 

Same here.  Engineering firms (locally) have their favored schools for new hires - and they have those they don't like.  Once one is on the job, they are judged by what they've done, but to get that first job... school (can) matter - just not in a US News Top Whatever sort of way.

 

In college, any connection one makes can help with future networking.  My two guys who have jobs (one working, one with promised jobs), it's been by entirely networking - no resume needed.  As mentioned before, neither have been Greek.  They've just made some really good connections.  My other guy is heading to med school... connections might help him get in there too (in combination with all he has done).  We're still waiting to see.  Greek life isn't a factor.

 

There are many factors that go into life.  For some, Greek is one of those, but if Greek isn't "your" student, they certainly don't need to make it work to succeed.  Make connections via what they like (profs, labs, internships, clubs, etc) and they're more likely to end up in a job they like too.

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My ds is a freshman business major and he always has a mind toward networking.  He attends any panel or event hosted by the business department and any other similar events he is able to.  He was thinking of a fraternity basically because they pitched him the networking angle.  He decided that he would do better in that regard to get on the alumni relations board.  He interviewed for that and was chosen.

 

I agree there are lots of ways to network.  When I was in college I was around the athletic department alot and I actually saw that the athletes had a pretty good network.  They met the parents of other athletes and the regular fans that attended all the events. It seemed lots of opportunities came from that which had nothing to do with sports.

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My ds is a freshman business major and he always has a mind toward networking.  He attends any panel or event hosted by the business department and any other similar events he is able to.  He was thinking of a fraternity basically because they pitched him the networking angle.  He decided that he would do better in that regard to get on the alumni relations board.  He interviewed for that and was chosen.

 

I agree there are lots of ways to network.  When I was in college I was around the athletic department alot and I actually saw that the athletes had a pretty good network.  They met the parents of other athletes and the regular fans that attended all the events. It seemed lots of opportunities came from that which had nothing to do with sports.

When my middle son was going through the recruiting process, this was one of the benefits that one of the Ivy schools he spoke with mentioned.  They have a mentoring program where every athlete is assigned a mentor in his field of study at the beginning of freshman year.  The athlete and the mentor remain in frequent contact during the college years and the athlete is guaranteed a job in his field upon graduation. 

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The ability to gain Networking opportunities in college (if one pursues them) is a huge one in the "pro" column for various campuses IME.  If one just goes to classes and nothing else, they will still get a degree, but they can miss out on so much.  

 

Be active.  Attend things.  Work with people/profs.

 

And with it all, be sure to have honed people skills/tact or the networking will have its limits.

 

I always recommend a Public Speaking class for high schoolers.  Kids don't just learn public speaking, they learn a ton about body language, how things are perceived, and general tact.  That info is as useful as pretty much anything academic when it comes to real life.

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In a big school, I think one of the problems people have making connections can be that there are just too many people.  Big classes without the same people much makes it hard to meet people.  So finding a smaller pool can help with that.  My college had only about 1000 students altogether, and noone ever joined a sorority or fraternity - it was already a very intimate atmosphere - you always know someone who knows someone.

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In a big school, I think one of the problems people have making connections can be that there are just too many people.  Big classes without the same people much makes it hard to meet people.  So finding a smaller pool can help with that.  My college had only about 1000 students altogether, and noone ever joined a sorority or fraternity - it was already a very intimate atmosphere - you always know someone who knows someone.

 

There are pros and cons.  Both types of schools can work, so again, matching the student can work well rather than trying to make something not ideal fit.  

 

At larger schools there's a wider variety of people (with their expertise) to know - esp profs who can be connected through research, etc.  If one likes a smaller school (as two of mine have), it's important to be sure the fit is good - esp if looking for research or expertise connections.

 

Not all need research, of course.  My oldest didn't want it.  He's enjoyed his business connections though.

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The meal plan we had was quite expensive, but I ate better than I had my entire life up until that point.  They had really really good food.  Tons of choices.  They had a huge salad bar.  I remember eating some dishes and wondering what that fantastic thing was.  And then I'd figure out wow...these herb things...rosemary...and stuff are so tasty! 

 

And you know the freshman 15 stuff...I actually lost weight.  I wasn't overweight to begin with, but I think the good food improved my health. 

 

This is my second dd. She was describing one good meal a few weeks ago, and I realize she was talking about Duck a l'Orange! That's what they had for dinner. :D Another night they had Cracker Barrel catered in (it was Jim Harbaugh theme night, and apparently that's his favorite meal.) The dining plan is fantastic.

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My kids have all worked during college, full-time in the summer, and part-time during the school year.  Their school year work hours varied, but they always earned their own spending money no matter what.  So, we paid for tuition, dorm, and food plan, and they paid for nearly everything else.  For my dd who is currently in college, all three of her roommates also have part-time jobs.  The city she is in probably has about 10 colleges total, and it really seems like anyone who wants to work part-time to earn a little spending money actually could find something there.  

 

But, she is very careful about spending money.  She's quite frugal.

 

I could see though that some students with especially rigorous schedules might not have extra time to work during the school year.  That hasn't been the case so far with my kids.

 

My dd in college has a part-time job now that sometimes gets her back to campus late at night.  When she returns with other students, they just take the light rail together.  But I've told her that if she ever has to return alone, to take a Lyft or Uber, which yes, is charged to our account.  She ends up needing to do that a few times during the school year.

 

Of course if she was ever stranded there over the holidays and the cafeteria was closed or other unusual situations, we'd step in and help.  But, she also has a sister and other relatives who live nearby, so she has lots of fall-back options.

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