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So nervous about traveling internationally


lovinmyboys
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An opportunity came up for Dh to go to Germany for 3 months for work. The kids (4 boys age 4-10) and I can go with him, but we have to pay our way. I immediately said yes, but now I am so anxious about it. I don't know anything about living in a different country. I'll be able to figure it out, right?

 

I know we need passports and plane tickets. I'm planning to pack light and just buy anything we need there. I have to figure out how to buy the stuff (can I just use my current credit card?) Can we FaceTime the US with our phones with wifi? I feel so ridiculous that I don't know this stuff...

 

And I hate flying.

 

Please tell me that this is going to be great and we won't regret it. Also, I am open to any suggestions for making it great.

Edited by lovinmyboys
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It will be a great experience. Most speak some English (I have a family member there). Yes, you can FaceTime anywhere there is wifi. It takes a couple months to get passports unless you pay a fee to expedite.

 

Airberlin has really reasonably priced flights and flies in to many major cities. You will have a great time.

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You'll be fine, especially in a country like Germany. You can use your credit card there, although European cards use a chip and pin so it takes a little longer to process US cards that need a chip and signature. But it's not a problem.

 

I truly dread flying (motion sickness), but it's always worth it and over quickly. Packing light is a good idea, but do take some things for your kids to do while you're getting settled. Getting your stuff from the airport to wherever you're staying won't be easy, probably, but you just have to do it once.

 

What a great opportunity! Getting ready to go can be stressful, but then you're in Germany and it will be wonderful. Keep your eyes on the prize.

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Oh - it's going to be great!  That time will go so fast.  :)  Super jealous.  I was in Italy over the summer and it was fabulous.  We had super fast turn over on passports, but I would not delay and get them ASAP.  Check the paper work carefully - lots of hoops and BOTH parents and the child need to be present to apply.  Yes, you should be able to use wifi just like at home.  You may want to look into a reasonablely priced phone plan that will work over there too.  My phone would only work on the wifi in Europe.  But I skyped and e-mailed with people daily. 

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- get your passports done as soon as possible. Christmas season ramp up for passport applications usually start by now.

- get a few travel plug adaptors

e.g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B012VNTYNW

https://www.amazon.com/VCT-VP-109-Universal-Grounded-Netherlands/dp/B001ISR9B6

 

Your credit cards would work. You could get a credit card pin from the issuing bank. Citibank does issue a pin for their credit cards on request. FaceTime would work.

Depending on your clothes sizes, it might be easy or hard to get clothes your size. I had to buy outerwear from the kids dept in Germany, Paris, Switzerland because I am smaller size than my DS11.

 

Also read up on the VAT refund. Our tour guide help us with it but it's not hard to DIY. You just have to have the correct documentation. We processed and received the refund at the airport.

https://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/individuals/travelling/travellers-leaving-eu/guide-vat-refund-visitors-eu_en

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It will be great. And you will only regret it if you expect it to conform to your demands of what a "good place" looks like. If you're prepared to meet it on its terms as "different" without a good/bad judgement you will be fine. Germany worked just fine before you got there, and it's important to remember that when you come up against things that seem difficult or awkward to you! Don't EVER say, or even think, as one lady once did to me in relation to local norms "Well, I know it's their country, but I'm an American" - this will not make you universally adored :-)

 

Moving overseas is stressful, but you'll have the best of it, as you know it's not long term. You get to enjoy the honeymoon, without the irritations of the marriage!

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My friend, his wife and his daughter and son enjoyed many trips to Lego Deutschland while he was outstation there. His kids went to preschool there and picked up German from zero to proficient. For three months, you could treat it as language immersion by just staying there.

https://www.legoland.de

 

I don't know when you are going but if it is soon, the Christmas markets are lovely.

http://www.germany.travel/en/specials/christmas/christmas.html?gclid=CMTvxfacjtACFcdhfgodNUYLMg#!/event/search/category/christmas

 

We like blackforest cake, laugenbroetchen, laugenbrezel, pork knuckle (Schweinshaxe), chestnuts and others. Luckily we didn't gain much weight :lol:

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It will be a great experience. Most speak some English (I have a family member there). Yes, you can FaceTime anywhere there is wifi. It takes a couple months to get passports unless you pay a fee to expedite.

 

Airberlin has really reasonably priced flights and flies in to many major cities. You will have a great time.

 

Actually dh just got his passport and it took less than 3 weeks without expedited service. But if you know you are going, it would be good to start now since you need pics for everyone and fill out passport forms.

 

Most people your age will speak some degree of English in Germany. Basic dictionary or online translation service should suffice if you are stumped by something.

3 months is great - either you will be happy to leave or be sad it was so short...good opportunity to check out another country.

 

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You'll have the time of your life!  You'll feel so comfortable there by the end of your 3 months.  Germany is efficient and easy to maneuver.  We charge a lot when we travel because it's so easy  (I mean, rather than paying for everything with cash), and we have a credit card that doesn't charge conversion fees.  That's something you can look into.  It's also easy to get cash with your ATM card.  You may need to notify your credit card company and your ATM/bank that you're traveling so they don't block your account.  (Just in case they do -- which sometimes happens when you're in a different country -- you should make sure you have their phone numbers with you so you can call them.)

 

Your boys will be having so much fun on the flight over, that you won't even notice that you're nervous anymore.  I love flying!  

 

And yes, you can FaceTime with your phone in wifi areas there.  My phone also allows me to have regular phone use while abroad for an extra $2.00/day.  

 

You'll be able to get everything you need over there, so you don't need to worry about too much.  However, if there are certain over-the-counter meds you like, I've often found that it's easier to bring them than buy them in a different country.  I've been surprised at how meds I use here (like our favorite cold medicines, etc.) are not always available in other countries, or if they are, it is under a completely different name.  And if you use a daily prescription for anything, you can usually get enough to last 90 days, at least.  (We often get them for a full three-months at a time to cover a long trip.)

 

Have a great time!!

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Ok thanks! I know there is no real reason to be nervous. I think I just get nervous doing new things in a new place while also taking care of the kids. I posted on here about being nervous taking them to Chicago by myself, and that trip was wonderful.

 

I am so excited about going to Germany, but I just feel like I don't know what I am doing. I'm sure I will figure it out once we are there.

 

Another random question: my kids live in athletic clothes. Is that ok? Should I plan on buying them clothes there? Do people care what kids wear?

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In my experience, Europe is a great place to take your kids.  In most places, you will find someone who speaks good English.  Folks in Europe are tolerant of kids (it varies from country to country, but it's not worse than the USA). You will be able to easily travel to the other nearby countries via train.  Your kids will gain valuable cultural literacy.  Enjoy!

 

Funny thing about kids and travel.  Mine have done a lot, and they tend to groan before we leave because "sightseeing is boring."  But one day we were at the airport for a different reason, and my kids commented that they loved the smell and that airports are among their favorite places.  So that tells you something.  :)

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So jealous!  While there are lots of experts here at the WTM forums, if you have specific questions, I know there are other Internet forums dedicated to helping ex-pats.  You may want to check those out for suggestions and ideas.  I'm sure three months will fly by.  One thing I'd plan for is inter-European travel -- Because it is so easy, I'd also be planning side-trips to France, Italy, etc.  

 

I'd also use the trip as an excuse to do crash immersion German language training for your boys.  While you can easily get by without speaking a word of German, it is much more polite and fun to try to learn at least some bits of the native language and culture.

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One thing I'd plan for is inter-European travel -- Because it is so easy, I'd also be planning side-trips to France, Italy, etc.

 

Seat61 is an invaluable website for train travel. The Germany page includes a 'beginners guide' to local train travel that you might find helpful:

http://www.seat61.com/Germany.htm

 

ExpatWoman is the new global incarnation of ExpatMum, a website I used when we lived in the Middle East. Their Germany page is here: http://www.expatwoman.com/germany.aspx

Edited by nd293
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With credit cards and devices that can be plugged in with a simple adapter (I remember the days of worrying my American laptop was going to overheat and die with an elaborate gerry-rigged system of power adapters when I lived in China), it's really so much easier these days. It will be an adventure.

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Please go!  It will a life experience you'll always remember and talk about - a fantastic family memory! And, once you see that you can do it you;ll keep on traveling.....  My 11yo dd went to Australia and New Zealand last year with dh for work and it was just an all around great trip. Travel with kids is just so worth it!

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Another random question: my kids live in athletic clothes. Is that ok? Should I plan on buying them clothes there? Do people care what kids wear?

 

Nobody cares. German kids wear athletic clothing or jeans and T shirts. Especially since you won't be sending them to school if you're only there for such a  short time, I would not worry about clothes.

Make sure they have decent shoes though in which they can walk. You'll be doing a lot of walking and using public transit.

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It would be criminal for you guys to NOT go.  Get the passports now.  

 

I would load up e-reader with reading material if you want to continue reading books in English in your downtime.  The English print books are expensive.  I've heard that there are some things you can download in America but not there.  

 

Next start researching places for weekend trips.   My absolute favorite is Roteburg ab der Tauber.  That is where German's go to look at old buildings.  The museum is in my top 10 favorite museums in the world.   

 

You might check into buying a prepaid SIM card for use over there.  Their phone service is much cheaper.  

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Wrt credit cards, it might depend. Visa and Mastercard should work just fine (and I think American Express), but some of the less ordinary ones may or may not work (we're going to The Netherlands in a couple of weeks, and best I can tell Discover won't work). Of course, NL is not Germany, but you might want to google the card name and the country to see if it works. 

 

Learn a little bit of the language before you go - just a little bit will make stuff seem less foreign and confusing. Your library might have some materials you can borrow, or there's Duolingo you can do for free (I hear the app and computer version are quite different, fwiw). Don't feel obligated to do immersion German - if you want to, go for it, but it's only 3 months, which is basically an extended vacation.

 

Bring things to do for your kids on the plane, especially some new things they've never played with before (but that aren't noisy, and that don't have a million parts that are going to fall on the floor and end up who-knows-where on the plane). It's a long flight. If you have tablets and the like, install some new apps the kids can play with on the plane.

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Excited for you.

 

I've been to Iceland, Germany, France, Egypt - and NOT the touristy areas except for two days out of 24 and it was just fine - and Jamaica. Looking forward to more. European travel was ridiculously easy, and Egypt was not problematic.

 

Be adventurous. You won't regret it!

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GO! You'll love it!

 

Ditto on some OTC meds. IT's just easier to take a few things you are comfortable with. Tylenol or Advil. German stores have everything else you need.

Ditto on some English language books--there are English bookstores but fewer.

 

Get a Rick Steves guide called Europe through the Back Door. Very informative.

 

Go to a Christmas Market or three. Lovely.

 

Visit Rothenburg.

 

Visit the Castles on the Rhine.

 

Germany is terrific--you'll enjoy your time there!

 

The first few days you might feel overwhelmed by all the German you hear. Let it roll over you like a wave in the ocean. You will find your feet and rhythm and function just fine.

 

 

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I think this is fabulous way to do exactly what you were talking about in your thread on slowing down life. Granted, it will take energy and logistics to get there. But once you have a couple days to settle in, you can choose how much you do, or how much you relax. If you feel like R&R, a trip to a playground and dinner can really be it for the day, and it will probably feel like a grand adventure. If you want to explore, you'll have so many exciting options, and can expand gradually as you become more comfortable, since it's an extended trip. 

 

It's super cool that it removes you entirely from your everyday routine, and that you'll be free to choose how you live your days there. Don't be surprised if those three months end up altering your life after your return home, in positive ways. That's one of the coolest things about travel, to me, especially with kids. It changes you and your little people, and often changes your perspective and priorities in such exciting and freeing ways.

 

Go you!

 

Amy

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This will be a wonderful experience for you and for your family. You will grow, as people. You will need some patience, and a sense of humor, when you are faced with a language barrier. Many people will speak English, but many will not, and you are in their country, so you need to be patient and courteous and maintain your sense of humor when frustrated by the language barrier. This will change all of you and you will look at the world differently, after you return to the USA.  Your DH will need a Visa that permits him to work in Germany. It would be better for you and your DC if his Work Visa can include all of you, so that you and your DC are not there on "Tourist" Visas.  Your U.S. credit card(s) will be welcome.  It is possible his assignment will be extended, so that is a big reason why I believe it would be better for you and your DC if you can be on his Work Visa.  NOTE: You need to be well aware that U.S. Citizens are taxed on Worldwide Income. There may be an agreement, between Germany and the USA, to prevent double taxation.  ENJOY!

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You'll be able to get everything you need over there, so you don't need to worry about too much.  However, if there are certain over-the-counter meds you like, I've often found that it's easier to bring them than buy them in a different country.  I've been surprised at how meds I use here (like our favorite cold medicines, etc.) are not always available in other countries, or if they are, it is under a completely different name.  And if you use a daily prescription for anything, you can usually get enough to last 90 days, at least.  (We often get them for a full three-months at a time to cover a long trip.)

 

Personally, I think OTC pain relievers are easy enough to buy when you get there.  Yes, names are different, but the chemistry is the same, google is available, and pharmacists/druggist are helpful.  Tylenol = Acetaminophen = Paracetamol = Panadol = CalPol.  Here's a page for Ibuprofen names:  https://www.drugs.com/international/ibuprofen.html   But you know your family's needs for the meds and how much space you have.  (I don't know anything about cold medicines overseas.)

 

I'd prioritize bringing my own feminine products from the US, though.

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A lot of that is true, but there actually are some meds that are OTC in some countries, and prescription only in other countries, for example.  We've run into that before.

 

ETA:  That reminds me of a funny story.  My mother came to visit us when we were temporarily living overseas, and she needed to get something for constipation.  No one at the pharmacy spoke English, and they sometimes don't have meds on display in front in pharmacies in other countries.  Everything is behind the counter and you have to explain to the pharmacist what you need.  (Otherwise, perhaps she would have recognized a bottle?  I don't know.)  Anyway, she couldn't figure out how to tell the pharmacist, but her taxi driver came in at one point to check on her, and she was finally able to get the message across to him (not easily though), and then he could tell the pharmacist.  They all had a good laugh from that.  

Edited by J-rap
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Call your credit cards to tell them your travel dates. Otherwise they'll think your card was stolen. Call your phone co to discuss service and plans in Germany. Start making a list of things you'll need to do to prepare your home for the long absence. List for things you'll need to bring. I would just set aside a notebook for this trip.

 

I think your least concern should be if you will enjoy the people or the experience. I definitely think you will. I would focus your efforts on organizing the logistics. You have plenty of time!

 

ETA: somehow my brain decided that you were going in the summer. After rereading your post, I realized that I have no idea when you are going. :-)

Edited by Sassenach
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I don't have practical advice for you like many other posters will, but I wanted to say that spending a bit over two months in Turkey completely changed my worldview.

 

It is never as hard as you imagine. I was able to navigate public transportation, and ordering food, and paying for souvenirs with little difficulty. People speak English everywhere.

 

You will probably have some times when you feel uncertain and out of place, but that is part of the experience. I would jump on any chance to travel internationally.

 

Have fun!!

 

Edited to add my ONE piece of practical advice: I agree with some of the others that the more flexible and understanding you are, the better time you will have. Did you get on a wrong bus? It's okay... you will see an area of a foreign city you might not have seen otherwise. Take those things in stride.

Edited by staceyobu
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Make sure you have a credit card that does not charge foreign transaction fees. Someone mentioned it above, but I wanted to reiterate it. Foreign transaction fees are not cheap and there are several cards without them to choose from, but it isn't so standard that the average card won't charge you for them. If you don't know if yours charges fees, call and ask.

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I have a bit of practical advice – there are often subtle but important social niceties to which Americans can be oblivious. Most natives will give you a lot of slack b/c they will be able to tell (instantly!) that you are foreigners, but how much nicer to extend the usual courtesies to people you meet. These will vary depending on where you are going, but as an example, in parts of Asia people hand an object (credit card, package, whatever) using both hands only. If you are not watching or read up on social niceties, you would miss this. And of course they do not expect this from foreigners, but you can tell they appreciate that you are making an effort.

 

I'm sure folks on this board who are more familiar with the current situation can correct me, but it used to be considered impolite in Germany to talk with both hands in your pockets (I imagine that has relaxed). What is still probably true, especially in smaller villages, is that you greet everyone you pass in the street, maybe just with a nod or a "Guten Abend/Morgen/Tag". Although I do notice that Germans one meets on a hike do not always say "Guten Tag/Grüß Gott [ in the south ] " – this also seems to be changing. It is probably still customary, when entering a small shop such as an apothecary, butcher, etc., to greet the shopkeeper and any other patrons – again, just a nod and a muttered greeting. You will notice this if you are looking for it (& if it is done in your village). In Switzerland and France people do the same thing upon entering a crowded post office, even a doctor's waiting room with anyone else in it. In French people would say "Bonjour/bonsoir/salut, messieurs-dames." It is very important to greet someone in France before launching into a request (just "Bonjour, madame/monsieur") – they will love that, and be annoyed if you don't.

 

In any country you visit (and I encourage you to just enjoy your local area like a native, but try to find time for some excursions to other countries or areas if you can), knowing just hello, please, and thank you can make all the difference! We got pretty far in places like Bulgaria and Serbia with just knowing these.

 

One last thing – as mentioned upthread, expect the unexpected. 3-hour wash cycles in Austria (this may have changed?) w/95ºC water as an option; getting yelled at in Germany at the post office for not having twine on my package (in the U.S. this was not allowed because of automation; again, this may have changed); seeing a chic young woman come out of a toilet stall in a café in Paris and finding out the "toilet" was a hole in the ground ... 

 

You will have the time of your life. And what an awesome homeschooling adventure – better than any schoolwork. I LOVE travel, and I LOVE living overseas. Some things will make you appreciate home, and some things you will miss dearly when you are back in the U.S.

 

 

Sorry this got so long ... two more things! Europeans often talk much more quietly than we do. It almost seems like they are whispering, but it enables people living and traveling in close proximity to not drive each other nuts. If you lower your voices, you will stand out less. Also, when leaving a party, people usually say good-bye to every person. And please don't worry about remembering any of this – my point is just to be aware that things are subtly different (sometimes in very pleasant ways!). And that is half the fun.

 

 

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I have a bit of practical advice – there are often subtle but important social niceties to which Americans can be oblivious. Most natives will give you a lot of slack b/c they will be able to tell (instantly!) that you are foreigners, but how much nicer to extend the usual courtesies to people you meet. These will vary depending on where you are going, but as an example, in parts of Asia people hand an object (credit card, package, whatever) using both hands only. If you are not watching or read up on social niceties, you would miss this. And of course they do not expect this from foreigners, but you can tell they appreciate that you are making an effort.

 

I'm sure folks on this board who are more familiar with the current situation can correct me, but it used to be considered impolite in Germany to talk with both hands in your pockets (I imagine that has relaxed). What is still probably true, especially in smaller villages, is that you greet everyone you pass in the street, maybe just with a nod or a "Guten Abend/Morgen/Tag". Although I do notice that Germans one meets on a hike do not always say "Guten Tag/Grüß Gott [ in the south ] " – this also seems to be changing. It is probably still customary, when entering a small shop such as an apothecary, butcher, etc., to greet the shopkeeper and any other patrons – again, just a nod and a muttered greeting. You will notice this if you are looking for it (& if it is done in your village). In Switzerland and France people do the same thing upon entering a crowded post office, even a doctor's waiting room with anyone else in it. In French people would say "Bonjour/bonsoir/salut, messieurs-dames." It is very important to greet someone in France before launching into a request (just "Bonjour, madame/monsieur") – they will love that, and be annoyed if you don't.

 

In any country you visit (and I encourage you to just enjoy your local area like a native, but try to find time for some excursions to other countries or areas if you can), knowing just hello, please, and thank you can make all the difference! We got pretty far in places like Bulgaria and Serbia with just knowing these.

 

One last thing – as mentioned upthread, expect the unexpected. 3-hour wash cycles in Austria (this may have changed?) w/95ºC water as an option; getting yelled at in Germany at the post office for not having twine on my package (in the U.S. this was not allowed because of automation; again, this may have changed); seeing a chic young woman come out of a toilet stall in a café in Paris and finding out the "toilet" was a hole in the ground ... 

 

You will have the time of your life. And what an awesome homeschooling adventure – better than any schoolwork. I LOVE travel, and I LOVE living overseas. Some things will make you appreciate home, and some things you will miss dearly when you are back in the U.S.

 

 

Sorry this got so long ... two more things! Europeans often talk much more quietly than we do. It almost seems like they are whispering, but it enables people living and traveling in close proximity to not drive each other nuts. If you lower your voices, you will stand out less. Also, when leaving a party, people usually say good-bye to every person. And please don't worry about remembering any of this – my point is just to be aware that things are subtly different (sometimes in very pleasant ways!). And that is half the fun.

Great post!

The greeting thing is such a nice custom. I remember waiting for laundry in the laundrymat when the owner came in. BONJOUR, Madame! in such a big, friendly way. Startled me a bit, then made me smile.

 

 

 

 

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If you are looking for a good travel credit card, the Capitol One Venture reward card is specifically for travelers. We have used it for all of our international transactions and everything was smooth, no exchange fees, etc. We use our rewards as they accumulate on plane tickets or hotels.When overseas, it is a better card for us to use than our Amazon CHASE Visa.

 

Check with your bank too. Ours encourages travel so when out of the country, we incur no exchange fees when using an ATM and only limited ATM fees. My sister changed her American checking and savings account here to another bank for the same reason while she is living in France. She is charged very little for using ATM's there, and it allows us to have a place to keep some emergency funds for her. That isn't much of an issue now that she is an EU citizen and married to her French husband, but at the time she was a poor, American college student studying abroad without much income, it was definitely needed.

 

Since this is job related, it is possible that you can get a lot of expenses paid for by the company. Dh's company policy is that they cannot ask an employee to go overseas for more than 3 week without paying for his family to accompany him. So when dh heads to Ireland for two months,  ds and I will be going because they will pay our plane tickets and for an apartment for the duration of the stay. We already have our passports which is something they would not cover.

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Btw, it's been over a decade, but from what I remember, you're going to want to have coins on hand for grocery carts (you'll get the coin back when you return the cart to the corral) and for restrooms - also, there aren't as many public restrooms as in the US (don't expect to go to the grocery store and use the restroom while you're there - restaurants of course do have restrooms). And store hours are more limited - no 24 hour Walmart/Wegmans/Tops/etc.

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A lot of that is true, but there actually are some meds that are OTC in some countries, and prescription only in other countries, for example.  We've run into that before.

 

ETA:  That reminds me of a funny story.  My mother came to visit us when we were temporarily living overseas, and she needed to get something for constipation.  No one at the pharmacy spoke English, and they sometimes don't have meds on display in front in pharmacies in other countries.  Everything is behind the counter and you have to explain to the pharmacist what you need.  (Otherwise, perhaps she would have recognized a bottle?  I don't know.)  Anyway, she couldn't figure out how to tell the pharmacist, but her taxi driver came in at one point to check on her, and she was finally able to get the message across to him (not easily though), and then he could tell the pharmacist.  They all had a good laugh from that.  

 

When my mother was in Germany and pregnant with me, she had a sore throat.  They went to the pharmacy who insisted that the bottle of liquid was for a sore throat.   They were too worried to try it when they saw a drawing of a dead bug on it.  Their landlord explained that like an American might say "a frog in my throat", they would say "a bug in my throat".   So, the dead bug symbol was really saying it made a sore throat feel better.  

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I spent a month working in Germany about 15 years ago, so a lot has changed since then, but it was a fabulous experience and much easier than I expected. I highly recommend Rick Steves' books, and second the recommendation to start learning a little bit of German before you go. Knowing numbers, greetings, and how to ask for directions will be very helpful.

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I'd also recommend the Culture Shock book on Germany.  It explained lots of little mysteries to me.  

Also, he will be able to ask coworkers about your mysteries.  For example, one of my coworkers explained that contact lens supplies like cleaning solutions are sold at the eye doctors office not the drug store.  That had me stumped.  

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OP   You wrote that you hate flying. International flights are the same as domestic flights, with the addition of Immigration and Customs checks.  If you are doing nothing illegal, if you have nothing to hide and you answer the questions honestly, you go through quickly.   Before the flight lands, you fill out a simple Customs declaration about any gifts you are bringing in, if you have more than USD $10K in cash, etc.  It isn't a big deal.. You will need to check in for an International departure earlier than you would need to check in for a Domestic flight.  You will need valid Passports.  You may need a Visa, depending on the country you are going to. 

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Thanks everyone so much for your help. I have definitely started feeling more excited and less nervous. After I posted, it looked like it may not work out, but now it is officially on.  It just got pushed back a little, which will actually be good.  It gives me more time to prepare.  

 

Yay!  I'm so excited for you.

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See if your library has the Michael Thomas learning German CD's. I practically have a learning-languages-learning-disability, and he taught me some things.

Oh my gosh YES! You can download the app and do 5 minutes of certain languages to see how it works. It was so, so weird to learn a language like that! There's a documentary about his method (I found it on YouTube) where he takes his method to a small group of 'failed' language students in a UK high school and teaches them over 5 days or whatever.

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An opportunity came up for Dh to go to Germany for 3 months for work. The kids (4 boys age 4-10) and I can go with him, but we have to pay our way. I immediately said yes, but now I am so anxious about it. I don't know anything about living in a different country. I'll be able to figure it out, right?

 

I know we need passports and plane tickets. I'm planning to pack light and just buy anything we need there. I have to figure out how to buy the stuff (can I just use my current credit card?) Can we FaceTime the US with our phones with wifi? I feel so ridiculous that I don't know this stuff...

 

And I hate flying.

 

Please tell me that this is going to be great and we won't regret it. Also, I am open to any suggestions for making it great.

 

Since you're Canadian, you'll be fine, eh?

 

Bill

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Thanks everyone so much for your help. I have definitely started feeling more excited and less nervous. After I posted, it looked like it may not work out, but now it is officially on.  It just got pushed back a little, which will actually be good.  It gives me more time to prepare.  

 

It will be great! So roughly when will you be going?

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You may want too work up a set, noncommittal answer about politics. I am amazed how often I would be asked these questions casually, but with a serious undercurrent. I found chuckling and saying something like, "I could go in all day about that" and then changing the subject worked well. Not that all such conversations are bad, but they so get awkward and tiresome in some situations.

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