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5LittleMonkeys

How would you do an in text citation for a quote taken from a movie?

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Example - 

 

The 11th Doctor loves bow ties and fezzes.  Often, he can be heard exclaiming, "Bow ties are cool!" and "Fezzes are cool!" 

 

The child has bibliography cited for each episode that these quotes came from...how would she cite within the sentence? 

 

Thanks!

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It depends on the style you're using.  In APA style, the reference list would list the names of the producer and director, the date, the title, the fact that it is a motion picture, the country, and the production company.  The in text citation would list the last names of the producer and director, the date, and the time the quotation occurred in the film.  

 

Here is an example from a paper I recently wrote where I quoted something from the film A Beautiful Mind:

 

And then he presents a solution: "Well, what if no one goes for the blonde?  We don't get in each other's way, and we don't insult the other girls.  That's the only way we win" (Grazer & Howard, 2001, 20:21).

 

And the citation in the reference list looks like this:

 

Grazer, B. (Producer), & Howard, R. (Producer & Director).  (2001).  A beautiful mind [Motion picture].  United States: Imagine Entertainment.

 

 

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Example - 

 

The 11th Doctor loves bow ties and fezzes.  Often, he can be heard exclaiming, "Bow ties are cool!" and "Fezzes are cool!" 

 

The child has bibliography cited for each episode that these quotes came from...how would she cite within the sentence? 

 

Thanks!

 

Quick side note: the ordinal number is spelled out AND capitalized as part of the Doctor's name/title: Eleventh Doctor, rather than 11th Doctor. ;)

 

Since she already has most of the required info in the paragraph itself, the simplest route that works for both MLA and APA formats is to just add the missing info of the title of the TV show in which the 11th Dr. is a character into the sentence. Example:

 

The character of the Eleventh Doctor from the British TV series Doctor Who loves bow ties and fezzes. In numerous episodes throughout the series, he can be heard exclaiming: "Bow ties are cool!" and "Fezzes are cool!".

 

Or, for a parenthetical citation, MLA format (assuming you have already introduced that you are writing about a character from the TV series Doctor Who), list the episode title and the run time of the quotation or reference. In this case, DD is referencing multiple episodes, so to cite multiple sources (here, multiple episodes of the show) in the SAME in-text citation, separate each source (episode) by a semi-colon:

 

The Eleventh Doctor loves bow ties and fezzes. Often, he can be heard exclaiming: "Bow ties are cool!" ("Episode Title" 05:14-05:16; "Episode Title" 37:04-37-39; "Episode Title 03:56-03:58) and "Fezzes are cool!" ("Episode Title" 09:22-09:23); "Episode Title" 06:02-06-03).

 

Because this makes for very long and disruptive parenthetical citations, I would go for the elegance and streamlined simplicity of the first example, which includes the relevant information as part of the text, and then save the parenthetical (in-text) citations for times when only one or two episodes are referenced in one citation.

 

 

For MLA style, the parenthetical citation (the in-text citation that follows what is being either quoted or referenced) takes the first element from the full citation that appears on the Works Cited page at the end of the paper, and puts that in parenthesis after the end quotation mark, but before the final punctuation. Usually if it is a book or article, this in-text citation will be the last name of the author + the page numbers where this was found. If this were quoting from a specific TV program episode, it would be the episode title and the time into the show where the quotation starts:

 

"Title of Episode if any." Title of Program. Title of the series. Name of 

           Network. Call Numbers if any, city of local station if any.

           Broadcast date. Medium.

 

One quick note: citing Doctor Who is a bit tricky, as there are two series -- the original which ran from 1963-1989, and the "re-boot" which has run from 2005 to present. See this Wikipedia article on how to do full citations on Doctor Who.

 

Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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