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I am looking for ideas to stay motivated to lose weight. I feel that I have the knowledge on what to do but I lose steam after a month or two of effort and weight loss. I lose motivation to track (I use MyFitnessPal app), I stop for fast food, and I stop cooking healthy. I don't exercise sometimes. Then the weight returns. My recent successes over the last few months were due mostly to a personal health motivation and more flexibility with my schedule. But even now I'd rather do other things than eat healthy.

 

In the past I have used weight watchers with varying success but I'm a chronic joiner/quitter. I prefer just counting calories than points but the meetings did help me focus. I'd rather not spend the money.

 

Any suggestions? I think I've tried almost everything. My recent thought is that I am planning on getting weight loss books, watch movies, or listen to podcasts just to help myself stay focused. I think it's easy for me to ignore what needs to be done even when I know intellectually what I have to do. I'm also starting to schedule in exercise, meal planning, reading/motivation/focus days. I have alarms to remind me to track but I ignore them 😕.

 

Another thought is to see my doctor for weight checks as a motivator.

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The biggest thing for me was making it easier to eat healthy than not.

 

I learned a few specific ready-meals that I could have on the table immediately. I prepped protein that I knew I was ok with and I'd cook a few day's worth at once. If necessary, I did stuff like buy the steam-in-bag vegetables -- yes, ok, they're expensive, but they're less expensive than fast food. Basically, I made it so that I could have a healthy meal on the table with 5 minutes of actual work and possibly some sitting around time when I was exhausted after a rough day. 

 

Then I (temporarily) got rid of the things at home that I would default to instead of eating healthy. I'd go with cereal, toast, chips, popcorn, nuts -- basically anything that was already prepared and fast and easy, and mostly carbs with some fats. I have most of those back in the kitchen now, but removing them as an option forced me to go beyond my default. 

 

When on-plan is easy and off-plan requires a trip out, staying on-plan becomes easier. 

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There are a couple things that might help:

 

You might find motivation in reading books about habit-forming rather than just purely diet/health/weight loss materials.  Really, if you approach it from a habit training perspective, you might have better long-term success.  Personally, I enjoyed The Happiness Project and Better than Before, both by Gretchen Rubin, but there are other good ones out there.  

 

Your goal with habits is to eliminate decisions so that you are just on auto-pilot.  Humans (and all animals) are creatures of habit and routine and making decisions is actually very taxing to us mentally and emotionally.  So one example that has been working well for me is that I ALWAYS eat a (giant) green salad for lunch.  Never mind what the kids are having, never mind what's in the fridge or freezer or pantry- I am having a big fat salad with a high (olive oil) fat dressing and a protein of some kind on top.  I no longer allow myself to *think* about this meal.  Similarly with breakfast, I have my choices limited to three possibilities- eggs/bacon, no sugar protein shake, or cottage cheese.  

 

My eating journey has finally led me to eliminating sugar, which is a HUGE deal for me.  I was a total sugar addict.  Regular coke, half liter, daily.  Yikes!  But I no longer eat daily sugar.  It's just done, and I don't think about it, it's no longer a daily, hourly decision I have to make, and remake, and remake again.  

 

You have to set the rules that you want to live by, then make them habits so that thinking is just... not necessary anymore.  My rules are:

 

- at home, I eat a ketogenic diet

- at a restaurant (extremely rare event), I'll eat what I want but try to aim for healthy choices, no sugared drinks

- when invited to other's home, I'll eat what is served but in reasonable portions, no sugared drinks

- for a special event  (birthday parties, holidays), I will eat what is served, including what I serve (I always have dessert for guests and cakes for my kids' parties).  I keep this as a rule because I believe eating is also a social event and I want to engage in it as a social event.  Of course we can say, "It's not about the food!"... but in many ways, it is about the food.  For so many family members and friends who cook, the food is a manifestation of love and I want to graciously accept that gift.  But... no sugared drinks!  lol

 

I'm trying to figure out what "moderation" REALLY means in terms of diet, and I think I'm getting closer.  For me personally, it cannot involve a small treat daily.  That spirals out of control.  But it can involve having seconds of desert for Christmas and making (and eating) fun cakes at my own kids' birthdays.  

 

 

 

 

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I just want to encourage you to keep trying. Our bodies and needs constantly change.

 

I did Weight Watchers in my 30's and late 40's, and it worked very well for me. I had very good leaders and friends there.

 

Enter my 50's. I'm just WAY too busy. Going to a meeting is nearly impossible for me. I've never been good at portion sizes and tend to eat on the run or put it off to the point that I eat too much. I tried TOPS because they have online meeting that worked well for me, and the diet reminds me of the old Weight Watchers that I first used. That was good for about 20 pounds this year, but I got completely stalled and the meeting times don't work for me in the fall.

 

I ordered Nutrisystem in late August. I don't like the expense, but the food is better than you think, and I've lost another 15 pounds. At this point, I need the meals planned for me. On the weekend I eat on my own, and I've learned to plan my snacks and be better with portion sizes. DH is retiring in December, and I don't think we'll be able to afford it after that, but it's been good for me. We'll see how our finances shake out.

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I really love to eat and love food, so getting bored with meals is a sure fire way to get me to quit. I have to stay excited about my food. I meal plan and use tons of recipes from Emily Bites and Skinnytaste, they are almost always really good and mostly fairly easy. I found that working out too much was inhibiting my loss so I dialed it back to 3 times a week (I was at 6-7) but I still try to get steps in. I also believe that wine was inhibiting my loss even when I had the caloric room for it. As far as tracking goes, I hate the monotony of it, so I stopped using mfp and started using he tracker in Fitbit app, and I don't log each food, I only log the calories, it takes much less time and gives me the same result. Sometimes I have to search a particular food, but usually I just figure out the calories and put them in, instead of logging everything individually. Basically I need my healthy lifestyle and weight loss to be as close to effortless and fun as it can be. I have been yoyoing within a 15ish pound range for years and I'm so tired of it, I would accept a few extra pounds if I could just figure out maintenance. I know I can't maintain "thin" but I can get to a weight that I think I look great at.

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Do you have a goal what you want to do when you lost the weight? My very overweight friend who lost heavily started training for bike races and set some race dates. That motivated her to stick with an eating and training regime. She also hired an online personal coach who keeps her accountable - she has to report what she eats, trains, weight, blood pressure etc, and he does not mince words when she has slacked.

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I don't know how well this would work for anyone else, but I've been using a "rewards system" lately that really works nicely for me.  I earn points by exercising and eating right.  I deduct points when I eat something off-plan, or if I skip a workout without a darn good excuse (migraines do, unfortunately, sometimes give me no choice, so I don't deduct for that).  I put a little money aside at the beginning of the week, and if by the end of the week I have earned x number of points, I get to spend that money on something frivolous and indulgent and purely fun.  If not, I give the money to one of my favorite charities.  

 

I deliberately set x to equal a number of points that I could earn by being "really good" but NOT having to be absolutely perfect.  Because for me, I know that perfectionism is the enemy of excellence.  So I essentially wanted to train myself to realize that really good is good enough.   :001_smile:

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Do you have friends IRL or on-line to be accountable to/with? I belong to a group which focuses on making healthy changes - we have teams and we play for money (just a little bit!) - it's fun and it's motivating!

 

Anne

 

 

That does sound fun!  I belong to a FB group for fitness and healthy eating that is mostly comprised of old friends from high school.  It helps to know there are others dealing with the same struggles.  Adding a little bit of friendly competition probably makes it more interesting!

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The biggest thing for me was making it easier to eat healthy than not.

 

I learned a few specific ready-meals that I could have on the table immediately. I prepped protein that I knew I was ok with and I'd cook a few day's worth at once. If necessary, I did stuff like buy the steam-in-bag vegetables -- yes, ok, they're expensive, but they're less expensive than fast food. Basically, I made it so that I could have a healthy meal on the table with 5 minutes of actual work and possibly some sitting around time when I was exhausted after a rough day.

 

Then I (temporarily) got rid of the things at home that I would default to instead of eating healthy. I'd go with cereal, toast, chips, popcorn, nuts -- basically anything that was already prepared and fast and easy, and mostly carbs with some fats. I have most of those back in the kitchen now, but removing them as an option forced me to go beyond my default.

 

When on-plan is easy and off-plan requires a trip out, staying on-plan becomes easier.

This is part of my goal. One excuse is that we're out of the house at least three night at dinner time. Instead of having it as an excuse, I could at least bring along a healthier option or snacks. I struggle with cooking in general and have little motivation in that area. So I am pencilling it into my schedule to meal plan too. :) I can't rely on coming up with a quick/healthy menu spontaneously. This will take time as I don't like to make the same foods often for dinner. But to cook something new too often is also overwhelming.

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  I put a little money aside at the beginning of the week, and if by the end of the week I have earned x number of points, I get to spend that money on something frivolous and indulgent and purely fun.  If not, I give the money to one of my favorite charities.  

even though I'm a positive trainer & can talk you into a boredom coma about positive dog training.....

 

I'd tweak the aversive side a bit.... "if not, I give money to my LEAST favourite charities"  because that would motivate me so much more :D 

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even though I'm a positive trainer & can talk you into a boredom coma about positive dog training.....

 

I'd tweak the aversive side a bit.... "if not, I give money to my LEAST favourite charities"  because that would motivate me so much more :D

 

 

:lol:  I guess that would be pretty motivating!

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I tried and failed to lose weight for over ten years. What finally pushed me over the edge was seeing a new high on the scale. I didn't know exactly how I was going to lose the weight, but I knew I needed to do it. I started small and slowly made more rules for myself. I experimented. I read about what other people were doing and tried new things. If it worked, I'd make a new rule. I know that you can't exercise the weight off, but exercise became part of my plan. My first rules were:

 

1. No eating until I hit 5000 steps

2. Track all food in Lose It and stay within calories

3. Attend 3 strength training classes per week at the gym

4. Weigh in every day

 

That was it for the first month or so. Then I started reading about ketogenic diets and about intermittent fasting, so I have quite a few more rules. I also started the Couch to 10k app, so running 3 times a week became another rule. 

 

I know a lot of people don't like to weigh in every day, but I really need the accountability. I track my weight in the Lose It app and it's really motivating to see the downward trend, even though there are a lot of spikes in there as well. Tracking weight helped me to see patterns - for instance, I have a very hard time losing any weight during two weeks of the month. The other two weeks are pretty good losing weeks. Sometimes I get frustrated when I'm eating well and exercising but gain a pound or two during the "bad" weeks, but then I just look at my weight loss graph and see that it will come off eventually. 

 

I'm 55lbs down now. 

 

Oh, and once it starts coming off I find that trying on clothes (even without buying them) is pretty motivating. I can't believe how fun it is to try on something in a size I never thought I'd see again.

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I have had two really big motivations in the last year.  I have a friend who is morbidly obese and dying.  She is about 5 years younger than me and will likely not see her DS graduate in a year and a half.  Almost all of her health issues are from her weight and at this point she is on a waiting list for a new heart and kidneys.  She let her blood sugar get out of control and wouldn't eat right.  It has been so sad to watch.  The other is not being able to do the things I used to love like going on hikes and playing active games with my kids.  I was getting out of breath just walking upstairs.  It was embarrassing and so I would avoid going places because I was so embarrassed about my weight and the horrible shape I was in.

 

My DH got me an exercise bike and a couple small weights at my request to work out at home.  I talked to my doctor and made a plan and then I forced myself to stick with it even on days I didn't want to.  I made a rule of no computer time or fun activities until my workout was done for the day.  Then I went cold turkey on giving up Pepsi.  I had tried weaning myself off it a number of times but that didn't work for me.  I made a realistic meal plan for food at home and plans for what I can do if we need to eat out.  I let myself splurge once in a while on something not so healthy.  My doctor was impressed at my appointment last week that I have lost weight.  I have lost close to 35 pounds in about six months and need to lose quite a bit more.  My doctor said he has weight loss discussions all the time but very rarely does he see any follow through.  He told me to think about what my plan is for after losing the weight to keep it off.  So I have been working on that as well.  I am hoping do continue the daily workouts and eating right plus going on hikes with DH and the kids. 

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I hesitate to recommend a book because sometimes that makes people feel like they're following a program and I've never had success with it.  The book that motivated me most to get started and just do what **I** could was Jillian Michaels' Slim for Life.  It's really just a TON of ideas about healthy living that you can take or leave and none of them are what you HAVE to do.  I think it gives you hope that even if you don't make the best choice all the time, even a BETTER choice is success!

 

OK, the other thing I would say as far as food goes is to first try making over some of your favorites and maybe even saying goodbye for a while to some that just won't fit into your goals.  Then, once you have the hang of that (thank you, Cooking Light, honestly), you can branch out.  Meal prep is a pain in the butt, but it is key.  Plan and prep to succeed...or at least to have a back-up for the hard days!

 

Everyone is so different in the ways they want/need to eat and work out for weight loss.  Here's hoping you find YOUR way!

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Maybe you are trying to make too many changes at once?

Tracking food, starting exercise, cooking only "healthy" meals all at the same time?

Perhaps if you did just one thing and did it long enough to become your new normal then it would be easier to stick to?

This.

 

I'm down 81lbs in not quite three years and this is basically how I did it.

 

You say that you have success with calorie counting, but you don't stick with it. To me, that's a sign that calorie counting is not what works for you in the long term. ime, however you lose weight, it has to be sustainable, something you can live with for the rest of your life, and it cannot require you exert will power to keep you on track.

 

It has to be new habits that become so normal, they replace the old habits. So start slow. Biggest Loser level weight loss is an outlier so remind yourself this is for the long term. Pick one thing on your list of things you want to do. Maybe just start cooking heathy. Do that for a month or more. Once that becomes your new habit then add in something else.

 

I focused just on the food part for the first year and a half before I added in exercise. Then I spent a few months working my way up to running a 5k. Then I had the food part down and the regular running part down so I upped my long run mileage. Then once I had done that, I upped my weekly/monthly mileage.

 

For me at the two year point was when I realized I had definitely found "it." It is easy to keep going because it's normal now. This is how I eat. This is how I exercise. I may go weeks where the scale hardly moves, but I maintain the weight I've lost without having to try or exert my willpower to do the "right" thing.

 

Also, weight loss is not linear. You go up a few pounds and down a few pounds. Over time that averages out to that nice downhill line when you take the long view so remind yourself that along the way. Just because rhe scale is up two pounds does not mean you're failing. Keep at it.

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For me, my motivator is my knee pain. It's not good to have th carrying extra weight, and, really: my knees have a best-before date on them. They are weak and won't last. Less weight, every day, will give them another 10 years. That's what matters.

 

It's not looks (what I want to look like), and it's not ethics (what I 'should' do), it's not values (eating well): it's science. Extra mass will wear out my body's joints at an accelerated rate. No ifs, ands, or buts!

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I'm not a pro. But I've been slowly and steadily losing since June 1. So - maybe not long enough?

 

What's keeps my me going: I see my doc every 3 mos, sometimes more. She is a great cheerleader. She saved my life (literally) when other docs had given up, and I follow what she says now, to a T. DH and I thought I'd be in a wheelchair by now, and ... Not only am I still here, I'm running! So, it helps that she put me on this particular diet that's working. She tweaks my meds and supplements, as needed. Once my running got to a certain point, she suggested I train for a race. Having that goal has kept me going. She wants me to run a 10K, and DS wants to train with me. That helps! And it helps that I've always enjoyed running, so this is returning to something I've loved, and still love.

 

Reading blogs, books, etc about how my particular eating plan works helps keep me on track. And I plan for treats. DH's bday was last week, so I knew for two mos that I had cheesecake to anticipate.

 

I use an app to track stuff, and find that working at the weight graph is helpful, it shows a downward trend no matter the tiny bumps up and the ridiculous slowness.

Edited by Spryte
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For me, avoiding cancer and diabetes are motivators. To make it work, I plan meals, as controlling carbs is what makes me successful. Motivation....nothing like taking older relatives to their appts whilst they complain about their insulin and its cost after 25 years of 'pre diabetes'....and realizing what poor food choices do to cataract risk etc as well as all the limitations on movement and shoe and clothing choice. Then at holidays, when you realize choices can lead directly to cancer, its motivational. I dont want to go there. Its up to me to see that I eat well.

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I'm not a pro. But I've been slowly and steadily losing since June 1. So - maybe not long enough?

 

What's keeps my me going: I see my doc every 3 mos, sometimes more. She is a great cheerleader. She saved my life (literally) when other docs had given up, and I follow what she says now, to a T. DH and I thought I'd be in a wheelchair by now, and ... Not only am I still here, I'm running! So, it helps that she put me on this particular diet that's working. She tweaks my meds and supplements, as needed. Once my running got to a certain point, she suggested I train for a race. Having that goal has kept me going. She wants me to run a 10K, and DS wants to train with me. That helps! And it helps that I've always enjoyed running, so this is returning to something I've loved, and still love.

 

Reading blogs, books, etc about who my particular eating plan works helps keep me on track. And I plan for treats. DH's bday was last week, so I knew for two mos that I had cheesecake to anticipate.

 

I use an app to track stuff, and find that working at the weight graph is helpful, it shows a downward trend no matter the tiny bumps up and the ridiculous slowness.

What is your eating plan?

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have you invited people to your myfitnesspal account as part of a support group?

is there something you'd like as a goal?

 

I'd made increasing goals - with rewards for achieving those goals.

 

if I did x number of yoga practices in a given amount of time - I went and got a massage.

if I lost x number of pounds, and kept it off for x amount of time - I could go splurge on a nice outfit/etc.

 

take the money you would spend on weight watchers, and put it aside - BUT - you can only put it aside the weeks you lose.   when you've reached a goal, go buy something NON-food, for yourself

 

 

what works for people varies.  I got the idea from a woman who wanted to quit smoking.  she put the money she wasn't spending on cigarettes into a savings account.  when she no longer had cravings and had reliably quit - she took the money she saved by NOT buying cigarettes and bought herself a pair of diamond earrings.

 

you could take the money you *aren't*   spending on junk food, and put that in a savings account.  when you reach your goal - spend it.

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And by the same token, there is no one way. As much as everyone wants weight loss to be like "one true diet to rule them all," it's just not the case - especially when you consider the bigger, long term picture (and I'm thinking years, not months here).

 

Most people can do anything for a month or two. They could maybe even eek out several months if they're blessed with greater than average willpower. I made it six months and lost 40lbs on a LCHF diet. And then gained all that back plus some. I had varying success with LCHF for shorter periods of time after that before I became so discouraged, I gave up altogether. I made it to 274 (though I think my high was probably higher). I had decided at that point that weightloss was impossible and I was stuck there because I bought the idea that LCHF was the only way to go. I reasoned that since I couldn't do it that meant I couldn't lose weight.

 

I'm really glad I found GoKaleo in 2013/2014 and gave myself permission to think I could do it without being LCHF. It's 2016 and I'm really glad I did it the "wrong" way. Remind yourself that long term, there are as many ways to lose weight as there are people who have lost it.

 

I think it's fantastic when anyone loses weight and keeps it off. I think it's awesome when people are excited and optimistic about the new thing their doing. That does fade, though, and it can get harder. It's the strength of your habits that gets you past six months. It's the sustainability of your plan that gets you past year two.

 

Plan for the long term and save money for new clothes. ;)

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I just wanted to say... Go Ketogrils! Ra ra ra! I've been doing it a month and never felt so great!

It's just the first week or two that can be rough. I tell people if they can get through the basic adaptation phase it gets better and better.

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One excuse is that we're out of the house at least three night at dinner time. Instead of having it as an excuse, I could at least bring along a healthier option or snacks. I struggle with cooking in general and have little motivation in that area. So I am pencilling it into my schedule to meal plan too. :) I can't rely on coming up with a quick/healthy menu spontaneously. This will take time as I don't like to make the same foods often for dinner. But to cook something new too often is also overwhelming.

 

Can you have the big warm meal at midday on these days? I cook at lunch.

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Also:  the best book on diet and weight loss I've ever read.  And that's thanks to Katy here on these boards.  She mentioned it another thread a few months ago, and I finally got around to reading it just recently.  I've been implementing his suggestions (well, his top suggestions, not even all of his suggestions!) for about three weeks now, and I've lost two pounds per week for those three weeks.

 

ETA:  And I'm not hungry or feeling deprived like I'm on a "diet", or feeling weak, tired, and cranky like I do with calorie restriction.  

Edited by Greta
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I lose/maintain best on an 80/20 diet, which for me means eating healthy during the week and more...relaxed?... expectations on the weekend.

 

Listening to healthy/clean eating podcasts,and following a lot of healthy living people on IG and FB, helps keep weight loss salient and motivating.

 

I also like to "trap" myself into having a healthy dinner at home by using the crock pot on days I think I might be tempted to cheat.

 

I really think that a moderate approach is best in forming the lifestyle habits you want.

 

Good luck!

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It's just the first week or two that can be rough. I tell people if they can get through the basic adaptation phase it gets better and better.

I don't kno w if you've seen the recent articles on keto and migraines, but it has definitely reduced mine from several times a week to... not at all. I chose it for the PCOS related benefits, but this one is actually way better.

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Maybe you are trying to make too many changes at once?

Tracking food, starting exercise, cooking only "healthy" meals all at the same time?

Perhaps if you did just one thing and did it long enough to become your new normal then it would be easier to stick to?

I think this may by true, especially in the past. Recently when I lost weight I've started rethinking weight loss to make it more natural. I'd go on a bike ride for fun because I wanted to. Or I'd make sure I had room for a treat daily. But maybe I should focus on one new habit, like just meal planning and figure that out until it's more natural. Edited by displace
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There are a couple things that might help:

 

You might find motivation in reading books about habit-forming rather than just purely diet/health/weight loss materials. Really, if you approach it from a habit training perspective, you might have better long-term success. Personally, I enjoyed The Happiness Project and Better than Before, both by Gretchen Rubin, but there are other good ones out there.

 

Your goal with habits is to eliminate decisions so that you are just on auto-pilot. Humans (and all animals) are creatures of habit and routine and making decisions is actually very taxing to us mentally and emotionally. So one example that has been working well for me is that I ALWAYS eat a (giant) green salad for lunch. Never mind what the kids are having, never mind what's in the fridge or freezer or pantry- I am having a big fat salad with a high (olive oil) fat dressing and a protein of some kind on top. I no longer allow myself to *think* about this meal. Similarly with breakfast, I have my choices limited to three possibilities- eggs/bacon, no sugar protein shake, or cottage cheese.

 

My eating journey has finally led me to eliminating sugar, which is a HUGE deal for me. I was a total sugar addict. Regular coke, half liter, daily. Yikes! But I no longer eat daily sugar. It's just done, and I don't think about it, it's no longer a daily, hourly decision I have to make, and remake, and remake again.

 

You have to set the rules that you want to live by, then make them habits so that thinking is just... not necessary anymore. My rules are:

 

- at home, I eat a ketogenic diet

- at a restaurant (extremely rare event), I'll eat what I want but try to aim for healthy choices, no sugared drinks

- when invited to other's home, I'll eat what is served but in reasonable portions, no sugared drinks

- for a special event (birthday parties, holidays), I will eat what is served, including what I serve (I always have dessert for guests and cakes for my kids' parties). I keep this as a rule because I believe eating is also a social event and I want to engage in it as a social event. Of course we can say, "It's not about the food!"... but in many ways, it is about the food. For so many family members and friends who cook, the food is a manifestation of love and I want to graciously accept that gift. But... no sugared drinks! lol

 

I'm trying to figure out what "moderation" REALLY means in terms of diet, and I think I'm getting closer. For me personally, it cannot involve a small treat daily. That spirals out of control. But it can involve having seconds of desert for Christmas and making (and eating) fun cakes at my own kids' birthdays.

Thanks for the book suggestions. I agree about making it a more habitual change and I want to get there. Breakfast is healthy and nutritious (usually), but sometimes I get bored. I probably need to have a rotation of meals I like, so it's not the same thing daily but also not a new recipe every day either :). Then repeat for lunch and dinner. Thankfully, I have found my taste changing to be less excited by junk food. I can say no easily now to some things sometimes. I am also trying to be more conscious of my body and the effects. One reason I eat so well for breakfast is that when I have (for me), too many simple carbs in the morning I am sleepy by noon. I hate that so I now avoid it consciously. I'm trying to make other body conscious decisions about portion sizes and how I feel afterwards.

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I just want to encourage you to keep trying. Our bodies and needs constantly change.

 

I did Weight Watchers in my 30's and late 40's, and it worked very well for me. I had very good leaders and friends there.

 

Enter my 50's. I'm just WAY too busy. Going to a meeting is nearly impossible for me. I've never been good at portion sizes and tend to eat on the run or put it off to the point that I eat too much. I tried TOPS because they have online meeting that worked well for me, and the diet reminds me of the old Weight Watchers that I first used. That was good for about 20 pounds this year, but I got completely stalled and the meeting times don't work for me in the fall.

 

I ordered Nutrisystem in late August. I don't like the expense, but the food is better than you think, and I've lost another 15 pounds. At this point, I need the meals planned for me. On the weekend I eat on my own, and I've learned to plan my snacks and be better with portion sizes. DH is retiring in December, and I don't think we'll be able to afford it after that, but it's been good for me. We'll see how our finances shake out.

Thanks for the tips. I do eat frozen meals but I get bored after a bit, but I'm not opposed to portion sizes foods to help while I'm figuring things out. I may look into alternative meeting weight loss programs. Heck, I'd even consider WW again but my whole philosophy about restriction is different now so I don't know if it'd work.

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Do you have a goal what you want to do when you lost the weight? My very overweight friend who lost heavily started training for bike races and set some race dates. That motivated her to stick with an eating and training regime. She also hired an online personal coach who keeps her accountable - she has to report what she eats, trains, weight, blood pressure etc, and he does not mince words when she has slacked.

Good idea. I was just looking at bike ride races. I've done a 5k but I'd prefer to bike. I'm looking into it as I am not a racer. Like a fun run, but for bikes. I don't have a final goal of something to do. I just want to be healthy.

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This.

 

I'm down 81lbs in not quite three years and this is basically how I did it.

 

You say that you have success with calorie counting, but you don't stick with it. To me, that's a sign that calorie counting is not what works for you in the long term. ime, however you lose weight, it has to be sustainable, something you can live with for the rest of your life, and it cannot require you exert will power to keep you on track.

 

It has to be new habits that become so normal, they replace the old habits. So start slow. Biggest Loser level weight loss is an outlier so remind yourself this is for the long term. Pick one thing on your list of things you want to do. Maybe just start cooking heathy. Do that for a month or more. Once that becomes your new habit then add in something else.

 

I focused just on the food part for the first year and a half before I added in exercise. Then I spent a few months working my way up to running a 5k. Then I had the food part down and the regular running part down so I upped my long run mileage. Then once I had done that, I upped my weekly/monthly mileage.

 

For me at the two year point was when I realized I had definitely found "it." It is easy to keep going because it's normal now. This is how I eat. This is how I exercise. I may go weeks where the scale hardly moves, but I maintain the weight I've lost without having to try or exert my willpower to do the "right" thing.

 

Also, weight loss is not linear. You go up a few pounds and down a few pounds. Over time that averages out to that nice downhill line when you take the long view so remind yourself that along the way. Just because rhe scale is up two pounds does not mean you're failing. Keep at it.

ITA with weight loss fluctuations. It's hard for me to see those and not panic a little. I know I said I use MFP to track calories but I don't follow their limits. I track to be accountable and for reflection. For instance, if I'm stuffed from a bag of chips and it was X calories, would half a bag have been satisfying? Or was I eating emotionally? I use it as more of a guideline and journal, if that makes sense.

 

ITA with making small habits natural as a key for me.

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For me, my motivator is my knee pain. It's not good to have th carrying extra weight, and, really: my knees have a best-before date on them. They are weak and won't last. Less weight, every day, will give them another 10 years. That's what matters.

 

It's not looks (what I want to look like), and it's not ethics (what I 'should' do), it's not values (eating well): it's science. Extra mass will wear out my body's joints at an accelerated rate. No ifs, ands, or buts!

I had/have? knee issues too, and knowing that one pound of extra weight is four extra pounds of pressure on my knees is motivating. But when my pain is gone with weight loss I feel less motivation, if that makes sense. Though I still know I have more to lose.

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I don't kno w if you've seen the recent articles on keto and migraines, but it has definitely reduced mine from several times a week to... not at all. I chose it for the PCOS related benefits, but this one is actually way better.

This would be a great motivator! I have migraines and usually attribute them to poor sleep and skipped meals. I don't like to restrict too much but maybe I can make a few changes to help.

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I lose/maintain best on an 80/20 diet, which for me means eating healthy during the week and more...relaxed?... expectations on the weekend.

 

Listening to healthy/clean eating podcasts,and following a lot of healthy living people on IG and FB, helps keep weight loss salient and motivating.

 

I also like to "trap" myself into having a healthy dinner at home by using the crock pot on days I think I might be tempted to cheat.

 

I really think that a moderate approach is best in forming the lifestyle habits you want.

 

Good luck!

I used my crockpot last night! It wasn't an awesome meal, but the quickness combined with the edible-ness made it ok. In the past I'd have way too many leftovers and to eat that again for days would discourage me, so now I make smaller meals even though I'd have to cook more often.

 

I also like my rice cooker for speed and to take the thought out. I like frozen or prepped veggies, rice, and some precooked chicken or egg or maybe tofu with a little sauce to flavor.

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Also: the best book on diet and weight loss I've ever read. And that's thanks to Katy here on these boards. She mentioned it another thread a few months ago, and I finally got around to reading it just recently. I've been implementing his suggestions (well, his top suggestions, not even all of his suggestions!) for about three weeks now, and I've lost two pounds per week for those three weeks.

 

ETA: And I'm not hungry or feeling deprived like I'm on a "diet", or feeling weak, tired, and cranky like I do with calorie restriction.

Thanks for the book suggestion. It's on my list now. I'm currently about one page into How to have your cake and skinny jeans too. Edited by displace
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Also:  the best book on diet and weight loss I've ever read.  And that's thanks to Katy here on these boards.  She mentioned it another thread a few months ago, and I finally got around to reading it just recently.  I've been implementing his suggestions (well, his top suggestions, not even all of his suggestions!) for about three weeks now, and I've lost two pounds per week for those three weeks.

 

ETA:  And I'm not hungry or feeling deprived like I'm on a "diet", or feeling weak, tired, and cranky like I do with calorie restriction.  

Is that the thread about large weight loss? Do you have a link?  I thought it was a great thread and have been unable to find it.

 

Wanted to say my scale was 199.6 today! I have not been under 200 in over 16 years.

 

To OP, I will post later on my thoughts on this since it has been a journey for me.

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I started WW because I couldn't fit into my jeans anymore and needed to go up a size. Again. I cried and decided to do something about it. That was my 3rd time joining WW but I was determined to see it out and honestly change the way I ate. I didn't consider myself on a diet really. I was making food changes. I gave some stuff up completely and learned portion control of others. I had a treat every night. I also had a Starbucks coffee on my weekly weigh-in day. It all fit into my plan and I was loving it. When I lost a pants size, my motivation changed. Then I loved seeing my weight numbers go down. I had weeks where I gained. I had weeks I maintained. But I had weeks where I had a decent size loss. I just kept the big picture in mind. When I reached my goal weight, my loss averaged out to 1 lb. a week. I lost another 10 lbs. about 6 months later because I lowered my carbs and upped my protein. I've held fairly steady for 4 years now. I even still count points because it's so natural and easy peasy. I weigh myself every day. I'm so happy with my weight, that I can have what I call a big eating day about once a week. I gain a little from doing it but lose it again in the next couple of days.

 

There is also a history of diabetes in my family. My A1C went way down when I lost my weight. That was a relief. I really don't want to become diabetic and have to change the way I eat again.

 

But honestly, my main motivation right now is seeing my weight stay in a certain range. It just feels so good to see that number on my scale.

 

My dd got mad at me because I told her something that often ran through my head while I was losing. She said it was unhealthy, but it worked for me. I'd tell myself that nothing tastes as good as skinny feels. I guess that could be unhealthy but it sure worked for me. It affected some of my choices. Like do I really want that 120 calories of pepsi or would unsweet tea be just as good. I have a healthy respect for food now. I know how to make the good choices. I know my triggers.

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Is that the thread about large weight loss? Do you have a link?  I thought it was a great thread and have been unable to find it.

 

Wanted to say my scale was 199.6 today! I have not been under 200 in over 16 years.

 

To OP, I will post later on my thoughts on this since it has been a journey for me.

 

I'm not sure if this is the thread you were thinking of, but this is the one where I remember first hearing of this book:  http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/606497-follow-up-on-problems-with-dieting-from-nyt/

 

 

And congrats on getting below 200!   :001_smile:

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I don't kno w if you've seen the recent articles on keto and migraines, but it has definitely reduced mine from several times a week to... not at all. I chose it for the PCOS related benefits, but this one is actually way better.

 

 

That is amazing, I'm really jealous!  Keto worked great for me for 12 years, but then when I hit perimenopause, it was a disaster.  Among other (far less troubling) problems, it increased my migraines to 5-7 per week.  It wasn't only the keto - I've had to make some other changes including going on a preventive medication, and the hormonal changes of periomenopause are clearly at the root of it all.  But for me, the keto + perimenopause was a bad combo.  I don't mean this to be discouraging to anyone, because I truly believe keto is an excellent diet.  But I suffered for over a year before a friend said that going OFF keto helped her migraines.  I was stunned, but I tried it, and it helped.  So I just wanted to say that it takes some experimenting to find what will work for you (general you) and our needs can change with time.  Ugh, I'm afraid I sound like I'm arguing with you, and that's not my intention at all!  Just sharing my experience.   :blush:

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Is that the thread about large weight loss? Do you have a link? I thought it was a great thread and have been unable to find it.

 

Wanted to say my scale was 199.6 today! I have not been under 200 in over 16 years.

 

To OP, I will post later on my thoughts on this since it has been a journey for me.

Congrats on the weight loss milestone!!

 

ETA - 🎉💥!!

Edited by displace
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I had/have? knee issues too, and knowing that one pound of extra weight is four extra pounds of pressure on my knees is motivating. But when my pain is gone with weight loss I feel less motivation, if that makes sense. Though I still know I have more to lose.

I don't know about your knees, but for mine, I know that they will continue to 'wear out' and the pain will return (eventually) even at lower weights. I'd rather push that day as far into the future as I can.

 

I get a reminder on pain free days -- when I pick up something heavy (laundry, groceries, book bag) and try to do stairs. Ouch! Even the few extra pounds in my hands makes a huge difference. I can't wait to put it down.

 

How much greater is the impact of my less noticable 'every step of every day' extra pounds of 'load' from my body mass?

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That is amazing, I'm really jealous!  Keto worked great for me for 12 years, but then when I hit perimenopause, it was a disaster.  Among other (far less troubling) problems, it increased my migraines to 5-7 per week.  It wasn't only the keto - I've had to make some other changes including going on a preventive medication, and the hormonal changes of periomenopause are clearly at the root of it all.  But for me, the keto + perimenopause was a bad combo.  I don't mean this to be discouraging to anyone, because I truly believe keto is an excellent diet.  But I suffered for over a year before a friend said that going OFF keto helped her migraines.  I was stunned, but I tried it, and it helped.  So I just wanted to say that it takes some experimenting to find what will work for you (general you) and our needs can change with time.  Ugh, I'm afraid I sound like I'm arguing with you, and that's not my intention at all!  Just sharing my experience.   :blush:

 

Oh don't worry, this thread is about all peoples' experiences, not any one right way to do anything!

 

I have been paleo (with exceptions for special occasions) for about a year now, and that really has been great, but had no effect on weight or headaches.  Cutting out coke was great for me, but it was also my best "medicine" for migraines because too much excedrin kills my stomach.  But I decided to try to get these last few baby pounds off and address some PCOS issues, and started keto... and poof... headaches are gone.  I can tell there is something weird happening in my brain, as it has also totally changed my quality of sleep and vividness of dreams.  

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