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Van1998

I'm 18 And I Never Attended School

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I guess I chose the wrong words when I wrote that. My parents don't file any paperwork annually or anything like that. I don't have any documentation about my education, mostly because I odn't have an education. I wasn't lying or stretching the truth when I said that the first 17 years of my life were spent in my home in front of my television. The only real documentation out there on me is my birth certificate, a few medical records, and my social security card, which I didn't have until August this year.

If they never registered or submitted annual renewals, then unfortunately you were not "legally homeschooled" in Louisiana, you would be counted as truant. Are you sure they don't file as a home-based private school or something? 

 

If I were you, I would focus on the CLEP tests. Maybe start with English Comp, since you already write very well. Pick up an REA prep book for $20, read through it, and see how you do on the practice tests. If it seems like you will pass, sign up to take the test at Sowela. Get as many CLEPs as you can under your belt this year, then look into applying to Sowela for next fall. 

 

There is a school called North Atlantic Regional High School that can legally grant an accredited high school diploma retroactively after a student has completed the equivalent of 1 yr of college courses. So if you get through a year's worth of courses at Sowela, you can pay around $500-600 to NARHS and they will issue a fully accredited high school diploma. Then you can honestly check the "high school diploma" box on job applications, and can avoid the GED stigma.

 

 

Edited by Corraleno
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If they never registered or submitted annual renewals, then unfortunately you were not "legally homeschooled" in Louisiana, you would be counted as truant. Are you sure they don't file as a home-based private school or something? 

 

If I were you, I would focus on the CLEP tests. Maybe start with English Comp, since you already write very well. Pick up an REA prep book for $20, read through it, and see how you do on the practice tests. If it seems like you will pass, sign up to take the test at Sowela. Get as many CLEPs as you can under your belt this year, then look into applying to Sowela for next fall. 

 

There is a school called North Atlantic Regional High School that can legally grant an accredited high school diploma retroactively after a student has completed the equivalent of 1 yr of college courses. So if you get through a year's worth of courses at Sowela, you can pay around $500-600 to NARHS and they will issue a fully accredited high school diploma. Then you can honestly check the "high school diploma" box on job applications, and can avoid the GED stigma.

No, they didn't. I just asked my father to make sure.

 

I guess I've got no other options than to do those tests.

 

I've gotten conflicting answers on whether or not the high school diploma actually matters when applying for a job. I plan to start looking immediately after I get my drivers license, do I NEED the diploma or not?

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No, they didn't. I just asked my father to make sure.

 

I guess I've got no other options than to do those tests.

 

I've gotten conflicting answers on whether or not the high school diploma actually matters when applying for a job. I plan to start looking immediately after I get my drivers license, do I NEED the diploma or not?

 

It depends on the job.  I would look into a Beach High School diploma if you need the piece of paper.  You're articulate and driven.  With a little remediation in math (which quite a few traditional graduates also need) you're also ready for college.  Get your piece of paper and get on with your life.

 

And please start giving yourself some credit.  You've managed to learn (really learn, retain) as much as some students with 12 years of direct instruction.  You're definitely a far better writer than many traditional graduates.  I'm impressed :)

Edited by shinyhappypeople
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It depends on the job.  I would look into a Beach High School diploma if you need the piece of paper.  You're articulate and driven.  With a little remediation in math (which quite a few traditional graduates also need) you're also ready for college.  Get your piece of paper and get on with your life.

 

And please start giving yourself some credit.  You've managed to learn (really learn, retain) as much as some students with 12 years of direct instruction.  You're definitely a far better writer than many traditional graduates.  I'm impressed :)

I'm not sure if I can afford the BHS diploma right now, but I will keep it in mind. Hopefully I can find a job that doesn't require it. Thank you.

 

And I've noticed a lot of you saying I should give myself more credit, but it's different from my perspective...My lack of an education has caused many, many problems throughout my life. It was one of the main reasons that a girl who I was very much in love with felt she had to leave me. For these reasons I just can't be proud of myself or the things I've done. But again, this is an education board, not a place for people to spout their personal issues all over the place, so I won't say anymore, but thank you for being impressed. I appreciate it.

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Do you want to work part time or fulltime?  If you want part-time work, you can apply as a high school student.  As others have pointed out, you are still within the age range for a high school junior or senior.  So employers won't necessarily ask for a diploma.  Since you are 18, you should be able to apply without needing a signature/documentation from your parents.  (I'm basing this on my 19 year old son's experience in this state, which is across the country from you so LA laws might be slightly different.)

 

I want to also encourage you that many of the young men I know your age (my son and his friends) have many of the same feelings that you do of uncertainty about life goals and feelings of uncertainty about how to proceed.  It's good that you have set some short term goals that are still getting you farther in your longer terms goals of independence.  That's great that you are going for your driver's license.  And that you are pursuing the next steps in education.  I think that you will find that many of us have had challenges in life, even if they are all slightly different from each other.  And all of us have had to work on things step by step. 

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I was thinking of something: People on here have talked a lot about the stigma of having a GED, but isn't there also a stigma to attending a community college? I'm honestly not sure what the difference is between a community college and a regular college, but I do remember people that went to CC's being the butt of many jokes, like on TV shows and such.

 

That used to be the case back when 4 year college tuition wasn't remotely as expensive as it is today. Back when I was in high school in the '90's, basically nobody who could get accepted to a 4 year school started out at community college to save money because there wasn't as big of a price difference. The year I graduated high school, an entire year's in-state tuition at the 4 year state flagship cost only $2200 (the equivalent of $3400 today). Now the annual tuition at that same school is $15k and lots of kids who are smart enough to get into 4 year schools decide to do the community college-and-transfer route to save money.

 

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My lack of an education has caused many, many problems throughout my life. It was one of the main reasons that a girl who I was very much in love with felt she had to leave me.  

 

My $0.02 is that's just an excuse she used to end the relationship. If she had truly loved you, she would've figured out a way to help you better your life.

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My $0.02 is that's just an excuse she used to end the relationship. If she had truly loved you, she would've figured out a way to help you better your life.

Well I didn't say anything about her loving me, I just know I loved her. I still do.

 

And in regards to your earlier post, what you're saying does make a lot of sense to me (that the stigma for a GED wouldn't be so bad in the current day) and I'll definitely keep that as my sort of back-up plan, but I think I'm going to try the CLEP exams first, hopefully that will allow me to get many things done at once, plus allow me to be working at a college level without having to go through the earlier grades. It's honestly really hard to find stuff online for earlier grades, it's much easier for High School and College surprisingly. 

 

Thank you all for your suggestions, I appreciate every single one of you. Since this thread is super-long at this point, I'll start a new one when I have more questions.

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I agree, that was just an easy way for her to get out there of the relationship. You prove her wrong & make something great of yourself! I'' sorry your parents have let you down.

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So here's a plan for you: spend the next couple of years catching up and filling in gaps, maybe get a start at a community college. You come across as very motivated, articulate and intelligent--you can absolutely do this.

 

Two years from now, apply to a bunch of good universities with your self-education transcript and a killer essay about how you truly pulled yourself up by your bootstraps after years of severe educational neglect.

 

Somebody is going to accept you with a hefty scholarship because you will have a story worth telling and proof that you know how to work hard and overcome obstacles.

I think of all the responses I've gotten on here, and there have been a lot of good ones, this is the one that gives me the most hope. I never thought about it that way, maybe my curse was actually a blessing in disguise. Thank you so much.

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I honestly have no idea what I want to be in life. For a long time I wanted to be a politician, since I was passionate about politics for several years but that's since gone away. I thought about becoming a doctor, until I learned how much schooling you have to go through for it. I'm just not looking to put the next 10-12 years of my life into CC, a 4 year university, and then 4 years of medical school. I'm still trying to figure out what my calling in this life is, but I haven't found anything yet.

 

Many community colleges offer a class or free interest/aptitude testing. 

 

My son took the CHSPE (high school diploma equivalent test in CA) at 16 and went to community college because....he didn't want to homeschool anymore. It was a great thing for him. He took several classes to see if he was interested, took all his college general education requirements, and graduated after 4 years with an AA and a certificate in marketing as well as a good sense of what he wanted to major in. He was able to transfer no problem to a 4-year state school. In our state community colleges are deliberately set up to feed into the state college/university system, so no stigma. They also offer a number of vocational paths (radiology, nursing, engineering technology, agricultural, culinary, you name it) so there's lots of interesting possibilities. And you don't even have to have a high school diploma to attend.

 

I'd suggest.....go in and take the CC placement tests in english and math now, see how you do and decide how much more you want to study. Sometimes a bit more study can really pay off by saving you a semester or two of remedial classes, especially in math.

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I'm not so sure the girlfriend was capable of staying around to help. I'm figuring she is also around 18 years old. I'm not sure I'd want my 18 year old daughter (if I had one), dating a guy with absolutely no future who had played video games for the past 12 years.

 

The thing is, Van, that this isn't your fault. Kids look to their parents for guidance. You parents didn't guide you, so you did as any young person would do--you played. Two summers ago I tested to see what my kids would do on summer vacation if I didn't make them do anything. They played computer games for 10 hours a day for 2.5 solid months. They were really happy. But they were too young to know that if they kept that up, there would be problems later. I haven't let them do that since.

 

So, it's not your fault that you're in this situation. It's gotta hurt so much that your girlfriend left. Yet, I can't imagine her mother thinking it's a good idea for her to get attached to a guy who has zero education. I don't know you or her, but on paper, she made the "right" decision not to date the young man with zero prospects. I can't imagine telling an 18 year old person, "Oh, if you love him, you'll figure out how to educate him." Um...no. I don't see that happening. It's not her responsibilty and possibly not even in her capacity to do that. She's still barely an adult and still has to get her own education.

 

So Van...what you're doing now--getting your own education is SO impressive. SO impressive. You've had no guidance, yet you're tackling this anyway. While your life is not where you wanted it to be, know that the blame is on the adults in your life. Perhaps you "made wrong choices" by choosing to play games all day...but you were a kid! It's what kids do! You wouldn't have had the maturity or ability to see the long term picture then. Now that you're 18, and lost someone very close to you, you now have the maturity to see that you were let down.

 

Please, look ahead not behind. You honestly have a lot of time to fix this. You really do.

 

 

(ETA: I have found out my words were misplaced. I thought that Van had not started improving himself when the girlfriend left and I assumed that she didn't think he had prospects. I have found out that he was working to improve himself before she left. My words came out badly as if he still didn't have prospects. I have apologized. I won't change the post because Van responds to it later, but I realize I came across as insensitive and I feel pretty bad about it..)

Edited by Garga
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Many community colleges offer a class or free interest/aptitude testing.

 

My son took the CHSPE (high school diploma equivalent test in CA) at 16 and went to community college because....he didn't want to homeschool anymore. It was a great thing for him. He took several classes to see if he was interested, took all his college general education requirements, and graduated after 4 years with an AA and a certificate in marketing as well as a good sense of what he wanted to major in. He was able to transfer no problem to a 4-year state school. In our state community colleges are deliberately set up to feed into the state college/university system, so no stigma. They also offer a number of vocational paths (radiology, nursing, engineering technology, agricultural, culinary, you name it) so there's lots of interesting possibilities. And you don't even have to have a high school diploma to attend.

 

I'd suggest.....go in and take the CC placement tests in english and math now, see how you do and decide how much more you want to study. Sometimes a bit more study can really pay off by saving you a semester or two of remedial classes, especially in math.

Plus I know in our area, the CC will give you help for free in areas that you need it. Worth checking. I'm having my 16 year old tested this week to see where he's at.

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I had an aquaintance in high school who I later found out (like 20 years later on Facebook) had been abused all throughout her childhood. One summer, her parents locked her in the basement for 3 months and fed her every other day.

 

They kicked her out at 15. She managed to get a job at an old historic movie theater and lived in the grimy apartment above the theater. She got herself to school most days, and worked longer hours than was legal. She had no guidance from parents. She kept working and sent herself to college. She went to New York City with $12 in her pocket.

 

She's the person I wrote about earlier, who has the test prep company--I would help her teach people essay writing. She started that company by herself. She has an office for her test prep on Wall Street in New York. She's not rich at all, but she has carved her own way in this life and is a business owner and is a published author of a test prep book.

 

She's not someone special. She didn't have any extra drive. She's not rich, but she made her way. Alone. There were a couple of teachers in high school that sensed something was wrong in her life and tried to help her, but that was it.

 

So, you can do this, too. There are a lot of people out there whose parents let them down in some way or another. Your path won't be traditional, but you can still have a great life.

Edited by Garga

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Plus I know in our area, the CC will give you help for free in areas that you need it. Worth checking. I'm having my 16 year old tested this week to see where he's at.

 

Absolutely true. They have both math and writing tutoring centers and have referrals to other students willing to help in specific areas.

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I'm not so sure the girlfriend was capable of staying around to help. I'm figuring she is also around 18 years old. I'm not sure I'd want my 18 year old daughter (if I had one), dating a guy with absolutely no future who had played video games for the past 12 years.

 

The thing is, Van, that this isn't your fault. Kids look to their parents for guidance. You parents didn't guide you, so you did as any young person would do--you played. Two summers ago I tested to see what my kids would do on summer vacation if I didn't make them do anything. They played computer games for 10 hours a day for 2.5 solid months. They were really happy. But they were too young to know that if they kept that up, there would be problems later. I haven't let them do that since.

 

So, it's not your fault that you're in this situation. It's gotta hurt so much that your girlfriend left. Yet, I can't imagine her mother thinking it's a good idea for her to get attached to a guy who has zero education. I don't know you or her, but on paper, she made the "right" decision not to date the young man with zero prospects. I can't imagine telling an 18 year old person, "Oh, if you love him, you'll figure out how to educate him." Um...no. I don't see that happening. It's not her responsibilty and possibly not even in her capacity to do that. She's still barely an adult and still has to get her own education.

 

So Van...what you're doing now--getting your own education is SO impressive. SO impressive. You've had no guidance, yet you're tackling this anyway. While your life is not where you wanted it to be, know that the blame is on the adults in your life. Perhaps you "made wrong choices" by choosing to play games all day...but you were a kid! It's what kids do! You wouldn't have had the maturity or ability to see the long term picture then. Now that you're 18, and lost someone very close to you, you now have the maturity to see that you were let down.

 

Please, look ahead not behind. You honestly have a lot of time to fix this. You really do.

Your theory would make a lot of sense if it wasn't for one thing: Her parent's didn't know anything about me or the fact I was dating their daughter. And I never asked her to "educate me", I didn't even want her knowing about my situation. She only got to know because she basically beat it out of me. Of course I have to give some credence to the possibility that she just used my situation as an excuse, but I don't buy that. There are things that I don't care to go into that make me believe that she was being genuine. It hurts, but it is what it is, I guess.

 

And when I was little, I would often times feel like I was wasting my time on unimportant things, but I'd always think "Well if Mom and Dad aren't telling me anything about it, then it must be okay." If I only knew.

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And when I was little, I would often times feel like I was wasting my time on unimportant things, but I'd always think "Well if Mom and Dad aren't telling me anything about it, then it must be okay." If I only knew.

 

I know 60 year olds who are still blaming their parents for the way their life turned out. Look how far ahead of that game you are. :)

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Hi Van1998: 

Your writing/typing skills are actually not bad for someone who has had very little education. Your spelling looks good as well as grammar unless you are a using a voice to text program or dictating this for someone else to type for you. I have known people who have gone to all 12 years of school and still can't write at all. Your language skills again are not bad. I have seen worse. Can't you still go to high school up until you are 21 years old? My son was in high school until 19/20yrs.Go to the nearest high school and find out.  

 

Also contact these people. There are others in your shoes and read this:

 

  http://www.responsiblehomeschooling.org/so-you-have-a-deficient-homeschool-education-what-next/

 

http://www.responsiblehomeschooling.org/adult-basic-education-for-the-educationally-neglected-homeschool-graduate/

 

http://www.responsiblehomeschooling.org/how-to-obtain-a-homeschool-diploma/

 

http://www.responsiblehomeschooling.org/how-to-obtain-a-homeschool-transcript/

 

I too lost many years of education. I made up for 3 years in one year during high school. In elementary school, my home life was so bad that I don't have any memories of several grades. Plus I was moved around from placement to placement. I got little sleep at nights for various reasons- trauma, domestic violence, abuse of various nature, neglect. CPS and cops entering in and out.  14 different schools in a four year period I remember. But I survived and so will you! 

 

So I will toss you some tough love cause that's all I know...

 

1 ) Yes you will feel overwhelmed and depressed but it's not going to get you anywhere.

 

2) People break up with others for various reasons but that is life. You just got to move on. Turn it into a learning experience and you can say you got one year of education down already. I had a similar situation. I just looked up my ex boyfriend. Not very appealing anymore :) I have a great husband now who gets me as he has walked a similar path as I have. I respect him even more in fact compared to my pompous ex boyfriend of a lawyer who had everything handed to him. No he was a very nice guy but he broke up because our paths (past, present) were just different plus I think he got pressured from his parents too. My husband I did not meet until I was 35 years. It took me that long to find the right man for me and lots of painful mistakes but learning experiences along the way. Turn everything painful experience into something educational, something you learned about yourself and the world. Learn to gain insight. The worst is to get into the trap of feeling sorry for yourself and blaming others. 

 

3) You may have hit rock bottom...but there is only one way to go and it is UP.

 

4) Here is a hint: People are learning all the time. Not just the first 12 years of their lives. Start giving yourself an education right now. 

 

5) There are many types of education. Think of all the things you do know that many of us do not know. And tap into that. 

 

6) Put yourself on hyperdrive with learning. Consider yourself a sponge and read everything you can get your hands on and watch every documentary you can get free on YouTube or at the library. Work through Khan Academy step by step and get your GED. Learn to write incredible essays. Start keeping a journal and start to learn to express yourself daily for 5 mins, then 10 minutes, then 20 mins, then 30 mins building up. Listen to that internal conversation in your head and get it out on the paper. Once you start writing your personal story down you got a great college essay as well as for scholarships explaining your situations. 

 

7) Its not impossible but it will be hardwork. 

 

8) For every hardship you have right now, there will be someone else who have walked this similar path. Listen to those who have walked that path and continued moving on. It isn't always beautiful or graceful but its still moving on.

 

9) What does it mean to move on? It means making goals, setting up steps and taking steps to achieve them.

 

10) Take one day at a time. What does that mean? Todays goals will be different than tomorrows goal. Maybe todays goals is to not wake up without crying about your ex and to read a chapter in a book and do a set of math program and watch a good documentary. Tomorrows goal is just going through the day and only thinking of your ex three times a day only, read another chapter, do another set of math program and watch another documentary. The following day is think of ex twice only,read a chap, do math, start freewriting/journaling, watch a documentary and post a discussion on it here on the forum. Pretty soon your day is packed of all kinds of things that will be your life education and you will once again start living. Add a goal to maybe learn a new recipe, a song, meet a new friend, get a GED book, take the GED test, go to Community College and look into financial aid

 

11) Start right now and right a goal for tomorrow and post it here.   

 

12) If you start feeling sorry for yourself, put a rubber band around your wrist and snap it. Stop yourself and don't go down that road. HOPE! Stay with Hope! Imagine how you want your life to be and write it down and turn it into a reality. 

 

I'm sorry if I have offended people but that is how I have learned to survive and many others I have known who have walked that path. Reminding ourselves that life is not meant to be fair. Its a fight for many of us. 

 

Right now my life is so good: I do not go to bed hungry, beaten, mistreated, scared and assaulted anymore. I have an awesome husband and a family to work for. I have a house to live in. I have friends in person and online.  I may not have a degree as I got exhausted working 40 hours a week to support myself through college full time but I have enough education to survive day to day and to be able to educate my children and support my husband in his job. I enjoyed being an EMT, CNA with six kids in tow and a preschool teacher before having kids. I started nursing school at one point while a single mom. I even brought my infant son to college. Many times I am not sure how I got into college but I remember my high school principal of my last year did some illegal things to my transcript and I got into college somehow. He ended up getting fired for embezzling or something illegal but he helped me get into college. 

 

 

Ps ...My house is filled with books and pictures of my kids and their picture that they have drawn and made. We have board games and lots of craft things. My house now is nothing like my childhood and proud of it. 

 

So you can do anything if you want it badly enough. Another friend of mine grew up in a bad neighborhood of Richmond. His mom was a single mom of five kids and his mom died of cancer when he was young. He is the only one who made it to college. He went to UC Berkeley and got an engineering degree and started med school in his mid 30's which is a really late late start. 

 

Husband was in special ed all of high school and he said all of high school he went there high and drunk. Starting 10yrs of age he got started on substances from his elementary school. He was also neglected and abused. He has no recollection of any schooling beyond 2 or 3rd grade. He never cracked open a book that he remembers. Now over 20yrs later he is fine supporting his family of 7 in the SF Bay Area which is not a cheap place at all. I think he is bright and wonderful. He is amazing in carpentry and fixing things. He's often on the computer seeking information. The most important thing of all: my husband is a good hardworking man who loves his wife, family and life. He is an awesome father. My kids adore him.

 

Got another friend who was human trafficked. She eventually made it through college and became a therapist working in the hospitals. 

 

Another friend victim of incest and horrible horrible childhood. She became a teacher. 

 

 

 

Edited by happycc
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I'm not so sure the girlfriend was capable of staying around to help. I'm figuring she is also around 18 years old. I'm not sure I'd want my 18 year old daughter (if I had one), dating a guy with absolutely no future who had played video games for the past 12 years.

 

The thing is, Van, that this isn't your fault. Kids look to their parents for guidance. You parents didn't guide you, so you did as any young person would do--you played. Two summers ago I tested to see what my kids would do on summer vacation if I didn't make them do anything. They played computer games for 10 hours a day for 2.5 solid months. They were really happy. But they were too young to know that if they kept that up, there would be problems later. I haven't let them do that since.

 

So, it's not your fault that you're in this situation. It's gotta hurt so much that your girlfriend left. Yet, I can't imagine her mother thinking it's a good idea for her to get attached to a guy who has zero education. I don't know you or her, but on paper, she made the "right" decision not to date the young man with zero prospects. I can't imagine telling an 18 year old person, "Oh, if you love him, you'll figure out how to educate him." Um...no. I don't see that happening. It's not her responsibilty and possibly not even in her capacity to do that. She's still barely an adult and still has to get her own education.

 

So Van...what you're doing now--getting your own education is SO impressive. SO impressive. You've had no guidance, yet you're tackling this anyway. While your life is not where you wanted it to be, know that the blame is on the adults in your life. Perhaps you "made wrong choices" by choosing to play games all day...but you were a kid! It's what kids do! You wouldn't have had the maturity or ability to see the long term picture then. Now that you're 18, and lost someone very close to you, you now have the maturity to see that you were let down.

 

Please, look ahead not behind. You honestly have a lot of time to fix this. You really do.

And I'd also like to point out that I began trying to dig myself out of this hole before I ever met my ex. And I don't have "zero prospects". I've intended to acquire some form of college education for a long time now. She didn't leave me because of that, it was more because we were in different places in life at the time. I don't really want to talk about her anymore, I should have never mentioned anything about her to begin with.

 

Miss, I really appreciate the help you've given me on this board, but I don't much care for being told that I have "absolutely no future". I mean that with the up-most respect.

 

Edited by Van1998

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And I'd also like to point out that I began trying to dig myself out of this hole before I ever met my ex. And I don't have "zero prospects". I've intended to acquire some form of college education for a long time now. She didn't leave me because of that, it was more because we were in different places in life at the time. I don't really want to talk about her anymore, I should have never mentioned anything about her to begin with.

 

Miss, I really appreciate the help you've given me on this board, but I don't much care for being told that I have "absolutely no future". I mean that with the up-most respect.

 

I cringed at those lines of her post as well. I completely disagree that you have zero prospects or absolutely no future. I think you've shown yourself to have tremendous potential through what you've written here (and how well you've expressed yourself). I'm in agreement with the other poster who suggsted that once you've gotten yourself college-ready, which you obviously have the qualities needed to do, you're going to have a heck of a personal statement to write for your college applications.

 

ETA: I don't think Garga meant it that way, and am not calling her out.

Edited by kand

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I cringed at those lines of her post as well. I completely disagree that you have zero prospects or absolutely no future. I think you've shown yourself to have tremendous potential through what you've written here (and how well you've expressed yourself). I'm in agreement with the other poster who suggsted that once you've gotten yourself college-ready, which you obviously have the qualities needed to do, you're going to have a heck of a personal statement to write for your college applications.

I honestly shouldn't have said that. I don't want to start a fight or an argument among the people who are kind enough to help me. I probably took it out of context anyway, so I apologize.

 

I'm actually reading through the CLEP official study guide right now. I'm in the American literature section at the moment, having a few issues but I think I can do okay with some practice.

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I honestly shouldn't have said that. I don't want to start a fight or an argument among the people who are kind enough to help me. I probably took it out of context anyway, so I apologize.

.

And this response speaks volumes about your character, which is more important than all this other stuff anyway. I really think your going to be okay. :)
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Van: I added these links above to my post as an edit but figured I should recopy them here for you to find and use as resources and contact these people for help immediately and meet others in your very exact shoes. 

 

 http://www.responsib...tion-what-next/

 

http://www.responsib...chool-graduate/

 

http://www.responsib...school-diploma/

 

http://www.responsib...ool-transcript/

 

 

First I want you to make a  list of everything you have ever done, gone to or seen. 

 

Let's consider what video games you played and consider it English Language Arts. 

Some video games can be construed to be strategic or mathematical. 

Also what movies have you watched? What documentaries? 

You said you were into political stuff. That could be consider Government. 

You can type-so that's typing credit.

Computer-computer credit. 

 

Some people are amazing at turning non academic things into  "educationalize"-turning nonacademic activities into something academic that can give you credit all with words. 

 

Did you do Boy Scouts or 4H as a kid? Play an instrument? Make or build anything?  Did you build models? 

Do you have photographs of your childhood to help you remember?

Did you cook, bake, sew, draw, paint? 

 

 

Read this: This is good too! 

https://homeschoolersanonymous.org/2016/08/03/how-early-college-actually-set-me-back-jos-story/

 

Suggests kids need to get a small part time job just to have experience with some kind of work. Gives them an idea of what they might like to do before wasting time and money on a degree before they know what they want to do. 

Edited by happycc

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Van: I added these links above to my post as an edit but figured I should recopy them here for you to find and use as resources and contact these people for help immediately and meet others in your very exact shoes. 

 

 http://www.responsib...tion-what-next/

 

http://www.responsib...chool-graduate/

 

http://www.responsib...school-diploma/

 

http://www.responsib...ool-transcript/

 

 

First I want you to make a  list of everything you have ever done, gone to or seen. 

 

Let's consider what video games you played and consider it English Language Arts. 

Some video games can be construed to be strategic or mathematical. 

Also what movies have you watched? What documentaries? 

You said you were into political stuff. That could be consider Government. 

You can type-so that's typing credit.

Computer-computer credit. 

 

Some people are amazing at turning non academic things into  "educationalize"-turning nonacademic activities into something academic that can give you credit all with words. 

 

Did you do Boy Scouts or 4H as a kid? Play an instrument? Make or build anything?  Did you build models? 

Do you have photographs of your childhood to help you remember?

Did you cook, bake, sew, draw, paint? 

 

 

Read this: This is good too! 

https://homeschoolersanonymous.org/2016/08/03/how-early-college-actually-set-me-back-jos-story/

 

Suggests kids need to get a small part time job just to have experience with some kind of work. Gives them an idea of what they might like to do before wasting time and money on a degree before they know what they want to do. 

Phew...this is gonna be a tough one.

 

I've played so many video games it's hard to really say.

 

I don't watch many movies, but I have watched several documentaries on World War 1 recently, and when I was little I watched countless History channel documentaries.

 

I didn't do boy scouts or 4H, but I do know how to play the guitar though. I've done some very light construction work with my father before, but I've never built models.

 

I can cook a few things, it's actually something I want to learn more about. I love food, haha! But I don't do the other things.

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I'm writing this here so that more people will see it. I've spent the last few weeks going through driver's ed, I passed, and I went to get my license earlier today. Apparently they won't give you one without some type of letter from a school. I'm technically a truant, so I have nothing to give them. Without my license I can't get a job and I can't begin to work on everything I had planned to.

 

I'm writing this basically just to say I've given up. I can't take this anymore. I can't take the constant failure and depression anymore. Thank you guys for all your help, but I guess it was all for nothing in the end.

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I'm writing this here so that more people will see it. I've spent the last few weeks going through driver's ed, I passed, and I went to get my license earlier today. Apparently they won't give you one without some type of letter from a school. I'm technically a truant, so I have nothing to give them. Without my license I can't get a job and I can't begin to work on everything I had planned to.

 

I'm writing this basically just to say I've given up. I can't take this anymore. I can't take the constant failure and depression anymore. Thank you guys for all your help, but I guess it was all for nothing in the end.

Congratulations, Van, please don't give up. I'm really impressed by everything you are trying to do. The world is waiting for your talents. You can overcome the rotten hand you have been dealt.

 

I can't give you specific advice because I don't live in the US, but I hope that some of the ladies on this thread can come back with ideas. My best wishes to you.

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But you are 18, an adult.   What state are you in?   

Louisiana. I told them I was 18 but they still said I'd need a GED, diploma, or a letter from whatever company I was home schooled through.

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Please don't give up!  You have done so much and do have a future ahead of you.  This is a hurdle, not a brick wall.  Go ahead and lick your wounds.  I am sure people here will have some ideas on how to manage a way over this sticking point. 

 

I hope someone else can verify this, but I looked up the licensing requirements for your state for someone over 18.  Here is something I found online.

 

FIRST-TIME APPLICANTS -- 18 Years of Age or older -- must provide one of the following:

  • A certificate of completion of a six (6) hour pre-licensing training course and the certificate of completion of an eight (8) hours of behind-the-wheel instruction which has been approved by the Department of Public Safety & Corrections. (Passing score of 80% classroom and 70% behind-the-wheel).
  • A certificate of completion of a driver education course consisting of a minimum of thirty (30) hours classroom instruction and eight (8) hours of behind-the-wheel instruction which has been approved by the Department of Public Safety & Corrections (Passing score of 80% classroom and 70% behind the wheel)).
  • An "Application and School Instruction Permit DE 1821 (R 10/95)" (Passing score of 75%).
  • A letter, on letterhead, from a Louisiana high school signed by the principal or instructor certifying completion of the course.
  • An official transcript from a Louisiana school which indicates that high school course credit has been given for a driver's education course.
  • A certificate of completion of military driver training. Applicant must provide proof of active duty status and successfully pass the knowledge and skills tests.

 (bolded mine).  Unless the law has changed, it looks like the person who denied your request for a license is not familiar with the law.  Since you are over 18, you should not need anything other than the completion certificate from the drivers ed school. 

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Can you show them this page of their own website that says all you need is driver's ed certification and a birth certificate? (The requirements seem to apply only to 17 year olds / legal minors? Unless I am reading this wrong?)

 

From the website:

 

Effective 09/16/2013

  • Effective September 16, 2013, the minor applicant seventeen (17 years of age) must also present a completed Certification of Required Attendance form indicating his enrollment / attendance status. A current Certificate of Required school attendance must be submitted or verified each time a minor makes application with the Office of Motor Vehicles (to lift the 02 restriction, be issued a duplicate, be issued a Class E (at age 17) or request a change of address). Effective 08/01/2014, the current school attendance form is valid for 90 days from the date of issuance.
  • For home study or registered nonpublic school students, the parent/guardian must submit one of the following documents each time a minor makes application with the OMV (as stated above) :
  • SBESE home study - signed and approved Home Study Approval Notification Letter. This letter is valid for one year from the date on the letter and must be renewed annually.
  • Private option - signed Registered Nonpublic School: Registration Confirmation Letter verifying registration of the nonpublic school. This letter is valid for one year from the date of the letter and must be renewed annually.
  • If the applicant has graduated or attained the high school equivalency diploma, he may present the diploma upon application in lieu of the Certification of Required Attendance.

R.S. 32:422
Class E Learner's License for those 18 years of age and above
Any applicant eighteen (18) years of age or above who is applying for a learner's license will be required to provide proof that he/she has completed a full thirty-eight (38) hour driver's education course or a six (6) hour pre-licensing course in addition to completion of an eight (8) hour behind-the-wheel instruction course. Once this proof is furnished and provided all other general requirements are met including successfully passing the vision and written examinations, the learner's license may be issued. This license authorizes the holder to drive while accompanied by a licensed driver. Upon providing this proof, the restriction may be removed immediately upon the applicant successfully passing the on-the-road driving examination.

 

 

 

Or maybe you could leverage some resources to obtain an "official" letter? (I'm not suggesting that you lie about your status, but - there are plenty of 18 year olds who have gone through all 12 years of public school and landed with fewer English skills than yours at least, and their letters are valid. So you educated yourself - write your own letter.)

Edited by Lucy the Valiant

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I'm writing this here so that more people will see it. I've spent the last few weeks going through driver's ed, I passed, and I went to get my license earlier today. Apparently they won't give you one without some type of letter from a school. I'm technically a truant, so I have nothing to give them. Without my license I can't get a job and I can't begin to work on everything I had planned to.

 

I'm writing this basically just to say I've given up. I can't take this anymore. I can't take the constant failure and depression anymore. Thank you guys for all your help, but I guess it was all for nothing in the end.

I think you just need the letter from your Driver's Ed school. Some kids take Driver's Ed at their high school, some take it at a driving school. The fact that you are truant from high school doesn't mean you can't attend a driving school. I found the "Driving School of Lake Charles" online. They have a class for grownups that is only 14 hours. You can do this!!!

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Obviously I don't know all your circumstances, but have you considered enrolling in public high school? It looks like you aren't too old. I don't know how well they could meet your needs, but it's free, right? In my high school it was possible to do things like independent study and summer school if you needed to pick up extra credits, so it wouldn't necessarily take forever... They often have "credit recovery" options to help kids who fail classes graduate on time. Maybe vocational training?

 

Here is the link from the school district about enrollment age.

 

http://www2.cpsb.org/System/policies/CAPS/CalcasieuCAPS.htm

 

The way I read it, 18 is totally okay. 19 too. It's twenty where they start limiting things. The point is I think you have options, maybe more options than you think.

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Obviously I don't know all your circumstances, but have you considered enrolling in public high school? It looks like you aren't too old. I don't know how well they could meet your needs, but it's free, right? In my high school it was possible to do things like independent study and summer school if you needed to pick up extra credits, so it wouldn't necessarily take forever... They often have "credit recovery" options to help kids who fail classes graduate on time. Maybe vocational training?

 

Here is the link from the school district about enrollment age.

 

http://www2.cpsb.org/System/policies/CAPS/CalcasieuCAPS.htm

 

The way I read it, 18 is totally okay. 19 too. It's twenty where they start limiting things. The point is I think you have options, maybe more options than you think.

I can't enroll in public school, my parents would be sent to jail for never enrolling me in school. 

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Hey Van,

 

I'm sorry you've faced a setback. Life's kinda like that--every one of us here has had them. Want to know some of the setbacks that have happened in my family? They include extended periods of unemployment, rejection after rejection after rejection for job applications, rejections on college applications, terrifying, life-threatening illneses, serious mental health problems, truthfully, the list could go on and on.

 

It's life. We move forward. Sometimes it's just putting one foot in front of the other. Some days you can't do even that. But maybe the next day you can.

 

And know what? There are amazing opportunities and experiences along the way. Holding a newborn baby. A long talk with a friend. Paying off a debt that had been a burden for years. Finishing my master's degree--while raising six kids and barely keeping my head above water with daily life.

 

Get a good night's sleep. Take a long walk. Then go back and figure out what your next step is. There is always a next step. And there is always a way to move forward in a positive direction.

 

Never, never use a setback as an excuse to give up. Maybe that is what your parents did--at some point they decided that raising and educating a kid was just too hard, so they decided not try.

 

You're not going to do the same. You're going to get up today, and you're going to put one foot in front of another. When you come to an obstacle in the road, you will work at the problem until you find a way over or around or through that obstacle.

 

You can do it.

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<snip>

 

Get a good night's sleep. Take a long walk. Then go back and figure out what your next step is. There is always a next step. And there is always a way to move forward in a positive direction.

 

Never, never use a setback as an excuse to give up. Maybe that is what your parents did--at some point they decided that raising and educating a kid was just too hard, so they decided not try.

 

You're not going to do the same. You're going to get up today, and you're going to put one foot in front of another. When you come to an obstacle in the road, you will work at the problem until you find a way over or around or through that obstacle.

 

You can do it.

 

I couldn't just like this post.  It is worth repeating!  And there are days where I have needed this repeated to me. 

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Van1998, your update brought back my personal Bad Bureaucrat memories.  I was in Barcelona, Spain and everything had been stolen. so there was lots of paperwork to be replaced.  Train and plane tickers, passport, credit cards, prescription medicine.  The guy at the embassy was lovely.  But every Spanish bureaucrat was a total snot.   50% of the time they would say "No" before you even said anything.  The only thing you could do was get in someone else's line and hope you landed on the right side of the 50% with the next person.  So, I guess there is advice in there.   When dealing with bureaucrats, if you know you are right, just get in another line.  

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I can't enroll in public school, my parents would be sent to jail for never enrolling me in school. 

 

 

I doubt it. Nobody has the time to be dealing with such stuff & kids drop out all the time. IME, schools are thrilled to see teens come back. I'd call a school or a local continuing education office and ask to speak to a counsellor. You don't have to give your name. Just explain & see what they say. My money is on them saying: "it's cool, we'll figure it out." 

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Van-I know it has been suggested that you look at community colleges. I'm going to add another suggestion-take the ACT (you can do a practice test and see how you do). At least in my state, you can enroll as a "non traditional student" at a CC without a high school diploma as long as you are college-ready in at least one ACT section (here, a 18-19 is enough), and, once you have completed 12 credit hours at the college level can get a high school equivalency, which makes you eligible for financial aid, state licenses requiring a high school diploma, etc. My guess is that you are college ready now, at least in English, and possibly in other sections as well. The reading and science are reading comprehension tests more than anything else, and the English is much more "what looks/sounds right". You can couple that with CLEP, too.

Edited by dmmetler
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I am sorry what happen when you were going to get your license and for the educational neglect you received. That must be so demoralizing to not be able to get your license. Hopefully you can get that worked out. You are obviously very intelligent to write as well as you do without much education and to get through that much math in a short time using only khan academy. I met someone recently who was in a similar situation where he did not an education at all after he was pulled in 2nd grade in his case for religious reasons. He was especially behind in math and science and history knowledge. He was going to college but had to take remedial math classes at a very low level while he was taking regular cases for other subjects. He was very embarrassed by it but he was intelligent like you are. I know there is a lot in your path that will be difficult after what you been through. You do not need to be strong. Just take things one day at a time and keep going forward and if you cannot just yet that is ok. You are writing very well.

Edited by MistyMountain

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A Small update: My sister looked into things, and nowhere online does it say you need anything education related for a license in my state if you're 18 and above. Unless the law literally just changed and the websites aren't updated with the information yet, it's very possible that the woman at the OMV might not have been completely familiar with how things work. My sister printed out what it says on the OMV's website so that she can show it to them when I go up there again on Monday. 50/50 chance it works, but it's better than the 0% chance I have just staying at home.

 

If it works out, then I won't give up. If it doesn't, I have no choice.

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A Small update: My sister looked into things, and nowhere online does it say you need anything education related for a license in my state if you're 18 and above. Unless the law literally just changed and the websites aren't updated with the information yet, it's very possible that the woman at the OMV might not have been completely familiar with how things work. My sister printed out what it says on the OMV's website so that she can show it to them when I go up there again on Monday. 50/50 chance it works, but it's better than the 0% chance I have just staying at home.

 

If it works out, then I won't give up. If it doesn't, I have no choice.

Good luck!

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If it works out, then I won't give up. If it doesn't, I have no choice.

 

Horsefeathers.

 

If it works out, super.

 

If it doesn't work...seriously, your plan is to just...moulder in your parents' basement?  That would get boring, fast.  If it doesn't work, you stand in a different line.  Again.  And again.

 

Or you sign up at high school, and sort it out that way.

 

Or you contact some of the non-traditional schools that people have recommended that will issue a high-school diploma to you--and, while you're there, a driver's ed. letter.

 

Or you take a driver's ed. class through a private company.

 

There are DOZENS of ways to approach this that do not include "just give up."

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Good luck tomorrow. Did you take drivers ed through a driver's ed school of some kind? If so, the way I read the law posted above, you would just need something from them showing you completed it.

 

Either way, don't give up. You have a lot of options still. Is your sister older or younger?

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Good luck today Van!

 

Keep talking to people until you get to one who will help. You may encounter a few more clueless employees before you get to someone who can actually think through the regulations themself :)

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