Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Van1998

I'm 18 And I Never Attended School

Recommended Posts

Van, I don't know what state you live in, but in my state, a homeschool parent can issue a high school diploma even for unschooling.  This is not true in all states so look up  your state's laws regarding homeschooling.   Obviously you would still want to pursue an education from what you've said, but it wouldn't stop you from applying for jobs.  My 19 year old son is on his second job now and he has learned so much just from working.  And he's saved up enough money to start taking college classes.  His first job in a grocery store did not require a lot of education.  His job now doing IT requires a lot of knowledge but he is doing it without a degree to back him up.  All his employer cares about is whether he can do the job.  Ds does want that college degree for future advancement and employment opportunity but I wouldn't sell yourself short. 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wanted to jump in on the cheering squad!! You can do this!! My grandpa dropped out of high school, joined the army, then became a civil servant for 30+ years. After retirement, he went back and got his GED. It was a real struggle for him, a man who was very smart, but never had a chance at an education. I remember that we did our homework together ;) He never really said much about it. After he passed away, I found it in his drawer of important papers that he kept locked away, with his wedding photo and birth certificate, etc. All this to say, it's never too late, and you already have a head start on my grandpa, who would have struggled to write the way you do. And what CAN'T you do with all these mothers behind you, lol?!!!

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can get a homeschooled high school diploma that would also open up military career opportunities. Don't know if that is of interest to you but there are lots of job options, it's good work experience, and the education benefits are phenomenal. I bet you could ace the ASVAB with some study--libraries typically have books for this.

 

No pressure to take this route if you're not interested, just posting as an option.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd imagine they would be willing to sign it. And they're honestly pretty indifferent to the whole thing. I'm more-or-less doing this independently.

 

I'm unemployed right now, I've never applied for a job because I think the complete lack of any formal education would 1: look fishy from a legal standpoint, and 2: would put me at a distinct disadvantage to anyone else with a formal education. And I live with my parents, they have told me that I could stay with them for free as long as I need to, so that's one plus.

 

You're only 18. There's no reason you can't classify yourself as a full time high school student (senior) as far as any job applications are concerned. They'll never know the difference. Places that tend to be teen employment friendly probably don't require transcripts anyway. And if they ask where you go to school, homeschooling isn't uncommon these days. Just list that as your education to date and give the graduation date as June 2017. If you gained that much ground in six months alone, imagine where you'll be in ten months. 

 

You're motivated, independently working towards furthering your education of your own accord, and if your posts are any indication, a well spoken individual. You need to chin up and have confidence in yourself! If you have jobs you would like to apply for, go for it! :) 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might talk to this fellow:

 

http://beachhigh.education/guidance/

 

He has a great deal of experience in helping people with unconventional educational backgrounds turn what they do have into a transcript, as well as helping steer you to meet your own educational goals. He comes highly recommended by a friend of mine.

Do I click on the contact button at the top? I don't see any links on the page itself. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do I click on the contact button at the top? I don't see any links on the page itself.

Yes, click the contact button and it will take you to a page with a phone number and email address.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coming in late here, but from what you've written, it appears that your writing skills are better than the majority of the people in my master's degree program--and those people are all teachers.  

 

I would take the English placement test at your local community college.  I bet you'd pass.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again I guess I should have clarified: I'm not actively studying calculus right now, but knowing that something that seems so difficult is on the horizon is very intimidating to me. It's hard for me to find the motivation to study the level of math I'm currently at when I feel like I'm headed for near-certain failure once I get to that point. 

 

But if it's not as hard as it seems once you have a better understanding of the more advanced maths, then I'll trudge on.

 

Don't worry about Calculus before you get through Algebra.  Calculus is not my favorite subject. But I LOVED algebra and I'd hate to see the fun of "Find the missing variable" (its really a lot like a logic puzzle with those rules to figure out who had which house and which color car...) marred by worrying about what comes next.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been 10 years since I had a kid at a CC. I have tutored some students over the past 10 years that were at a CC or preparing for one.

 

One of my boys used American School. The other took the GED. Both went to our small satellite CC. CC's can differ widely.

 

Some CCs are rigorous and trying to take the place of the 1st two years of a rigorous university. They have a priority of maintaining an automatic transfer of students to a more expensive 4 year school. They really don't care about helping underprepared students enter their school. They just care about their wealthier and more prepared transfer students.

 

Other CCs are all about attracting underprepared students and being an asset to the community.

 

The school my boys went to only required "College Algebra" to graduate and used an algebra 2 books and only did the easier problems. Your writing skills would have allowed you into Comp and English 101 and you would have passed, but probably not gotten an A. I doubt you would have had to take remedial English. If you are using  Khan Academy 7 and have mastered that material, they would have placed you in either Beginning Algebra or Basis Math which are remedial classes and wouldn't count towards graduation.

 

In my city there is a CC that is the transfer type. And unfortunately some of the agencies have an agreement with that school to try and force all students there, even though it is the least welcoming for these students. It makes me angry. I have had to help students find ways to appeal placement there and get placed at another more welcoming school. If the first CC you talk to is intimidating, don't give up on CC. Call another one.

 

The GED is a for profit company. I don't know what they are doing right now, but there is a lot of controversy and many CCs are offering an alternate and easier test to take. I was pro GED until the test got so hard and the company started focusing on profits before the needs of students.

 

Some CCs don't require any outside testing. Applying for FAFSA grants, which do NOT need to be paid back, if your parents are low income is likely to require a diploma or outside testing. My boys qualified for FAFSA but only after showing an accredited diploma or GED. That was more than 10 years ago, though.

 

When applying for a job, audacity will get you a job. Just say, "I was homeschooled," and act like you had the most awesome education imaginable. Throw your shoulders back, hold up your head, and look the manager in the eye. Be bold. Act confident.

 

First step. Go visit your closest CC and then come back and tell us what they said. Don't panic whatever they said. Just come back and tell us. Some CCs are SOOOO welcoming and others just suck. I have dealt with both ends of the spectrum and a lot in between.

 

I have other ideas for you, too. But go visit the CC first.

 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been 10 years since I had a kid at a CC. I have tutored some students over the past 10 years that were at a CC or preparing for one.

 

One of my boys used American School. The other took the GED. Both went to our small satellite CC. CC's can differ widely.

 

Some CCs are rigorous and trying to take the place of the 1st two years of a rigorous university. They have a priority of maintaining an automatic transfer of students to a more expensive 4 year school. They really don't care about helping underprepared students enter their school. They just care about their wealthier and more prepared transfer students.

 

Other CCs are all about attracting underprepared students and being an asset to the community.

 

The school my boys went to only required "College Algebra" to graduate and used an algebra 2 books and only did the easier problems. Your writing skills would have allowed you into Comp and English 101 and you would have passed, but probably not gotten an A. I doubt you would have had to take remedial English. If you are using  Khan Academy 7 and have mastered that material, they would have placed you in either Beginning Algebra or Basis Math which are remedial classes and wouldn't count towards graduation.

 

In my city there is a CC that is the transfer type. And unfortunately some of the agencies have an agreement with that school to try and force all students there, even though it is the least welcoming for these students. It makes me angry. I have had to help students find ways to appeal placement there and get placed at another more welcoming school. If the first CC you talk to is intimidating, don't give up on CC. Call another one.

 

The GED is a for profit company. I don't know what they are doing right now, but there is a lot of controversy and many CCs are offering an alternate and easier test to take. I was pro GED until the test got so hard and the company started focusing on profits before the needs of students.

 

Some CCs don't require any outside testing. Applying for FAFSA grants, which do NOT need to be paid back, if your parents are low income is likely to require a diploma or outside testing. My boys qualified for FAFSA but only after showing an accredited diploma or GED. That was more than 10 years ago, though.

 

When applying for a job, audacity will get you a job. Just say, "I was homeschooled," and act like you had the most awesome education imaginable. Throw your shoulders back, hold up your head, and look the manager in the eye. Be bold. Act confident.

 

First step. Go visit your closest CC and then come back and tell us what they said. Don't panic whatever they said. Just come back and tell us. Some CCs are SOOOO welcoming and others just suck. I have dealt with both ends of the spectrum and a lot in between.

 

I have other ideas for you, too. But go visit the CC first.

Unfortunately there's only one CC near me, so I hope it's one of the more welcoming CC's like you said because I've got few options if it isn't.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been 10 years since I had a kid at a CC. I have tutored some students over the past 10 years that were at a CC or preparing for one.

 

One of my boys used American School. The other took the GED. Both went to our small satellite CC. CC's can differ widely.

 

Some CCs are rigorous and trying to take the place of the 1st two years of a rigorous university. They have a priority of maintaining an automatic transfer of students to a more expensive 4 year school. They really don't care about helping underprepared students enter their school. They just care about their wealthier and more prepared transfer students.

 

Other CCs are all about attracting underprepared students and being an asset to the community.

 

The school my boys went to only required "College Algebra" to graduate and used an algebra 2 books and only did the easier problems. Your writing skills would have allowed you into Comp and English 101 and you would have passed, but probably not gotten an A. I doubt you would have had to take remedial English. If you are using  Khan Academy 7 and have mastered that material, they would have placed you in either Beginning Algebra or Basis Math which are remedial classes and wouldn't count towards graduation.

 

In my city there is a CC that is the transfer type. And unfortunately some of the agencies have an agreement with that school to try and force all students there, even though it is the least welcoming for these students. It makes me angry. I have had to help students find ways to appeal placement there and get placed at another more welcoming school. If the first CC you talk to is intimidating, don't give up on CC. Call another one.

 

The GED is a for profit company. I don't know what they are doing right now, but there is a lot of controversy and many CCs are offering an alternate and easier test to take. I was pro GED until the test got so hard and the company started focusing on profits before the needs of students.

 

Some CCs don't require any outside testing. Applying for FAFSA grants, which do NOT need to be paid back, if your parents are low income is likely to require a diploma or outside testing. My boys qualified for FAFSA but only after showing an accredited diploma or GED. That was more than 10 years ago, though.

 

When applying for a job, audacity will get you a job. Just say, "I was homeschooled," and act like you had the most awesome education imaginable. Throw your shoulders back, hold up your head, and look the manager in the eye. Be bold. Act confident.

 

First step. Go visit your closest CC and then come back and tell us what they said. Don't panic whatever they said. Just come back and tell us. Some CCs are SOOOO welcoming and others just suck. I have dealt with both ends of the spectrum and a lot in between.

 

I have other ideas for you, too. But go visit the CC first.

And also I'd like to point out that I've not completed grade 7 math on Khan Academy yet. I'm about 40% of the way through all the courses on there, but I've been stuck for quite some time now. I think I've hit the wall of what I can realistically teach myself, as most of what I'm trying to learn now all just seems very confusing to me.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW - many community colleges use the Compass test as an English and Math placement test.  You can do the sample questions on this site https://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/act-compass/test-preparation.html to see how you do.  It will give you an idea of what you've mastered and what you still need to work on.

 

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How good is your local library?  My library has free tutoring once or twice a week.  There is also online tutoring on Tutor.com.  It is a paid service but our library contracts with them to provide free tutoring (with your library card number) at certain times of the day.  Also - at our library we can get some math programs like Teaching Textbooks - pre-algebra that has CD lectures and examples of how to work the math.  I would go to the library to see what is available.  They can be great sources of free help. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How good is your local library?  My library has free tutoring once or twice a week.  There is also online tutoring on Tutor.com.  It is a paid service but our library contracts with them to provide free tutoring (with your library card number) at certain times of the day.  Also - at our library we can get some math programs like Teaching Textbooks - pre-algebra that has CD lectures and examples of how to work the math.  I would go to the library to see what is available.  They can be great sources of free help. 

Honestly I haven't been to the library in so long that I couldn't give an honest opinion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And also I'd like to point out that I've not completed grade 7 math on Khan Academy yet. I'm about 40% of the way through all the courses on there, but I've been stuck for quite some time now. I think I've hit the wall of what I can realistically teach myself, as most of what I'm trying to learn now all just seems very confusing to me.

 

Would your parents assist you financially in hiring a math tutor to help you get past this point? If they would, you could call your local Community College or university and talk to the math department's secretary to find some students who offer tutoring. They could help you move forward while you consider your GED vs CC, etc. options. They're usually not horribly expensive and that way you could utilize them as needed and move forward through self study in the meantime. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would your parents assist you financially in hiring a math tutor to help you get past this point? If they would, you could call your local Community College or university and talk to the math department's secretary to find some students who offer tutoring. They could help you move forward while you consider your GED vs CC, etc. options. They're usually not horribly expensive and that way you could utilize them as needed and move forward through self study in the meantime. 

Honestly, probably not. Like I said before, they don't really care either way. I'm in this alone. U'm going to try my best to work my way through 7th and 8th grade math on my own (which probably means putting in many, many hours of constant studying). If after, say, a month I've not made any substantial progress then I'll look into some kind of tutor. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before hiring a tutor, I would buying a digital copy of Mastering Essential Math Skills

http://www.mathessentials.net/digital-download

Once you have the password, there are free videos that I think are easier than Khan Academy

http://www.mathessentials.net/videos

 

Here is a preview of Aufmann's Basic College Mathematics that was used for remedial classes at my boys' college. You can sometimes find older editions really really cheap and 1/2 the answers are in the back. This gives you an idea of how hard that remedial class is. Finishing 6th grade Khan Academy is fine to start this book.

https://books.google.com/books?id=JgKlDqnlvswC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

If you can make it to your capital city library, they usually give a card to all residents of the state. You will be able to access all the online resources using wifi at home. They sometimes offer free online classes. Also they usually have a pretty extensive career and college counseling service for free.

 

Your local library should also have free counseling or even just a list of phone numbers.

 

The local unemployment office usually offers services to young people like yourself.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can find yourself an old copy of Saxon 54 FIRST edition, that was a great book for self-study that starts at the beginning. It is getting harder and harder to find first edition, especially the answer key. A full kit goes from dirt cheap to expensive highly sought after by those who know what a treasure it is.

 

Saxon was a remedial college math teacher. Hake, who is updating the series since Saxon died, focuses on gifted kids preparing for competitive colleges. Saxon always had his eye on the bottom. Hake always has his eye on the top. I preferred Saxon's work unedited by Hake.

 

Each Saxon book covered multiple grades of topics and were meant to almost kill the student with drill. The old 54 covers math from about grades 3-7. It is a great book no matter what is used after it. It is a great mop up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Van, I sent you a PM. You should see a little envelope thing in the top right corner of your screen. Click on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can find yourself an old copy of Saxon 54 FIRST edition, that was a great book for self-study that starts at the beginning. It is getting harder and harder to find first edition, especially the answer key. A full kit goes from dirt cheap to expensive highly sought after by those who know what a treasure it is.

 

Saxon was a remedial college math teacher. Hake, who is updating the series since Saxon died, focuses on gifted kids preparing for competitive colleges. Saxon always had his eye on the bottom. Hake always has his eye on the top. I preferred Saxon's work unedited by Hake.

 

Each Saxon book covered multiple grades of topics and were meant to almost kill the student with drill. The old 54 covers math from about grades 3-7. It is a great book no matter what is used after it. It is a great mop up.

 

Hunter, which year is the first edition?  The earliest I can find is 1990, but that's Saxon/Hake.  Is that the one you're talking about?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hunter, which year is the first edition?  The earliest I can find is 1990, but that's Saxon/Hake.  Is that the one you're talking about?

 

I forget the copyright, but yes, Hake did write the middle school books, but Saxon oversaw the writing. Hake was required to conform his middle school books to the Saxon highschool books that were already written. Saxon had the final say. Hake now has the final say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saxon second edition books say second edition. First edition often don't list a version.

 

I think 76 was the first book written and then the series might have been written backwards and then 76 second edition being out along side the other first edition middle school books. Calculus first edition was out alongside Algebra 1 third edition. Not all books were updated at the same time. 76 and Calculus were the ones most different in editions used alongside the other books that were more similar in edition.

 

Algebra 1 and 2 first edition were originally written for community college remediation.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Van, sorry for hijacking your thread! But Shiny, the REAL story behind the overlap of 87 and algebra 1/2 is that they were written by different authors. Saxon didn't need an 87 book, but he must have allowed Hake to write one or couldn't stop him. Or maybe he died before it came out. Saxon was all set with Algebra 1/2. 76 was written to be used before algebra 1/2 which was already out, I believe.

 

Of course now the recommendation is to use 87 and skip algebra 1/2 if not doing them both. I don't agree. Use Saxon to prepare for Saxon high school. I think he knew best what was needed for his own books.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You've received some really good advice on this thread.  As you are continuing your journey you will have more questions.  Please come back to this group of amazing parents who collectively have a lot of experience with high school coursework, community colleges, college applications, math, science, history, the whole shebang.  Post to this thread or start a new one.

 

They are also very positive and encouraging.  You're in good hands.  

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know its been a while since I've started this thread, but I figured since a lot of you guys encouraged me to update from time to time, I figured I would post this: 

 

Since this post I've taken a break from studying math to focus on my English skills, which are, according to a few of you, more important when applying for remedial classes than math skills are. Of course I've had to start at the very bottom, I've learned what a noun, pronoun, and predicates are as well as the concepts of agreement in writing (matching verbs together, etc.) I do seem to be struggling with verbs, though. I've been using the site Englishgrammar101.com as well as some other sites here and there to learn, and I have a very hard time telling the difference between helping verbs and linking verbs. I just don't seem to understand it. And thank you to whoever suggested the site. Its helped me a lot.

 

I haven't studied as much in the past few days because I have a drivers test coming up on Monday, so I've been devoting most of my time and energy to that instead. Essentially, I need my drivers license to get a job so I can start saving money to pay for remedial classes at my local CC (It's Sowella, if anyone has any experience with that place.)

 

Thank you guys for all your help and suggestions, I'll keep you guys updated.

  • Like 18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've gathered from the responses on here that a GED is not the way to go, at least if there are other options available to me. That's very useful to me because I never knew there were alternatives, thank you all for that bit of information.

This is not true, see about getting tested, look up adult reading academy for your area. I'd start looking into a GED ir High School Equivalency, it's going to be your quicket route to find out what you need to know. I jnow people that have dine just fine with a GED, don't let people here scare you otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Van, it's good to hear from you! Sounds like you are doing great.

 

Don't stress too much over the formal grammar; I've done professional writing and have a graduate degree but don't have a clue what linking verbs or helping verbs are. Knowing how to use language intuitively, as your writing shows that you are able to do, is more important.

 

Have you looked into community college options in your area? What about opportunities for an adult to get a high school diploma? I suspect community college will be your best option--you come across as very bright and motivated.

 

Good luck with your driving test!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Van! Read your update.

 

I didn't see this thread the first time around, but I did want to say that at your age, you are still in high school. This means you don't necessarily need to go the GED route. It's better to have a high school diploma rather than a GED. If you tell us what state you're in, we can help you figure out if you have enough to get a homeschool high school diploma. The GED has a negative connotation to it: employers wonder why you dropped out of high school.

 

Since you didn't drop out, you don't want that connotation attached to you. I'm not super sure of the laws and all, and maybe it's just too late for you to honestly say you have a high school diploma, but it's something worth investigating.

 

Linking Verbs vs. Helping Verbs

 

Linking verbs are like little equal signs. If there is a linking verb in the sentence, the sentence usually has this format:

 

Subject - Verb - Description of the Subject.

 

Mary Poppins was the most beautiful woman I'd ever met.

 

Mary Poppins - Was - Beautiful.

 

You can often switch these sentences around.

 

The most beautiful woman I'd ever met was Mary Poppins.

 

The was is an equal sign: Mary Poppins = Beautiful.

 

Linking verbs link the subject to a description. Mary Poppins (subject) - Was (linking verb, = sign) - Beautiful (description)

 

 

They can also rename the subject.

 

Mary Poppins was Jane's twentieth nanny.

 

Mary Poppins = nanny

 

Mary Poppins (subject) - is (linking verb, equal sign) - nanny (a word that renames Mary Poppins with her job.)

 

Again, these sentences are easy to flip flop:

 

Jane's twentieth nanny was Mary Poppins.

 

Linking verbs are equal signs. There is no real "action" in the sentence. There is no action verb. No run or jump or sing. There's just a verb whose sole job is to be an equal sign describing or renaming the subject.

 

 

Helping Verbs:

 

Somewhere along the line, the people who make up grammar rules decided that we can't just say:

 

I playing baseball this afternoon.

I going to mow the lawn after my nap.

Julia growing better at swimming every day.

 

We have to add helpers to the verbs:

 

I am playing baseball this afternoon.

I was going to mow the lawn after my nap.

Julia has been growing better at swimming every day.

 

There is action in these sentences. There was no action in the linking verb sentences. Those were just equal signs.

 

But here in these helping verb sentences, there are little words that you put in front of the action to make it "sound better."

 

Helping verbs go in front of the main verb in the sentence, and they make it "sound right." I don't normally say to study grammar and go with what just "sounds right" but in this case, it's pretty clear that if you take out the helping verbs, the sentences sound wrong.

 

*************************

 

Best of luck to you. You're still young enough to be in high school and get yourself a regular diploma, depending on your state's laws and how you can manage to write up the transcript. Let us know if you have questions about that and we'll see if you really do have enough for a diploma.

 

If you have more specific questions about diplomas and requirements for high school, start new threads with new subject lines or your question will get hidden in the middle of this thread and you won't get answers.

Edited by Garga
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thought - have you looked into GED tutoring? I don't know where you are, but our church does free GED tutoring several times each week. Even if you ultimately decide not to take the GED, it would give you some tutors who know the material that you're getting stuck on. When I lived across the country, our church there didn't do GED tutoring, but they did have once/week tutoring for kids in the local school system. There were mostly elementary-aged students, but the volunteer group included engineers and retired teachers and between them they could have helped with pretty much any subject (and some of them would have been willing to meet more often to help somebody with unusual circumstances). I don't know how common this is, but having found it at 2 different churches on opposite sides of the country, I thought I'd suggest it. You might be able to search 'GED tutoring' or 'free tutoring', or look on individual websites of local churches or civic groups and look at their list of programs, ministries, or maybe even their weekly schedule of events. Good luck.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to encourage you to keep plugging along. I certainly don't know the best route for you to take, but it sounds like you are off to a good start. I admire your determination to work and learn.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Van, it's good to hear from you! Sounds like you are doing great.

 

Don't stress too much over the formal grammar; I've done professional writing and have a graduate degree but don't have a clue what linking verbs or helping verbs are. Knowing how to use language intuitively, as your writing shows that you are able to do, is more important.

 

Have you looked into community college options in your area? What about opportunities for an adult to get a high school diploma? I suspect community college will be your best option--you come across as very bright and motivated.

 

Good luck with your driving test!

I was thinking of something: People on here have talked a lot about the stigma of having a GED, but isn't there also a stigma to attending a community college? I'm honestly not sure what the difference is between a community college and a regular college, but I do remember people that went to CC's being the butt of many jokes, like on TV shows and such.

 

I could be completely wrong, I know, it's just something I've always wondered about.

 

And yes, I've looked into them. I live in a place called Lake Charles, Louisiana and the only CC near me seems to be a place called Sowella Tech. I've not set up an appointment with a councilor there yet, but I will once I have my car and everything in order.

 

And I've actually had to postpone my driving test due to a dental emergency. I hate teeth :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Van! Read your update.

 

I didn't see this thread the first time around, but I did want to say that at your age, you are still in high school. This means you don't necessarily need to go the GED route. It's better to have a high school diploma rather than a GED. If you tell us what state you're in, we can help you figure out if you have enough to get a homeschool high school diploma. The GED has a negative connotation to it: employers wonder why you dropped out of high school.

 

Since you didn't drop out, you don't want that connotation attached to you. I'm not super sure of the laws and all, and maybe it's just too late for you to honestly say you have a high school diploma, but it's something worth investigating.

 

Linking Verbs vs. Helping Verbs

 

Linking verbs are like little equal signs. If there is a linking verb in the sentence, the sentence usually has this format:

 

Subject - Verb - Description of the Subject.

 

Mary Poppins was the most beautiful woman I'd ever met.

 

Mary Poppins - Was - Beautiful.

 

You can often switch these sentences around.

 

The most beautiful woman I'd ever met was Mary Poppins.

 

The was is an equal sign: Mary Poppins = Beautiful.

 

Linking verbs link the subject to a description. Mary Poppins (subject) - Was (linking verb, = sign) - Beautiful (description)

 

 

They can also rename the subject.

 

Mary Poppins was Jane's twentieth nanny.

 

Mary Poppins = nanny

 

Mary Poppins (subject) - is (linking verb, equal sign) - nanny (a word that renames Mary Poppins with her job.)

 

Again, these sentences are easy to flip flop:

 

Jane's twentieth nanny was Mary Poppins.

 

Linking verbs are equal signs. There is no real "action" in the sentence. There is no action verb. No run or jump or sing. There's just a verb whose sole job is to be an equal sign describing or renaming the subject.

 

 

Helping Verbs:

 

Somewhere along the line, the people who make up grammar rules decided that we can't just say:

 

I playing baseball this afternoon.

I going to mow the lawn after my nap.

Julia growing better at swimming every day.

 

We have to add helpers to the verbs:

 

I am playing baseball this afternoon.

I was going to mow the lawn after my nap.

Julia has been growing better at swimming every day.

 

There is action in these sentences. There was no action in the linking verb sentences. Those were just equal signs.

 

But here in these helping verb sentences, there are little words that you put in front of the action to make it "sound better."

 

Helping verbs go in front of the main verb in the sentence, and they make it "sound right." I don't normally say to study grammar and go with what just "sounds right" but in this case, it's pretty clear that if you take out the helping verbs, the sentences sound wrong.

 

*************************

 

Best of luck to you. You're still young enough to be in high school and get yourself a regular diploma, depending on your state's laws and how you can manage to write up the transcript. Let us know if you have questions about that and we'll see if you really do have enough for a diploma.

 

If you have more specific questions about diplomas and requirements for high school, start new threads with new subject lines or your question will get hidden in the middle of this thread and you won't get answers.

I live in Louisiana. And thank you for your help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking of something: People on here have talked a lot about the stigma of having a GED, but isn't there also a stigma to attending a community college? I'm honestly not sure what the difference is between a community college and a regular college, but I do remember people that went to CC's being the butt of many jokes, like on TV shows and such.

 

I could be completely wrong, I know, it's just something I've always wondered about.

 

And yes, I've looked into them. I live in a place called Lake Charles, Louisiana and the only CC near me seems to be a place called Sowella Tech. I've not set up an appointment with a councilor there yet, but I will once I have my car and everything in order.

 

And I've actually had to postpone my driving test due to a dental emergency. I hate teeth :(

 

 

There is a bit of stigma for community college, but not the same as GED.  Though, sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do and go from there.  I wouldn't feel too bad about GEDs or Community College at this point for you in particular.  

 

While it's not true in many cases, a GED tends to make people think of a kid who dropped out of high school because of his own fault.  It brings up images of parents begging a student to do homework and the student refuses. As you well know, that's not what happens for many people who get a GED.  Often it's not through a fault on their part, but on circumstances around them.  So, if you have to go the GED route, then go the GED route.  You know the truth of what has happened and you can explain it if you want/need to.  In your case, you doing this on your own shows remarkable initiative.

 

Community College can have a stigma because CCs accept anyone, so that means that people who don't want to try very hard or who aren't very smart can get into Community College if they can't get in anywhere else.   However, not everyone at a CC is in that boat.  There are plenty of bright people at CC who refuse to go into debt, so they start at CC, or they're older students going back to learn something new.  Or they're like you and they're using the CC to catch up on high school knowledge.  

 

So, yes.  There is a stigma for GED and CC.  However, you have to do what has to be done to position yourself for future success.  Get that GED and that CC under your belt, and then you can move forward.  You can head straight to a 4 year for the last 2 years of school, or you can work for a bit and save money and then go to a 4 year.  

 

Honestly, you really are young.  There is still time.  It might not seem that way because other people your age are ahead, but this whole "life" thing isn't a race.  It's a journey and there are many paths.  

 

Don't look back too much at "what if".  Grapple with what you have, make a plan, put it into motion, and let it unfold.  Yes, you'll be "behind" others, but wow--what a story of maturity and perseverance you'll have when you're done.  You will have walked through the fire and come out tempered.  You'll know what you're made of.  

 

 

I don't know enough about Louisiana law to help you figure out how to get yourself a high school diploma.  

 

 

You might want to start a new thread. The new one could say something like, "I'm 18 and wasn't schooled, so I'm schooling myself. Would anyone from LA be willing to help me figure out if I have enough knowledge/hours/whatever to have earned a high school diploma?  Or what else do I need to do to get that diploma?"  Link this old one to it.  

 

The answers will probably be the same:  to talk to the CC.  What did your mother or father plan on putting on a transcript?  Did they have a plan at all that they didn't share with you?  Can they brainstorm with you and help you figure out what you did that could be put on a transcript?  As others have said, you seem to write well, so perhaps you were educated in ways that aren't traditional, yet are valid?  Maybe not.  I understand that some families honestly do not educate, but some do in ways that aren't obvious at first.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a bit of stigma for community college, but not the same as GED.  Though, sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do and go from there.  I wouldn't feel too bad about GEDs or Community College at this point for you in particular.  

 

While it's not true in many cases, a GED tends to make people think of a kid who dropped out of high school because of his own fault.  It brings up images of parents begging a student to do homework and the student refuses. As you well know, that's not what happens for many people who get a GED.  Often it's not through a fault on their part, but on circumstances around them.  So, if you have to go the GED route, then go the GED route.  You know the truth of what has happened and you can explain it if you want/need to.  In your case, you doing this on your own shows remarkable initiative.

 

Community College can have a stigma because CCs accept anyone, so that means that people who don't want to try very hard or who aren't very smart can get into Community College if they can't get in anywhere else.   However, not everyone at a CC is in that boat.  There are plenty of bright people at CC who refuse to go into debt, so they start at CC, or they're older students going back to learn something new.  Or they're like you and they're using the CC to catch up on high school knowledge.  

 

So, yes.  There is a stigma for GED and CC.  However, you have to do what has to be done to position yourself for future success.  Get that GED and that CC under your belt, and then you can move forward.  You can head straight to a 4 year for the last 2 years of school, or you can work for a bit and save money and then go to a 4 year.  

 

Honestly, you really are young.  There is still time.  It might not seem that way because other people your age are ahead, but this whole "life" thing isn't a race.  It's a journey and there are many paths.  

 

Don't look back too much at "what if".  Grapple with what you have, make a plan, put it into motion, and let it unfold.  Yes, you'll be "behind" others, but wow--what a story of maturity and perseverance you'll have when you're done.  You will have walked through the fire and come out tempered.  You'll know what you're made of.  

 

 

I don't know enough about Louisiana law to help you figure out how to get yourself a high school diploma.  

 

 

You might want to start a new thread. The new one could say something like, "I'm 18 and wasn't schooled, so I'm schooling myself. Would anyone from LA be willing to help me figure out if I have enough knowledge/hours/whatever to have earned a high school diploma?  Or what else do I need to do to get that diploma?"  Link this old one to it.  

 

The answers will probably be the same:  to talk to the CC.  What did your mother or father plan on putting on a transcript?  Did they have a plan at all that they didn't share with you?  Can they brainstorm with you and help you figure out what you did that could be put on a transcript?  As others have said, you seem to write well, so perhaps you were educated in ways that aren't traditional, yet are valid?  Maybe not.  I understand that some families honestly do not educate, but some do in ways that aren't obvious at first.  

So there's a stigma to CC's, but I imagine that as long as I explain why I had to take that route people would understand.

 

I'm pretty certain my parents don't have any plan. I don't even know what a transcript is, honestly. That should tell you all you need to know.

 

I wasn't educated at all. Everything I know I've learned through my own initiative. My parents taught me how to count and read and that's it. I didn't even know how to write anything other than my name until 2010, when I was 11 years old. My parent's have never talked about education with me, they've basically just left me to my own devices. I don't know why they chose to screw over their only son, but they did, and my life is now exponentially more difficult for it. Now I get to have severe depression and feel inadequate to everyone else because my parents just simply didn't care. Life sure is a wonderful thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a bit of stigma for community college, but not the same as GED.  Though, sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do and go from there.  I wouldn't feel too bad about GEDs or Community College at this point for you in particular.  

 

While it's not true in many cases, a GED tends to make people think of a kid who dropped out of high school because of his own fault.  It brings up images of parents begging a student to do homework and the student refuses. As you well know, that's not what happens for many people who get a GED.  Often it's not through a fault on their part, but on circumstances around them.  So, if you have to go the GED route, then go the GED route.  You know the truth of what has happened and you can explain it if you want/need to.  In your case, you doing this on your own shows remarkable initiative.

 

Community College can have a stigma because CCs accept anyone, so that means that people who don't want to try very hard or who aren't very smart can get into Community College if they can't get in anywhere else.   However, not everyone at a CC is in that boat.  There are plenty of bright people at CC who refuse to go into debt, so they start at CC, or they're older students going back to learn something new.  Or they're like you and they're using the CC to catch up on high school knowledge.  

 

So, yes.  There is a stigma for GED and CC.  However, you have to do what has to be done to position yourself for future success.  Get that GED and that CC under your belt, and then you can move forward.  You can head straight to a 4 year for the last 2 years of school, or you can work for a bit and save money and then go to a 4 year.  

 

Honestly, you really are young.  There is still time.  It might not seem that way because other people your age are ahead, but this whole "life" thing isn't a race.  It's a journey and there are many paths.  

 

Don't look back too much at "what if".  Grapple with what you have, make a plan, put it into motion, and let it unfold.  Yes, you'll be "behind" others, but wow--what a story of maturity and perseverance you'll have when you're done.  You will have walked through the fire and come out tempered.  You'll know what you're made of.  

 

 

I don't know enough about Louisiana law to help you figure out how to get yourself a high school diploma.  

 

 

You might want to start a new thread. The new one could say something like, "I'm 18 and wasn't schooled, so I'm schooling myself. Would anyone from LA be willing to help me figure out if I have enough knowledge/hours/whatever to have earned a high school diploma?  Or what else do I need to do to get that diploma?"  Link this old one to it.  

 

The answers will probably be the same:  to talk to the CC.  What did your mother or father plan on putting on a transcript?  Did they have a plan at all that they didn't share with you?  Can they brainstorm with you and help you figure out what you did that could be put on a transcript?  As others have said, you seem to write well, so perhaps you were educated in ways that aren't traditional, yet are valid?  Maybe not.  I understand that some families honestly do not educate, but some do in ways that aren't obvious at first.  

And honestly I feel like asking something like that would just be a waste of everybody's time at this point. I'm certain I don't know enough to get a high school diploma. There's no doubt in that, I don't know basic English yet and I can only due math (fluently?) at a 6th grade level. I don't even have fundamental knowledge of most other subjects, except for a bit of chemistry.

 

My situation is so...odd that there's no precedent for it. There's no set way to dig myself out of this hole so I've just got to figure it out myself, with the help of you fine people, of course.

 

And I'm sorry, I didn't mean to go on a rant like that. It just sort of happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there's really a stigma with community college out in the real world.  Lots of students with completely normal educations go that route.  Once you transfer to a 4 year school (if you choose that route) it becomes a non-issue.  

 

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And honestly I feel like asking something like that would just be a waste of everybody's time at this point. I'm certain I don't know enough to get a high school diploma. There's no doubt in that, I don't know basic English yet and I can only due math (fluently?) at a 6th grade level. I don't even have fundamental knowledge of most other subjects, except for a bit of chemistry.

 

My situation is so...odd that there's no precedent for it. There's no set way to dig myself out of this hole so I've just got to figure it out myself, with the help of you fine people, of course.

 

And I'm sorry, I didn't mean to go on a rant like that. It just sort of happened.

 

Van, I think you are greatly overestimating how much an average student learns in high school, as well as underestimating your own knowledge and skills. I have no doubt that there are literally hundreds of thousands of students who graduate HS every year whose English and math skills are no better than yours, and in many cases are far worse.

 

You'd be amazed how many college students have no idea what a verb is. There was a recent thread here about a student who made it through HS calculus with As and yet only tested into remedial algebra, because he hadn't actually learned or retained anything — and apparently that is not uncommon. You'd be astounded by how many students get accepted to colleges and then end up in remedial math & English classes.

 

As for content subjects, like history and science, "Intro" level college courses start from scratch; they can't assume that students have much if any prior knowledge in the area. If you want some suggestions for books that will cover the basics of various sciences in a simple and straightforward way, I'm sure many people will have suggestions. Personally I recommend the Conceptual Integrated Science text by Hewitt & Suchocki; it covers the main concepts in each branch of science, with minimal math, and you can get a used copy for less than 10 bucks. Pick up a cheap used copy of a decent world history text, and one on American history, and you will have covered more than many HS graduates.

 

The fact that you are an excellent, articulate writer, and a self-motivated and ambitious student, means that you are already ahead of many many high school graduates. Seriously! I have TA'd intro 101 level classes at a top university, and half of those students did not write as well as you do, and most of the ones who could write still couldn't be bothered to do more than the minimal requirements to pass.

 

There are lots of people here who are ready and willing to help you accomplish what you want; please do not hesitate to ask for help. We're rooting for you!

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there's really a stigma with community college out in the real world.  Lots of students with completely normal educations go that route.  Once you transfer to a 4 year school (if you choose that route) it becomes a non-issue.  

 

Yes, this is our experience. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're being too hard on yourself, clearly you know more grammar than you think, you can write a heck of a lot better than people that come out of a public school education. I wouldn't worry about what others think, find something you enjoy & figure out a career from there. Do you have any ideas what you would like to do? There's nothing wrong with CC. College is expensive and my daughter chose community college to start mainly because of this. She will tell you that she doesn't care what others think. I'm proud of her for that. There are a lot of technical degrees out there that make decent money & are needed. I would do what makes you happy.

Edited by Prairie~Phlox
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're being too hard on yourself, clearly you know more grammar than you think, you can write a heck of a lot better than people that come out of a public school education. I wouldn't worry about what others think, find something you enjoy & figure out a career from there. Do you have any ideas what you would like to do? There's nothing wrong with CC. College is expensive and my daughter chose community college to start mainly because of this. She will tell you that she doesn't care what others think. I'm proud of her for that. There are a lot of technical degrees out there that make decent money & are needed. I would do what makes you happy.

I honestly have no idea what I want to be in life. For a long time I wanted to be a politician, since I was passionate about politics for several years but that's since gone away. I thought about becoming a doctor, until I learned how much schooling you have to go through for it. I'm just not looking to put the next 10-12 years of my life into CC, a 4 year university, and then 4 years of medical school. I'm still trying to figure out what my calling in this life is, but I haven't found anything yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there's really a stigma with community college out in the real world.  Lots of students with completely normal educations go that route.  Once you transfer to a 4 year school (if you choose that route) it becomes a non-issue.

 

:iagree:

 

The fact that choice A may be more "prestigious" or carry more value than choice B does not mean that there is a stigma attached to B. A 4-yr degree is considered to have "higher value" than a 2 yr degree, which carries more value than just a HS diploma, which is more valuable than a GED, which is more valuable than dropping out with no diploma at all. The reason the GED does carry a bit of a stigma is because it is associated with high school dropouts. That does not apply to CC at all — CC is still college, which by definition is a higher level than high school.

 

I think a lot of students who start at CC these days are purposely choosing that route versus direct entry to a 4 yr, especially for financial reasons. Students who then transfer to a 4 yr get the same diploma as someone who spent all 4 yrs there, but they may have significantly less debt. That can be a smart 1st choice, not just a 2nd choice because they couldn't get admitted directly to a 4yr. And there are lots of 2 yr certificate programs that lead directly to employment, which can be excellent choices.

Edited by Corraleno
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I taught at a community college for several years.  They vary a lot, and can have different programs within a single school - some are more of a vocational school (teaching certificate programs like plumbing, cooking, etc), some teach a lot of remedial classes, and some serve students trying to get 2 years of prerequisites finished before transferring to a 4-year school or a program like nursing.  There are a variety of students, too.  I taught young dual-enrollment students, traditional-aged students, students who were re-training or returning to school now that their children were school-aged, and grandparents looking for a career change or just some knowledge.  I had students who could have been successful in any college they tried, students who needed coaching to learn how to study, students who couldn't write coherent sentences, and everything in between.  Although a degree from a 4-year school is more prestigious, I don't think that there is a stigma attached to community college classes.  A lot of places work hard to make sure that their intro classes are comparable with what is being taught at local 4-year schools so that students can transfer seamlessly. 

 

As far as looking for help, a quick search turned up 2 different sites listing possible help in your area.  The first lists 2 different places that do GED tutoring and adult education, and the second is an alternative high school that claims to work 1-on-1 with students.  I don't know anything about it, but I do know that there is a similar program near where I live.  I'm guessing that the 2 resources listed in the first link could probably direct you to other resources.  Have you checked your public library?  They sometimes do classes, too. 

 

ged101.com/ged-classes-in-lake-Charles-la.html

and

www.syf.org/academies

 

I know that it can be hard when you look at a long road and don't see the end.  I once had a student break down crying in my class - she was a newly-single mom who hadn't taken classes in 12 years while she stayed home raising her kids.  When her husband suddenly left, she was scrambling trying to train for a job in nursing.  She was looking at long road, since she could only take classes part time while working to keep food on the table, and she was daunted by students who seemed better prepared, or at least hadn't forgotten how to do school.  Although your situation is a little different, there are lots of people with similar struggles - folks who haven't been to school in a long time and have forgotten a lot, students who graduated from poor schools that left them very unprepared for anything (I had high school grads who couldn't write coherent sentences), and students juggling work, school, and family. 

 

Finally, don't feel like you have to make a 'forever plan' to work towards.  Lots of people change careers. I have a relative who trained as a cosmetologist while in high school, then worked cutting hair to put herself through a program in a medical-related field, and another who worked as a dental hygienist for years before going back to dental school...and other people make even more dramatic changes.  My classroom was full of people making changes, based on finances or interest.  And, although it's good to keep learning and try to get where you want to be academically, not all careers require a lot of advanced schooling.  Many people are gainfully employed without learning calculus, so unless it's something required to meet your goals, I wouldn't worry about something that you might not need to learn.   

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Van, I looked up some information about Sowella Tech. It seems that it skews heavily towards technical certificates, but also offers a General Studies AA as well as transfer degrees in science, humanities, and social sciences. One thing that particularly jumped out at me is that they seem to grant credit for a lot of CLEP tests, which is good news! 

Are you familiar with the CLEP program? This could be an excellent way for you to kill several birds with one stone: self-study content subjects at home on your own schedule, demonstrate proficiency in those subjects, get college credit for your self-study, and save a bunch of money in the process. The tests are 90 minutes and are all multiple choice. The REA test prep books for CLEP are excellent, and I've read of many people passing some of the easier CLEPs (e.g. Psychology, Sociology) after only a few weeks of study with no prior background. CLEP tests generally only cost $100-120, and each test is worth 3-4 credits at Sowella. Here is a link to the page that shows all the CLEPs they will accept: College Level Examination Program.
 

I would call the registrars office there and ask if there is a limit to how many CLEP credits they will accept, or if there are any other restrictions (e.g. not accepted in your major, or whatever). Then I would check your local library and see if they have any of the REA CLEP prep books, and get started on some of the easier ones. If your library doesnt have them, you can buy them for around $20 (sometimes even cheaper used). You might even want to start with the English one, since I'm confident that one would show you that your skills are better than you think!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Van,

 

I just happened upon this thread and I have to say that I am very impressed with your drive and motivation as well as how articulate you are.  Please don't let your circumstances define who you think you are. 

 

First of all, I don't agree that there is stigma associated with community college.  Many people use it as a way to save money before transferring to a 4-year college.  Many people use it to get a 2 year degree to be able to start working in a certain field, which may be a stepping stone to bigger things.  There are many paths just like there are many kinds of people.  Let me tell you a story ... my sister had the advantages of parents who valued education.  She was very smart, but very troubled.  While she did graduate high school and went away to college, things fell apart in college and she had to leave.  She worked at various jobs, moved around the country with whatever guy she was with at the time, restarted community college about 15 times.  At 40, she did get a bachelors' degree from a 4 year college.  At 50, she received a masters degree in Education.  Out of the 6 siblings, she is the only one with a masters degree.   Her path was not linear, but it doesn't mean she wasn't successful. While she had advantages, she threw them away and attended the "school of hard knocks" for a couple of decades.

 

Second, it is OK that you don't know what you want to do yet.  You can be working on the basics and still figuring it out.  I am 52 years old, college educated and I don't know what I want to do with the rest of my life.  My kids are almost done homeschooling and my old career is not available to me.  You can also work toward the requirements for a job that can help you earn money while working toward a 4 year degree.  You just want to make sure that you are making progress toward the 4 year degree, not just toward a certificate. 

 

Like all of the previous posters, I just want to keep encouraging you to put one foot in front of the other and not worry too much about was is very far down the path.  And keep coming back and updating us. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I should have clarified: I am legally home schooled, but my parent's never actually made me learn anything beyond very basic math (I couldn't do basic division at the start of this year) and very basic English (I honestly don't know what a verb, noun, etc. are). The first 17 years of my life basically consisted of me sitting in my house watching TV and playing video games. I'm very far behind.

 

I have a question about the bolded — have your parents filed the paperwork annually? Did they list a grade level? The reason I ask is because unless they've somehow listed you as having already graduated when you turned 18, is there any reason you could not list yourself as an 11th grader this year? Lots of kids, especially boys, get "red-shirted" and graduate at 19, so that would not be unusual. 

 

If you count this year as 11th grade, then you have 2 yrs to gain the knowledge you'd need to legitimately issue a homeschool high school diploma and transcript (listed by subject rather than by year). You should think in terms of the level you reach, rather than how many hours or years you have put into the study. In other words, if you pass the CLEPs in English Lit and College Composition, then you have achieved or exceeded the minimum English requirements for HS graduation — just put English 9, English 10, English Lit (CLEP), and College Composition (CLEP) on your transcript. If you pass the 2 US History CLEPs and the Sociology or Psychology CLEP, that's 3 Social Studies credits that count for both HS and college. A couple of science CLEPs or a couple of courses at Sowella would meet the science requirement. Think about any other things you've been doing for the past few years, or may want to do in the next 2 yrs, that could be counted — give yourself a couple of PE credits for any exercise (hiking, biking, whatever). Do you draw or sketch or make things with your hands? That can be a credit in Fine Arts or Industrial Arts. Computer time can be a Technology credit. Sign up for a free Duolingo account and start teaching yourself a language; count that towards Foreign Language credits.

 

You can definitely do this, and the path is really not as long or as daunting as you think.  :thumbup1:

Edited by Corraleno
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Van,

 

I had a job for a number of years with a test preparation company. The people who came to this company were people with Master's degrees. This meant that they'd gone though six years of college. They had 18 years of schooling. 20 if you count preschool and kindergarten.

 

These people had to take a certification test in order to become teachers in New York state. They came to the company I worked for to help them prepare for the certification test. One thing they had to do to prepare to write an essay for the test, was to practice writing essays. We'd give them a topic and they'd write an essay it, following our advice on the format. My job was to read their essays and then teach them how to improve their writing.

 

Van, you would not believe the sort of writing I received. Seriously, you would not believe it. Some of the people who came to our company spoke English as a second language and they really struggled to write the essay. But I am being 100% honest with you that I could not tell the native English speakers from the non-native. They were all equally bad.

 

After 18-20 years of education, these people would write essays that sounded like something someone who had just learned English a couple of years ago would write. I am not exaggerating.

 

You are not as bad off as you think. It doesn't matter so much whether or not you know the vocabulary of grammar (noun, verb, etc.). It matters whether you can get your point across without glaring problems. You use proper punctuation and spelling and sentence structure. Believe it or not, you're ahead of some of the people I helped with their master's degrees.

 

I honestly had to quit that job because I didn't believe the people I was helping should have been certified as teachers. They were so bad that I thought I was doing future students a disservice.

Edited by Garga
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please feel free to come back here and ask us lots of questions. I ask questions here all the time.

 

But do start new threads for new topics. If a thread gets really long, new questions get lost somewhere in the middle of the posts.

 

A transcript is a piece of paper where you write down how you met the requirements to graduate for your state. You would list the math you took over the past 4 years and the English and the science, etc. They are given to colleges so the college knows what you did in high school and can determine it's enough to get into their college. There is a certain format for the transcript and policies about to get it to the college. It sounds like you don't have enough for an official transcript like that.

 

If I were you, I'd be pretty upset, too. I feel for you. As someone who spends literally 9 hours a day homeschooling my kids, plus 2 hours each night planning for the next day, plus 9 hours on Sat/Sun doing more planning, plus uses my weeks off at Christmas and over the summer planning for future years, I get very angry when I hear of someone not even pretending to educate their child. I feel for you so much.

 

I hope our words encourage you and help you to keep going. Don't give up on yourself. You are in an unenviable position, sure. But it doesn't help to dwell on the past too much. If your living situation isn't miserable, then it's good your family will let you stay there while you work and study on your own. I hope that we can help you with the challenges you're facing now and that we can help you look to the future.

 

I wrote that there is a stigma to CC, but I was just answering your question about it honestly. Yup, there can be a stigma, but as others have said, it's not a very big one. I would gladly deal with a "stigma" and get an education and save money along the way. (Four year colleges are startlingly expensive.). And if you happen to head out to a 4 year college at the end of 2 years, then the stigma is overridden by the 4 year college.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have a question about the bolded — have your parents filed the paperwork annually? Did they list a grade level? The reason I ask is because unless they've somehow listed you as having already graduated when you turned 18, is there any reason you could not list yourself as an 11th grader this year? Lots of kids, especially boys, get "red-shirted" and graduate at 19, so that would not be unusual. 

 

If you count this year as 11th grade, then you have 2 yrs to gain the knowledge you'd need to legitimately issue a homeschool high school diploma and transcript (listed by subject rather than by year). You should think in terms of the level you reach, rather than how many hours or years you have put into the study. In other words, if you pass the CLEPs in English Lit and College Composition, then you have achieved or exceeded the minimum English requirements for HS graduation — just put English 9, English 10, English Lit (CLEP), and College Composition (CLEP) on your transcript. If you pass the 2 US History CLEPs and the Sociology or Psychology CLEP, that's 3 Social Studies credits that count for both HS and college. A couple of science CLEPs or a couple of courses at Sowella would meet the science requirement. Think about any other things you've been doing for the past few years, or may want to do in the next 2 yrs, that could be counted — give yourself a couple of PE credits for any exercise (hiking, biking, whatever). Do you draw or sketch or make things with your hands? That can be a credit in Fine Arts or Industrial Arts. Computer time can be a Technology credit. Sign up for a free Duolingo account and start teaching yourself a language; count that towards Foreign Language credits.

 

You can definitely do this, and the path is really not as long or as daunting as you think.  :thumbup1:

I guess I chose the wrong words when I wrote that. My parents don't file any paperwork annually or anything like that. I don't have any documentation about my education, mostly because I odn't have an education. I wasn't lying or stretching the truth when I said that the first 17 years of my life were spent in my home in front of my television. The only real documentation out there on me is my birth certificate, a few medical records, and my social security card, which I didn't have until August this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I chose the wrong words when I wrote that. My parents don't file any paperwork annually or anything like that. I don't have any documentation about my education, mostly because I odn't have an education. I wasn't lying or stretching the truth when I said that the first 17 years of my life were spent in my home in front of my television. The only real documentation out there on me is my birth certificate, a few medical records, and my social security card, which I didn't have until August this year.

So here's a plan for you: spend the next couple of years catching up and filling in gaps, maybe get a start at a community college. You come across as very motivated, articulate and intelligent--you can absolutely do this.

 

Two years from now, apply to a bunch of good universities with your self-education transcript and a killer essay about how you truly pulled yourself up by your bootstraps after years of severe educational neglect.

 

Somebody is going to accept you with a hefty scholarship because you will have a story worth telling and proof that you know how to work hard and overcome obstacles.

Edited by maize
  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if your parents didn't file paperwork then it's no stretch to consider yourself an 11th grader :) As someone pointed out above, it's typical these days to "red-shirt" boys (in other words, hold them back a year for social-emotional purposes).

 

You are doing great. Don't be so hard on yourself. For someone who hasn't had a formal education, you articulate clearly and definitely appear to know the mechanics of writing. You are also motivated, which is clear. 

 

Keep posting and updating. Listen to the veteran parents on this board - they will steer you in the right direction. You've got this!

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...