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I am 100% for treating food allergies as disabilities and protecting people. 100%.

 

I think the issue is, for lack of better word, the fakers. The "I don't like mushrooms so I'll tell the waiter I'm allergic" people. Or the, "I'm gluten free and I need everyone to respect that, but then I'll have'just a couple of bites' of the cheesecake (which I clearly told everyone has flour in every part of it)." I know people have sensitivities which are really mild allergies, and I know there are times when eating something delicious after depriving yourself is worth the consequences (and that it's the individuals right to choose when they get sick). I just think that the fakers are making people desensitized to life threatening allergies and it's very, very dangerous. There was an article in the Boston Globe I read about how difficult is becoming for restaurants to treat allergies seriously through the noise of how people order.

 

Again, I get sensitivities, mild allergies, and things that make you sick. I do. I have them. I have places I can't eat without DIRE consequences. But, I think if when we order we're clear "No mushrooms please. I'm not allergic, I just think they're gross and I'd prefer not to have any.", might be more helpful to families facing the horror of life threatening food allergies.

 

And, I'll add, none of us have any idea how the plane incident went down. It seems horrid and awful and terribly handled, but we have no idea both sides of the story. We have no idea how aggressive the parents were being or the tone of the flight or the crew. It's terrible the family had a bad experience, but I'm getting really tired of self reporting on other people and uploading video and pictures without others being able to have their say. I understand frustration and getting a response from a company, but I just can't help but think there's another side of the story (because most people are reasonable people who aren't out to hurt anyone or ruin their days, and if it were me, I'd want my side shared).

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We have always been warned ahead of time by airlines (read the small print, and talk to your allergist and the allergy community to hear stories) that we can be asked to leave a flight if the risk is deemed too great. We board every flight knowing there's a tightrope to walk between asking for accommodations and making too big a deal about it. We always have a back up plan for getting home (try another flight there will be different staff on next plane, or rent a car). It is a reality of flying with LTFAs. It stinks. Because of the anxiety and uncertainty we rarely fly.

 

We do a lot to minimize our risk, and we ask for any accommodations nicely, knowing that the airline is *not* required to do anything special for us. It is up to the flight attendant to make the call on asking that passengers within three rows don't consume nuts. Sometimes the flight attendants decide to refrain from serving nut mixes and do opt to ask passengers within three rows to create a buffer zone. That is very kind! I want to kiss them, honestly. We board early, we personally clean our entire row of seats to clear any nut residue. Our son uses a specially made seat cover so he doesn't touch the cloth seat and get residue on his hands, then touch his eyes or mouth. We pre-load him with Benadryl, and we carry enough epinephrine to keep an elephant alive. Well, I used to think so, but since there was a young boy who went into anaphylaxis on a flight and the pilot refused to emergency land, I sometimes think our six epipens are inadequate. Injections every 15 minutes only get us an hour and a half of extra time. But that's the best we can do.

 

Even with ALL of the above, my son went into anaphylaxis on his last flight. :( on that particular flight, the attendants did not ask for that 3 row buffer zone. Someone may have eaten nuts, there may have been nut dust in the air. We don't know. Fortunately, it started during landing, and we got off the flight before we even realized what was happening - it wasn't that quick, sudden type.

 

Most of you know this, but life threatening allergies are a disability and protected by the ADA. Not that the airlines seem to know, but that pilot was wrong.

Edited by Spryte
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This is a tough one. I wouldn't be too thrilled to be asked by a fellow passenger on a plane to refrain from eating certain foods. But the rest is ridiculous.

Yeh, and that's part of why we rarely fly. I don't like asking accommodations of people who might get mad. It's uncomfortable. And they do get mad. At a child. Who didn't choose his allergy. And just wants to go see his grandma who lives 18 hours away by car.

 

You probably wouldn't get mad. You'd be inconvenienced. It would be a pain. But I bet you'd care that someone could die. Because you're not the kind of person to blame a kid. I think. :)

 

I've heard enough of the "my kid has the right to eat peanut butter" arguments in my life, from the unkind types. Sure. Your kid can eat that sandwich and my kid can risk his life because of it. I just don't want to argue with people about food.

 

So on flights, we explain our son's allergies, do what we can, and the attendants make all the calls re: requests for a buffer zone. We don't bring it up, we don't ask. But if the flight attendants believe it will make their job easier, they do it. We won't tell them not to, because obviously it helps. But we don't ask. So - on flights, if you (General you) are asked to refrain from eating certain foods, please know it might not have been a request of the allergic individual but the flight attendants. No need to turn around and glare, or make nasty comments about the kid with allergies staying home.

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Yeh, and that's part of why we rarely fly. I don't like asking accommodations of people who might get mad. It's uncomfortable. And they do get mad. At a child. Who didn't choose his allergy. And just wants to go see his grandma who lives 18 hours away by car.

 

You probably wouldn't get mad. You'd be inconvenienced. It would be a pain. But I bet you'd care that someone could die. Because you're not the kind of person to blame a kid. I think. :)

 

I've heard enough of the "my kid has the right to eat peanut butter" arguments in my life, from the unkind types. Sure. Your kid can eat that sandwich and my kid can risk his life because of it. I just don't want to argue with people about food.

 

So on flights, we explain our son's allergies, do what we can, and the attendants make all the calls re: requests for a buffer zone. We don't bring it up, we don't ask. But if the flight attendants believe it will make their job easier, they do it. We won't tell them not to, because obviously it helps. But we don't ask. So - on flights, if you (General you) are asked to refrain from eating certain foods, please know it might not have been a request of the allergic individual but the flight attendants. No need to turn around and glare, or make nasty comments about the kid with allergies staying home.

 

Well I flew last week.  The flight didn't include food (international flight).  So we brought various things that could sit around awhile such as protein bars and stuff.  Most of that stuff has nuts.  Those are the foods that can sit.  What else is there?  Ya know?  So if someone said I can't eat the bars while on the flight I would have had zero food.  Then what?  If someone could somehow tell me that WAY ahead that would be more doable, but right then and there not so much.

 

 

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Well I flew last week. The flight didn't include food (international flight). So we brought various things that could sit around awhile such as protein bars and stuff. Most of that stuff has nuts. Those are the foods that can sit. What else is there? Ya know? So if someone said I can't eat the bars while on the flight I would have had zero food. Then what? If someone could somehow tell me that WAY ahead that would be more doable, but right then and there not so much.

Like I said, I don't argue with people about food.

 

So it would be the airline asking you to make an accommodation, not my family. I'm 100% sure, because I've seen it happen, that if you refused or had a problem with it, they'd offer a seat change. Since we'd have boarded early to wash down the seats, the seat change would likely be offered to you, as we would not have time to wash down another seating section without delaying the flight, so that would inconvenience you. If you refused a seat change, and stated that you'd be eating nut products within the airline's requested buffer zone, then one of two things would likely happen: either the airline would deem us too great a risk on the flight and we'd be asked to leave; or they'd ask us to decide if we'd like to stay on the flight and risk it, or get off. We'd probably get off, since DS recently had anaphylaxis on a flight where there was no buffer zone. Anaphylaxis during a flight would likely precipitate an emergency landing, and certainly a lot of commotion on the flight, especially within those six rows that would have been the buffer zone, so that's an inconvenience, too.

 

See how inconvenient we allergy people are? Many people would prefer we just stay home.

 

Flying with allergies sucks. Because even if people or airlines are kind enough to try to help there is always a disgruntled passenger, or someone feeling inconvenienced or put out. So on top of the very real fear of, well to put it bluntly, watching your child die in front of you, there is the anxiety about inconveniencing the wrong passenger. You know, the one who will yell and cause a scene, or drink too much and talk loudly about those people who should stay home and not get on a flight or go in public.

 

We don't fly unless we absolutely have to. But since I want my kid to have a relationship with some family members to whom we cannot drive, say over water, we have to fly sometimes. It is the pits. And talk about mental health issues, the anxiety and stress and fear are debilitating.

 

I'm sorry it sucks for other passengers. If it helps to know that we'd rather not live with allergies, then I can say that with impunity. And if you had nothing to eat, and were not eating your nutty food to save my son's life on a flight, out of kindness to our family, I would happily share anything I had with you. And then some.

Edited by Spryte
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I'd do my best, but on top of this we had to pay extra for the seats we had.  Every single thing costs something.  So sure I'll change seats, but then I would not be getting what I paid for.  Now granted this was a total no frills airline.  My guess is they don't make accommodations easily. 

 

I'm sure this is a major difficulty for some people.  Flying stresses me out as it is so whew...I cannot imagine.  It would be nice if they implemented some sort of procedure for this such as having a few seats be the allergy zone or something.  Although airlines give you less and less these days.  I got WAY better service for way less money years ago.  Now it's just awful. 

 

I just wonder though, what on earth do you do about the bathroom situation? 

 

 

Like I said, I don't argue with people about food.

So it would be the airline asking you to make an accommodation, not my family. I'm 100% sure, because I've seen it happen, that if you refused or had a problem with it, they'd offer a seat change. Since we'd have boarded early to wash down the seats, the seat change would likely be offered to you, as we would not have time to wash down another seating section without delaying the flight, so that would inconvenience you. If you refused a seat change, and stated that you'd be eating nut products within the airline's requested buffer zone, then one of two things would likely happen: either the airline would deem us too great a risk on the flight and we'd be asked to leave; or they'd ask us to decide if we'd like to stay on the flight and risk it, or get off. We'd probably get off, since DS recently had anaphylaxis on a flight where there was no buffer zone. Anaphylaxis during a flight would likely precipitate an emergency landing, and certainly a lot of commotion on the flight, especially within those six rows that would have been the buffer zone, so that's an inconvenience, too.

See how inconvenient we allergy people are? Many people would prefer we just stay home.

Flying with allergies sucks. Because even if people or airlines are kind enough to try to help there is always a disgruntled passenger, or someone feeling inconvenienced or put out. So on top of the very real fear of, well to put it bluntly, watching your child die in front of you, there is the anxiety about inconveniencing the wrong passenger. You know, the one who will yell and cause a scene, or drink too much and talk loudly about those people who should stay home and not get on a flight or go in public.

We don't fly unless we absolutely have to. But since I want my kid to have a relationship with some family members to whom we cannot drive, say over water, we have to fly sometimes. It is the pits. And talk about mental health issues, the anxiety and stress and fear are debilitating.

I'm sorry it sucks for other passengers. If it helps to know that we'd rather not live with allergies, then I can say that with impunity. And if you had nothing to eat, and were not eating your nutty food to save my son's life on a flight, out of kindness to our family, I would happily share anything I had with you. And then some.

 

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The bathroom situation? Same as we do every day. And probably most people - because bathrooms have germs. So I think most people wash and try not to touch things then touch their face. Try not to touch too much, hope no one took food in (gross), wash hands. Leave and walk back to seat, trying not to touch seat backs, but knowing you will wash hands when arriving back at seat (we keep wipes handy for the purpose).

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The bathroom situation? Same as we do every day. And probably most people - because bathrooms have germs. So I think most people wash and try not to touch things then touch their face. Try not to touch too much, hope no one took food in (gross), wash hands. Leave and walk back to seat, trying not to touch seat backs, but knowing you will wash hands when arriving back at seat (we keep wipes handy for the purpose).

 

Yeah that all kinda goes out the door on an airplane.  There is no way you can't touch things.  You squish past people.  You have to hang onto seat backs so as to not fall on the floor.  At least I do.

 

Although I requested the last seats way in the back which was close to the bathroom to make going there easier!

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Here's the article I mentioned about fakers: https://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/2015/10/14/why-food-allergy-fakers-need-stop/PB6uN8NF3eLWFjXnKF5A9K/story.html

 

FWIW, I'm happy to not eat something in a plane that is life threatening to another passenger. Easy peasy. I fly quite a bit and it wouldn't bother me at all. To be safe, if my kids and I eat pb, before we get onboard we go wash up well. You never know. I'm very thankful we don't have to deal with life threatening allergies every day.

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I wonder if trains are better because they are open to the air more. 

 

I really feel bad for people with airborne food allergies. That really scares me! 

 

I also get that some people don't have ana reactions to food, yet are allergic to it. My baby can eat a muffin, but give him a slice of pizza and he gets diarrhea if not worse. My peanut allergy started mild but now I am having reactions to smaller and smaller quantities. I worry that I will be ana soon.  However I do think that there are those that exploit this. My mother in law says she is allergic to cilantro. Cilantro is EVERYWHERE. She often eats out too. She has even told me how she had her throat swell up but she didn't need an epi-pen because of cilantro. We rarely eat out but we always tell our allergies to the hostess and our waiter, but when they come out I notice that it is an after thought for her. You would think that she would be very concerned with this like we are of our allergies but sometimes she doesn't even say anything to the waiter. It upsets me that she is using as a "me too!" I don't want to question her on it, but I often wonder. 

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Here's the article I mentioned about fakers: https://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/2015/10/14/why-food-allergy-fakers-need-stop/PB6uN8NF3eLWFjXnKF5A9K/story.html

 

FWIW, I'm happy to not eat something in a plane that is life threatening to another passenger. Easy peasy. I fly quite a bit and it wouldn't bother me at all. To be safe, if my kids and I eat pb, before we get onboard we go wash up well. You never know. I'm very thankful we don't have to deal with life threatening allergies every day.

 

It's not easy peasy when you are traveling internationally. 

 

For a short flight, sure.

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It's not easy peasy when you are traveling internationally.

 

For a short flight, sure.

No, I meant for me. I can skip nuts for as long a flight as is needed to help someone out. It's easy peasy for me, but definitely not for the affected person. It's a tiny inconvenience for me as a passenger.

 

ETA, I don't even think it's a inconvenience, honestly. If they never served nuts I a airplane again I would be totally cool with it.

Edited by FriedClams
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No, I meant for me. I can skip nuts for as long a flight as is needed to help someone out. It's easy peasy for me, but definitely not for the affected person. It's a tiny inconvenience for me as a passenger.

 

ETA, I don't even think it's a inconvenience, honestly. If they never served nuts I a airplane again I would be totally cool with it.

 

Ok, but do you realize how many foods have nuts?  That's the problem.  Nearly all the travel food I brought had some sort of nut or nut warning.  Even dumb stuff like crackers.  The airline sold food and several of the items had nuts.  Nuts are in so many things.  Sure if we are talking I have to have pretzels instead of nuts on those flights that serve such things, no problem.

 

It was challenging coming up with stuff to bring that could sit for hours and wasn't all total carbs.

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Ok, but do you realize how many foods have nuts?  That's the problem.  Nearly all the travel food I brought had some sort of nut or nut warning.  Even dumb stuff like crackers.  The airline sold food and several of the items had nuts.  Nuts are in so many things.  Sure if we are talking I have to have pretzels instead of nuts on those flights that serve such things, no problem.

 

It was challenging coming up with stuff to bring that could sit for hours and wasn't all total carbs.

 

No one is asking you to consume only foods that would be safe for a nut allergic person.  Just foods that don't likely go airborne and cause a reaction.

 

When an airline flight attendant asks that passengers within three rows of a person with a specific allergy ask that passengers not consume that allergen, they ask that the specific allergen not be consumed.  You're not feeding the allergic person.  So something with a statement like "may contain traces of nuts" on a package of crackers is not a concern.  It would be a concern if the allergic person consumed the product, sure, but not if someone eats it near them, because it is extremely unlikely that the tiny trace amount that is in that cracker would go airborne and find it's way to the allergic person.  It's possible, I suppose, but not very likely.  The airline attendants generally ask that no one consume *actual* peanuts or walnuts or whatever the allergen is.  Why?  Because those items easily go airborne - tiny particles that can't be seen float around in the air, and can end up in a mouth or an eye, easily.  Then the entire plane full of people is inconvenienced with an emergency aboard.

 

If you haven't had it happen, and it sound like you haven't, here's how it goes down:  flight attendant walks up to boarding passengers preparing to get into seats in the buffer zone, and says something like, "Good morning.  We have another passenger with a severe allergy to X.  We'd like to ask that you refrain from peanuts [or insert very specific ingredient, in this case I'll specific peanut, but it might be walnuts, or almonds or nuts in general]."  You might say, "No problem!"  Or you could say, "Oh no, I only packed these crackers and this trail mix as snacks for my kids."  Then you look and see that there's a cross contamination warning, but no actual peanuts in either, and maybe you ask the attendant if it's okay.  He/she says it's fine, and you go about your business.  Or you say you can't accommodate, your kids must eat the peanut butter sandwiches you packed, because that's all they'll eat on the flight.  And the flight attendant asks if you'll consider moving seats.  All of this takes place as you are boarding, so you're not settled into your seats and nested.  

 

But if you paid for specific seats, say at the back of the plane (which by they way, many allergy people do as well, as that limits their potential exposure to allergens), then you can dig in your heels, and say no.  In which case, the allergy family may be asked to leave the flight or take the risk.  Or maybe you'll be reimbursed the difference by the airline.  Or maybe you'll just be kind and realize that you're lucky that your kids don't have to fear for their lives, and you, as parents, don't have to fly with your heart in your mouth, fearing the drop in blood pressure and potential catastrophe.

 

Hopefully, you'll never be on a flight where they ask you to be part of creating a buffer zone for an allergic passenger, and this will never impact your life. 

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I just don't eat nuts, or bring nuts to any public place.  Everyone knows it's a big deal for a lot of people.  Eat your nuts at home.  I know there are other common allergens, but this is the biggie.  I don't understand why it has to be such a problem.

 

Ok, so what would you bring that could sit around for about 20 hours and not be all carbs?

 

I really tried to think of stuff, but there isn't much in that department.  I did end up buying stuff with nuts.  Stuff like trail mix and protein bars.  It crossed my mind, but again, I could not figure anything else out.

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A day of carbs isn't going to kill me, but peanuts might kill them.  

 

What about homemade beef jerky?  Or granola with coconut oil and pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds?

 

Sliced fruit and veggies don't have to be kept cold, and if you eat the more perishable to the least throughout the day, shouldn't be a big deal.

 

Yeah see flying has gotten really stupid.  They weighed everything including anything we carried on.  So I had to consider weight.  It was challenging to come up with stuff that met all the criteria.  Plus who knows what various countries allow in terms of produce. 

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You realize that if it were impossible to survive an international flight without eating nuts, then those who are food allergic to nuts wouldn't be on the flight- as they would starve to death. It may not be easy, but it seems rather ridiculous to pose a question (presumably to the parents of a nut allergic child) asking if they know how many foods have nuts in them. Uh yeah, we do and it sucks for us every single day, not just for a one day flight.

 

 

FWIW, we don't fly ever. I guess if we travel overseas, we'll take a cruise. I am not willing to take the risk. 

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Plus who knows what various countries allow in terms of produce. 

 

Produce is only an issue if you carry it into the other country - the questions come when you go through customs after landing.  So you eat whatever produce you want on the plane, then bin the excess before customs.

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re produce on planes = OK, vs going through customs = sometimes problematical

 

Produce is only an issue if you carry it into the other country - the questions come when you go through customs after landing.  So you eat whatever produce you want on the plane, then bin the excess before customs.

 

Right.  (Consumable quantities) of baby carrots and clementines are among my go-to travel foods, and I've never had a problem either taking them through security on the front end or consuming them on planes in the interim.  (The smell might be annoying to some people, I suppose.)  Sunflower seeds, dried fruit, and vacuum-packed string cheese are all good too.

 

 

 

 

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A day of carbs isn't going to kill me, but peanuts might kill them.  

 

What about homemade beef jerky?  Or granola with coconut oil and pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds?

 

Sliced fruit and veggies don't have to be kept cold, and if you eat the more perishable to the least throughout the day, shouldn't be a big deal.

 

Babybel cheese - easy to carry.  If you are really worried about it going off, then freeze some to defrost for the second half of the journey.  But cheese has fed people unrefrigerated for millennia.

Edited by Laura Corin
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Ok, so what would you bring that could sit around for about 20 hours and not be all carbs?

 

I really tried to think of stuff, but there isn't much in that department. I did end up buying stuff with nuts. Stuff like trail mix and protein bars. It crossed my mind, but again, I could not figure anything else out.

I give my kids crackers, applesauce, dried fruit, cured meats, jerky, etc.

I don't eat anything when we travel. I fast.

Unless one is diabetic (on meds that reduce blood glucose) there is no reason there is no reason we can't fast for 12-18 hours.

Edited by kitten18
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It's not easy peasy when you are traveling internationally. 

 

For a short flight, sure.

 

It's not that hard. Go to a health food store and you will find nut free stuff suitable for travel. You can even find these things in regular stores. I flew to Europe and did not pack anything with nuts (or gluten but that's cause I can't eat it). I simply don't travel with nuts. Our return flight ended up being 26 hours due to delays and missed flights. 

 

Cheese can be room temp for a long time. 

Sunflower seeds

Nut free granola (yes it exists and I can get it at my regular store)

Nut free protein bars (also found in regular stores and health food stores) 

Pumpkin seeds

Sandwich or wrap made with sunbutter (sunflower seeds also found in my regular grocery store)

Celery sticks with sunbutter

Bell pepper slices

Freeze yogurt tubes and they will stay cold long enough for you to eat them

 

 

All of that listed above is enough for a day of travel. 

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I guess I have a slightly different perspective-my airborne allergen is cinnamon. Fortunately, it's never gotten to an epipen stage when airborne, just sinus congestion and hives (and misery the next day) and that can usually be averted by taking benedryl before getting to the airport and topping off as needed. It's only potentially epipen worthy if I eat it.

 

But one side effect of nut bans and even just increased awareness is that it's amazing how many alternatives have cinnamon in them, and as a result, it's gotten harder and harder for me in enclosed places. For example, one of the airlines has gone from using nuts, which I could eat, to offering cookies or pretzels. The pretzels are fine, but if they have the cookies, I'm going to be reaching for an extra dose of Benedryl. It's not as bad as having a Cinnabon stand in the airplane (For me, the worst case scenario is for there to be a Cinnabon baking cinnamon rolls right at the gate-because not only will it affect me at the gate, but it's likely several people will bring them on the plane), but it can get bad. And I'm lucky-my rare allergen is only barely at the "LTFA" level.

 

How can we ever make it safe for everyone?

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I haven't ever heard of a cinnamon allergy, that really stinks, too.  (I've noticed more things with cinnamon since peanut allergy became a thing, as well.  Yes, I know there have always been people with peanut allergies, but it has become a lot more prevalent in recent years.)

 

I don't see an easy solution, because there are so many potential allergens.  I just thought it "funny" to see this article in my feed after the discussion of animals on planes recently.

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Just finished reading that, very thought provoking.  We've never even mentioned my son's shellfish allergy in a restaurant, I'm not sure I knew you could.  We avoid mainly seafood restaurants and we never order it at our table, but we also pre-load Benadryl anytime we think shellfish is a possibility in a restaurant.  Thankfully, son quickly learned "the warning tingle" on his lips, and if he gets it, he and I leave immediately and Dad sits with the siblings to finish and pay.  (We learned to pre-load him after a tingle at a Mexican restaurant..he and I got up to leave and by the time we got out to our vehicle, his lips were quite swollen and he was clawing at his throat.  That's when the allergist told us that just the smell could trigger him.)

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Dmmetler, that stinks. Allergies stink.

 

I don't think airlines are trying to make it safe for everyone. They aren't. My family, with multiple life threatening allergies, isn't either. Airlines and public spaces will never be without risk, and there's no way to make everyone safe. It's not reasonable to ask for a complete allergen free environment because all allergies are different.

 

In the case of any allergy with the potential of causing an airborne ana reaction, a passenger could inform the airline. If you had experienced anaphylaxis as a result of someone consuming cinnamon nearby, say from a cookie that you didn't touch, you could certainly discuss that with the airline. They may or may not make a temporary accommodation for you. It's never up to the passenger, it's always at the airline's discretion. We discuss with airlines knowing that they call all the shots, and that it carries the potential of being deemed too great a risk and asked to leave the flight. We always know that our luggage may fly without us, and we may have to await a different flight, because it's up to the pilot and attendants at the time of boarding. Like in the article, only it's not actually uncommon, and it's listed on every airline's fine print. We'd never have posted pics or taken it to social media.

 

FWIW, most allergens are worse if there is cooking involved. My son once went into anaphylaxis when I cooked lentil soup, not knowing he was allergic. Roasting almonds at an outdoor stand have done it, too. So something like a Cinnabon place would clearly cause issues. If you can smell it, there are particles in the air - so get out of the area, and fast. Stay safe. :)

 

Kind of related, I never even mention his dairy or egg allergies, as those don't go airborne.

 

My son is allergic to a lot more than the Top 8 allergens, with some bizarre ones thrown in (see: lentils), but I really only ever hope for understanding about the Top 8.

 

I'm very sorry for anyone inconvenienced by allergies. And very grateful to all of you who work together to keep kids and adults safe when you can. It's usually a fairly small thing, to ask that three rows of people not eat nuts or whatever, and most people are supportive. Thanks!

 

ETA: by a small thing, I don't mean it's a small sacrifice from each person. I mean it's a limited number of people being asked to make a change for a period of hours, and it's not the entire plane full. Just people in the immediate vicinity, in an area where the allergic person can't get up and move away discreetly, as they normally would.

Edited by Spryte
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I give my kids crackers, applesauce, dried fruit, cured meats, jerky, etc.

I don't eat anything when we travel. I fast.

Unless one is diabetic (on meds that reduce blood glucose) there is no reason there is no reason we can't fast for 12-18 hours.

There are actually lots of reasons people can't go that long without eating, some may or may not be life threatening.

 

But you rather flippantly say that about diabetics.

 

There's 8.1 million dx type 2 diabetics in the United States.

There's 3 million with type 1 diabetes.

 

That's no small number of people who need to be able to have food accessible to them at all times. And doesn't include gestational diabetes or those with undiagnosed type 2. Which could raise the numbers to an estimated 29 million.

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Slightly OT, but I didn't know dairy didn't go airborne. I do know that I feel TERRIBLE standing in a fudge or ice cream shop, without touching or eating anything.

Even if it could, I don't foresee an appetizing outcome to any dairy or fresh produce in cramped carry on luggage bins. My dh always packs 24 hours of shelf stable snacks and extra insulin supplies when flying for work. Experience has taught him it's the smart thing to do.

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There are actually lots of reasons people can't go that long without eating, some may or may not be life threatening.

 

But you rather flippantly say that about diabetics.

 

There's 8.1 million dx type 2 diabetics in the United States.

There's 3 million with type 1 diabetes.

 

That's no small number of people who need to be able to have food accessible to them at all times. And doesn't include gestational diabetes or those with undiagnosed type 2. Which could raise the numbers to an estimated 29 million.

If someone has symptoms of hypoglycemia they can eat. They can eat some crackers or cheese or jerky. They don't need nuts.

I know many type 2 diabetics who regularly fast for 18+ hours.

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Slightly OT, but I didn't know dairy didn't go airborne. I do know that I feel TERRIBLE standing in a fudge or ice cream shop, without touching or eating anything.

I honestly don't know. But DS has never had an airborne reaction, so I personally don't worry for him re: airborne dairy. YMMV

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If someone has symptoms of hypoglycemia they can eat. They can eat some crackers or cheese or jerky. They don't need nuts.

I know many type 2 diabetics who regularly fast for 18+ hours.

Like nuts are the only allergen out there. There are plenty of people with severe dairy and gluten allergens too.

If a diabetic is fasting, it is not on a whim and it is not without risk and planning. And at any moment they understand they might HAVE to stop fasting if their sugar drops too low.

 

Diabetics aren't much different than anyone else trying to take care of their personal medical needs - they are just trying to deal as best they can. They aren't trying to screw some other passenger over by eating a package of peanut butter crackers or a poptart. My dh wouldn't take it as an insult or whatever if the passenger next to him had a peanut or gluten allergy either. Knowing before he goes to the airport would be exceedingly helpful though. Because once he is packed, that's just the way it is and he isn't going to want to risk needing glucagon just like they aren't going to want to risk needing epi.

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I honestly don't know. But DS has never had an airborne reaction, so I personally don't worry for him re: airborne dairy. YMMV

I don't know about airborne. But I do know two people who cannot have any contact, even residual, with dairy or gluten. Before they can visit, I have to be sure we didn't have dairy that day and do a thorough wipe down. If one of my kids had cereal for breakfast and then breathed on his kid - The kid could have an ana reaction. I have no idea how they would fly. Very nervously I suspect.

Edited by Murphy101
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I would not mind being in a nut buffer zone, as long as I knew in advance. But if I just bought nut filled snacks on the plane and had no other options for food, it would be a problem. The only experience I have with it flying Is when we were about to leave for Hawaii. We'd pushed back and were taxxing, when the captain said we were turning around. Turns out a lady said she thought it was a peanut free flight, and the flight attendants told her such a thing did not exist. She said she had a life threatening airborne reaction. They told her she had to get off, then she decided it wasn't life threatening and caused a scene. They did put her off. Lesson to her Was probably don't be a drama queen, because either you have a life threatening problem or you don't. I'm sure they thought, as did I, at if one person on the entire plane pulled out some nuts, she could die. I really feel for you folks with allergies. And the airlines are in a difficult place too....how long will it be before the airplines make accommodations but someone dies anyway and they are sued?

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It's not that hard. Go to a health food store and you will find nut free stuff suitable for travel. You can even find these things in regular stores. I flew to Europe and did not pack anything with nuts (or gluten but that's cause I can't eat it). I simply don't travel with nuts. Our return flight ended up being 26 hours due to delays and missed flights. 

 

Cheese can be room temp for a long time. 

Sunflower seeds

Nut free granola (yes it exists and I can get it at my regular store)

Nut free protein bars (also found in regular stores and health food stores) 

Pumpkin seeds

Sandwich or wrap made with sunbutter (sunflower seeds also found in my regular grocery store)

Celery sticks with sunbutter

Bell pepper slices

Freeze yogurt tubes and they will stay cold long enough for you to eat them

 

 

All of that listed above is enough for a day of travel. 

 

Which just yuck.  Most of that not my thing.  Maybe the sunflower seeds.  And I had no time to prep veg.  I mean when?  We had to be out of there at 6 in the morning.  I really needed easy stuff that didn't require prep. 

 

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I don't know about airborne. But I do know two people who cannot have any contact, even residual, with dairy or gluten. Before they can visit, I have to be sure we didn't have dairy that day and do a thorough wipe down. If one of my kids had cereal for breakfast and then breathed on his kid - The kid could have an ana reaction. I have no idea how they would fly. Very nervously I suspect.

 

Yeah I thought about avoiding nut products, but then I started to wonder about dairy.  Then I started to wonder about eggs.  Then I started to wonder.  Then I said forget it.  I cannot possibly please everyone and manage every possible scenario.

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If someone has symptoms of hypoglycemia they can eat. They can eat some crackers or cheese or jerky. They don't need nuts.

I know many type 2 diabetics who regularly fast for 18+ hours.

 

I get hypoglycemic reactions from carby foods though.  I don't NEED nuts, but they are shelf stable and don't require prep or anything.  How much cheese am I gonna eat?  You pack cheese in a bag that'll sit on a hot bus for hours it turns into a ball of gross mush.  I know because I also did bring cheese.

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Babybel cheese - easy to carry.  If you are really worried about it going off, then freeze some to defrost for the second half of the journey.  But cheese has fed people unrefrigerated for millennia.

 

Those things cost almost a dollar per piece.  Super super expensive.  I did bring some and ate them, but I actually can't stand them.  Expensive and lousy taste. 

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Which just yuck. Most of that not my thing. Maybe the sunflower seeds. And I had no time to prep veg. I mean when? We had to be out of there at 6 in the morning. I really needed easy stuff that didn't require prep.

 

I have always said sunbutter has the taste and texture I always imagined baby poop would have. ðŸ˜

 

And health food stores are expensive! Sunbutter is triple the cost of peanut butter. So are the nut free granola bars and the gluten or dairy free whatevers.

 

I've often lamented with whole30 substitutes that if my life was staked on being able to afford whatever free foods - I'd probably die bc we just can't afford most of those things. When I'm doing whole30, I mostly cut those things without making pricey substitutions. And even that takes planning ahead and financial navigation.

 

And no, I'm not at all equating whole30 with life ending hazzards. I might get sick, but I'm not going to die from having a cookie or being near someone with a cookie.

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I get hypoglycemic reactions from carby foods though. I don't NEED nuts, but they are shelf stable and don't require prep or anything. How much cheese am I gonna eat? You pack cheese in a bag that'll sit on a hot bus for hours it turns into a ball of gross mush. I know because I also did bring cheese.

Yep. And nuts are a better protein so it will "carry" you longer.

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Those things cost almost a dollar per piece.  Super super expensive.  I did bring some and ate them, but I actually can't stand them.  Expensive and lousy taste. 

 

I don't know - after years of airline food, I don't expect to eat anything that tastes nice on board.  It's: survive until we arrive and try to not to inconvenience others. Other cheeses frozen would last though.

Edited by Laura Corin
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Maybe airlines should go back to the time when they served complimentary meals on flights and make them peanut-free. Would that work? It makes me sad to think that it is so hard for someone with a peant-allergy to fly safely. I do think we should accommodate in a way that works for everyone. At some point though we have to ask why there is so much peanut allergies today when they used to serve peanuts to everyone on the plane.

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I give my kids crackers, applesauce, dried fruit, cured meats, jerky, etc.

I don't eat anything when we travel. I fast.

Unless one is diabetic (on meds that reduce blood glucose) there is no reason there is no reason we can't fast for 12-18 hours.

 

That isn't true.

 

My mom is on medication for RA and she can't fast more than 6 hours, max.

 

I am not diabetic or pre-diabetic (they keep watching my labs), and the longest I can fast is overnight from 8pm to 5am. At that, I'm starting to get sick and needing to eat when I get up.

 

There are many reasons people can't fast for more than 6 hours and they are natural. Typically, I eat a small meal 6 times a day. 

 

Kris

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Which just yuck.  Most of that not my thing.  Maybe the sunflower seeds.  And I had no time to prep veg.  I mean when?  We had to be out of there at 6 in the morning.  I really needed easy stuff that didn't require prep. 

 

 

I'm sorry that people haven't come up with foods that are agreeable to you.

 

But you know what's not my thing?

 

The very real fear and anxiety that my child might *die* because you haven't found foods that are acceptable enough to you for the duration of a plane flight.

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I'm sorry that people haven't come up with foods that are agreeable to you.

 

But you know what's not my thing?

 

The very real fear and anxiety that my child might *die* because you haven't found foods that are acceptable enough to you for the duration of a plane flight.

Oh whatever. No one is wanting your child to die.

 

The point was that people pack the food that they think they need. They aren't trying to kill anyone and can't anticipate all the possible needs of other people. They are doing the same thing as you - just trying to deal with life as they manage whatever their needs are. Be it needing to eat or to not eat dairy, gluten, nuts or what all else. People with food allergens don't have a monopoly on difficulties trying to meet their dietary needs. People with nut allergens don't take priority over those with other allergens. Allergens don't take priority over other medical conditions. It all sucks and everyone is just trying to make it another day.

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I guess I have a slightly different perspective-my airborne allergen is cinnamon. Fortunately, it's never gotten to an epipen stage when airborne, just sinus congestion and hives (and misery the next day) and that can usually be averted by taking benedryl before getting to the airport and topping off as needed. It's only potentially epipen worthy if I eat it.

 

But one side effect of nut bans and even just increased awareness is that it's amazing how many alternatives have cinnamon in them, and as a result, it's gotten harder and harder for me in enclosed places. For example, one of the airlines has gone from using nuts, which I could eat, to offering cookies or pretzels. The pretzels are fine, but if they have the cookies, I'm going to be reaching for an extra dose of Benedryl. It's not as bad as having a Cinnabon stand in the airplane (For me, the worst case scenario is for there to be a Cinnabon baking cinnamon rolls right at the gate-because not only will it affect me at the gate, but it's likely several people will bring them on the plane), but it can get bad. And I'm lucky-my rare allergen is only barely at the "LTFA" level.

 

How can we ever make it safe for everyone?

 

Yes, mine is citrus.  Orange particles are highly airborne.  In everyday life I can usually get away from it quickly, and I carry my epi-pens for just in case, but I've had to have some very uncomfortable conversations when flying.

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This is a tough one.  I wouldn't be too thrilled to be asked by a fellow passenger on a plane to refrain from eating certain foods.  But the rest is ridiculous.

 

Even something so limited as nuts? 

 

I can understand if she asked that no one eat anything on a long flight, but to refrain from just the peanuts doesn't seem over-the-top to me. 

 

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The only time I have gone without food for 12-18 hours is if I'm preparing for surgery. I think suggesting that order people in the plane just not eat is beyond the pale. Perhaps folks who are food allergic might carry some extra appropriate food on board to offer the people around them if they had no other options. Kind of like if I had a baby who was really fussy I might buy earplugs and a drink for those having to sit around me.

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