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Placement testing for charter school. Results: I'm a failure.


pinkmint
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Thank you for bearing with me and offering any support.

 

I went to turn in the applications to the charter school this morning and get on the waiting list. I did not expect them to be given placement tests right then but they were. I was wondering why it was taking so long. The lady sat me down in her office and explained that they are so far behind where they need to be that they are both barely kindergarten level. Maybe it was just me but I sensed her looking at me like I was scum too.

 

Worst fears confirmed? Yep. Right now the sense of failure I have is more of a fact than a feeling to me. Plus we're running out of options. I know a bunch of people will say the local terrible public school should be a fine and dandy option. I know I am poor and depressed so I'm not allowed to have standards but I'm not sending my kids there. I also checked a nearby much better school district and they told me no way do they accept kids from a different school district so scratch that too.

 

Thanks for reading. I could not be feeling much more low right now. Just needed someones to talk to.

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:grouphug:

 

Is it possible that your oldest might have a learning disorder?   I'd be interested to know exactly what their testing looked like.

 

I am guessing you don't want any more suggestions, but I hope you find a way to move forward. 

Edited by WoolySocks
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Oh, I'm sorry. Nothing like a good kick in the ribs when you're down, eh? I can understand why you feel stuck. I have no advice for you, but just wanted to commiserate with you. This is a hard blow. :(

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Do you think the testing is accurate?  Or is it illogical based on what you see at home?  Some kids get nervous and don't test well in situations like you described.  If you think that is the case, maybe you could talk it over with them and see if there is another way to do this.

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I imagine if they sat any random 7 year old from any random public school the results could very well be similar.  You aren't a failure.  

 

I agree. You are not a failure. 

 

I don't know of any kids other than geniuses who would perform well on an unannounced placement test. My daughter is extremely bright, but mention the work test and it's like her brain just reverts back to preschool. 

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Isn't your 5 year old just going into K anyhow?

 

What kind of testing was it?

 

 

I don't know.  I mean maybe it was just a scary situation for them. You said you didn't know it was going to happen so they didn't either right?  Have they ever been tested before?

Maybe they froze.

I would think my kids might do that too if they hadn't had any experience with it.  

 

And then some kids are just bad test takers.  But really have they ever done it before?

 

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Has your 7 year old ever taken a test before? Poor performance on a test does not necessarily mean a child doesn't know the material--they may simply not know how to take a test.

 

That doesn't mean you are a failure as a homeschooler. My DD in 3rd grade randomly bubbled a test because of anxiety. That doesn't mean she didn't know a lick of what was on the test.

 

And the 5 year old is 5, why would a 5 year old be expected to not test K level?

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I thought 5 was kindergarten. What are they expecting one to know to enter kindergarten?  Let's say they were considering the 5 year old to enter first.  It's not that huge of a set back.

 

Now the 7 year old, really it could boil down to that you had a different approach than the school.  I know I did.  My kids weren't writing paragraphs.  They weren't keeping journals.  I didn't give them reading comprehension worksheets.  I have no clue how they would have fared on a placement test, but I bet with some of it it would have been so different than what they were used to they could have come across as being very behind. 

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Where I live, a child who isn't 6 by 7/31 would be going into KG.  So that is fine if you agree the test reflects her ability.

 

The state may have a website telling you where kids should be at each grade level, or especially for KG entry.  That may help you decide whether the assessments are fair.

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An example is that my almost 6 yo was told to write as many numbers as she could in a row up to 100 and only wrote the number 1.

 

She 100 percent knows how to count. This test was completely unexpected. They were hungry and taken off guard. We thought we were dropping papers an leaving.

 

I don't know what to think. I just feel like a big fat, no options failure right now. I am basically ruining my kids lives.

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Has your 7 year old ever taken a test before? Poor performance on a test does not necessarily mean a child doesn't know the material--they may simply not know how to take a test.

 

 

Oh geesh and that!  I never gave my kids tests at that age.  No standardized tests.  They probably would have been confused as hell by that.

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She'll be 6 in a week and 1/2. She should be ready for 1st. Her in particular the woman said she's not even kindergarten ready.

 

Where we live it seems like half the kids are redshirted and are 6 going into Kindergarten.  A lot of kids aren't ready for the early push for academics.

 

"Not even Kindergarten ready" is ridiculous...   :glare:

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It doesn't sound like that was handled properly. She just whisked them off and tested them without warning? In a strange room, with a strange person, and without you? I think most kids wouldn't come up shining in that scenario.

 

Do you know how she tested them? What subjects, etc? I suppose numbers and reading levels primarily, but was she using familiar methods?

 

I'm so sorry she made you feel like that. :(. You are clearly doing the BEST for your children; please don't let any busybody tell you otherwise.

 

If you really want/need to put them in this school, I hope you can muster the courage to confront her about her methods and expectations. Not in a negative way of course, but to start the conversation about how "results" clearly vary from your own.

 

Best of luck with the situation.

Edited by MEmama
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An example is that my almost 6 yo was told to write as many numbers as she could in a row up to 100 and only wrote the number 1.

 

She 100 percent knows how to count. This test was completely unexpected. They were hungry and taken off guard. We thought we were dropping papers an leaving.

 

I don't know what to think. I just feel like a big fat, no options failure right now. I am basically ruining my kids lives.

 

The test situation was unfair.

 

For someone so young, they should let you sit there so you an encourage her.  It sounds obvious that she was extremely intimidated.  Sounds like she froze up.

 

Please have a strong cup of coffee (or whatever gives you gumption) and make a plan to go back and discuss assessment options.  You need to know what they're going to do and when.  You need to be able to prepare your children for the testing process.  You should be able to watch it also IMO.  Maybe there is someone in the school system that you can call.

 

Another thought is to demand an assessment for an IEP.  My sister's kid had one recently (she has mild CP and physical challenges), and they found out she was ridiculously advanced.  I think the testing process would be more fair.

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An example is that my almost 6 yo was told to write as many numbers as she could in a row up to 100 and only wrote the number 1.

 

She 100 percent knows how to count. This test was completely unexpected. They were hungry and taken off guard. We thought we were dropping papers an leaving.

 

I don't know what to think. I just feel like a big fat, no options failure right now. I am basically ruining my kids lives.

 

I think that says it all though.  I think very young kids don't necessary realize the importance of their results.  They hear write what you can and think ....write what you feel like writing.  BTDT with one of mine and vision/hearing tests.  By the time they were done they were convinced he had a hearing problem and a major vision problems.  Nope.  He just raised his hand randomly when he felt like it. 

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An example is that my almost 6 yo was told to write as many numbers as she could in a row up to 100 and only wrote the number 1.

 

She 100 percent knows how to count. This test was completely unexpected. They were hungry and taken off guard. We thought we were dropping papers an leaving.

 

I don't know what to think. I just feel like a big fat, no options failure right now. I am basically ruining my kids lives.

Okay, let's put this into perspective...

 

They are 5 and 7. When my oldest kids were that age, they were way behind what a public school child would've been. I was pregnant with #5, and I had 7yo twins, a 5yo, and a 3yo. Plus my husband was in a condensed 1-year master degree program fulltime (interpretation: he was never around). Very little, if any, schooling got done.

 

Fast forward 15 years. Those same kids - homeschooled all the way through - got into college and are thriving. One of those 7yo twins is an engineering technology major, one twin made the dean's list last term, and the 5yo has been accepted into the honors college at his university this fall.

 

Take the long view and realize that what is going on now is not the end result. I'm sure you've heard it before, but remember that homeschooling is a marathon, not a sprint.

Edited by Kinsa
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The test situation was unfair.

 

For someone so young, they should let you sit there so you an encourage her.  It sounds obvious that she was extremely intimidated.  Sounds like she froze up.

 

Please have a strong cup of coffee (or whatever gives you gumption) and make a plan to go back and discuss assessment options.  You need to know what they're going to do and when.  You need to be able to prepare your children for the testing process.  You should be able to watch it also IMO.  Maybe there is someone in the school system that you can call.

 

Another thought is to demand an assessment for an IEP.  My sister's kid had one recently (she has mild CP and physical challenges), and they found out she was ridiculously advanced.  I think the testing process would be more fair.

 

 

This! 

 

I am so sorry!  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

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Yeah my 2 year old was running around yelling. I was definitely not ready for this.

 

I thought it was odd that they had my kids in a different room from me in a high pressure setting but I have no clue what's normal as I've never had my kids in non-homeschool school before and tried to be open minded. Especially since there seems to be a long line of kids trying to get into this school. I figured we would do what they tell us within reason.

 

I definitely don't like what I've experienced of this school so far in this short time but I question what I even know because my kids are so "far behind".

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Okay, let's put this into perspective...

 

They are 5 and 7. When my oldest kids were that age, they were way behind what a public school child would've been. I was pregnant with #5, and I had 7yo twins, a 5yo, and a 3yo. Plus my husband was in a condensed 1-year master degree program fulltime (interpretation: he was never around). Very little, if any, schooling got done.

 

Fast forward 15 years. Those same kids - homeschooled all the way through - got into college and are thriving. One of those 7yo twins is an engineering technology major, one twin made the dean's list last term, and the 5yo has been accepted into the honors college at his university this fall.

 

Take the long view and realize that what is going on now is not the end result. I'm sure you've heard it before, but remember that homeschooling is a marathon, not a sprint.

 

 

Love this.  I think all us young hs moms need to hear this.

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I don't even know what "kindergarten-ready" means. I wouldn't expect kids going into kindergarten to know anything - that's what kindergarten is FOR. (Preschool is not mandatory in our state, and kindergarten only became mandatory two years ago.) That said, I agree the surprise and unusualness of the test is probably a lot of it for both kids. Just because your kids didn't test well when they weren't ready to be tested (and maybe hadn't been tested formally before, which is FINE) doesn't mean you're a failure! Testing is way overrated.

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An example is that my almost 6 yo was told to write as many numbers as she could in a row up to 100 and only wrote the number 1.

 

She 100 percent knows how to count. This test was completely unexpected. They were hungry and taken off guard. We thought we were dropping papers an leaving.

 

I don't know what to think. I just feel like a big fat, no options failure right now. I am basically ruining my kids lives.

 

 

Can they redo it?

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At 6 I bet my mathy kid would not have written many numbers down because he would have been overwhelmed with all of that writing.  That is a lot of writing.  And since we did a lot of one on one stuff he didn't need to do as much writing.  I would never have said here write down all the numbers from 1 - 100.  That's a ridiculous assignment.   He took his first college level math course starting at 13.  What would they have told me at that point?  He is hopelessly behind in math because he won't write the numbers 1 -100.   Stupid!

 

 

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Thank you for bearing with me and offering any support.

 

I went to turn in the applications to the charter school this morning and get on the waiting list. I did not expect them to be given placement tests right then but they were. I was wondering why it was taking so long. The lady sat me down in her office and explained that they are so far behind where they need to be that they are both barely kindergarten level. Maybe it was just me but I sensed her looking at me like I was scum too.

 

Worst fears confirmed? Yep. Right now the sense of failure I have is more of a fact than a feeling to me. Plus we're running out of options. I know a bunch of people will say the local terrible public school should be a fine and dandy option. I know I am poor and depressed so I'm not allowed to have standards but I'm not sending my kids there. I also checked a nearby much better school district and they told me no way do they accept kids from a different school district so scratch that too.

 

Thanks for reading. I could not be feeling much more low right now. Just needed someones to talk to.

 

That is not, and never will be, the case.

 

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You haven't had time to ruin your kids lives. They will be fine. But it does sound like you need an easy education plan for this year.  :grouphug: Find someone here that's up on early years curriculum to make a plan with you. I bet the materials are lying around in the hive's homes and could come to you.

Edited by Starr
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A 7 year old simply can't be THAT "far behind" unless there are significant developmental delays. I mean, really, its SEVEN. 

 

Testing for schools around here is always scheduled in advance. I would, at the least, ask for a re-test and question why they would even do that in the first place!

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And am I really going to start my kids in their very first school setting already "behind" and being labeled as "not where they should be"? Older than their classmates etc and being reminded of their inadequacy?

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An example is that my almost 6 yo was told to write as many numbers as she could in a row up to 100 and only wrote the number 1.

 

She 100 percent knows how to count.

When DS was around that age he took a test (first ever) at the local public school. They told him to write down as many letters as he could in a minute or so. They gave me the super stink eye and admonished me because he only wrote 10 or 15 letters so clearly "didn't even know the alphabet!" He not only knew the alphabet, he could read at well above grade level and he regularly used a dictionary/encyclopedia. It just never occurred to him to write down the alphabet in order because we didn't drill things like that at home.

 

Lots of educators (often the not terribly well informed ones) are very opposed to homeschooling and their prejudices are going to come through. If you are confident that your children are learning then I wouldn't worry about it.

Edited by bibiche
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:grouphug: kids may not test well and kids do catch up.

 

Well there is no such thing as "not kindergarten ready" IMO. Sounds like they are biased.

They had "kindergarten readiness" tests for kids registering for my local public schools. The admin test uppercase, lowercase, numbers, writing your first name, and whatever Head Start teaches for PreK. They want to know how well a child can read or write.

 

ETA:

They give a testing appointment so not on the same day as enrollment. Kindergarten cohort max at 120 each year for that school due to insufficient classrooms.

 

ETA:

My kid's 1st grade teacher was even more check box personality than the admin who does the tests. His K teacher was flexible.

Edited by Arcadia
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Yeah my 2 year old was running around yelling. I was definitely not ready for this.

 

I thought it was odd that they had my kids in a different room from me in a high pressure setting but I have no clue what's normal as I've never had my kids in non-homeschool school before and tried to be open minded. Especially since there seems to be a long line of kids trying to get into this school. I figured we would do what they tell us within reason.

 

I definitely don't like what I've experienced of this school so far in this short time but I question what I even know because my kids are so "far behind".

But really, they AREN'T "so far behind".

 

You know what your kids know and are capable of. At 5 and 7 there simply is no "being behind". There is a huge, wide curve of abilities at this ages and truly, outside of total neglect (which is obviously not the case), you can't damage them at this point. Kids are born learning, but it's not always up to us to decide in which order. ;)

 

Please, please do not let this so-called educator get under your skin. From all your posts, it is clear you are a loving, involved , intentional parent. Kids from those homes are not "behind" and a random lady giving a random test to kids ready for lunch does not have the right to tell you otherwise.

 

I'm so mad on your behalf. I hope you have some good chocolate stashed away.

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She'll be 6 in a week and 1/2. She should be ready for 1st. Her in particular the woman said she's not even kindergarten ready.

That's still within Kindergarten cut-off range for my area.  There's zero shame in putting an August 6 yo into Kindergarten.  

 

Did the charter school turn them away?  

 

There's still just such a huge range of skill and development at these ages.  I had one kid who taught herself to read before her 5th birthday and another one who didn't really click in with the reading until she was close to 7.  

 

First things first:  Are you being treated for your depression?  You need to get your own oxygen mask on, so to speak.  The depression is going to color everything related to how you perceive and deal with everything in your situation.  

 

Secondly, if you decide to homeschool, these kids are young enough that you can get away with doing a lot of reading and some writing for at least a year or two, maybe longer.  Pick some subjects they want to learn about.  Go to the library and check out books.  Look up information on websites.  Have them draw some pictures and write some sentences about what they learned (maybe with your help for the younger one).  Throw in some math.  I'm not trying to talk you into homeschooling if you feel like you cant handle it, but I also just wanted to say that it might not be quite as overwhelming as you think  :001_smile: 

 

 

Edited by Forget-me-not
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I wouldn't want to have my kids go to a school that tested kids without warning or consent and then slammed the parents.

 

Btw, I am one of the people who say that you should LOOK at the local district. Just look, no commitment.

Edited by Alessandra
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BTDT - I totally understand that humiliated feeling.  I remember my son being asked some pretty simple  questions that he just couldn't answer.  He was totally off in la-la land when this teacher was talking to him.   And that wasn't a written test. 

 

Most of my kids are terrible test takers.

 

 I would try a re-do.  I would call and talk with someone else if possible and explain you had no idea that was coming and all of you were caught completely off guard.  Your poor kids!! I'd play up taking your children into a room alone with a stranger and how that may have scared them.  Seriously.  The school completely mis-handled that one.  Demand that your kids be given another chance with someone else.

 

But, you can also look at this as a chance to learn.  Can you homeschool one more year, or are you needing to put them in this fall?   If you can, use the knowledge you've gained from this experience to help prep them for next time.

 

 

Edited by PrincessMommy
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I'm sorry.  I had my moments, as well,but they came much later.  Ugh.  

 

One thing:  if this school is going to put that much pressure on kids that young, it might be that you have dodged a bullet.  I dodged a couple in my day, but it seemed like failure at the time.  

 

My kid went to kindergarten at barely-age-5.  I wish we had waited a year.  He went to a "high performance school" because he is incredibly smart...but he was not ready for the social and workload stuff.  Anyway, when he went to kindergarten, he was the only kid in the room who did not know how to read.  (I read to him for hours a day--and I am not exaggerating--at least 3-4 hours a DAY...)  Anyway, the teacher was a little MIFFED that she had to teach my kid to READ (mom=failure).  Well he learned in about 5 minutes, and within 2 months was *by far* the best reader in the class.  

 

He also did not impress the school with his behavior and so on at the interview, but they let him in anyway...  WELL, when we pulled him out at second grade to homeschool (as did the OTHER "problem child") their class standardized test went from being in the 95th percentile to the 85th.  HA.  (For my sorry sad self, that was extremely gratifying...)  But those two weren't a great fit in that school...even though it was highly rated and had wonderful curriculum.  

 

So were the other mom and I "failures"?  We sure felt like it at the time.  

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Another thought is to demand an assessment for an IEP.  My sister's kid had one recently and they found out she was ridiculously advanced.  

 

We had a similar experience - which is why we homeschool.

 

The teacher crabbed at me during our first parent-teacher conference and said my daughter couldn't grasp what was happening in class.  Had a "deer in the headlights look"...seemed behind the other kids...couldn't follow the class.  They did gifted testing and she scored in the top 1 percentile.  They had to call a gifted specialist out to the school.

 

The next year, the same teacher was doing this exact same thing to my son.  She was even sending him to the special education classroom every day for awhile.  I could see the writing on the wall.

 

They're both teenagers and they're not behind.  *rolling eyes*  They both want to be doctors. 

 

If I were you, I would look around a little more.  How bad is the public school?

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At 6 I bet my mathy kid would not have written many numbers down because he would have been overwhelmed with all of that writing.  That is a lot of writing.  And since we did a lot of one on one stuff he didn't need to do as much writing.  I would never have said here write down all the numbers from 1 - 100.  That's a ridiculous assignment.   He took his first college level math course starting at 13.  What would they have told me at that point?  He is hopelessly behind in math because he won't write the numbers 1 -100.   Stupid!

 

I'm fairly certain it is not expected here for kids to be able to write all the numbers from 1 to 100 in one sitting even at the END of K.  My son (whose 9th birthday is coming up Aug 3... making me wonder when your daughter's is), who is way advanced, could not have done that then and might struggle now (At the end of 3rd grade) -- because of the amount of writing. Not the numbers.

 

Edited by vonfirmath
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Thank you for bearing with me and offering any support.

 

I went to turn in the applications to the charter school this morning and get on the waiting list. I did not expect them to be given placement tests right then but they were. I was wondering why it was taking so long. The lady sat me down in her office and explained that they are so far behind where they need to be that they are both barely kindergarten level. Maybe it was just me but I sensed her looking at me like I was scum too.

 

Worst fears confirmed? Yep. Right now the sense of failure I have is more of a fact than a feeling to me. Plus we're running out of options. I know a bunch of people will say the local terrible public school should be a fine and dandy option. I know I am poor and depressed so I'm not allowed to have standards but I'm not sending my kids there. I also checked a nearby much better school district and they told me no way do they accept kids from a different school district so scratch that too.

 

Thanks for reading. I could not be feeling much more low right now. Just needed someones to talk to.

I'm sorry! Hugs to you.
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And am I really going to start my kids in their very first school setting already "behind" and being labeled as "not where they should be"? Older than their classmates etc and being reminded of their inadequacy?

 

In our district, a child turning 6 in August would be more likely to be starting K than 1st anyway.  A good school will not paint kids this way but reminds kids they learn things in their own way in their own time.  There are always a RANGE of skill sets and academic levels in early elementary (on up for that matter). 

 

If your child can write numbers and you think the testing didn't really show what they can know, call up the school and tell them.  Bring in work samples.  I guess I wouldn't do that unless you were called off the waiting list.  Here, getting called off waiting lists for popular schools before fall is not super common unless you're right at the top of the list.  We sat on a waiting list all year for a school at #5. 

 

It is what it is.  You're definitely not a failure.  Testing young kids is fraught with trouble.  My son was a horrible writer in early elementary.  And by writer, I mean the act of physically writing.  He has no problem typing papers and completing work now. 

 

ETA - my son's K and 1st grade experience was very similar to Patty Joanna's.  Overly smart kid that was active and not a hoop jumper.  Didn't go over too great in the regular classroom.  I was lucky that the boy had an October birthday so he was already (and continues to be) old for grade.  Academically he's more than ready for college.  He needs a few more years under my roof.

 

Edited by WoolySocks
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:grouphug: kids may not test well and kids do catch up.

 

They had "kindergarten readiness" tests for kids registering for my local public schools. The admin test uppercase, lowercase, numbers, writing your first name, and whatever Head Start teaches for PreK. They want to know how well a child can read or write.

 

ETA:

They give a testing appointment so not on the same day as enrollment. Kindergarten cohort max at 120 each year for that school due to insufficient classrooms.

 

I understand that they have what are called "readiness tests," but I thought those were more of an informational tool.  A child who is age-ready for KG enters KG when his parents say, at least where I live.  And 1st grade and so on.

 

I will say that the schools I contacted would not accept my kids "young" until they had completed KG.  So they could not have gone to 1st at 5yo without having official KG under their belt.  There is no way to officially homeschool early KG here.  But that is not pertinent to the OP.

Edited by SKL
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She'll be 6 in a week and 1/2. She should be ready for 1st. Her in particular the woman said she's not even kindergarten ready.

First things first, as other pp say, you are not a failure.

 

Second, why should she be ready for 1st? Our oldest will be six at the beginning of Aug. This is his official K year. Yes, many start K at 5. But...that would have been a disaster for him (public, private or HS). He just flat out wasn't ready for formal phonics, math, and handwriting. (Now, science is a completely different story!) 

 

However, many start at 6. And if that's when they start, that's when they start. So being in K at 6 is well-within the (wide) range of normal. And, in my state, you aren't required to start school until 6. So yes, 6 is K, even if some choose to start earlier.

 

And I have no idea what K ready is. (And I am a former teacher!) K is the beginning of school. There should academic expectations for those just beginning.

 

Third, if I was unexpectedly given a test that I didn't know was coming, I might not do well.

 

So, like other posters, do not let this get you down.

 

I wish I were closer and could do something to help in person, even if that was just give you a short break!

 

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I understand that they have what are called "readiness tests," but I thought those were more of an informational tool.  A child who is age-ready for KG enters KG when his parents say, at last where I live.  And 1st grade and so on.

 

I will say that the schools I contacted would not accept my kids "young" until they had completed KG.  So they could not have gone to 1st at 5yo without having official KG under their belt.  There is no way to officially homeschool early KG here.  But that is not pertinent to the OP.

 

Here, you have to private school K and 1st to get a child in early.  (Or have an accommodating school that will work with you.)  In general, They will put a child aged for K in Kindergarten even if they just completed "K" in a different school.

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Please, please, please, be kind to yourself. You have SO MUCH to worry about, you can't allow a silly test to push you down further.

 

You were not ready for the "test". Kids weren't ready either. All of a sudden they are removed from you and asked questions??? They were expected to be with a random stranger, no warning, nothing? You are not a failure, but that school did fail in the way they handled things. And giving you guilt about it? Ugh!!!!! So mad for you.

 

You have seen your 6yr old count. She didn't do it in front of random stranger. So what???

 

Besides, what does kindergarten ready mean?

 

I know it sounds easier said than done, but please, don't let this bother you. Big hugs!! I prayed for you this morning!

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And am I really going to start my kids in their very first school setting already "behind" and being labeled as "not where they should be"? Older than their classmates etc and being reminded of their inadequacy?

 

My son went "on time" even with a late birthday.  He was the youngest by SIX MONTHS in his high school graduating class.  Everyone red-shirted, and I wish we would have.  In the high school years, driving a year later than the other kids is really annoying and socially isolating to some degree.  Boys' later physical development is *very* hard for them to handle.  

 

And if this was just a bad test and not really a measure of their ability, then they are not behind.  

 

I would not worry about this for one more minute...if I were myself now.  I would have been a basket case at the time, so I do understand.  But I'm telling you, all the basket-casing does is tell you lies and lead you to bad decisions.  ***EVERY SINGLE MISTAKE*** I ever made regarding my son and his education was based in fear.  Fear is a bad platform for decision making.  So take a couple of days to wallow (I would have and still do sometimes) but then stand up straight and find a place where you can make decisions based on what you know is true and not based in fear.  

 

I'm saying this in an encouraging not slamming voice.  I'm talking as much to my  younger self as I am to you.  

 

Edited to add a correct apostrophe.  :::eyeroll:::

 

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