Jump to content

Menu

CC: How do you approach the subject of Bible in your homeschool?


Recommended Posts

We've done different things over the years with the idea of doing Bible during our home school.  This has varied from using a formal curriculum like Explorer's Bible Studies, or BSGFAA to less formal as in  just reading missionary biographies and memorizing verses.

 

This year I'm considering the idea of whether Bible should really be a "subject" for school or if it should be more of a quiet time done by each kid individually as they get older.  

 

Any thoughts?  As an adult, I've struggled with the habit of a "quiet time" with God each day and would love to be able to instill that in my kids, but does that really work?  Does encouraging that habit (or requiring it) as a child really carry over into adulthood?

 

On the other hand, doing an in-depth study of a book of the Bible and requiring it as a subject in school does force it to get done.  My older kids have all gone onto a Christian College with four bible credits on their high school transcripts which wouldn't happen if we switch to an emphasis of having a personal quiet time with God rather than using a formal curriculum.

 

Maybe I'm putting too much thought into this . . . maybe doing both is 'ideal' . . . 

 

If you've chosen one approach or the other (or both), can you help me think this through?

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I try to nurture both private reading *and* systematic study, so I don't think it has to be either/or.  The one is a habit/choice and the other is required.  But we can nurture/water habits.   :)

 

You can put Bible on the transcript, but you don't have to.  I'm not going to.  My dd is applying to a state school, and while it's not a problem, I just didn't want to.  If I put it down and put 1, then I'm implying how much time we spent.  It doesn't really matter either way.  I wasn't really picky about time.  I usually have given her something and she has worked through it, so it wasn't about the time just did you work on it today.  It would be nice if it were this round table, romantic experience, but that wasn't our reality.  If that's what you're doing and you like it, I would keep going.

 

I don't think you judge what you did exclusively by how they turn out, because you can't control adult choices.  Kids have to sort through things for themselves, and even kids who read their Bibles and are diligent all the way through high school, a christian college, grad school, etc. can be left questioning later.  I think it's natural to have things transition from what you require them to do to what they choose to do.  So nowadays our discussions are hey when you go to the college what christian fellowship groups will you be in with?  Things transition and they have to drive it.

 

If you liked what you did and it was good, keep doing it.   :)

Edited by OhElizabeth
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD is going into 8th grade, and we've always had some combo of Bible/Apologetics or combined with another class subject.  For instance, last year she had a separate Apologetics class and a combined Bible/Literature class.  For the combined class, we read the Chronicles of Narnia and talked about the biblical themes running through the series.  It was a great class.  Her Apologetics class was comprised of reading and discussing Dr. Michael Heiser's book, Unseen Realm.  All I can say about that book is WOW!  We were all (DH would listen in from his office as we read) blown away.  It was just a fantastic, revealing, eye-opening read and brought so much clarity and understanding as to why the ancient Israelites thought and acted the way they did.

 

This next year, Bible will be it's own class, with apologetic undertones, centered on an in-depth study of Jesus and His Teachings.  We will delve into the historical Jesus; Jesus of the Bible, Jesus in the OT and NT; His teachings; Myths (think Gnostic) and misconceptions about Jesus, etc.  9th Grade will focus on the OT with supplemental reading from Enoch, Jasher and Jubilees, as these provided pivotal background information in understanding passages such as Gen. 6:1-4; Gen. 11; Deut 32:8-9 and various other threads woven throughout the OT & NT books.

 

All our Bible studies are home-grown using resources and books I cobble together.  We just don't fit any "standard" Bible curricula because there's always some aspect/doctrine/feel-good fluff we don't subscribe to.  In addition, we don't use what we consider "feel-good fluff" resources like Joyce Meyer, Max Lucado, or Lee Strobel.  I specifically look for scholarly work done by those who can read and translate ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, NT Greek, and other ancient Near East languages such as Ugaritic and Akkadian. For instance, Dr. Michael Heiser's seminars on

will be used during our OT studies, coupled with the book, Beginning at Moses, by Dr. Michael P.V. Barrett.  

 

Another practice we're going to re-institute next year is to break away from studies for 7 minutes at some point each day, or first thing in the morning, specifically for prayer. We each go to a quiet place and pray about whatever is on our minds, or just praise and worship Him for 7 minutes each day. We did this faithfully a few years ago, and we really saw God working in our lives and answering prayer.  It was so amazing.  But, we got lazy.....and that fell by the wayside too.

 

FWIW, we institute these practices and classes in our school schedule specifically because, like many, spending time in the Word or prayer wouldn't happen otherwise.  It's a sad but very true realiy. So, we do what is necessary to guarantee we do what should come naturally and joyfully.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Another practice we're going to re-institute next year is to break away from studies for 7 minutes at some point each day, or first thing in the morning, specifically for prayer. We each go to a quiet place and pray about whatever is on our minds, or just praise and worship Him for 7 minutes each day. We did this faithfully a few years ago, and we really saw God working in our lives and answering prayer.  It was so amazing.  But, we got lazy.....and that fell by the wayside too.

 

 

 

 

FWIW, we institute these practices and classes in our school schedule specifically because, like many, spending time in the Word or prayer wouldn't happen otherwise.  It's a sad but very true realiy. So, we do what is necessary to guarantee we do what should come naturally and joyfully.

 

Love the idea of having a small time set aside for prayer!  I'm going to try to incorporate that into our day this year.

 

Thank you for the last paragraph.  That is what I was struggling with verbalizing.  It should come naturally and joyfully BUT you're right, it doesn't always and by making a part of the daily schedule it will get done.  Thank you for clarifying that thought for me.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

You can put Bible on the transcript, but you don't have to.  I'm not going to.  My dd is applying to a state school, and while it's not a problem, I just didn't want to.  If I put it down and put 1, then I'm implying how much time we spent.  It doesn't really matter either way.  I wasn't really picky about time.  I usually have given her something and she has worked through it, so it wasn't about the time just did you work on it today.  It would be nice if it were this round table, romantic experience, but that wasn't our reality.  If that's what you're doing and you like it, I would keep going.

 

I don't think you judge what you did exclusively by how they turn out, because you can't control adult choices.  Kids have to sort through things for themselves, and even kids who read their Bibles and are diligent all the way through high school, a christian college, grad school, etc. can be left questioning later.  I think it's natural to have things transition from what you require them to do to what they choose to do.  So nowadays our discussions are hey when you go to the college what christian fellowship groups will you be in with?  Things transition and they have to drive it.

 

If you liked what you did and it was good, keep doing it.   :)

 

Thanks for your reply.  I really only put the Bible credits on the transcript because of where they were applying and probably wouldn't for a child not heading into a Christian college.  I almost didn't put it down on my most recent grads transcript anyway but my dd works for the same college in a branch of their admissions department and she said that it seems to be normal practice for the home school students and Christian school students to have such credits on their transcripts so I went ahead with it.

 

Absolutely agree that there are no guarantees of how they turn out.   I'm just musing what I can do to encourage them in that habit so they don't have to struggle as much as I have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I grew up homeschooled and had regular Bible classes at home.  I have loved the depth of knowledge that time spent with my mom in the Word has given me as a basis in my Christian life.  I have regretted that I have never really formed a consistent habit of Bible reading for myself.

So, for my own children, I am doing both.  "Read your Bible" is right next to "brush your teeth" on the list of morning routine.  It helps that it is on my morning routine list as well.  I am hoping that spending time in their Bible becomes a habit that will serve them for the rest of their life.

I am also spending time in the school schedule to cover Bible as a subject.  While I cannot force my children to have faith, I can teach them what beliefs a Christian should have, and how they should live in light of a real relationship with Christ.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We don't do Bible curriculum , but my kids have devotional books they do in the morning, and we do family Bible time in the evening with dh.

They are also very active in our church, church camps, Sunday school, midweek kids club, and the list goes on.

 

When they were younger, I used a curriculum for them, and will use one for my five year old. It's mostly to have a knowledge of all the Bible stories, be familiar with verses, and have a good idea of the scope and sequence of the old and new testaments.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are going to continue Bible as a formal subject through high school - even though my kids do two years of Confirmation, church services, Youth Group, etc - because, with even that stuff, I noticed huge gaps in their knowledge.  We are using the Positive Action for Christ curriculum and supplementing with other stuff like some of CS Lewis' work.

 

Growing up, even though we went to church every Sunday, I knew next to nothing about the actual Bible and it seemed like everyone taught the same 10 Bible stories over and over again.   :glare:   I have learned a ton just from doing a survey through the books of the Bible with my teenagers.  Embarrassingly...

 

And I'm not sure about transcripts, either.  I wonder if college admissions will be weirded out if my kids have 4 credits of Biblical studies on their transcripts.  I guess I don't have to list everything on there (and we can still do it).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My girls are still relatively young, so take this with a grain of salt. But here is what we try to do:

 

Start the Day (choose from one or two of the following):

  • Group Bible Reading -- During the school year, we read aloud as a group from our chosen book of the Bible, about 3x/week. We read about 3-5 chapters, depending on length, taking turns with the reading. We read for approximately 15 minutes.
  • Worship & Hymns -- After the Bible reading, we sing a worship song or hymn (or two), about 2-3x/week. This takes about 5 minutes.
  • Personal Devotional Time -- On the other days, we each find a quiet, private corner of the house, take a timer (or use a watch), and spend 15 minutes developing the habit of "personal devotional time." From time to time, I might offer suggestions about what to do during this time, ways to pray, ideas for connecting with God, and so on, but for the most part, I just leave this time open and let each person have that availability for the Holy Spirit to use as He sees fit.

Christian Faith:

  • Christian Doctrines -- During the summer, we systematically study two or three Christian doctrines (through a formal program for this purpose) & the girls earn badges. We're about to finish up our doctrine work this summer, if possible, so next year, we may either start over again (with another, more in-depth course) or begin book or genre studies (e.g., Synoptic Gospels, Pentateuch, etc.).
  • Christian Traditions -- During the calendar year, we try to incorporate teachings about Christian traditions (water baptism, communion, Advent, church history, and so on) into our family's celebrations and connections, primarily through our church body. This is not something that we consider to be "school," but simply a matter of discipling our children in the faith.
  • Christian Community -- We are a part of a healthy, living church, and in this context of other maturing believers, we and our children are further discipled and strengthened in our faith. The girls participate in our church's midweek ministry to children, which emphasizes truth applied to life, as well as scripture memorization. The girls have memorized a lot of scripture passages!

Bible Memory & Bible Study:

  • Sing the Word CDs -- We have listened to Sing the Word & other scripture memory song CDs since the girls were little. I bought every Sing the Word CD years ago, and it's amazing to me how much the girls have memorized through singing and dancing in the playroom! :)
  • Children's Bibles -- Since my kids are still somewhat young, they have up until recently been reading DK Children's Illustrated Bible, Egermeier's, and the like, in addition to their own personal Bibles.
  • What the Bible Is All About: Handbook for Kids -- This is the revamp of the Henrietta C. Mears "What the Bible Is All About," the version for young people. My oldest read through the entire volume, and the twins are working through it in two years (this past & next). Good background in here, they have enjoyed reading this.
  • Journey through the Bible -- My oldest is working through this resource in two years (this past & next). There is good background information in here, too, at an older level than the Mears young readers book.
  • Bible Study Tools -- We have a children's concordance, some children's Bible handbooks, a Bible atlas, and several other Bible study tools on the shelves. From time to time, we work through how to use these tools, and practice using them. The girls are free to use these resources at any time. They look at the photos of "life in Bible times" and learn from that.
  • Formal Bible Studies -- Up to this point, we have not used formal Bible studies. I've looked at several, but haven't really liked the approach that so many of them use. This upcoming year (for 4th/4th/6th), we will use Christian Light Education's Bible 4 series. I'm using the 4th grade series because we just worked through the Old Testament in our Ancient History (Part 1) studies this year, and the 4th grade level works through the gospels. The CLE books seem well laid-out, and the first book covers some background information on what Jewish life was life in New Testament times and places. The next four books work through the gospel parables and narrative. I think it will be a good study.

Future Plans:

  • Church History -- I'd really, really, really like to do at least two full years of Church History when the girls are in junior high/high school, probably through a college-level correspondence course, or something I pull together using this. I loved my church history courses when I was a student!
  • Comparative Worldviews -- At some point (when?), we'd like to study major world religions and worldviews comparatively. So, a worldview course will go in there, too, I suppose.
  • Comparative Christianity -- We'd also like to explore the various "branches" of Christianity, including participating in (visiting) other churches and services to experience this personally. I feel that this is the most important course of all, for a Christian to understand what other traditions contribute, determine where he or she stands in the stream, and work out how to relate to those from other traditions. So probably 11th or 12th grade, or beyond.
  • Book Studies & Other Bible courses -- IMO, everyone should do at least one book study in high school, if for no other reason than to learn how to do a book study! In another year or two, I'll look for something my oldest can do for credit, perhaps through this resource.
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've gone all over the map with this one, and here's what has been working for us:

 

Right after breakfast, we sing a hymn (Hymns for Kid's Heart is awesome) and then read a chapter or half a chapter out of the Bible and talk about it. Right now we're in John. I try to spend only about 15 minutes on this.

 

My youngest and I do a little of Apologia's Who is God? Twice a week. Before that we did Leading Little Ones to God. I've got Who am I? lined up next, although when I did it with my son we didn't like it as much and dropped it. But I'm giving it another shot.

 

My oldest, twice a week, reads a chapter from Jon Courson's Bible Commentary. He's reading through Exodus right now. His choice. He loves it. In between books of the Bible, I'm having him read some Christian living and apologetics books. Also he has memory work. I've got him working on chapters or books of the Bible. He memorizes two verses per day. He memorized all of 1 John. Now he is working on the entire Sermon on the Mount from Matthew.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 For instance, Dr. Michael Heiser's seminars on Jesus in the OT will be used during our OT studies, coupled with the book, Beginning at Moses, by Dr. Michael P.V. Barrett.  

 

 

Ok, can I just chuckle and say I NEVER thought I'd see Barrett mentioned here on the boards?   :lol:  I took classes with him in college and have that book.  That would be like zip zoom over the heads of my kids, but sure, good stuff!  Pairing it with videos or something makes sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply.  I really only put the Bible credits on the transcript because of where they were applying and probably wouldn't for a child not heading into a Christian college.  I almost didn't put it down on my most recent grads transcript anyway but my dd works for the same college in a branch of their admissions department and she said that it seems to be normal practice for the home school students and Christian school students to have such credits on their transcripts so I went ahead with it.

 

Absolutely agree that there are no guarantees of how they turn out.   I'm just musing what I can do to encourage them in that habit so they don't have to struggle as much as I have.

 

Yes, it's the norm!  :)

 

I don't think even habit can protect you there, even though it's a start.  I think we wake up every day and make choices, just like with our nutrition or everything else.  There's nothing we can do that makes it less tempting to take the easy way or cut corners or say we're tired or say we're too discouraged or whatever.  EVERY ONE of my friends has had to go through this.  We all make choices every day.

 

But yes, like the others, I really wanted my dd to have her Bible reading as a personal habit.  I picked night time, because I felt like in the morning we were doing 20 minutes or whatever together.  I told her she could stay up as late as she wanted, if she was reading her Bible.  ;)  I put her into the NIrV, which is totally NOT POPULAR in our circles, because I felt like it was more important to be able to read the Bible than to be picky about which version.  And every night, for years and years, I reminded her to read her Bible.  Now when she's out on trips, she knows she's going to get "Are you reading your Bible?"  I don't think there are ever too many reminders, because we all, every day, make that choice and need that reminder and encouragement.  Life encroaches on all of us.  I don't think it's ever like we arrive and are there.  The apostle certainly didn't think he had.  I think the astonishing thing is to get to adulthood, to the age where you always thought Oh they've ARRIVED! and realize you haven't arrived and they hadn't arrived.  :)

 

You know when my dd was little it was SO the fad in homeschooling to say that father's should teach Bible, almost to the exclusion of the mother!  I went to hs conventions and was told this.  And I'm like ok so I can't teach them?  So I spent a lot of time trying to nurture my dh to read to them.  And it's good and we do that!  And I felt guilty if I taught them, like oh I'm usurping my dh and I'm not supposed to be doing this and it's 2nd best, blah blah.  Then you read in the Bible where mothers taught their kids and you think about your friends who love the Word and realize it came from their mothers typically. 

 

So that's sort of why we were spread out, because it was like 20 minutes with me (Bible and singing), then time with your father, then time for your personal.  Not like one long hour and done.  But one long hour AND personal and talking with father in the car, that would have been cool too!  It's all good.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Right after breakfast, we sing a hymn (Hymns for Kid's Heart is awesome) 

 

Yes!!  There are more books in the series too.  There's an Easter book and a Christmas book and of course the three (or more now?) hymn books.  And we'd do things like focusing on one and trying to memorize the verses.  

 

Sanseri has a Christmas study we did one year.  Another year Timberdoodle put out a list of verses for Easter that we memorized and studied.  I like those kinds of things.

 

What I like is that somehow she came through our imperfect process thinking the Word is *authoritative*, as in decisive, the arbiter.  So I mentioned something, and she says "Oh, I was looking that up online and the historical context in the x culture..."  Yes!  

 

Just as an aside, there were some books I had seen mentioned over the years (the Paul Little books, for instance) that never really flew with her.  I had been relying on some freshman Bible classes she's doing as DE this fall to fill in some gaps, and then I had assumed she'd get to go through a basic doctrines sequence with Ryrie or whatever using online classes.  Now I'm realizing if that doesn't happen that I need to get that done!  It was on my list to get done before she goes away.  Of course if your kids are going to a christian college, it's no biggee.  She has picked out this program at a big state school, and I keep trying throw at her questions, hard questions, that I KNOW will come up.  She thinks I'm picking on her, and I'm like no, you really aren't that solid yet, you haven't thought THAT HARD about whether and why, and you don't want to be surprised/flustered!  I have topics I still need to cover with her.  Alcohol is the big one we aren't done with yet.  I have a book I want her to read on it that examines the issue from many angles, looking carefully at the Scriptures.

 

Warren Wiersbe studies were nice for her the last few years.  They're easy to pick up and read, very accessible to a high schooler, and they were just enough.  That was what I meant by reality, that with ds' SN doing a lot more just wasn't reality.  I try to be around for talks and to get her thinking on topics, reading on topics, but for actual study I gave her the Be series.  Just enough for a 9th grader, and maybe by doing it that way it nurtured that independence and self-choosing, since no one was doing it for her?  But I'm really glad that for fall we have OT and NT survey classes.  If I add Ryrie to that, that will be enough.  I thought she was going to take an extra DE class that we decided against, so she has room.  I found some online syllabii and questions and things to go with Ryrie.  So again, same gig.  Syllabus, materials, independent, with me there coming in at points discussing and challenging.  Not as nice as being together the whole time, but it's just what I can make happen.  Now maybe with the ABA tutors coming I can make more happen?  That would be interesting to ponder.

Edited by OhElizabeth
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love the idea of having a small time set aside for prayer!  I'm going to try to incorporate that into our day this year.

 

Thank you for the last paragraph.  That is what I was struggling with verbalizing.  It should come naturally and joyfully BUT you're right, it doesn't always and by making a part of the daily schedule it will get done.  Thank you for clarifying that thought for me.

 

Yes, something for Bible has always been on our daily schedule!  Might not be on the transcript, but definitely on the schedule!  I wanted it to be as much "of course we do this" as math or science or anything else.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the thoughts mentioned above-- we've done different versions of many of those. Some things we have done that I didn't see mentioned--

1) apostolic prayers/prayers from scripture (Eph 1:17-19, Eph 3:16-19, Phil 1:9-11, etc.) We memorize these and use them regularly, which has helped to give my kids language for how to pray for others in a mature, Biblical way, beyond just "bless this family, etc." (Of course, He hears and loves the simple prayers too!)

2) a "Prayer Wall" bulletin board where we hang pictures, Christmas card photos, pictures of children we sponsor, etc. Every morning we choose one photo and we all pray for that person/family. This has helped my kiddos feel comfortable and confident praying for others as well.

3) devotional art and dance-- painting or dancing devotionally to worship music. There have been some incredible moments during these times.

4) assigned devotional reading-- I like to do this in a way that is relevant to all of us. The year we did CC and memorized John 1 in Latin, we also read a devotional commentary on the Gospel of John all together. Ugh, so good... My kids loved that. This year my oldest is in 7th, and she'll be reading Tozer's The Pursuit of God and two other devotional selections, just a chapter a week, and writing her thoughts in a prayer journal.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, can I just chuckle and say I NEVER thought I'd see Barrett mentioned here on the boards?   :lol:  I took classes with him in college and have that book.  That would be like zip zoom over the heads of my kids, but sure, good stuff!  Pairing it with videos or something makes sense.

 

That looks good. For just 99 cents on Kindle. Its on my device now! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, can I just chuckle and say I NEVER thought I'd see Barrett mentioned here on the boards?   :lol:  I took classes with him in college and have that book.  That would be like zip zoom over the heads of my kids, but sure, good stuff!  Pairing it with videos or something makes sense.

 

Ever since we read Dr. Heiser's book, The Unseen Realm, DD wants nothing to do with anything but the Bible and scholarly work. She actually eats it up.  I can't say as I blame her.  So, now I have to research all the books for our studies to make sure it's coming from authors who understand the context of how the ANE Israelite thought and not 21st century thinking, what they believed and why, as well as the surrounding cultures of the time -- NOT TO MENTION being able to read, speak, and understand ANE languages! This kind of criteria certainly culls resource availability. 

 

Funny thing is, when she went to Bible camp last year (12YO), a group of college kids from Kingswood University were counselors for the Jr. High Camp.  DD got into some pretty deep theological discussions with these kids during their group sessions.  They couldn't understand how she knew all these things and wanted to know where she was learning this from.  Some of the them hadn't yet learned what DD was talking about.  One of the counselors suggested she go to college and study Theology as she would fit right in.

 

This last Sunday, we just dropped DD off at the same camp.  She was so pleased to see the same group from Kingswood there.  She told me she can't wait to rekindle their conversations and especially to share all she learned from The Unseen Realm.  I have a feeling they are going to be shell-shocked.

 

That kid's on a mission, I tell ya!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Sanseri has a Christmas study we did one year.  Another year Timberdoodle put out a list of verses for Easter that we memorized and studied.  I like those kinds of things.

 

Thanks for mentioning this. I put the advent study in my Amazon cart. I also find we enjoy and remember things if they are tied to a holiday like that. Waldorf has something going with all those festivals.

 

Since leaving HoD which had formal Bible programs interwoven, we have not done anything structured with Bible, and I also have often wondered which is better. The last few years, we have just been reading Bible stories during Circle Time (just finished Egermeier's) and also a Psalm for memory work. The minimalist side of me likes not having an extra subject added to our schoolday. My high schooler is required to read the Bible on a daily basis, but we do not stipulate what or how long, and we do not "follow up." I selected Notgrass for history for him this year, and that has some Bible study included. So he will get a little formal coverage, and I guess I feel a little relieved about that. 

 

We also do a bit of praying and singing with DH on the guitar in the eves, after our bedtime read-aloud, but it's very hit-and-miss. I am reading Cindy Rollins' new book, and feel like we need to be more consistent with those two things. (Especially since you don't hear hymns in CHURCH anymore. Ugh! Don't get me started.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fwiw, I eventually used the ideas behind WTM study of the GB's as a guideline for our Bible studies.  And hermeneutics books helped greatly with that.  Plus, all my kids really enjoyed those hermeneutics books.

 

 

I don't comment much, but I saw this part of your post and wondered what "GB's" were and what hermeneutics books y'all used? 

SaveSave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much ~d9n! I appreciate the suggestions! My girls are only 1st grade and preschool ages, so hermeneutics will be for me and then as they get to the logic stage, I'd like to start introducing them to homiletics and then move to hermeneutics.

I'm unclear, but I think you might be confused. I can't see the logic in teaching middle schoolers to preach the bible (homiletics) and then moving to teaching them to interpret, understand, and apply it (hermeneutics).

 

Hermeneutics is more caught than taught -- and you are certainly already 'teaching' it through demonstration.

 

In any case, you have a long time to figure it out. I was just surprised by your use of the terms. The only way to preach the bible without first interpreting it is to preach from someone else's interpretation (from a commentary or other book)... It's an odd way to start a preacher's training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm unclear, but I think you might be confused. I can't see the logic in teaching middle schoolers to preach the bible (homiletics) and then moving to teaching them to interpret, understand, and apply it (hermeneutics).

 

Hermeneutics is more caught than taught -- and you are certainly already 'teaching' it through demonstration.

 

In any case, you have a long time to figure it out. I was just surprised by your use of the terms. The only way to preach the bible without first interpreting it is to preach from someone else's interpretation (from a commentary or other book)... It's an odd way to start a preacher's training.

Perhaps I am confused  :unsure: I really want to get my girls to the point that they're effectively discerning the content of a passage, how to logically divide it out, and create a summary statement so they can pinpoint where a selection of scripture is located in the bible. I'd also like them to use this knowledge to put together a presentation to share with other family members, or whomever. I don't necessarily want them to develop an aim, applications, or questions when we start that path.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like you want to focus on exegesis and memorization... Not really hermeneutics or homelitics at all.

 

Exegesis is a great place to start. Exegesis is discerning the content and logic of a passage in its context. Exegesis results in knowledge, which can be shared in a variety of ways.

 

As long as you are comfortable with your own hermeneutic, they should pick it up from you without much effort.

 

FYI:

 

Hermeneutics focuses on meaning: not in the reading-comprehension sense, but in the sense of how we, as people, personally take ownership of things that are meaningful to us. It's about how our theology and worldview come to be built from the things we read. It also focuses on the transition from 'then and them' to 'us and now'.

 

For example a believer reads 'love is patient' and finds a meaning that is personal: God is patient with us; people who are patent with me love me; I have a duty to be patient with those I love; I am reminded that I could love more and better than I do love; I am reminded that God is patent with me: because love. <- doing that is more than reading comprehension. It's hermeneutics.

 

Hermeneutics tells us that not every OT story we read is a 'do likewise' story, not every OT promise is for "me", not every NT parable actually happened, that figures of speech require interpretation, and visions aren't meant to be taken literally.

 

Homelitics is the spiritually rich communication of both knowledge and meaning from the Bible: with an aim of enhancing the spiritual formation of others. It has elements of invitation, transformation, and leadership that go beyond just explaining to others 'what I've learned'.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I consider devotional time different from study time.  The former, ideally, I think should go on throughout someone's life as a CHristian.  I don't consider it to be a school thing at all.  In my religious tradition, the laity often participate in some form of morning and evening prayer, which includes daily Bible reading.  At various times I've used somewhat different forms, depending on the ages.  I suppose that is technically part of corporate worship - I also encourage private devotional time, though my younger kids are a bit small for that, my eldest dd likes to read before bed from a private daily devotional.

 

Religious studies for school are a different kettle of fish.  In the big picture, I want my kids to be educated CHristians, and that means not only a working knowledge of the Bible but of Church history and theology.  But that can look really different depending on the age of the child and her inclinations.  It may not be necessary todo something with it every term either.  For younger kids I tend to be story based - have regular Bible reading, stories of saints or other things in the Church, and we often use prayer for copywork, which I consider to be a theological exercise of sorts.  With an older student it would be a more directed study - I've done a formal Bible study with my dd11 last year, for example, using one of N.T. Wright's books.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We take time in the morning for Bible.  It is usually more relaxed and not curriculum-based. Sometime we just watch Christian music videos and meditate. On a typical day my older kids have some private time and then we come together for a little Bible study.  We are slowly going through a book of the Bible and studying verse by verse.  With my youngest we read a Bible story book.  For high school, Bible will still be part of our day, but it won't be for credit or graded.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

  • What the Bible Is All About: Handbook for Kids -- This is the revamp of the Henrietta C. Mears "What the Bible Is All About," the version for young people. My oldest read through the entire volume, and the twins are working through it in two years (this past & next). Good background in here, they have enjoyed reading this.

 

My son was given this book by our church so I think I'll start here since we already own it.  How do you use this book with your kids? Do you just read each section about the books of the Bible and then go through the actual corresponding Bible book? Do you start at Genesis and go through? Or let your kids pick what they want to read?

 

I don't have any formal Bible studies myself, so I am learning at the same time as my kids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I definitely used Bible as a credit. I counted it the last 2 years if highschool as ethics I believe, and I forget what I termed the other one.

 

The amount if study that went in, way too much to not give a credit for. You could get creative in your terminology, just make sure it meets the requirements for w/e schools where they are looking. (State vs private )

 

We studied different studies by R.C. Sproul, Francis Shaffer, lots of studies. I think one we counted as a world religion.

 

We knew we were state bound tho, and accedemic scholarships were in play.

 

My oldest goes to a big state university, we went the comm coll route first.

 

I think it depends on your child and the plans they have.

 

I always had it there, counted, ready to be used at anytime lol.

 

These , for us, were studies separate from family Bible study/reading , daily devotionals etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't read all the replies...

 

If I don't keep it simple, it doesn't happen. Here is what we do that actually happens:

We read a kids version of the story, look it up in our bibles (kids practice looking things up), one of the kids read the same story out loud again. Then they copy out the main verse into their bible notebook. We have a quick talk about what we read, pray, and done.

 

Using complicated programs never happened in real life, and I like to let the text speak for itself as much as possible.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD just does bible lessons by mail through a couple of places {mailbox club, Kid's Corner, Kids time 4 Jesus, Your Story Hour, etc}. It normally works out to about a lesson a week. 

 

We don't attend church and aren't religious, but I want dd to have an understanding of christian morals and culture since it's the prevailing religious belief here in the US. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was exactly my experience and I wanted my own kids to be very Bible literate and understand how Biblical history and theology fits into secular history and thought. 

 

Growing up, even though we went to church every Sunday, I knew next to nothing about the actual Bible and it seemed like everyone taught the same 10 Bible stories over and over again.   :glare:   I have learned a ton just from doing a survey through the books of the Bible with my teenagers.  Embarrassingly.

 

 

 

 

We've done two things for Bible. Neither is a school subject and I don't think I've ever given credit for it. My kids have taken apologetics and received high school credit for that. 

 

First, we meet together as a family first thing in the morning for Bible. For 17 years, we've mostly systematically read through the Bible. We've covered the Pentateuch; most of the histories like 1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, Ezra, Nehemiah, Daniel and Acts. We've gone through Proverbs, the gospels, a couple of Paul's letters and Revelation. 

 

We go slowly, taking part or all of one chapter each day. Last year we covered Acts. There's no writing, no homework, no extra reading. We read the text and then talk about it -- what is God teaching, what does this tell us about God, what does it tell us about how God relates to man, what lessons are being taught? 

 

We also do scripture memory which is usually one large portion of scripture and then we pray, make any family announcements or go over any logistics for the day and then everyone separates to start school for the day. 

 

Hands down, this Bible time has been the best part of homeschooling -- something i didn't foresee at all. My kids have loved it, they miss it when they're gone (they tell me) and I hope it's given them such a taste for the Word that they will want to do it for themselves when they're grown and on their own. 

 

Secondly, my kids often have a daily devotion they're working through. I'm not a huge stickler about it -- I encourage it, I ask them about it but I don't check it off. That's just me  -- I know they are getting Bible study as a family and plenty at church and through our daily conversations so I don't want to have to add to my load by checking up on their own devotions. 

 

What we use: usually just a good study Bible, sometimes Precepts and every now and again another book -- we did Hinds Feet on High Places after my dh died and we used Windows on the World as a supplement two years when we were focusing on missions. 

 

I have a 100 Days through the gospels reading plan that we will likely start in January through Easter. 

 

Hope that helps! 
Lisa

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was exactly my experience and I wanted my own kids to be very Bible literate and understand how Biblical history and theology fits into secular history and thought. 

 

Growing up, even though we went to church every Sunday, I knew next to nothing about the actual Bible and it seemed like everyone taught the same 10 Bible stories over and over again.   :glare:   I have learned a ton just from doing a survey through the books of the Bible with my teenagers.  Embarrassingly.

 

 

 

 

We've done two things for Bible. Neither is a school subject and I don't think I've ever given credit for it. My kids have taken apologetics and received high school credit for that. 

 

First, we meet together as a family first thing in the morning for Bible. For 17 years, we've mostly systematically read through the Bible. We've covered the Pentateuch; most of the histories like 1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, Ezra, Nehemiah, Daniel and Acts. We've gone through Proverbs, the gospels, a couple of Paul's letters and Revelation. 

 

We go slowly, taking part or all of one chapter each day. Last year we covered Acts. There's no writing, no homework, no extra reading. We read the text and then talk about it -- what is God teaching, what does this tell us about God, what does it tell us about how God relates to man, what lessons are being taught? 

 

We also do scripture memory which is usually one large portion of scripture and then we pray, make any family announcements or go over any logistics for the day and then everyone separates to start school for the day. 

 

Hands down, this Bible time has been the best part of homeschooling -- something i didn't foresee at all. My kids have loved it, they miss it when they're gone (they tell me) and I hope it's given them such a taste for the Word that they will want to do it for themselves when they're grown and on their own. 

 

Secondly, my kids often have a daily devotion they're working through. I'm not a huge stickler about it -- I encourage it, I ask them about it but I don't check it off. That's just me  -- I know they are getting Bible study as a family and plenty at church and through our daily conversations so I don't want to have to add to my load by checking up on their own devotions. 

 

What we use: usually just a good study Bible, sometimes Precepts and every now and again another book -- we did Hinds Feet on High Places after my dh died and we used Windows on the World as a supplement two years when we were focusing on missions. 

 

I have a 100 Days through the gospels reading plan that we will likely start in January through Easter. 

 

Hope that helps! 
Lisa

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...