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Right Start for Preschool Math


LlamaMama
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Have any of you used Right Start Math Level A and then moved on to other more "traditional" programs? How did it work out?

 

My daughter is four years old. For her preschool math, we've been using Critical Thinking Reasoning Level A and Kumon connect-the-dot books. At most we'll cover about four pages a week in the Critical Thinking book; we don't get to it every day.

 

I've also tried to teach her skip counting by having her place raisins on a 100 number chart. When she was younger we worked through Mighty Minds tanagrams. I've shown her MUS rods (borrowed from a relative) but she wasn't interested in playing with them much and I didn't have the background to engage her in it.

 

Anyway, at this point, she can complete worksheets with my help, but does not seem to really have an understanding of the material presented. I want to give her a solid math foundation.

 

What do you think of Right Start Math? Would it work out for me to just get the games to play with her? Would it be easy to transition to another math program like MUS Alpha for the following year? RS A says its appropriate for four year olds. I also looked at Singapore, but I'd prefer not giving her another workbook.

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I bought A and B (long story;)) for my 4 year old. We like it for a while and then hit a wall. I don't blame that on the program, but more on my personality. I'm finding that I do best with workbooks. I do believe in the RightStart method, so I decided to keep it and keep doing workbook vacations with it. We bring it out and use it for a couple of weeks. When she(and I) hit the wall, I put it up and use a more traditional program(we finished Singapore EB series and now use Horizon) for a while. Then, we get RS out again. Even in between, I'll catch her singing the songs. And she definitely likes to play with the manipulatives. I thought about getting the game book, but decided that I already had enough invested in it.

 

Many say that you can buy B and do it more slowly. For *me* I found that I need things scripted out. A has less writing and includes the slowness. For example, it might have them trace out a specific number on the table while B goes right into writing several of them on paper. It is activity based, so I think it's great for the younger set.

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I have gone on to other programs because my kids don't fit in with the learning style of RS at the higher levels. But, RS Level A is absolutely the best foundation that can be had. As far as teaching her how the base 10 system works, evens and odds, doubles, money, clock, it is outstanding.

 

I have only one child who began with RS. The others jumped in after trying Saxon and MUS. The one child who began with Level A, although not the most gifted, is the child who really likes math and has the best understanding of our number system.

 

Don't pass up RS Level A! I could go on and on about this one!

 

Blessings,

 

Penny

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We tried RS A last year in K and both of us hated it. The program is great, but only for certain types of learners (and teachers :D). If your dc likes playing with manipulatives and can retain well without pencil and paper activities, RS is wonderful. If you have a kid who likes to memorize facts and do worksheets, they will hate it. RS is the only math program that actually made ds cry. We stuck with it for 2.5 weeks and then I threw in the towel. We were both much happier with Singapore Earlybird. We're even happier now that we can use Rod and Staff for 1st grade.

 

Since RS is fairly expensive, try to give it a test run before you have to order the whole kit. If you can't find someone locally who has it, try to visit a hs store or convention to look at it in person before buying.

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Thank you all for your advice. Since we've already been doing worksheets, I think this will be a fun change for her. I'm glad to hear that it works well as a foundations program. I don't think the style is something I would enjoy teaching for subsequent levels (eh, but who knows?).

 

I'll see if any of my friends have the program locally. Our convention is in June and I'd like to start using RS A before then.

 

What do you recommend I purchase? The workbooks and the games? Is it really best to get the whole kit if I can afford it?

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What do you think of Right Start Math? Would it work out for me to just get the games to play with her? Would it be easy to transition to another math program like MUS Alpha for the following year? RS A says its appropriate for four year olds. I also looked at Singapore, but I'd prefer not giving her another workbook.
Honestly, if you don't intend to continue to Level B, seems like there's a lot of groundwork laid for relatively little payoff, not to mention the expense of manipulatives. The ability to visualize the abacus pays off in Level B and the first half of C. DD switched to Singapore when almost halfway through C, but I'm glad she had her start with Right Start -- IMHO Level B is far superior to Primary Maths 1A/1B (and I say this as a fan of Singapore Math).

 

As for what to get -- you don't need the games book because the games are integrated into the program at this level. You may wish to get the games book for later supplementation.

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Thank you for the info on Right Start- I have never heard of it. Have people ever collected the math manipulatives individually? I think that would be more cost effective. Also can I order the program and then pick up the manipulatives/make them as time goes on? Is it difficult/more expensive to do it his way?

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Also can I order the program and then pick up the manipulatives/make them as time goes on? Is it difficult/more expensive to do it his way?
The manipulatives are good quality and cheaper to purchase as a set. With the exception of the math balance (DD just "got" the concept so we didn't need it), we used all of them. The heaviest use is in Levels A and B, so it wouldn't be practical to amass them bit by bit. Later on you'll need an expanded drawing board set.
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The ability to visualize the abacus pays off in Level B and the first half of C.

 

That's good to know. We'll get started with it and then see how far we want to continue. As for the expense, I also have a toddler and a newborn (all girls) so it will most likely get used with them too. At least that's how I justify buying trendy (some-what expensive!) clothing for them. ;)

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For *me* I found that I need things scripted out. A has less writing and includes the slowness. For example, it might have them trace out a specific number on the table while B goes right into writing several of them on paper. It is activity based, so I think it's great for the younger set.

 

I completely agree. I see the good curriculum for the younger set as much as an avenue for me to learn how to teach as it is a way to give them information. I imagine by the older grades, teaching will become more intuitive for me (hopefully!).

 

We use OPGTR and the scripting is one of the draws for me.

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As for the expense, I also have a toddler and a newborn (all girls) so it will most likely get used with them too. At least that's how I justify buying trendy (some-what expensive!) clothing for them. ;)
That's also how I justify our obscenely large (and ever-expanding) collection of children's books. However, I only have two children over which to amortize. :)
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  • 3 years later...

Don't bother with that link. It's not a math worksheets link. I figured that was the case based on the post and the fact that it was the poster's first and only post. I have a Mac, so wasn't overly concerned about viruses (and I'm just reckless sometimes, lol). It doesn't appear to be anything malicious, but it's not math worksheets, and you never know where you'll pick something up. I'm always suspicious of viruses and trojan horses when people link to something that isn't what they say it is.

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