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I would like more information and to hear other's opinions of the possible stigma of a GED.

Where I live, this is not an issue, but maybe that is because this state has a rather low graduation rate (around 65%).

 

Once I got in to college for the first time, no one has ever cared about my high school graduation. I have had to put the info on a few job applications, but no documentation has ever been required past that initial HS transcript. No time in my professional career has anyone asked or cared about high school.

I realize that if one is looking to attend a competitive university, a person with a GED might be less likely to be admitted, but if a student is going to a community college or directly into the work force, does it really matter?

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I realize that if one is looking to attend a competitive university, a person with a GED might be less likely to be admitted, but if a student is going to a community college or directly into the work force, does it really matter?

 

In my area, it would definitely matter if you are going straight into the workforce (or if you don't complete a degree). 

 

Many of the better companies will not hire you, especially for their training programs, without a diploma - a GED does not qualify. These are the jobs that have the chance for advancement and good pay without a college degree. 

 

Before the department of education acknowledged home study diplomas and stated that colleges in the state system would accept them, they also did not accept home school diplomas. 

 

Now, my information predates the new GED, so it may have changed, but I don't think so. I'm pretty sure I would have heard about it. 

 

Other companies may not have such a hard and fast rule, but the GED is definitely looked upon as 'less than' an actual diploma. 

Edited by katilac
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I think once a student has some college credits under their belt it matters less, but could still be in issue if they don't end up with a degree. Since college entrance doesn't usually depend on high school graduation status, at least for community college and such and really for many colleges, a student headed to college may be better off just going without a high school level diploma if a regular homeschool diploma cannot be issued.

 

GED can make it hard to enter the military for those who are interested in that option.

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A quick search found this:

 

http://www.militaryspot.com/enlist/can-i-join-the-army-with-a-ged

 


The military is not allowed to accept more than 10 percent of individuals with a GED, and each branch of the military sets its own limit, which is generally less than that 10 percent. Military statistics have shown that people who dropped out of high school tend to drop out of the military in their first term at a higer percentage than those with a high school diploma.

 

 

http://www.military.com/join-armed-forces/2014/05/14/80-of-military-recruitments-turned-down.html

 

 

The caliber of each applicant has increased, and a GED is no longer enough to enter the military. If individuals do not have a high school diploma, they are encouraged to obtain about a semester's-worth of college credits before reapplying.  
Edited by regentrude
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Aside from employment/military issues, there is still a social stigma, and it can come up in conversation over time. The perception in my area is that a GED is for those that were at risk of dropping out or drop outs who obtained GED as adults. Ex had a GED and it did hamper what jobs he could apply to from time-to-time. 

 

 

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Aside from employment/military issues, there is still a social stigma, and it can come up in conversation over time. The perception in my area is that a GED is for those that were at risk of dropping out or drop outs who obtained GED as adults. 

 

Which is an accurate perception because those are the people for whom the GED was designed. 

A person who has completed high school is not eligible to take the GED.

Edited by regentrude
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Which is an accurate perception because those are the people for whom the GED was designed. 

A person who has completed high school is not eligible to take the GED.

 

Yes, there was an additional thought I should have added. That perception leaves the stigma that the person is less intelligent or less disciplined or has dealt with issues, most commonly substance abuse issues. Not always true, of course. 

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I'm not denying there isn't some kind of stigma...and it feels like I'm always disagreeing with everyone on this board...but...

 

My sister got her GED and ended up graduating from a Tier 1 law school (actually, a pretty famous one).  She homeschooled high school and for some weird reason, my mom made her take the GED at the end (which is wrong, I know!).

 

I actually suspect my other sister has her GED, too, because I vaguely remember her talking about studying for it.  I'm not completely sure, though.  She is a BSN and currently in school for her nurse practitioner.  I'm going to text her and ask, because now I'm curious. 

 

This wasn't *that* long ago.  My youngest sister is about 30.  

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There is no blanket answer that will fit reality.  It depends on the area and the jobs available and the schools applying to and the policies in place and even whether the potential employer has seen the potential employee in action, maybe already knows them and knows they are capable or has heard about their work ethic/job skills from someone they trust.  

 

For some it is not an issue.  For others it can definitely be an issue.  For some jobs, the employer cares little about High School diplomas as long as the person applying can do the job and do it well.  For others that High School diploma is paramount to their trusting the person enough to hire them.  

 

The GED has changed, though, and is much harder and more complex now, so eventually negative perception may change and once perception changes then perhaps policy will, too. 

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I'm sure there is still a stigma, but I'm so over it.  I've known quite a few who did just fine and moved on with their lives and got some form of higher education.  My son will likely go that route due to the ridiculous homeschool regs in NY.  He'll be able to enter college early.  I can't imagine if he gets a BS that it'll hinder him.  And I tell him if anyone asks just say you were homeschooled, wanted to go to college early, and in NY that's pretty much the only easy way to do that.  A local woman suggested I give him a homeschool diploma as well.  She did that herself.

 

In terms of military anything, that is not an interest whatsoever.

 

 

Edited by SparklyUnicorn
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After thinking about this some more, no one should really be discriminating against them.  Most of the teens (not all) I know who went the GED route did so because they were trying to get out of a situation.  My neighbor dropped out of high school, took the GED and joined the army.  Her dad died and her mom literally stopped taking care of her - to the point where they didn't even have a working stove/oven or air conditioning.  The mom rarely left the house.  What was that kid supposed to do, just sit there until graduation?   :confused:  Anyway...I don't feel like there should be a stigma.

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I think there is more of a stigma now. Most states have now raised the age allowed for the GED to 18. It used to be that kids (mostly boys around us) would already have good jobs or plan to work for their families and would take the GED at 16 so they could work full time. It wasn't unusual. My dh took the GED and it hasn't hurt him any. He definitely makes more money than many of the degree holding men and women we know. He was able to move up in his company without it being an issue. But now, with the older age requirement in place, it takes away the option to enter the work force earlier, once a primary purpose of the GED.

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So, my DH is PG and had a lot of social and emotional issues concurrent with this..definitely 2e. His parents essentially gave up on him and he was radically unschooled...aka left to his own devices to do whatever he wanted pretty much until I met him. I'm 4 years older so I met him when he should have been a freshman in college and I was in my first year of grad school. I'm not exactly sure what their plan was for him because he hadn't attended high school since sophomore year. I made him take the GED and take the SATs. His SAT scores were (unsurprisingly) very high and the state university system (where I was in grad school) refused to enroll him with a GED despite his SAT scores unless he was over 21. It made no sense (this was in 1991). It was very frustrating too because he was finally ready to commit to school.

 

Long story short, he ended up taking a bunch of community college courses over the years but ended up deciding not to try a 4-year school. We happened to be the right age for the high tech job boom so he just transitioned to that. He's never had a problem getting jobs over the years especially with all the high tech experience he's gained. In fact, he was a SAHD for 6 years, and it took him exactly 1 week and 1 interview to get a job again.

 

I think times are probably different now for kids just starting out, and I think there are more opportunities now for PG kids like he was. His parents screwed up in so many ways.

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I'm not denying there isn't some kind of stigma...and it feels like I'm always disagreeing with everyone on this board...but...

 

My sister got her GED and ended up graduating from a Tier 1 law school (actually, a pretty famous one).  She homeschooled high school and for some weird reason, my mom made her take the GED at the end (which is wrong, I know!).

 

I actually suspect my other sister has her GED, too, because I vaguely remember her talking about studying for it.  I'm not completely sure, though.  She is a BSN and currently in school for her nurse practitioner.  I'm going to text her and ask, because now I'm curious. 

 

This wasn't *that* long ago.  My youngest sister is about 30.  

 

 

The stigma may stick around longer for those that don't go on to college or finish a degree. With ex, the GED he had was competing with other applicants that might have been high school graduates only, he has a semester or two of college but no degree. It's hard to sell your qualifications and character if you can't even get the interview. I know ex is very proud that he was able to study and finish the GED, I think he was near the age of 20 (not sure, before we met), but he definitely feels less smart than many of his peers. 

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My son will likely go that route due to the ridiculous homeschool regs in NY.  He'll be able to enter college early.  I can't imagine if he gets a BS that it'll hinder him.  And I tell him if anyone asks just say you were homeschooled, wanted to go to college early, and in NY that's pretty much the only easy way to do that.  A local woman suggested I give him a homeschool diploma as well.  She did that herself.

 

 

They make it that much of a hassle that he has to get his GED?!  What the heck?  I'm glad we're in TX.  I can just give them a homeschool diploma.  Sheesh.  That would make me mad!

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My company recently threatened to rescind a job offer to someone who could not provide evidence of graduating high school, despite the fact that he holds a 4-year college degree. Company policy. They will accept hs diploma, homeschool, GED. But nothing meant no job. He had to jump through hoops to get something that satisfied HR. Ridiculous.

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The people I personally knew who got GEDs while we were in High school were actually some of the brighter people I knew. They were over the dog and pony show of the last year of high school, knew where they wanted to go in life and were looking for the fastest way possible to get there. They took the GED and got on with their lives whether that be college or starting their own business or traveling or whatever. I would never judge someone for making that choice. It's ironic the areas the workforce is allowed to discriminate against, don't you think? Seems like dismissing GEDs against high school diplomas could be seen as highly discriminatory against some populations. Either you're qualified or you're not. I worked around too many idiots with PhD's who couldn't cross a street alone to base much of my judgment of capability on which letters are attached to someone's name. Yep. There are brilliant PHDs. And there are brilliant GEDs too. They need to take the time to evaluate the person, not the pedigree. It's just an easy cull to make HRs lives easier imo.

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They make it that much of a hassle that he has to get his GED?!  What the heck?  I'm glad we're in TX.  I can just give them a homeschool diploma.  Sheesh.  That would make me mad!

 

Yeah..pretty  much if you want to go to a state school of any kind. 

 

It's basically one of these things where there are options, but you won't know what your options are until you get there.  Literally, that is how stupid it is.  For example, you can satisfy the requirement by getting a letter from the superintendent.  They basically say yeah yeah the plan looks similar to what the kid would do in school.  Except there is absolutely nothing requiring them to do that.  So you might get to the end and your only reasonable option might just be getting the GED.

 

One option is also that my kid just goes to a regular high school, but he doesn't want to.  So he knows the pros and cons to this idea and that is what he wants to do.  He's already taking classes at the CC, but I'm limited because I can't afford tons of classes and he can't matriculate until he has at least the GED, which he can get at 16.  So that's the plan.

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I've seen job listings for low-wage service positions where is specifically said "high school diploma required- no G.E.D." There are options for adults to earn a H.S. diploma free of charge so I guess the thinking is that requiring an actual diploma rather than a G.E.D. weeds out those who lack motivation.

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In California, there are homeschool families (especially private homeschoolers that do not use charter schools) that take the CHSPE (California High School Proficiency Exam) in order to avoid the stigma of the GED and other issues that come with receiving a GED instead of a diploma.

 

Passing this exam is the legal equivalent of a high school diploma and, by law, all institutions in California must accept it as equal. This can be a big deal down the road when interviewing for promotions. As crazy as it seems, even if you have a college degree, the lack of a high school diploma can become a real issue.

 

You might want to check if your state as its own version of the CHSPE.

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I've seen job listings for low-wage service positions where is specifically said "high school diploma required- no G.E.D." There are options for adults to earn a H.S. diploma free of charge so I guess the thinking is that requiring an actual diploma rather than a G.E.D. weeds out those who lack motivation.

 

This is what I've seen as well.

 

Whether you agree or not, there is a perception that GED = high school dropout = kid who was a troubled teen. It's that vague idea that the GED holder was in some kind of trouble as a teen: drugs, petty crime, couldn't handle authority or high school rules. Many employers require a "real" high school diploma as a way to weed out employees who could be unreliable or troubled. And when you have a ton of applicants for every job opening, a GED holder may never even get a phone call or interview. 

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For getting hired, GED avoidance is usually part of a Principal-Agent problem. HR isn't rewarded for putting forward an ambiguous candidate, even if they end up being fantastic. However, they may be blamed for forwarding someone who turns out to be a bad match. This tends to bias the forwarding process in favor of "safe" candidates; those who are credentialed beyond criticism, regardless of their actual qualifications. While this is bad for the business in the long-term, it is good for individual HR employees in the short-term, so it leads to certain things having irrational stigmas, such as GEDs or job-hopping.

 

I would be surprised if a GED prevented someone from getting into community college, provided that they did well enough on the SAT.

 

From a cultural perspective, the stigma around GEDs is usually a social class issue. For various reasons, working class people often find that GEDs are the best choice for them, so having one in some places becomes a marker of being working class. The marker alone does not inherently cause a social stigma -- the stigma is from the "anxious middle class", those upwardly mobile individuals who fear that if they allow working class people or working class culture into their lives, they will be prevented from joining the upper class.

 

800px-Beer-street-and-Gin-lane.jpg

"Beer Street and Gin Lane", William Hogarth, 1751

 

This is an irrational fear, of course -- the upper class often enjoys working class things, sometimes to the point where the thing itself changes social class. Gin, for instance, before it was associated with an elegant lifestyle, was quite strongly a working class drink; it was rejected by the British middle class of the time as an immoral beverage, compared to wholesome beer. The British upper class took a liking to it while rubbing shoulders with the working class in the navy, and while slumming it at boxing matches. :)

Edited by Anacharsis
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I would like more information and to hear other's opinions of the possible stigma of a GED.

Where I live, this is not an issue, but maybe that is because this state has a rather low graduation rate (around 65%).

 

Once I got in to college for the first time, no one has ever cared about my high school graduation. I have had to put the info on a few job applications, but no documentation has ever been required past that initial HS transcript. No time in my professional career has anyone asked or cared about high school.

I realize that if one is looking to attend a competitive university, a person with a GED might be less likely to be admitted, but if a student is going to a community college or directly into the work force, does it really matter?

Competitive universities do not generally care about GEDs. I would never do a GED. If a college or university asked for one, I would find a better college or university.

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Have you had any kids go into the military? I'm just wondering because what you quoted isn't exactly accurate. Now, what I'm about to say isn't saying I'm in favor of GED, but just to clear up a discrepancy based on having 2 sons enter the military within the last two years and recently seeing recruiters because my last two want to enter the military.

 

There is a percentage that they are to use as a guide but that isn't followed very well by any of the branches. The Airforce is more picky than any of the branches about who they accept. Both of my son's did graduate and get high school diplomas, but the Airforce looks for good grades, good ACT or SAT scores (1 took the SAT & 1took the ACT), and most importantly they look for work experience and extracurricular activities.

 

They all accept the GED but it helps to show that your student was working and involved in church, sports, or other activities along with the GED. If the student's ACT or SAT scores are good then the GED doesn't bear weight at all on getting in or not.

 

The recruiters we spoke to told me that if I issue the boys a diploma it would be better than a GED. But, they said that if they decided to get a GED and their test scores were good plus they had work history then that's just as good as a diploma.

 

Both of my son's had airmen in BMT who got in with just a GED. Another interesting fact too, is that many with a college degree are choosing to go in as enlisted instead of officer because they get money for college and a few other perks that going in as officer they don't receive.

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The new GED is very different from what we grew up with.

 

Among other improvements it offers the chance of 10 college credits through ACE which should be accepted at the over two thousand community colleges and colleges that accept ACE credits. So it is worth almost a full college semester with very cheap credit hours......$120 for 10 credit hours if your dc has the potential of a high score is a pretty good deal for many kids. College is expensive!

 

http://www.gedtestingservice.com/educators/general-score-change-faqs

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Possible stigma of a GED?    I think it is not just possible, it is well documented.   Many years ago, when I was a boy, probably a GED had better acceptance, but this is 2016 and things are different.  I believe, for one example, one would have difficulty enlisting in the armed services of the United States, with only a GED, assuming that is possible.  If it is possible, the technical schools one might be able to attend would be severely restricted.  The military is one example. I'm sure there are other well documented examples.  

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The GED has a lot of stigma attached here. Many employers just won't hire anyone. Most of our state U's do not accept it, and while cc is attainable the student has to take placement tests. The assumption is bad student, high school drop out, not motivated.

 

There is a lot of HR bias that works against the GED holder. Many of the Mennonite kida in the area that attend their K-8 school take it, but not only.are a lot of them no passing on their first and second tries, unemployment in this tri-county area is higher than other parts of Michigan so it does not help them get jobs as there are a lot of unemployed regular high school diploma holders, those with a little college, and even those with associates.

 

So for living around here, I never recommend it if parents ask.

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Among other improvements it offers the chance of 10 college credits through ACE which should be accepted at the over two thousand community colleges and colleges that accept ACE credits. So it is worth almost a full college semester with very cheap credit hours......$120 for 10 credit hours if your dc has the potential of a high score is a pretty good deal for many kids. College is expensive!

 

College *IS* expensive but I would be wary of being "pennywise, pound foolish" and choosing the G.E.D. over CLEP or AP exams as a way of gaining college credits. $120 for 10 college credits with a G.E.D. vs. $240 for 9 credits with 3 CLEP exams is not worth the potential stigma of having a G.E.D. instead of a regular diploma IMHO.

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Thanks for all the info. I can see that there are big differences depending on location.

My state overall has lower income, low HS graduation rates, and very high rates of drug and alcohol abuse. The percentage of people with college degrees seems low except for a couple of small pockets around specific employers.

There is a local employer that puts in its job postings that it will not hire anyone with more than 2 DUI convictions. (This is for a good job for this area $15 hr and includes full benefits and overtime). They have a hard time finding enough qualified people.

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In my state, the law under which I homeschool requires me to have a high school diploma. A GED is not an acceptable substitute within that law.

 

The social stigma of a GED is real, regardless of whether it is deserved or not. The stories of people post-GED don't change that stigma. Unless there were no other valid alternative (Creekland's experience with NY state law, for example), I wouldn't choose a GED for my kids.

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Have you had any kids go into the military? I'm just wondering because what you quoted isn't exactly accurate. Now, what I'm about to say isn't saying I'm in favor of GED, but just to clear up a discrepancy based on having 2 sons enter the military within the last two years and recently seeing recruiters because my last two want to enter the military.

 

There is a percentage that they are to use as a guide but that isn't followed very well by any of the branches. The Airforce is more picky than any of the branches about who they accept. Both of my son's did graduate and get high school diplomas, but the Airforce looks for good grades, good ACT or SAT scores (1 took the SAT & 1took the ACT), and most importantly they look for work experience and extracurricular activities.

 

They all accept the GED but it helps to show that your student was working and involved in church, sports, or other activities along with the GED. If the student's ACT or SAT scores are good then the GED doesn't bear weight at all on getting in or not.

 

The recruiters we spoke to told me that if I issue the boys a diploma it would be better than a GED. But, they said that if they decided to get a GED and their test scores were good plus they had work history then that's just as good as a diploma.

 

Both of my son's had airmen in BMT who got in with just a GED. Another interesting fact too, is that many with a college degree are choosing to go in as enlisted instead of officer because they get money for college and a few other perks that going in as officer they don't receive.

I think there is a lot of hearsay going on here. Recruiters, for example, say many things--but they don't have the power to change regulations. GED holders are in a lower tier for enlistment purposes than high school diploma holders, and a recruiter can't change that. A certain number of college credits can be substituted for a high school diploma in order to achieve tier 1 status, so maybe that is how the GED holders your son knew got in.

 

Officers do get money for college, both tuition assistance and post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.

Edited by maize
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In California, there are homeschool families (especially private homeschoolers that do not use charter schools) that take the CHSPE (California High School Proficiency Exam) in order to avoid the stigma of the GED and other issues that come with receiving a GED instead of a diploma.

 

Passing this exam is the legal equivalent of a high school diploma and, by law, all institutions in California must accept it as equal. This can be a big deal down the road when interviewing for promotions. As crazy as it seems, even if you have a college degree, the lack of a high school diploma can become a real issue.

 

You might want to check if your state as its own version of the CHSPE.

 

This is sort of an option in NY.  One can take 5 regents exams.  Thing with that though is I might as well send my kid to school because he'd have to study/learn based on what is on the tests.  (He does not want to go to high school.)  Although I suspect this is an option that is so rarely used that most colleges would give one a hard time and we'd end up going back and forth trying to get them to follow the regulation.  They aren't going to argue about the GED because they know what it is (NY uses the TASC, not GED, but same concept). 

 

Edited by SparklyUnicorn
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Another issue for homeschoolers is NY is they also do not recognize any on-line earned high school diploma.  They do not even care if it is from a school that is fully accredited by the same institutions that accredit public schools.  So I can't even go that route and have my kid use it to attend a state school or CC in NY.

 

 

Edited by SparklyUnicorn
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I think the stigma is social, but I also think there are real concrete consequences to it, as well.  For example, the military is very stingy in accepting people with GEDs and they are channeled into jobs with less potential for advancement.  Also, some companies will not hire anyone with a GED, even if they have earned a college degree after (I am thinking of Lowe's as an example here).  That said, I think there are situations where it can be the best option, so you need to consider that, as well.

Edited by reefgazer
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Another issue for homeschoolers is NY is they also do not recognize any on-line earned high school diploma.  They do not even care if it is from a school that is fully accredited by the same institutions that accredit public schools.  So I can't even go that route and have my kid use it to attend a state school or CC in NY.

 

What??  The story gets worse???!    :ohmy:

 

So, you couldn't even use Kolbe Academy or anything like that?  That's awful!

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I'm not denying there isn't some kind of stigma...and it feels like I'm always disagreeing with everyone on this board...but...

 

My sister got her GED and ended up graduating from a Tier 1 law school (actually, a pretty famous one).  She homeschooled high school and for some weird reason, my mom made her take the GED at the end (which is wrong, I know!).

 

I actually suspect my other sister has her GED, too, because I vaguely remember her talking about studying for it.  I'm not completely sure, though.  She is a BSN and currently in school for her nurse practitioner.  I'm going to text her and ask, because now I'm curious. 

 

This wasn't *that* long ago.  My youngest sister is about 30.  

In terms of applying to a four year college or for entrance to a university and for some tech programs, 12 years ago is a very, very long time though it may not seem like it to you. A HUGE number of requirements have been upped in the last 12 years, and job competition is much greater coming out of the recession.

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I think the stigma is social, but I also think there are real concrete consequences to it, as well.  For example, the military is very stingy in accepting people with GEDs and they are channeled into jobs with less potential for advancement.  Also, some companies will not hire anyone with a GED, even if they have earned a college degree after (I am thinking of Lowe's as an example here).  That said, I think there are situations where it can be the best option, so you need to consider that, as well.

Many EMS companies will not accept anyone with a GED even if there is community college afterward. The stigma of "drop out" means to them, "not able to count on in the kinds of profound emergencies we encounter", and the fact that they need to have high graduation rates from the program in order to keep EMS staffed properly. Thus, they won't back down on the GED thing even if the student can pass the entrance exam.

 

It is unfortunate because obviously not all GED holders are going to be unreliable. It's a stereotype. Unfortunately though, our young adults are going to have to navigate job environments where stereotypes abound. 

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I think the stigma is social, but I also think there are real concrete consequences to it, as well.  For example, the military is very stingy in accepting people with GEDs and they are channeled into jobs with less potential for advancement.  Also, some companies will not hire anyone with a GED, even if they have earned a college degree after (I am thinking of Lowe's as an example here).  That said, I think there are situations where it can be the best option, so you need to consider that, as well.

 I'm not sure the Military thing is absolute. My brother, who took the GED, is a very recognized Green Beret. Having taken the GED has not hindered or limited him in any way as far as advancement or job choice in the military.

 

I also have 3 sisters who took it but long ago.

 

1 is about to start her PhD program in educational admin.

 

2 has a Master's in Social Work from one of the top programs in the nation.

 

3 has a double BS in Chemistry and Biology with a minor in Mathematics.

 

None have had any flack from having taken the GED.

 

I think it is just dumb that the GED is seen as a 'cop-out'.

Edited by Paradox5
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A google search yielded a list of who is eligible to take the GED

Who is eligible to take the GED® test?

 

"You may take the GED
®
test if:
  •  

    You are not enrolled in high school
  •  

    You have not graduated from high school
  •  

    You are at least 16 years old
  •  

    You meet state, provincial, or territorial requirements regarding age, residency, and the length of time since leaving school

 

If you are considering leaving high school, the GED Testing Service recommends that you first meet with your high school counselor to talk seriously about your decision and the level of academic skill needed to pass the GED
®
test."

 

​In my opinion, homeschoolers who are abiding by their state homeschooling laws do not meet the eligibility requirements to even sit for the GED.  I am surprised the state of NY has not been sued by its homeschooling population for discrimination.  Homeschoolers are not high school drop-outs. 

 

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... I'm not sure the Military thing is absolute. My brother, who took the GED, is a very recognized Green Beret. Having taken the GED has not hindered or limited him in any way as far as advancement or job choice in the military...

 

That is super your brother is having such great success as a Green Beret! :)

 

Don't know when your brother entered the service, but there have been a lot of changes to both the GED test and to Military recruitment and GED holders in the past 4 years. All branches of the US Military are now far less accepting of the GED -- they accept far fewer GED holders, AND, those they do accept are only allowed in at tier 2 -- UNLESS the GED applicant ALSO has successfully completed 15 or more college credits. Additionally, a higher score on the ASVAB is required of GED holders than those with a high school diploma.

 

See this article for the specific details on these recent changes to recruitment requirements: "Can You Join the Military with a GED?"

 

 

… My sister got her GED and ended up graduating from a Tier 1 law school (actually, a pretty famous one).  She homeschooled high school and for some weird reason, my mom made her take the GED at the end...

 

I actually suspect my other sister has her GED, too… She is a BSN and currently in school for her nurse practitioner… This wasn't *that* long ago.  My youngest sister is about 30. 

 

I also have 3 sisters who took it but long ago.

1 is about to start her PhD program in educational admin.

2 has a Master's in Social Work from one of the top programs in the nation.

3 has a double BS in Chemistry and Biology with a minor in Mathematics.

None have had any flack from having taken the GED.

 

What wonderful career paths and stories both of your families have! :)

 

In the past, the GED has not been a stigma for continuing with higher education, but rather been just one of the requirements for admission to a community college or university. Your sisters are definitely proof of that! :) The GED stigma seems to be more workplace-based, if the worker does not have a higher education degree of some kind.

 

However, the GED was recently revamped and rolled out for the first time in Jan. 2014. There are concerns that the new GED, which now has levels of passing, will potentially make it more difficult for those taking the new GED who score at a lower passing level to enter college. The new GED is designed to have "levels" to show high school equivalency through college readiness:

 

below 144 = fail

145-164 = pass / High School Equivalency

165-174 = GED College Ready

175-200 = GED College Ready + Credit (if college policies grant credit for GED)

 

If colleges decide to take those GED score levels seriously, students with a passing GED score below the college ready score may have no way of advancing with their education later in life...

 

This can be esp. problematic as there appear to be problems with the new GED test itself, in that it is now harder to pass -- apparently a lot of this has to do with the fact that it is now taken via computer, BUT, even more so because many of the new questions are vague, misleading, or poorly worded so that multiple answers look like they are equally correct to the test-takers. Here's a January 2015 NPR story on the new GED test: "A Sizable Decrease in Those Passing the GED"

 

So older experience with the old GED and college/work or military may or may not be similar to what the new GED and new regulations in the military, colleges or workplaces will be… Time will tell...

 

 

Snowbeltmom brings up the biggest problem for homeschool high school students, or homeschool graduates with parent-awarded diplomas trying to take the GED -- they do not meet the GED's stated eligibility requirements that they cannot be enrolled in high school and cannot have graduated from high school.

 

A final thought to wrestle with for those considering the GED: more states are dropping the GED in favor of their own high school equivalency exams/proofs, so the GED is becoming less universally accepted.

 

Edited by Lori D.
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 I'm not sure the Military thing is absolute. My brother, who took the GED, is a very recognized Green Beret. Having taken the GED has not hindered or limited him in any way as far as advancement or job choice in the military.

 

I also have 3 sisters who took it but long ago.

 

1 is about to start her PhD program in educational admin.

 

2 has a Master's in Social Work from one of the top programs in the nation.

 

3 has a double BS in Chemistry and Biology with a minor in Mathematics.

 

None have had any flack from having taken the GED.

 

I think it is just dumb that the GED is seen as a 'cop-out'.

I think it is unfortunate, but let's be realistic. It isn't the same as four years of high school unless all that was taken was remedial coursework in most subjects. Some students are going to be just fine, just like your sisters. Many, many more aren't, and the military has to have some idea who is who these days.

 

Consider the Michigan merit curriculum:

 

Four years of math through algebra 2, precalculus HIGHLY recommended, and most college bound students are taking precalc now. The GED only tests through algebra 1. The science covered is life science, physical science, and earth science. I've seen the test prep materials. This is only 7th and 8th grade level work or 9th grade remedial. It does not cover even basic foundational science of a decent high school biology class or a conceptual physics class.

 

A friend who teaches GED english prep said that the English covered amounts to the 9th grade non-honors English course. Well rounded, decent writing 8th graders can pass it. And she says the social studies can be passed by anyone who paid attention to social studies in 7th, 8th, and 9th grade. (9th is when US history is studied.)

 

It simply is not equivalent to the course material covered for 65% of the local high school graduates, and believe me, I'm not hailing my local PS for anything because I think it is pit of learning. But the reality is that a non college bound student who is not in special ed will take four years of high school english that is not remedial and no remedial reading comprehension courses, three social sciences and in the senior year that means US gov and econ with all of the other seniors except those taking the AP, algebra 1, geometry, algebra 2, and accounting. Biology and chemistry or physics. Remedial 9th grade science here is physical science which the top 50% of the class takes in 8th grade.

 

Two years of foreign language. Every kid that is not special ed is required to take two years. The GED does not cover that either nor has an optional section to show one has studied a foreign language.

 

Those that aren't headed to college will round out with six credits of technology classes at the tech center which options include automotive repair, construction, nurse's aide, catering and restaurant management, agricultural science which includes crop science, animal science - covers basic biology and bio-chemistry, and algebra as part of the coursework - electronics, veterinary tech, and several other courses. No one is allowed to go to tech center without a B average in all subjects otherwise they are headed to courses to remediate deficits, and all courses must include some use of algebra 1 as well as report and essay writing in some manner or science laboratory reports so that the students do not get rusty.

 

And again, I am no fan of my local PS. But the reality is that most of those kids are still covering and learning more material than the GED covers.

 

As for the ASVAB, it is tougher than it used to be of necessity because we have a high tech army with a lot of computerized elements and technical components and all of that means a higher level of numerical and scientific literacy, and well, reading at a higher grade level because technical manuals are not always cake walk to parse. So I am not shocked that if one is coming in with a GED a higher ASVAB scored is required. It is a double check to make sure the military is getting a recruit that has read and digested subject material of a higher level.

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My brother, who took the GED, is a very recognized Green Beret. H 

 

I also have 3 sisters who took it but long ago.

 

1 is about to  . . .2 has a Master's . . . 3 has a double BS 

 

None have had any flack from having taken the GED.

 

I think it is just dumb that the GED is seen as a 'cop-out'.

 

I don't think that anyone is trying to say that a GED automatically makes it more difficult to succeed, just that it can. 

 

Using the military example, certainly individuals with a GED can succeed and even pass up those with higher education. However, as a group, it can't be disputed that it is currently harder for them to enlist. 

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 I'm not sure the Military thing is absolute. My brother, who took the GED, is a very recognized Green Beret. Having taken the GED has not hindered or limited him in any way as far as advancement or job choice in the military.

 

I also have 3 sisters who took it but long ago.

 

1 is about to start her PhD program in educational admin.

 

2 has a Master's in Social Work from one of the top programs in the nation.

 

3 has a double BS in Chemistry and Biology with a minor in Mathematics.

 

None have had any flack from having taken the GED.

 

I think it is just dumb that the GED is seen as a 'cop-out'.

 

Glad to hear these positive stories!  Thanks!

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My good friend's son couldn't get into the army with a GED or mom-made high school diploma, because they had reached their quota.  They contacted HSLDA and a few letters went back and forth and some loopholes were found, etc. etc. and they got him in- the recruiter wanted him, he's a great young man.  But they just had only a certain number of GED's they would accept at the time, and it caused a bump in the road for him.  Mom's diploma din't work either.  

 

This is why we go under an official Umbrella School for high school.  If they had done that the army would never have known the difference all for a few hundred bucks. It really removes a lot of problems and barriers.

 

Of course the young man is now moving rapidly up the ranks after 3 years and was selected for a very high security detail- the army is very happy with him!  :o)

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I'd love to figure something else out.  Of course I could always do the wait and see, but I'm not sure I can handle the stress of that.  I don't think it is fair that I have to jump through so many hoops for something I may or may not get in the end which is based on the random whim of some random person.

 

 

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