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If you bought books you want them to read.,.


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Let's say you bought books you want them to read. What do you think of the idea of making up a basket of the books and set down a reading time each day. Pull them out during that time and they have to pick from the basket?

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That's pretty much exactly what we do, down to the basket. :) (We popcorn read, since my DD is still pretty young and doesn't have much stamina.) But yes, she chooses what to read from the basket, both library books and purchased books, even chooses which of the more complex books she wants for read alouds.

 

We have set reading periods (although we read outside of that time as well when she's in the mood--which is often since she adores books.) I read to her over breakfast, then she reads to me (popcorn reading) for an hour in the afternoon right after lunch, and I read to her again at bedtime.

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That is basically what we do. I have a basket with a pre-selected reading list for the year. My oldest has to read from a "school book" for 30-40 minutes a day. The 6 year old has to read for 15 minutes. They can pick whichever book they want from the basket for their required reading time. They read lots on their own from books of their own choosing (within reason) but they must pick something from the basket for their reading time. It's worked well for the past 2 years. All the books are ones I have selected but they get the control to pick what they want to read and when. 

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I choose a book if I want DS to read to me; I choose a book to read to him. But for books I want him to read on his own (i.e., not for school), I casually leave them near the couch and then come along later, and there he is reading them.

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I put all the books in the basket. If they read them, great; if not, great; and sometimes, if I think the book is important enough, I will read it to them.

 

I never required my dc to read anything.

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We have two large library baskets, one fiction, one non-fiction.  I just keep them filled with the books I think they'll enjoy and schedule reading time every day.  I tell them whether it's non-fiction or fiction time and they choose from one or the other baskets. 

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We've do a combination of approved reading, assigned reading and free reading.  Approved reading are award winning and worthy books (some older classics like Tom Sawyer some modern and contemporary classics by Shannon Hale's children's books) grouped together on shelves that the kid can choose from for me to read aloud.  We have a weekly assigned book related to history (historical fiction, literature, poetry.) Free reading is afterschool during free time and in the evenings where youngest and I read in my bed to ourselves whatever we like. 

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I just gave my oldest a book list and told him every time he finished XX many books *from the list*, he'd get a reward of some sort. This is working well for us (so far) because it easily adapts to different needs based on different reading levels in different languages (i.e., minority language is weaker, so rewards come more frequently for reading books in the minority language) or books of differing difficultites (i.e 5 books from this list are worth a prize, but 2 from this harder list are worth a prize). Sometimes the reward is just 30 min extra reading time after everyone else goes to bed, other times it's a trip to the zoo/arcade/etc. or a train ride or something. He's relatively young, or I wouldn't be bribing him to read. Probably. :)

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A book is the last thing my boys will pick up to do.  Chores would be chosen over books. Why? Who knows because they love read alouds.  So I assign reading to my kids to make sure it is done.  I have several assignments:  1) group novel read aloud - year round for about 45 minutes - hour M-F.  Can be a book recommended by their language arts program, historical fiction, or just a title I pick for fun. We read about 1 a week, 2) Novel Study - year round. At their grade levels (6th & 8th) I assign a title a quarter/summer which is read aloud 2x a week and a MP study guide (or the like) is completed., 3) Independent reading - year round. Every quarter/summer they have an Accelerated reading goal and they select the titles to reach it. No tests, reports, but may ask for an informed opinion of the book, 4) non-fiction read alouds on Friday - school year - a biography or book on a science/social studies/current event topic of interest - usually one a week, and 5) their Reading Anthology book selections (McGrall Hill Treasure or Holt Literature).  So we read tons, (over 100 read alouds plus independent reading last year) but all of it was assigned. 

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My kids have to read at least one hour a day.  Sometimes I assign books (usually they go along with history or literature), sometimes I let them read whatever they want.  My son will also stay up late at bedtime to continue reading and if he really gets into a book (recently Harry Potter, Gregor the Overlander, Mysterious Benedict Society) he'll read a lot more.

 

I don't use a basket.  They either have free choice of all their books or only one or two to chose from.  They read at different levels and have different interests so would need separate baskets.

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3) Independent reading - year round. Every quarter/summer they have an Accelerated reading goal and they select the titles to reach it. No tests, reports, but may ask for an informed opinion of the book,

How are you getting accelerated reader? Thru your local school? I didn't think it was available for homeschoolers. Interested!

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Let's say you bought books you want them to read. What do you think of the idea of making up a basket of the books and set down a reading time each day. Pull them out during that time and they have to pick from the basket?

Mine are older so no basket, but pretty much I require 45 min. a day of free reading, but it has to be books I approve.  My oldest is 15 and my youngest almost 11... 3 boys, 1 girl and never did a copy of Captain Underpants or Junie B. Jones cross our door step!  :-)  But don't ask about the bazillion stupid cat stories (Warriors) that have been the main diet of my 11 y/o.   :banghead:

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