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in your normal speech, do these words rhyme?


  

334 members have voted

  1. 1. rink, sink, think, mink

    • Yes, they all rhyme
      320
    • no. But three of four of them rhyme
      14
    • mandatory other. explain.
      0
  2. 2. which one is the odd out?

    • rink
      4
    • sink
      0
    • think
      9
    • mink
      0
    • They all rhyme
      308


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Hmmm, I had't noticed before -- "mink" is the odd one out for me.  I tend to say it a bit more like "meenk"

 

 

So curious which word is the odd one out for the 12% (so far) who have said no.  

 

Is it mink for all of you?  I can't make mink sound like meenk without making a strange face.  

 

They all rhyme for me, and all with a long E sound: reenk, seenk, theenk, meenk.

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I say think more like thank.

 

I say "I thank so" and not "I think so."

 

I say "let me thank."

 

The other words I do say with the i like a "long e," and they all rhyme.

 

If I make a point I can say think the same way, but it is not how I talk.

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They all rhyme, with a short i sound. Where are those of you who say them as 'ee' from? I've never heard them pronounced that way!

 

Yes, all short 'i' as in 'pig'.  My MIL would have made them 'ee'.  In fact she would have put in an extra syllable (ree-ink).  Texas.

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Yes, all short 'i' as in 'pig'.  My MIL would have made them 'ee'.  In fact she would have put in an extra syllable (ree-ink).  Texas.

 

Oh yes, a twang, but I think the posters above were saying meenk rather than mee-ink. (I said I hadn't heard it pronounced as meenk, but now I'm picturing Zsa Zsa Gabor, lol...)

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As a Southerner I usually pronounce thank and think the same way if I'm not paying attention. I try to not do it anymore but I still slip up. So in my normal conversation think would not rhyme with the others. If I'm attentive to my speech I would say think correctly.

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As a Southerner I usually pronounce thank and think the same way if I'm not paying attention. I try to not do it anymore but I still slip up. So in my normal conversation think would not rhyme with the others. If I'm attentive to my speech I would say think correctly.

 

Well, thank is the correct pronunciation if you still live in an area where that is the local dialect ;)

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So curious which word is the odd one out for the 12% (so far) who have said no.  

 

Is it mink for all of you?  I can't make mink sound like meenk without making a strange face.  

 

I don't know if anyone else would even notice that I'm saying it differently.  I just happened to notice that the others are a very pure short i, but in "mink" I leave the gap between my upper back palate and tongue a bit more closed, perhaps due to the initial /m/.  Maybe we lived in a different area when I learned that word, so the accent I heard and imitated was different.

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I say think more like thank.

 

I say "I thank so" and not "I think so."

 

I say "let me thank."

 

The other words I do say with the i like a "long e," and they all rhyme.

 

If I make a point I can say think the same way, but it is not how I talk.

Exactly this for me. Though it's not *quite* "thank". Somewhere in between theenk and thank.

 

For the record, I'm mostly from Indiana.

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Wow! I had no idea I was *such* a minority. I hate kid books, earlier reader type, that rhyme these words. Or use them in word families. Ugh. They don't rhyme!

 

Except, clearly they rhyme to everyone else 😀 huh. I wonder how I learned it wrong. Even when I hear it spoken by others, or in a movie, I hear it the way I say it.

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Well, thank is the correct pronunciation if you still live in an area where that is the local dialect ;)

Tell that to my mom! I was born and raised in Arkansas and she refused to let me speak with the common vernacular. I still picked up some Southern dialect and accent, but nothing like the way others in the Ozarks sounded!

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Wow! I had no idea I was *such* a minority. I hate kid books, earlier reader type, that rhyme these words. Or use them in word families. Ugh. They don't rhyme!

 

Except, clearly they rhyme to everyone else 😀 huh. I wonder how I learned it wrong. Even when I hear it spoken by others, or in a movie, I hear it the way I say it.

 

How do you say them?

 

I don't think you learned them wrong, words are pronounced differently by different groups of people. Personally I am fascinated by the variations.

 

Some people think it is weird that sell and sale and sail and hell and hail and gel and jail all rhyme to me. That doesn't make me think I learned them wrong, just that I grew up with people who used those pronunciations while some people grew up learning different pronunciations.

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So...when you listen to, say, national news broadcasts, or most TV shows, does it sound like everyone has an accent? This is fascinating to me, but I've only ever lived in one area.

 

 

I don't understand how you could make them with a short <i> sound.

 

All of them are the <ee> sound for me in California.

 

 

Really? I have friends and family in California (northern) and none of them would say it with an ee. So I'm confused...Maybe I'm imagining the ee as more exaggerated than you all mean. Does the "meenk" sound like "mean" and "seenk" like "seen"?

Edited by Anna's Mom
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They all rhyme with ink for me. For those in the south who say "thank," do you live in smaller towns? I was raised in the south and have lived in other southern states, but only a very small minority of people I have met would say thank. But we always lived in bigger cities.

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I grew up in a town in Oklahoma that has more than 100,000 people now, probably 70,000 and up in my childhood.

 

I don't think everyone there says "thank," but it is what I say.

 

I think it blends in more than it might seem, I don't think it is noticeable or that I have much of an accent.

 

I have lived a few places, my husband is in the Army and we talk to people from different parts of the country, and I don't think it is something that is jumping out at people.

 

Edit: I don't think things sound like there is an accent, there is just some little variation to me in American English.

 

But sometimes I think someone has a personally idiosyncratic way of talking, and it turns out to be how everyone talks where they are from.

 

But it is not the same for me as listening to British English, where I do feel like I am listening to someone who is speaking with an accent.

 

Everything that sounds like American English just sounds like some variations in American English, I don't have the feeling like I am listening to an accent.

Edited by Lecka
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Edit: I think I say ing words to rhyme and have long e, except thing I do say thing different ways.

 

I say thang a little, but it is not exaggerated. It is a lot less of an a than how I say think.

Edited by Lecka
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Hmmmm.  I first started to say that they all rhyme, but when I said them out loud, I found that I maybe say "think" slightly differently.  Not as strong a short "i"/slight "ee" sound as the others, maybe a hint of a short "e" sound in it.  But just a tiny bit.

Edited by happypamama
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I grew up in a town in Oklahoma that has more than 100,000 people now, probably 70,000 and up in my childhood.

 

I don't think everyone there says "thank," but it is what I say.

 

I think it blends in more than it might seem, I don't think it is noticeable or that I have much of an accent.

 

I have lived a few places, my husband is in the Army and we talk to people from different parts of the country, and I don't think it is something that is jumping out at people.

 

Edit: I don't think things sound like there is an accent, there is just some little variation to me in American English.

 

But sometimes I think someone has a personally idiosyncratic way of talking, and it turns out to be how everyone talks where they are from.

 

But it is not the same for me as listening to British English, where I do feel like I am listening to someone who is speaking with an accent.

 

Everything that sounds like American English just sounds like some variations in American English, I don't have the feeling like I am listening to an accent.

 

You're probably right. I bet I heard "thank" often and didn't even notice it. My mind probably translated it to think because it's what I expected.

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I am in Michigan and I use a long e. What about -ing- words? I taught my girls that with a long e as well. It was ang(long a) ing (long e) and ank (long a) ink(long e)

This. I'm a native Californian, Bay Area. Hubby, too (AR, though he had Speech Therapy, and speaks more like his Iowan parents). My kids, too...but I probably had something to do with that!

 

Cambridge pronunciation guide for both UK and US English: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ink?q=Ink

Edited by LisaK in VA is in IT
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The last two Americans on that site also say it with short I, which is also how I pronounce them. :)

 

This is so strange and fascinating to me.  I am from St. Louis and say them all with the long e sound.

 

And all of those recordings sounded like long e to me as well.  I have never noticed anyone ever using short I in these words...like thick.  I just don't hear that in the recordings.

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