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Monica_in_Switzerland

What's on your Teacher Training to-do list for the summer?

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I tend to like to try to self-educate during the summer.  Sometimes on an actual topic, but usually just on becoming a better teacher.  I feel like I've gotten a bit optimistic with my list this summer, but wanted to share and see what others are up to (maybe get some ideas for next summer, lol)!

 

To read- 

 

- Elementary Mathematics for Teachers

- Step-by-Step Model Drawing (bar diagram method)

- Re-read The Private Eye teacher's book

- Read a book on Mind-mapping note taking techniques

- Read Better Than Before (book about habit making)

- Read a vintage book on memorization work and how to do it

 

- Watch Teaching the Classics DVD seminar

- Re-watch/re-read blogs about loop and block scheduling and make a plan

- Review writing lessons book

 

 

And then I have a few planning to-dos:

- Make the kids' checklists for work

Make a progression of science stuff to do

- Make a progression for writing

- Decide on history 

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Definitely not summer here. I'm sitting here feeling glad not to be Canadian, because -3C is more than cold enough for me!

 

However, I finished reading 'The Dyslexic Advantage' last night, which I will be revisiting every year or two. Today I have been working through Hands on Equations because I think my tutored kid will be ready for it in a few weeks.

 

I really wish I could afford 'Teaching the Classics.' It's been on my Christmas list for 5 years now. :p 

 

So, not much teacher ed at the moment. I'm right in the thick of it at the moment, with books sitting on shelves waiting to be used because we're due to finish several programs in the next two months.

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Definitely not summer here. I'm sitting here feeling glad not to be Canadian, because -3C is more than cold enough for me!

 

However, I finished reading 'The Dyslexic Advantage' last night, which I will be revisiting every year or two. Today I have been working through Hands on Equations because I think my tutored kid will be ready for it in a few weeks.

 

I really wish I could afford 'Teaching the Classics.' It's been on my Christmas list for 5 years now. :p

 

So, not much teacher ed at the moment. I'm right in the thick of it at the moment, with books sitting on shelves waiting to be used because we're due to finish several programs in the next two months.

 

Yeah, it's been on my list for quite a while too!  I finally decided to make it a splurge this year... hope it's good!  

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I've been tryyyyyying to get through A Philosophy of Education by Charlotte mason. But I keep getting distracted by all of the other books in my towering piles of things to read. I also wanted to learn to bullet journal to keep my brain more organized. And, not educator related, but I discovered that my library gives free access to Lynda.com and I was poking around their graphic design section!

 

Has anyone else read How To Read A Book by Mortimer Adler? I just picked it up at a book sale yesterday because I've been wanting to read it.

 

I never really learned much about how to write well, logic, rhetoric, or anything else classy like that in my awesome public school experience. So I've been wishing I could begin teaching myself before teaching the kids, but I totally don't know where to start!

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I've been tryyyyyying to get through A Philosophy of Education by Charlotte mason. But I keep getting distracted by all of the other books in my towering piles of things to read. I also wanted to learn to bullet journal to keep my brain more organized. And, not educator related, but I discovered that my library gives free access to Lynda.com and I was poking around their graphic design section!

 

Has anyone else read How To Read A Book by Mortimer Adler? I just picked it up at a book sale yesterday because I've been wanting to read it.

 

I never really learned much about how to write well, logic, rhetoric, or anything else classy like that in my awesome public school experience. So I've been wishing I could begin teaching myself before teaching the kids, but I totally don't know where to start!

 

I haven't read the Adler book, but basically every book he's ever written is on my to-do list.  LOL

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I am teaching myself economics (macro and micro) before writing syllabi for each AP class.

 

After that, I get to refresh all my US government before writing the syllabus for that AP class.

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I attended the Teaching from Rest seminar that Circe put on locally, it was great.

 

I scored a used copy of "Teaching the Classics" which will hopefully arrive this week so I can get started watching/reading. It is so expensive! I feel lucky I found it.

 

Also to read: How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare and Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition.

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I've been putting a lot of time into pre-reading things for dd's content classes for next year, but I'm in pretty good shape there - still have some things to read, but I'm far enough ahead I should be able to keep up. I need to turn my attention to the growing stack of teaching books I have and wanted to get through this summer:

 

10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know

 

Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading

 

What's the Big Idea? Question-driven units to motivate Reading, Writing and Thinking

 

Doing Literary Criticism

 

Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing our Kids for the Innovation Era

 

 

 

I also have a bunch of creative writing books to read through and decide if I'm going to use with dd.  A big stack.  Better get right on that . . .  :huh:

 

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I've been putting a lot of time into pre-reading things for dd's content classes for next year, but I'm in pretty good shape there - still have some things to read, but I'm far enough ahead I should be able to keep up. I need to turn my attention to the growing stack of teaching books I have and wanted to get through this summer:

 

10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know

 

Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading

 

What's the Big Idea? Question-driven units to motivate Reading, Writing and Thinking

 

Doing Literary Criticism

 

Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing our Kids for the Innovation Era

 

 

 

I also have a bunch of creative writing books to read through and decide if I'm going to use with dd.  A big stack.  Better get right on that . . .  :huh:

 

 

The Big Idea book has been sitting in my amazon wish list for when my kids are a bit bigger.  I'm taking note of the Notice and Note book as well!  Thanks!

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I'm filling up on audio files of homeschool presenters while going Konmari on my house.

 

But I did pick up a copy of Teaching from Rest I plan to read. Also The Organized Mind. I have a stack of books I've already read, some numerous times, sitting by my bed from which I will pick only one or two - Taking Charge of ADHD, 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families, The Way They Learn, Latin-Centered Curriculum... I have been thinking about getting Teaching the Classics. It is going to be a terribly busy summer, so I don't know what I will realistically get to.

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I'd like to finish Consider This. I have a ton of pre-reading to do for U.S. History. Oh, and teach myself elementary chemistry. â˜¹ï¸ Whatever I learned in ps (not much) is long gone...even parts of Fizz, Bubble, and Flash! are not really making sense.

My kids keep swiping the chem books and now know more to me. 😳

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Watching all the IEW DVDs from TWSS, pre-reading a few novels, figuring out how to use some of our curriculum faster.

 

This is pretty much my list too.

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I've been focusing on calendar this week -- I have a spreadsheet covering every subject on every school day for the whole school year...

I plugged in the WWS assignments for 6th grader. I sorted through my various writing plans and decided which parts I wanted to cover with 10th grader (who needs some remediation) and decided how we'll follow that up. Worked through grammar and logic lessons that go alongside for each. Plugged in math assignments for 10th grader (Saxon Alg 2) to sort the schedule. Plugged in Greek lessons for 6th grader. Plugged in our 'co-op' days and our Thursday hikes so I've got them on the schedule.

 

++++

 

Finishing up some Coursera coverage of Astronomy as a refresher.

 

Watching ridiculous amounts of Horrible History videos to figure out where they will fit into our homegrown, multi-level British History course. I am NOT a youtuber -- I have very limited patience for short videos but these are pretty amusing so that helps.

 

Finishing book : A History of Wales (prep for British History)

 

Generally laying out the lesson plans for British History and Astronomy classes on 6th and 10th grade levels. (I've got middle school and college textbooks, I've got a general plan -- 10th grader will be doing a Coursera class as part of his Astronomy, in addition to bookwork, telescopic work, etc. But I need to get more specifics in place in terms of output. I'm planning on sketchbook notebooks for daily notes for both and I'm not sure what else....)

 

Working on some refreshing of my own Russian skills in prep for Russian 2 this year.

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It's our first year, so I have a big learning curve ahead of me. My main priority is familiarizing myself with all the curriculum and teacher's manuals, and planning our our first couple of months.  I have a few novels to preread.  I also have Teaching From Rest, and I'm really looking forward to reading that!  Oh, and perusing the new WTM when it gets here in August!

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Watching ridiculous amounts of Horrible History videos to figure out where they will fit into our homegrown, multi-level British History course. I am NOT a youtuber -- I have very limited patience for short videos but these are pretty amusing so that helps.

 

There's a list of Horrible History sorted by SOTW chapter in the link in my siggie. Not sure it'll help. I made those by working from the wikipedia list. 

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Wow, everyone is quite ambitious! For my continuing education and teacher training I'd planned on going to the local homeschool convention with my BFF, rent a hotel room, eat out a good dinner, and then stay up all night gossiping and eating ice cream. Oh yeah, and hanging out in the exhibit hall and maybe catching a few seminars.

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We are starting back July 5th so I have no real summer break to get through the books I would like to. Some how I hope to get through them anyways. On my to do list...

 

-Corbett's Classical Rhetoric for the Modern Student (Just from quickly glancing through the book, I can tell this is going to take a lot of will power to get through. But I must force myself to do it!!!)

 

-All the WWS books

 

-Any other writing books I can get my hands on

 

-Finish For the Children's Sake (I have one chapter left :) )

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I've been putting a lot of time into pre-reading things for dd's content classes for next year, but I'm in pretty good shape there - still have some things to read, but I'm far enough ahead I should be able to keep up. I need to turn my attention to the growing stack of teaching books I have and wanted to get through this summer:

 

10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know

 

Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading

 

What's the Big Idea? Question-driven units to motivate Reading, Writing and Thinking

 

Doing Literary Criticism

 

Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing our Kids for the Innovation Era

 

 

 

I also have a bunch of creative writing books to read through and decide if I'm going to use with dd. A big stack. Better get right on that . . . :huh:

If you don't mind me asking, what creative writing books are you reading through? :)

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I just figured out podcasts so I'm working through Circe and IEW podcasts while doing laundry and at the gym.

 

I'm learning about loop scheduling and morning baskets off and on. I'm also making lists of potential books and resources for our morning basket.

 

Attending the local homeschooling convention. 

 

I don't have any homeschooling books I really want to read this year, which is very unusual for me. I'm taking it as a sign that I need a break from continually thinking through and reevaluating this homeschooling process. I am enjoying reading books for fun and following my own educational rabbit trails that have nothing to do with educating children.

 

 

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I signed up for the WTM online homeschool conference last summer, but missed a few of the seminars, so I am listening to them (finally) this year (Bravewriter and one by SWB about high school). I want to look for a few other things to read or listen to as well.

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I signed up for the WTM online homeschool conference last summer, but missed a few of the seminars, so I am listening to them (finally) this year (Bravewriter and one by SWB about high school). I want to look for a few other things to read or listen to as well.

Loved the Bravewriter one!

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There's a list of Horrible History sorted by SOTW chapter in the link in my siggie. Not sure it'll help. I made those by working from the wikipedia list. 

 

You're AWESOME! Thanks!!!

 

My youngest got the Bloodcurdling Box for his birthday -- he's read about 1/2 of them.

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I plan to re-watch the SCM seminar and TWSS. Also, any podcasts or webinars I can find. I usually read TWTM every summer and make notes of new things to try and topics to cover. I just finished reading Teaching From Rest and Beyond Survival: A Homeschooler's Guide To Unshakeable Peace but I may read them again before the end of summer. I have the CM series too that I keep telling myself I'll read but never do. Maybe this will be the summer.

 

I also have some pre-reading to do. I want to at least get part way through my DD's General Science book and plan out our history and writing. I want to map out year a little more than I usually do so that we stay on track and get through everything by the end of the year.

 

If I can get my house decluttered and organized and systems in place for chores and meals that would probably be even more helpful than planning out school work.

 

I never actually accomplish everything I want to do during the summer but this is my ideal list and I'll be happy if I can get through half of it. :-)

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I've got to work through Dolciani Algebra, so I can pretend that I can teach it to one of my boys...I can't teach it by just looking through the TM.  The boy asks too many questions for me to fake it.  ;)

 

Finish reading A Man for All Seasons, Galileo's Daughter, Rulebook for Arguments, and a few others on the oldest boy's list so that I can discuss when he reads them.  This boy also asks too many questions for me to fake it. :lol:

 

Relentlessly hound remind the school district that I *have* submitted paperwork for dyslexia testing. The ball is in *your* court, and the clock is ticking, people.  :toetap05:

 

 

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I'll hopefully also be going through IEW's TWSS.  Not homeschool related, but I'm also doing some serious reading and youtube-watching on puppy training -- since we adopted a rescue puppy last week and I need to figure out what to do with it, lol.

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I attended the Teaching from Rest seminar that Circe put on locally, it was great.

 

I scored a used copy of "Teaching the Classics" which will hopefully arrive this week so I can get started watching/reading. It is so expensive! I feel lucky I found it.

 

Also to read: How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare and Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition.

I really liked Consider This. Great book!

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My self-ed learning this summer is kitchen renovations. Last summer it was carpet removal and flooring installation. The dc get to learn, too!  There are numerous benefits, such as physical activity and strength training is built right in, and there are a ton of mathematics and economics involved as well. The best part is enjoying the finished product at the end and knowing that it was a team effort for the entire family.

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My self-ed learning this summer is kitchen renovations. Last summer it was carpet removal and flooring installation. The dc get to learn, too!  There are numerous benefits, such as physical activity and strength training is built right in, and there are a ton of mathematics and economics involved as well. The best part is enjoying the finished product at the end and knowing that it was a team effort for the entire family.

 

Love it!  I wish we had more opportunities for practical, hands-on work.  Alas, we're renters... sigh.

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I'm working on my math skills, at least until we get dd's DE schedule sorted out. If she winds up outsourcing it, I will happily take a long break! 

 

Listening to some history audio lectures. 

 

I spend more time planning than training because, for us, a good plan is crucial to a good year. 

 

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Just found a forgotten Barnes and Noble gift card, pulled a 20% off coupon from an online coupon site, and added Consider This by Karen Glass to my summer reading list. :-)

Edited by 2ndgenhomeschooler
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