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Do your kids earn money?


mommyoffive
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Well, when our kids have turned 16/17 they have been allowed to go apply for a job as long as they have proven responsibility at home (laundry done, clean room, chores done). We don't pay for cell phones, car insurance, expensive clothes, or expensive HBA products so getting a job is the only way they get these things. All 5 of our oldest kids got jobs around the ages of 16 and have paid for all of that stuff, it has served them very well because they've learned how much things they want are and how to budget for them.

 

Before the age of 16, somewhere around 13/14, some of our kids have had paper routes, childcare at church for MOPS & women's bible studies, mowed lawns, shoveled snow, and other odd jobs. Right now one son knows about some work a pastor wants done around his farm like 3 times a week, all I have to do is get him to church those days.

 

Other jobs we are looking into doing are dog sitting/walking, light housekeeping, sitting with some elderly people and provide company, getting the mail for people who are on vacation, and many other jobs that people need but no one thinks about doing.

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Yes.  Odd jobs and working as field workers for hubby while they were still at home.  Youngest also worked at Chick Fil A his senior year of high school.

 

Work study at college.  Summer jobs as they wanted.  Two have done Food Factory work (making salads or bagging potato chips).  Middle son chose research jobs.  Oldest worked at his college doing audio/visual upgrades after freshman summer.  Youngest is working as a paid intern with Youth for Christ this summer and picking up odd jobs + helping dad.

 

Our kids have always worked on our farm too - doing chores, etc.  Thus is a farm kid's life.

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DS13 earns significant money as a soprano soloist. His voice is changing though, so we don't know how long he'll be able to do this or whether there will be as much demand when his voice finally settles. He also sometimes gets paid for being a guide for local birding trips and may also get a job in a small local birding shop in a year or two. In the meantime, he's looking for other ways to earn money.

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My parents own a greenhouse.  All 6 kids work there and get paid.  Even the 3 year old helps.  He puts empty pots in trays so they are ready to be filled with dirt, carries small things to the other end of the greenhouse, picks up dropped tags/twisties (invaluable for my parents who are older and have a hard time bending to the ground) etc.  In additional they do yard work for my sister, picking up sticks, raking, etc.  The older 3 kids clean college apartments during "flip" week.  Also our church has volunteers work concessions at various sporting events.  A portion of what they earn is used to pay for their church activities/camp throughout the year.

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Yes- 13 year old gets money for tending the animals on a weekly basis. She can earn more by doing "out of scope" chores like washing the cars, painting the chicken coop or something random like that, weeding beds etc. She and dh negotiate the rates on those things.

 

I also pay my little kids (3&4) for doing things outside of their chores- like dusting baseboards Etc. They don't really get how money values work yet but they will do some things like that and then we take them to Walmart to buy a toy usually. They at least are connecting they have to earn things.

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DD began babysitting at age 13 and was very popular with several local families so even at that tender age often earned $100 a month. At 16 she began farm sitting and house sitting so probably made $200-300 a month.

 

Our now 17 and 16 year old boys earn about $300 a piece farm sitting in the summers, and then maybe $150 a month during the off season dong house sitting and farm chores here and there. They are great with large livestock, horses in particular, and so they have several area farmers that hire them. Due to our desire to travel though, they only take jobs that work with our family schedule and do not take daily work like working in the fields and such. Usually weekend work on weekends we will be home.

 

College boy is a tutor for pay in the writing lab at his university.

 

Back when I was a teen, I earned quite a lot accompanying for Solo and Ensemble, tutoring, and teaching piano lessons. During Solo and Ensemble season, I charged $35.00 per soloist, and would take on 15-30 people. I was such a prolific accompanist that for districts, the organizers had to figure out who all I was playing for and work out the schedule so that rooms weren't behind due to waiting on me to get there from another performance. It was nice money. Fewer kids went to state, but since they wanted to improve in between which meant practicing with me more often, I charged $50.00 for state plus my costs of travel. DD also did this in high school as well.

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We are very, very limited in what jobs we can do.  Even back home, because we lived in a more rural area "getting a job" would have a lot of headaches with transportation that would have to be ironed out.

 

DS just completed his first lifeguard course.  He currently teaches swimming lessons, and will probably work as a lifeguard 10-12 hours a week.  He also dog sits (a job he shares with his sister).  DD (14) isn't allowed to work on base yet (except for baby sitting, which most often happens on base, and I'm not willing to drive two 90 minute round trips for a $15-$25 night there and back).

 

We have extra jobs that they can work (for dh and I), which we deposit money into their bank accounts.  These are beyond "family chores." 

 

Next summer, DS will most likely lifeguard a good part of the summer back in the states.  DD will still be too young to have a job, other than babysitting (but there may be a few more opportunities for her there).  When DD turns 16, she will most likely get her Lifeguard Certification and Lifeguard (either here or stateside).  

 

Job opportunities really depend on many factors (transportation costs should be included in that calculation).  If one can walk, bus or bike to a job -- that's awesome (I only worked as much as I did as a teen because I could walk -- if I had needed motorized transport, working at 16 would have been less possible).  It's just not the reality everywhere.

 

DD/DS earned $300 dog sitting.

DS earns $10/30 minutes teaching swimming lessons.

DS earns $50-$80/day Lifeguarding.

Edited by LisaK in VA is in IT
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My 4 yo and 10 yo do extra chores for money. These are things over and above their normal, everyday chores. Like scrubbing floors, scrubbing down walls and doors. Cleaning the outside of Windows. My 4yo will clean our hall closet, or dust. She obviously doesn't have as many opportunities [emoji6] in their young teens I think yard work, house cleaning, and babysitting would be great ideas. And of course when they are old enough to get a 'real' job we will encourage that too.

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Dd started pet sitting at 8 with some known neighbors. I accompanied her.

 

At 10 she started dog walking to. At 12 she advertised within the larger neighborhood and picked up more business watering plants while people were on vacation.

 

She got her lifeguard cert at 15 and did that as a sub two summers.

 

She got her WSI at 16 and has taught swimming since then. She still occasionally pet sits for a neighbor, who was her first client.

 

She leaves for college in August. I don't know if she'll work during school this year.

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My teenagers work.

 

Most of my boys do referee or umpire work (seasonally), and one is a junior training coach (assisting HIS coach at younger teams' practices). The boys also run private training lessons (in season) and speed & agility camps (off season) for their respective sports. My other son is more of a "get rich quick" guy who will come up with short-term money making ideas such as painting addresses on curbs for donation, power-washing trash cans for neighbors, etc. He buys bulk candy at Costco and re-sells it at profit to other kids at the park, practices, co-op, etc. His big earner is an annual garage sale for which he solicits donations all year long and makes most of his money in one shot.

 

Every one of my kids babysit. My boys are surprisingly in demand - parents at their games, practices and church often ask them to watch their sons, especially. They'll get the occasional traditional babysitting gig, but usually it's more of a "mom's helper" thing where my boys take some high-energy younger kids to the park, or the pool, or just in the backyard to play while Mom runs errands or just gets things done inside. They've turned that idea into a few weeklong summer camps the past few years.

 

This year two of my boys and a neighbor kid started a pet-sitting business. They charge $5 per visit, with most jobs requesting two visits per day while owners are away. They'll also do $10 for an hour at the dog park or to drop off/pick up from groomers (the boys drive) or to take the dog for a walk while the owner is at work. We have one neighbor who pays them $10/day M-F to let the dogs out at noon to potty, then bring them right back in. It's a 5 minute job. They usually outsource this one to my 11 year old during the school year because she will sit and play with the dogs for 15-20 minutes. All told, this man paid out $200/month to my kids, from Sept - May, with the expectation they'd spend less than 30 minutes per week with his dogs. Crazy money. Wish we had more neighbors like him, for my own income! :lol:

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12 yo dd has been earning steady cash since age 9 when she went into the cat-sitting business.  She has four regular clients that travel often which brings in an average of $100/month.  She has additional clients that are less regular.  The rule is she negotiates her own jobs but they must be within walking/biking distance from home because other than really bad weather, she is on her own for transport.  We only let her take on clients we know personally.  We live in a densely packed neighborhood with few children (potential cat sitters) so there is always more demand than supply.  She has never advertised.  It started by accident and has snowballed ever since.

 

She also babysits.  She is still a little young so she only currently sits for people we know well and only when one of us will be home as back-up.  She gets far more calls than she can take either because of her schedule or because of our rules.

 

Dd's biggest yield is for playing her violin.  She plays solo for weddings, church services, and events.  Those are usually big money.  She did her first wedding at age 7 for $50.  She thought she was rich!  She also plays in a band.  All of the other members are adults and they charge enough per gig that each member usually get at least $100.  They do play often pro bono for charity events so not every gig makes money.  She does it because she loves playing with the band and would happily do it for free.  Getting paid is just a happy byproduct. 

 

I cannot see her getting a traditional part-time job in her teens.  Partly because of her schedule but also because she has been spoiled by the jobs she does now.  Per hour they all yield far more than minimum wage.  

 

 

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My son is 16

 

For 2 years he has cleaned an office for $20 every weekend. I help him and it takes us about 45 min. And he has done various odd jobs for friends.....the past few weeks he has been helping a friend paint a house....he is getting 9 per hour for that.

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They don't have the opportunity outside of the family, but we try to give them the opportunity to make a little extra spending moved. I have two boys, aged 12 & 13 and 1 girl aged 10.

 

My boys occasionally go to my parents' house and do work for my dad - raking leaves, cleaning out rain gutters, stacking firewood, etc.

 

At home, we have some extra chores that are optional (they have a list of their regular chores, these are above and beyond) that all three have the option of doing them and getting paid for them. That would be mowing the front and back lawns and steam cleaning the kitchen and eating area.

 

It's a shame because we live in a highly agricultural region and when I was a kid I was working in the sheds when I was 13. You could make good money. But due to child labor laws (stupid, stupid) and the fact that they have early and late varieties of fruit that are ripe when the kids are still in school, there are few jobs for kids in the sheds anymore. There are few jobs for kids anywhere anymore.

Edited by KrissiK
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My dd16 does some house/church cleaning.  Only about $150 a month.  It's enough to pay for most of her "extras".  I wish she could find more though.

 

My ds13 and ds11 work with dh who does construction.  Just during the summer. He pays them percentage.  They make more than their older sister.  She could work construction too, if she wanted, but has no interest in that.

 

They get to spend 40% of what they earn.  10% tithe.  The rest is savings.

Edited by AnthemLights
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We live in the rural Midwest, so lots of seasonal hot and dirty and sweaty ag jobs that pay pretty well (for a teen) :)

 

16 year old worked for an intense month (6 days a week, 9 hour days) each of the past 2 summers doing hand pollination of corn at a research facility. This year he and 14 year old are working 2-4 days a week for an organic produce farm, putting up greenhouses, weeding, mulching, picking, packaging, etc. They both make $10/hour. The 16 year old also has another job where he goes in every 7-10 days and sprays out hog crates and mows, also for $10/hour.

 

Before age 14, they worked sporadically for farmers rogue-ing (pretty sure that's spelled wrong, but then again it's kind of a made up word, so I can spell it however I want ;) - it involves walking through fields and pulling out rogue corn plants that have sprouted amongst the soybeans) and picking up rocks in fields to get them ready to plant. They made about $30/afternoon.

 

12 year old works as a momma's helper once every 2 weeks for several hours. She makes $2-3/hour. She would have the opportunity to work the higher paid ag jobs as she gets older just as her brothers did, but she would rather make less money and not get sweaty and dirty. :) I can see her maybe wanting to work at the greenhouse someday, but definitely not in the fields.

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We live in the rural Midwest, so lots of seasonal hot and dirty and sweaty ag jobs that pay pretty well (for a teen) :)

 

16 year old worked for an intense month (6 days a week, 9 hour days) each of the past 2 summers doing hand pollination of corn at a research facility. This year he and 14 year old are working 2-4 days a week for an organic produce farm, putting up greenhouses, weeding, mulching, picking, packaging, etc. They both make $10/hour. The 16 year old also has another job where he goes in every 7-10 days and sprays out hog crates and mows, also for $10/hour.

 

Before age 14, they worked sporadically for farmers rogue-ing (pretty sure that's spelled wrong, but then again it's kind of a made up word, so I can spell it however I want ;) - it involves walking through fields and pulling out rogue corn plants that have sprouted amongst the soybeans) and picking up rocks in fields to get them ready to plant. They made about $30/afternoon.

 

12 year old works as a momma's helper once every 2 weeks for several hours. She makes $2-3/hour. She would have the opportunity to work the higher paid ag jobs as she gets older just as her brothers did, but she would rather make less money and not get sweaty and dirty. :) I can see her maybe wanting to work at the greenhouse someday, but definitely not in the fields.

 

The bolded....I always loved outdoors, hot, sweaty work.  I grow up in SD and there was field work for anyone wanting to do it.  Even if that option was available where we live now, pretty sure my dd16 wouldn't be wanting in part of it either.   :tongue_smilie:

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Not regularly.

 

Link earns some when he goes and works with his grandpa.  I think he got $35 last time?  $25 from grandpa and $10 from the customer :lol: ...

 

 

We have told Link that he *could* check around us and see if anyone is interested in him mowing their lawn for like $10 or something.  But he hasn't done that so far.  He hates mowing too much :p :D

 

 

Oops. Link is 12.  Astro (10) and Pink (7) are too young to really do anything.  Astro has just started mowing our lawn this year and he's not very good at it yet lol...

Edited by PeacefulChaos
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My 17yo has had a retail job, has umpired for extra cash, and occasionally gets paid for babysitting siblings if it's for something like a date night.

 

My 14yo wants a job (and has a work permit) but our family schedule absolutely cannot handle any more!

 

They all know they can earn extra cash by requesting extra work around the house, but they rarely want it enough.

 

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I am not a big fan, however, of teens having income.

 

 

May I ask why?  I'm just curious.

 

Yeah I'm really curious too.  I earned (and saved) enough during my teen years that when I went to college, I was able to pay my way through (after scholarships) without any help from my parents.  It was a huge relief to graduate and not have to pay back loans.  It's something I'm trying to help my kids do even though college costs so much more now.  I've always thought teens having jobs was a good thing so clearly there is another side that I've never even considered.

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My 10 and 13 year old have their regular chores - not tied to allowance, this is cost of being in our family.  However, I always have a list of other chores that can be done for $5 such as cleaning the fridge, washing windows, baseboards, cleaning grout,etc.  My 13 year now gets $10 each time mows either the front or back yard (alternating weeks) during the season.  So if there is a game or something they want beyond their $5 weekly allowance, then they can work for it. 

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DS worked at a math/reading center since just before his 16th birthday. It was a perfect job for him in highschool, because he only worked 2 days, for a total of 10 or less hours.  Just enough to build a savings account and a bit of spending money.  

 

DD17 was a dog sitter last year, and has a job interview at Trader Joes on Monday for a very part time (10-12 hours a week) job being a bagger/courtesy clerk.  It will be perfect for her since they only want nights/weekends and she can work that around her school/sports. We were there, buying our groceries and dd jumped in and started bagging them for us.  The asst manager was our cashier  and asked dd to apply for a position they have open. She even went out out of her way to give DD an application, so I think she has a pretty good chance of getting it.  :0)

 

 

I don't mind if the kids work, but I will not drive them, so they have to wait until they can get themselves around. They also have to keep up on school and family chores.  All the money they earn is 100% theirs to manage. Ds had $3000 saved when he went to college from that part time job.  DD is thinking she will give herself $20 a week spending money and bank $60 (Pay is $10/hr) so she will have a bit saved by the time she goes to college too. 

Edited by Tap
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I am not a big fan, however, of teens having income.

No biggie, really. Teens with jobs are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol. So, just statistically, I am not a fan of teen income. This, obviously, would not apply to teens who are saving money instead.

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ETA - I see this thread seems to be talking about older kids and jobs, but I'll leave my response here for any younger families who may benefit :o

 

My kids all earn money at home from about age four on, but it's highly controlled for basic cues and helpfulness, and good attitudes when doing their work (especially when the work is no fun - I do major rewards for a pleasant kid who is doing a bang up job on something nobody likes, like laundry).

 

They also get paid for doing good church notes and memory verses.

 

We use pennies and have something called 'the daddy store' that we stock and let them purchase from once a week. That way they learn about money and saving for things they want but it's items we purchase and control. When there older we will phase that out and pay them 'real' money - probably middle school.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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Yes! Two of my boys (11 and 9) treated me to a fun day today at our bowling alley/fun center. We batted balls, bowled, and played arcade games. We had a blast. They earned their money from helping neighbors with yard work.

 

They also make really good money working for my husband. He is a general contractor but also framing because there's a major shortage here. My almost 13 year old frames and sheets walls and floors, makes cuts, and more! Be is really picking up the trade. It's a great summer job now and during highschool and college too. It pays really well, better than most summer jobs.

 

Eta: An experienced framer starts at $20 an hour here.

Edited by ifIonlyhadabrain
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Meg is 12 until October, then she may volunteer. There are not any other opportunities I can think of other than pet sitting (which she does for a couple of neighbors) and babysitting. She is not mature enough to babysit yet and there are plenty of girls a little older than her that babysit already. We do pay her a weekly allowance. She has chores she does to make her allowance. She saves twenty percent and ten percent she gives to charity. When she is older, she has a job at the pizza place my husband has his second job at where she can answer phones. He can keep an eye on her and it is an easy job while she attends high school still. We live very close to the mall too, so she could get a job there, however we would prefer she work with her father until she is more mature. She will be volunteering at the Humane Society and a retirement home. 

Edited by MeghansMom
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No biggie, really. Teens with jobs are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol. So, just statistically, I am not a fan of teen income. This, obviously, would not apply to teens who are saving money instead.

Teens with jobs are also more likely to be earning higher incomes years down the road. A job can teach money and time management and people skills in a way that a parent is unlikely to. At the same time a job should not prevent a parent from being a parent. By teen years the parents' value system as should be well understood. During the teen years parents can still set rules about how much time is spent on the job and monitor activities.

 

I worked. I didn't smoke or do nefarious things even though I knew people who did (parent influence). My financial situation is a reflection of having 2 dc with disabilities. My brother worked and is very successful. My niece worked and is halfway through her OB/GYN residency.

 

Of my friends who worked in highschool I can't think of anyone who smoked (in the 70s and 80s when that was more popular). When I read the research on the positive outcomes from being a working teen a few years ago, I worried for my oldest who did not work as a teen. However his future success is going to be driven by how well he learns to manage his 2E behaviors.

 

Working as a teen is not a predictor of a bad future or bad habits.

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My teens all have jobs & have for quite some time. I believe it's good for them. Dd started babysitting around 13-14 & at 15 started working in a local greenhouse, this is her 3rd year seasonally & she's a cashier supervisor this summer.

Ds 16 also works there & is in the greenhouse, maintenance & production.

 

Ds ~15 is working on my dad's farm & living with them for the summer, it's his 2nd summer doing that.

 

They all started painting apartments with my dh several years ago, but he works a different job now, so this will be the first year that none of us will paint in August. Not going to miss it!

 

All 3 of my kids have a lit saved up. They do send a little bit & dd pays towards her car insurance & cell phone, not the whole amount, but some.

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ds20 ds18 and dd16 all work. The boys already have completed tertiary education and are out working. Dd16 is employed by a speech pathologist to assemble her speech they supplies that she sells to other therapists. Ds12 regularly looks after the neighbour's dogs.

 

Ds22 is doing final year aerospace engineering and cannot fit in work with his high study schedule

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In my experience it is the teens who have money without having a job that do most of the smoking and drinking.

 

 

My 9 year old sells eggs, only to her Nanna and I so far, but it's still legitimate business. If we didn't buy them from her, we'd buy them from someone else.

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 I've always thought teens having jobs was a good thing so clearly there is another side that I've never even considered.

 

Based upon what I see working at our local high school, teens having jobs is far more of a pro than a con.  Teens being in sports or band, etc, is also usually a plus.  Our smoking/druggie crowd rarely have jobs, unless dealing drugs is considered a job.  Drinking seems to be independent of jobs, but those who are working don't have as much time to be partying.

 

I'm in favor of (real) jobs working for the family or otherwise from toddler age on up.  Kids who work and truly support the family tend to have a decent work ethic, know a bit of how to do things (because they've been doing it), and have a good sense of belonging.  IMO, one of the best things we did as young parents was buy our farm and promote our boys to farm hands (at ages 5, 3, and 18 months). We also have always had our garden. Then it was helpful that our older boys could help their Civil Engineering dad out on job sites doing engineering surveying.

 

My guys had plenty of time to play, and of course, we all traveled together, but now that they are grown, they consider it "basic life" to be doing something.  Yesterday my youngest went to a (middle aged) friend's house and helped them (married couple) with their outdoor landscaping as the husband has had oodles of leg surgeries and can't do it and the wife works full time.  He's also been incredibly helpful helping out here when he's home too - no  hounding required.

 

It translates outside the home too.  My guys "get things done" in college (leaders in clubs and useful in labs, etc) and in other jobs or extra curriculars they have.

 

It can be far tougher to try to "train" a couch potato IMO.  Our society hasn't done ourselves any favors by our strict child labor laws.  No one wants kids working in the work houses, but there's a lot to be gained by feeling useful when one is young.

 

I started working (for pay) when I was 8 - helping my dad with his beekeeping (500 Hives) for $2 hour.  That was a pretty nice wage at the time.

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You're so lucky. I was cleaning toilets at that age. :lol:

 

I never really acquired the housecleaning gene.  My parents divorced when I was 11 and I lived with my dad.  At that point, if any cleaning (or cooking) went on, I did it.  This, of course, means laundry and dishes got done, but that's about it.

 

I never thought anything of it growing up - it was normal. :glare:  When I returned from college one summer (maybe vacation) I was disgusted at the state of the bathroom and started cleaning it - my sister was livid - totally convinced I was throwing away good (very outdated and cruddy looking) stuff.  I'm guessing that's the stage where it could be seen that I didn't inherit the Hoarding gene my dad has... My sister did.  Their places are still awful.  You could drop in here and find clutter around - esp if the weather's been nice outdoors - but we don't have paths or need to clean off places to sit and the bathroom won't gag you.  You probably can still find outdated meds tucked in places.  We rarely use them.

 

I still prefer doing things outdoors to cleaning inside though.

 

Speaking of which, I need to be heading out getting some weeds pulled or cut now.  Youngest is already out there.  (I was out earlier getting critters fed and checking on our newest arrival, so I'm not totally slacking off!)

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Two of mine have jobs, and one is looking.  It is rather expected of them, and they want to work so they can earn some money for fun stuff, and save up for the future.  They also have to pay for their own gas and clothes once they are working.

 

They started earning a little in their mid-teens from baby sitting.  Then my oldest's first job was working with kids in a summer-care program at a public school.  Her second, and current job, was at the local library where she started out as a page and is now a part-time librarian.  

 

One of my 16 year olds works at a thrift store, and is pulling in a pretty good paycheck this summer (a lot of hours).  

 

Dh and I both worked as soon as we could.  We've found from personal experience, and from experiences of people around us, that it is much easier to land a job if you've been working from the age of 16-17 than it is if you are 20 and trying to get your first job.  

 

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No biggie, really. Teens with jobs are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol. So, just statistically, I am not a fan of teen income. This, obviously, would not apply to teens who are saving money instead.

 

This seems counterintuitive to me.  I would assume a teen who is busier would be less likely to smoke and drink.  So a job would keep them busier. 

 

The people I knew growing up who smoked got their cigarettes from their parents.  I'm willing to bet that was the biggest factor and not that they had jobs.  I HOPE things are different now.

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