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What do they really need for the dorm?


kewb
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I am looking over the list of potential things to bring and am wondering what is really necessary.

Our budget is tight and I want to spend it on items that will be used.

 

So what is your take on some of these items:

Trunk

How many towels

How many sheets

Printer

Iron and ironing board

Laundry bag or basket or both

 

Any been there done that wish I had items?

Already have a stock of command products and duct tape.

Edited by kewb
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No printer. Colleges have printer access at library, etc.

 

My daughter has 4 towels. More seem to take up too much room.

 

One set of sheets. Otherwise she would just have two sets of sheets that need to be washed.

 

My child has never ironed anything in her life.

 

Laundry bag. Easy to hang and takes up less space.

 

My daughter looked at me like I had two heads when I mentioned a trunk.

 

I say less is more. If they decide they need something it's easy to ship from Amazon.

Edited by gingersmom
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No trunk (unless it will be used as a "coffee table" in a very spacious room!); nesting suitcases or collapsible duffels would be better,

 

2 sets of towels, one set of sheets

 

Check the website for number and location of printing stations.

 

Some schools outlaw irons.

 

One of mine used a laundry bag; one uses a basket.

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For my kid (who was only in the dorms one year)

 

His trunk/foot locker is his beloved... He adores that sucker... most dorm room beds are very high to make room for storage underneath. His fits there.

 

He's ROTC so his iron is 100% a necessity.

 

He liked his laundry bag.

 

He had three sets of towels and two sets of sheets.

 

He asked for a printer for Christmas that first year and got SO much use out of it. And had to charge his friends for ink cause they used it a lot too!

 

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No printer. We've yet to visit a university that wasn't well set to provide printing (almost always included in the price of tuition).

 

No trunk.

 

Two sets of towels.

 

One set of sheets.

 

No ironing board for DS, but he does have a clothes steamer.

 

For laundry a pop up mesh "hamper" with built in handles. A bag also comes in handy.

 

DS would say that a memory foam mattress pad is an essential.

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So what is your take on some of these items:

Trunk

How many towels

How many sheets

Printer

Iron and ironing board

Laundry bag or basket or both

 

 

trunk - did not use one.

Towels- 2-3. The extra towels we sent never got used.

Sheets: one set. The extra sheets never got used.

Printer - definitely, unless room mate brings one

Iron and ironing board:  ROFL. I cannot imagine a college student spending time ironing anything (unless mandated)

Laundry basket: we had a mesh hamper with a strap that could double as laundry bag. Must have, to take laundry to the laundry room

Edited by regentrude
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Between college and summer programs, I've moved a kid into a college dorm (or tent) at seven different institutions; working on the eighth.
 
No Trunk:  We haven't found a trunk to be particularly useful.  They are large, can't be opened under a low-lofted bed, hard to transport, and typically not water-proof (for tent purposes).  Plus they can be a safety issue around toddlers (when home for the summer.)  A better solution might be a set of those stacking plastic drawers - these are easier to transport (just duct tape them closed for the journey), can be opened from under a low-lofted bed, and help keep things organized rather than having just one big open space.  They can be used for "frequently in use" items, whereas a trunk or large plastic bin is mostly useful for rarely-used items, which should be kept at a minimum in dorm living.  And the drawers are a great place to store the college-specific gear when the student is home (with their gear) for the summer.
 
One set of sheets; they will wash them and put them back on the bed.  There will be no space to store a second set anyway.  They can swap out summer for winter sheets at Thanksgiving break if that is desired; mine made do with just the one set.  A fleece blanket is warm, easy to wash, and easy to transport, plus often found in thrift shops.  Target carries fairly decent solid-color sheets in extra-large twin size in their RE line.  We usually do a duvet and duvet cover rather than a comforter, but that's just personal preference.  (The duvet cover is easier to wash than a comforter, and it's easier to quickly make the bed.)
 
I would add a mattress pad of some sort, as most mattresses are vinyl; having a thick something between the fitted sheet and the vinyl is much more comfortable.
 
We do two towels, one of which is a beach towel.  The idea is that the regular bath towel is generally used (and washed with the sheets or the clothes); the beach towel is a back-up bath towel and also useful for swimming at the gym or for other outings.  Think about where the towel(s) will be hung to dry; you may need to purchase an over-the-door hook or rig up some other solution if the dorm doesn't include a built-in towel rack.  Sometimes, a towel can be hung on a bedpost, though this is usually not ideal.
 
No printer.  I have twice insisted on sending a printer, however between those two kids and a survey of teens we spoke to at recent graduation parties (who are home from freshman year), every single student uses the university's printing options and not their own printer.  It takes up space and requires them to keep up with paper and ink supplies.  Many assignments are turned in on-line and never printed anyway.  This time, we'll skip the printer; if needed we can bring one to Parents' Weekend.
 
Iron & board - depends on the child, what they like to wear, and whether they are likely to actually iron.  I'd go with the student's desires on this one.  I've never sent one.  Freshman year, the need for fancy clothes is likely minimal.  A well-pressed "nice outfit" can be brought from home and hung in a garment bag in the closet so it is ready for use if needed.  
 
Laundry hamper/bag:  We do a pop-up hamper (so it is easy to use and has a defined, minimal footprint).  Inside that we put a laundry bag; there are nice ones with a backpack-like shoulder strap.  On laundry day the bag can be taken to the laundromat and the pop-up hamper left in the room (or popped-down and brought along for transporting folded clean clothes and the laundry bag back to the dorm room).  A laundry basket is a definite no, as it takes up way too much floor space and isn't easy to carry to the laundromat.  

 

Clothes drying:  A folding drying rack is useful if the student has a lot of no-dryer clothes (some kinds of sports equipment, for example); if there are only a few such things (swim suit, a few bras), then it's better to get a pack of clothespin-hangar hooks.  These have a clothespin at the bottom attached to a hangar-like hook on the top; they can be hung somewhere in the room that gets decent air flow.  
 
Hanging things:  Some thought should be put into an appropriate hanging location for hangar hooks and other hanging things.  One savvy teen hung a spring tension rod in the opening to her closet (which had no door); this was a perfect place for hangar hook clothespin drying.  (She used a rod designed for shower curtains.)   A solution for a summer camp tent was to use tie wraps to hang a clothes rod from the ridge pole of the tent.  (We rigged up end caps for the rod, and the tie wraps went into the holes in the end caps and around the ridge pole.)  That rod could then be used to hang drying clothes, wet swimsuits, a lantern (hung from a super-large carabiner), and also some LED Christmas lights.
 
Tools:  With hacking the dorm in mind, we arrive with duct tape, tie wraps, and a few tools, in order to rig up whatever solutions might help with saving space and having a proper, designated place for everything.  We leave a Swiss army knife, a few tie wraps, and a roll of duct tape with the student for use in future hacks.

Edited by justasque
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All they really need?  A towel and a wash cloth, a set of sheets and a warm blanket, a pillow, and something to hold dirty laundry.

 

I think my daughter has a little travel iron which she uses maybe once or twice a year.  She can iron clothes on her towel on her bed, or even on the floor.

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I don't want to figure this out for a month for dd. I'm pretty sure no trunk.

 

Ds doesn't have a trunk.

He went with

Towels

Laundry bag (maybe bags)

Hangars (I'm sure unused)

Printer

Sheets

Towels

Blanket

Weather related boots and coats

Small trash can

Shower caddy

 

 

I'm sure dd will take closet organizers. I saw some in Target today. She will stay in a dorm next month for her orientation. W hen she's home from that hopefully she'll have ideas what she will use.

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Oh, I do have a question that hasn't been asked. .. what about a comforter? I can pretty easily find those twin XL sheets but it seems like all the XL comforters come in sets, and I don't really want to necessarily have to buy a set...

 

I splurged and bought DS a good quality (LL Bean) queen sized comforter.  The pros are that there's enough hanging room that it covers up what's stored under a dorm bed, and it can be used on a full sized bed when he moves into an apartment in August. The other pro is that it's probably much better made than most twin XL comforters (although of course it cost a LOT more).

 

The con is that it's bulky and a bit of a challenge to find some place to put it when he's changing his sheets, and to roll up for moving.

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This is so helpful. Thank you everyone. Please keep the suggestions coming

Dh and I are going down for a parent orientation in a couple of weeks and I will be sure to scope out the underbed storage situation and if the room is large enough for a coffee table trunk.

 

Where does your student lock up items such as laptop/camera/ipad.

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Our DS was fairly minimalistic:

- clothing (enough to be able to go 2 weeks between laundry trips), with some hangers for his button-down shirts, jackets, etc.

- electronics: laptop, i-pad, and i-pod, earbuds and all the chargers/cables, plus a simple phone

- small bag of personal/bathroom items

- linens: 2 bath towels, 2 hand towels, 1 small bath rug (first year he used an extra/old towel to step out of the shower), 1 set of sheets/pillow case, a comforter, pillow and 1-2 cozy/fleecy blankets

pop up mesh hamper with built in handles; rolls of quarters, laundry detergent and dryer sheets

- school supplies: desk caddy for pens/pencils, paper clips and/or small stapler, regular scotch tape, rubber bands, etc., paper/notebooks for taking notes in classes

- locking trunk -- stored under the lofted bed; used for locking up his electronics when not in use

 

Since DS was able to have a fridge/microwave in his room:

- "kitchen": trash can and garbage bags, paper towels, paper plates, box of disposable plastic flatware

 

One item DS needed that most will not need:

- soft, disposable earplugs he could sleep in -- 2nd year at college, DS had a snoring room mate  :ohmy:

 

Other possible items a student might want:

- plastic 2 or 3 drawer storage unit -- could double as a night stand

- food related: esp. if there is a microwave in the dorm room, a 2-cup or 4-cup pyrex measuring cup for heating measured amounts of water or other items, travel coffee mug (if your student likes hot drinks), Britta water filter, possibly a sharp knife, small cutting board, large spoon for stirring etc. if your student might do more than reheat microwave dinners

- small items: lamp that clips to the bed frame,  desk lamp (schools often prohibit halogen lamps)

- small appliances: you'll want to check on school policies on what is allowed in dorm rooms -- hot plates, hot pots, halogen lamps, irons, etc. are often not allowed, or must have auto-shut-off features, to prevent an accidental fire

 

If your student will be sharing a room with dorm mates, then they usually discuss in advance and divide up who brings what:

- dorm fridge

- microwave

- stick vacuum cleaner or hand-held vacuum

- TV -- both years at college, the roomies brought one, but DS did any watching either on his laptop or on the TV in the dorm lounge

- gaming system -- again, DS didn't bring anything, but roomies did

 

Additional health items to consider (we filled a small plastic Dollar-Store box with various health and first aid items):

- facial tissue

- vitamins

- aspirin or Ibprofin

- over the counter cold/flu items

- a few band-aids and antibiotic gel

 

If there is an in-the-dorm-room bathroom, or if students are responsible for dorm floor bathrooms, then you'll need other supplies:

- toilet paper

- bathroom trash can and bags

- soft scrub or other shower/sink cleaner

- windex

- paper towels

- toilet bowl cleaner, bowl brush, possibly a plunger

 

 

NO on these items:

- printer -- all DS's papers were turned in online; I'd check with the college to see if DS will need one, or if there is a common printer

- iron and ironing board -- if you do want this, be SURE to check what the school allows -- irons, if allowed, must have an automatic shut-off

- duct tape/masking tape -- usually NOT allowed by the school's dorm policies for using on walls/floors/ceilings; if thinking of needing it to fix or hold other things together, maybe include, but maybe the student could just purchase at a nearby drug store if needed?

 

Edited by Lori D.
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This is so helpful. Thank you everyone. Please keep the suggestions coming

Dh and I are going down for a parent orientation in a couple of weeks and I will be sure to scope out the underbed storage situation and if the room is large enough for a coffee table trunk.

 

Where does your student lock up items such as laptop/camera/ipad.

 

In the trunk/foot locker :)

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Both kids needed a fan. Dd needed a lamp - she only had a small light on the desk which was like a night light, couldn't study in her room until she got one.

 

Re: printer - The students were limited to 100 pages a semester. Seems like a lot, but some of ds's professors had him print of a lot of reading material so those 100 pages went really quick. I think he does plan on brining a printer next semester.

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Inquire as to whether an iron is available on the floor somewhere for any student to use.  I recall our dorms having an iron and ironing board, plus a vacuum cleaner, in our study lounges, which were one per half floor.  So unless we needed to iron very frequently and on a deadline (maybe ROTC?), there was no need for a personal iron.

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I am looking over the list of potential things to bring and am wondering what is really necessary.

Our budget is tight and I want to spend it on items that will be used.

 

So what is your take on some of these items:

Trunk

How many towels

How many sheets

Printer

Iron and ironing board

Laundry bag or basket or both

 

Any been there done that wish I had items?

Already have a stock of command products and duct tape.

 Trunk - no, not enough room for one

towels - directly impacted by how often student does laundry - my son has 8. He stacks them on his closet shelf when they aren't in a pile on the floor

Sheets - one set, wash and put it back on

printer - no, these are not often needed (electronic submission) and when they are they can be found in the library or computer lab. 

Iron and ironing board - No, not allowed

pop up laundry hamper that he can use to take clothes to laundry room & back

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Below is our (rather thorough) list.

 

No trunk (we actually had one from sleep-away camp days). Too bulky/unwieldy/heavy and just no room for it.

 

No printer

 

Only one set of sheets. I did, however, convince ds to wash at least his pillowcase once a week. Very easy to remove (unlike the sheets), and important for keeping acne in check.

______________________________________________________

 

College List

 

wallet

passport

cell phone/charger (2)

water bottle

glasses (2 pairs plus sunglasses)

 

 

Computer Supplies:

 

Laptop

iPad

flash drive

headset

ethernet cable

powerstrip (2)

external hard drive for backups

 

 

School Supplies:

 

pens

Pencils

highlighters

post its

index cards

Lined paper

notebooks/binders

ruler

3-hole punch

stapler/staples

paper clips/ Binder clips

lap desk

backpack

2 calculators (graphing/scientific)

summer reading

scissors

Scotch tape

desk draw organizer thing - with compartments (I loaded this up with the small items from above and wrapped the entire thing in cling wrap for transporting)

 

 

Entertainment:

 

playing cards

Musical instrument and sheet music (if applicable)

hammock

 

 

Dorm Room:

 

minifridge

desk lamp

back of door towel hooks/rack - got some large command hooks

clothes hangers

alarm clock

fan - we had a tall, skinny, oscillating one (small footprint)

lots of command hooks of various sizes

white board one-month calendar

 

Bed & Bath:

 

mattress encasement

mattress topper (foam)

mattress pad

1 set twin XL sheets

1-2 extra pillow cases

sleeping bag

light cotton thermal blanket

"cheap"comforter

2 pillows

2 towels

 

 

Daily Meds & Toiletries:

 

Shower caddy

any meds the student takes daily

toothbrush/toothpaste

dental floss

comb

face wash

body wash

deodorant

shampoo

electric razor

hand sanitizer

nail clippers

 

Laundry:

 

laundry basket or bag

detergent

stain spray

dryer sheets

febreeze

 

 

Go To Box - Medical Box (used a plastic tote with a lid and handle):

 

anything specific for the student's medical needs

sunscreen

bug spray

bandaids/triple antibiotic

tums

bug bite gel

spare toothbrush

acne cream

benadryl

tylenol

ibuprofen

naproxen sodium

sudafed

cough suppressant

allergy eye drops

mucinex

cough drops

thermometer

Q-tips (need a container or just a ziploc to put some in)

kleenex

lip balm

immodium

athlete's foot spray

reusable heat/cold pack

Cortisone creme

antiseptic

 

Go To Box - Other box:

 

sewing kit

safety pins

screwdriver - actually received a toolkit/tools for graduation and took that

duct tape

zip ties

sharpie marker

head lamp

hand crank flashlight / USB charger

ear plugs

spare lightbulbs for desk lamp

batteries (I included a list of everything he was taking that required batteries, and what kinds they needed)

notes cards and stamps

solar-powered radio

 

N.B. Go to boxes went on top shelf of bookcase in the room as they didn't need to be accessed every day. Each was only slightly larger than a shoebox.

 

Clothing:

 

your kid can probably figure this out, but remember:

swimsuit

2 sets dressier clothes (shirt, tie, dress pants, belt, socks)

dress shoes

good rain jacket

umbrella

 

Travel:

duffel bag (smaller one for weekend trips, plus big ones he moved stuff in with)

Ziploc bags - quart size for plane trips

 

 

Move-in Day items

Cooler with drinks/waters/fruit

granola bars / other snacks

trash bags

cleaning wipes

paper towels

doorstop

 

be sure to pack separately (backpack) laptop and anything else valuable or that would be very bad if misplaced (prescription meds) and personally hand carry to room when you move in.

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No trunk

No printer

No iron

 

Two sets of towels and mine have liked two sets of sheets.

 

Also... 

 

Mattress pad - makes the bed FAR more comfy

Fans - all three of mine have wanted fans

Shoe pad - we use a welcome mat that collects water/debris from shoes/boots

Door stopper - to prop open the door - they get creative with this - one uses a plunger he got as a gag gift at graduation

Plates/mugs/glasses - mine like eating in their dorm room at times

Microwave/fridge - but coordinate with roommates before purchase

Umbrella - one laughs, but both youngers go to colleges with a lot of rain, so yes, students use them!

 

With other things, we get them there and then add what they want/need once they see what they want/need.  One can ship things directly to their campus.  The two memorable things were a hammock for youngest and ice skates for middle.  I don't recall oldest ever requesting anything special, but we sent him with the most since he was our first and we were rather clueless.

 

We also bought some things at thrift stores saving $$.  Most college kids don't care if things match or were used.  I thought that might be just a guy thing, but middle son just had two female friends visit us here (with him) and they share those beliefs.

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ps  Regarding locking things up... mine haven't had to lock anything beyond having it locked in their dorm rooms.

 

We do buy NSSI insurance for their "stuff" in case anything happens.  It's pretty cheap.  We've never had a claim, but I'm still renewing their policies this year - just in case.  There was a fire with a bit of smoke/water damage in middle son's dorm this past year.  It wasn't on his floor, but if it had been, I'd have been thankful for the insurance.  It works for theft too.

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We sent these,too, although they could be purchased once at school:

paper plates

Paper towel

disposable utensils

cleaning wipes

Advil

band aids (including blister band aids)

 

My son has asked for these items for next year:

Boot tray

Hammock (it's a "thing" on his campus - there are hooks for them everywhere)

 

See if you can reserve textbooks in advance. For a $5 fee, ds' uni will pull them and have them ready for pickup. It's a much shorter line. His uni does have a really cool textbook rental program, too.

 

Borrow or buy a hand truck for move in day.

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I am looking over the list of potential things to bring and am wondering what is really necessary.

Our budget is tight and I want to spend it on items that will be used.

 

So what is your take on some of these items:

Trunk

How many towels

How many sheets

Printer

Iron and ironing board

Laundry bag or basket or both

 

Any been there done that wish I had items?

Already have a stock of command products and duct tape.

Shower caddy and shower shoes (unless he has private shower). Trust me on this one.

 

Cleaning supplies

 

Alarm clock (better than phone)

 

If within driving distance, FOOD and bottled water. Lots. And a dorm fridge. Paper plates.

 

At least two sets of sheets. They will smell and your kid needs to be able to replace without waiting.

 

Stash of OTC drugs and important vitamins and probiotics.

 

Rubbing alcohol to disinfect phone, door handles, and every other hard surface, especially when battling illness.

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Borrow or buy a hand truck for move in day.

 

Check on the school before doing this.  My guys schools have all have great freshman move in days where oodles of upperclassmen move everything in in minutes.  It was awesome.

 

For later years you may or may not need one.  We never have.

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Ds says the only thing he can imagine needing an ironing board for is if one joins a band and needs a keyboard stand. :D

 

Don't forget power strips and extension cords. 

 

Look at schools access to printers and how much they are allowed to print. If the student completes papers at the last minute they need to be able to print them quickly.

 

To save money look at book lists and see if you can order used online. In our experience most professors are happy with an older edition. Student can email and ask.

 

 

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ps  Regarding locking things up... mine haven't had to lock anything beyond having it locked in their dorm rooms.

 

We do buy NSSI insurance for their "stuff" in case anything happens.  It's pretty cheap.  We've never had a claim, but I'm still renewing their policies this year - just in case.  There was a fire with a bit of smoke/water damage in middle son's dorm this past year.  It wasn't on his floor, but if it had been, I'd have been thankful for the insurance.  It works for theft too.

 

What is NSSI insurance?  (Maybe it was mentioned earlier and I missed it.)  Our children have had things stolen or damaged from time to time (at school or summer jobs away from home), but it has always been covered by our regular homeowners' insurance.

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What is NSSI insurance?  (Maybe it was mentioned earlier and I missed it.)  Our children have had things stolen or damaged from time to time (at school or summer jobs away from home), but it has always been covered by our regular homeowners' insurance.

 

Here's the link:

 

http://www.nssi.com/

 

Here are the premiums:

 

http://www.nssi.com/insurance/coverage-premiums/

 

We get the $2000 w/$25 deductible.

 

Our homeowners insurance has a $1000 deductible, so most issues they would have wouldn't be covered there.  Anything greater than $2000 would be.

 

This way we all have piece of mind if someone were to drop a computer or spill water/coffee on it - or anything else similar.  Technically, we could cover 2K ourselves, but the aggravation would be more than the $79 we spend and with typical Murphy's Law in action it would probably happen at the same time we needed car/house repairs or were heading out on a trip.

 

I guess I consider the $79 to be like the "Umbrella Effect."  (Take it and you won't need it.  Don't take it and you'll get cranky.)

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And when you are buying all these things - remember those with allergies and get dye free, scent free, etc.  My oldest always has to reclean and air his dorm room to get rid of scents from febreeze, aftershave, "smelly" soaps & deodorants, room deodorizers, etc.

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This group is the best.

 

Please elaborate on why an alarm clock is better than just using his phone.

 

Already have the shower caddy and shoes. All those years of swimming have taught him to wear his shower shoes, but still a helpful tip.

 

The dorm supplies a microwave and fridge so I will check out the size for a water filter pitcher. Excellent idea.

 

I have a scent intolerance so nothing scented in our house.

 

Will look into to insurance and printer access and the book list. The issue I ran into with books when he took classes at our community college was that the texts had an online code for certain things and the code was only good for a year. Without the code the text was useless because most assignments utilized the online portion. Such a racket.

 

New questions:

Name written in clothes or not?

What is this hammock you speak of? Like the ones for holding toys?

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I have one math major who just graduated and one engineer who is a senior and both loved their printers.  My engineer just commented last week when we were packing her apartment for a move, how thrilled she was to have it.  No last minute rushes to the lab, no counting how many more "free" prints are left.  They both had B&W lasers with scanners built in and they both used the scanners a great deal as well.

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I have found what is useful varies not only from school to school but also from dorm to dorm at a particular school.  Freshman year DD would have had no place in her room for a trunk--wouldn't have even fit under the bed--sophomore year it would have but she did not need one.  The mattress sizes were different between the two dorms.  She found that one set of sheets and a couple of towels were plenty.  One year she found a laundry bag easier to store and take to the laundry room; the next year she preferred a laundry basket.  Both years irons and ironing boards were located in the laundry rooms. 

 

DD found a printer handy, but she and roommate shared--two in the room would be cumbersome.

 

Folding lawn chairs came in useful--could be stored easily but allowed for more seating in room when visitors came and could be taken outside.

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The dorm supplies a microwave and fridge so I will check out the size for a water filter pitcher. Excellent idea.

 

I have been at several universities that have filtered water fountains for filling water bottles. 

 

DD enjoyed having an electric kettle (some dorms don't allow these, however)  She has a french press and could make coffee, heat water for oatmeal, etc.  She also enjoyed a soda stream.

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New questions:

Name written in clothes or not?

 

Just my 2 cents worth about marking clothing:

Each student does their own laundry at the dorm laundry facilities, so while you might have an occasional mix-up or loss of an item or two, it's no more than what would happen when you visit a regular laundry mat. As far as getting clothes mixed with roommates -- even though all the young men in DS's dorm room had piles of clothing sitting around (lol), everyone seemed very aware of what pile belonged to whom. Also, the roomies are likely to be different sizes, which makes it easy to track clothing...

 

Maybe it's just a guy-thing, but our younger DS is currently on an AmeriCorps project and shares a bedroom with 5 other guys (3 sets of bunk beds), and clothing is exploded everywhere  :ohmy: , but they don't seem to have any troubles knowing what belongs to who...

 

Even if you do label, the odds of the clothing making it back to the owner are pretty slim, when you have several floors of dorm occupants, most of whom are unknown to one another, using the same laundry facility...

 

 

LOVE the many ideas in this thread! What it makes me realize is that what is really needed to bring for each student will be unique to what each student feels is essential for daily life. Everything in this thread is great -- but the truth is, my DS wouldn't have used a lot of these ideas. Or, they might be nice extras but would only be used once.

 

So what you might do is start off light and streamlined, and as your student mentions something, send it as a care package, with a few special food treats and a note from home. DS really appreciated getting several packages each semester, and it is sometimes hard to think of what to send, so that's a great time to include those bonus items.

 

Do use the college's list of what to bring/not bring as a guide as well. And if your student can contact dorm mates in advance, if any of them are returning students, they can provide good insight into what is really needed and what is not.

 

Enjoy researching, planning, and purchasing! :) Warmest regards, Lori D.

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No experience but ds plans to pack light initially. At his college upperclassmen unload and carry your stuff to your room for you. Knowing older students will be suffering if he brings too much or unnecessary stuff is quite a peer pressure deterrent.

 

My ds is a minimalist and is hesitant to anything extra. He will only be 2 hours away and I will be happy to drive him down missing items and buy him lunch :)

 

The ease of Amazon Prime and his proximity to home are taking some pressure off if feeling like he needs to be prepared for anything.

 

But I love all the lists and ideas. Thank you!

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Amazon Prime is wonderful to send your children things quickly. 

 

My dd is a music ed major. Freshman year she lived w/ an English major. My dd used her personal printer often. Her roommate took her printer home at Christmas break. Go figure! BTW, dd's printer died last semester, and it was an inconvenience not having it. She will have one when she returns this fall! Speaking of Amazon, I have a wish list ready w/ her printer model and refill toner and drum info all ready to order w/o having to look anything up or ask her. 

 

DD has a small ironing board and has taken it every year. She's a senior now and will take it this year too. 

 

I agree w/ less is more regarding towels and bedding. 

 

DD became a minimalist in college. She shames me!

 

 

Edited by Angie in VA
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Just going over this thread with my dh and he is was all "of course he will have his own printer. Why would you even ask? It is so much more convenient go have your own."

I am worried that ds will be bombarded with other kids asking to use his printer if he has his own. Seems to me the kind of situation where it can be hard to say no without looking like a jerk but can be costly and inconvenient for others to be using. Has anyone had this issue?

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I am worried that ds will be bombarded with other kids asking to use his printer if he has his own. Seems to me the kind of situation where it can be hard to say no without looking like a jerk but can be costly and inconvenient for others to be using. Has anyone had this issue?

 

Nope. First year DS had a roommate with a printer who offered to share, but neither of them ever needed to print anything -- everything was turned in online.

 

But every college will have different policies and printing/no printing needs. :) Best to contact the college in advance to help you decide.

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I suspect most things will be submitted online.  The college tuition does cover $20 of printing per sememster.  5 cents per page for black and white and 35 cents per page for color.

Printer will be going with him. Along with an ink supply.

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No experience but ds plans to pack light initially. At his college upperclassmen unload and carry your stuff to your room for you. Knowing older students will be suffering if he brings too much or unnecessary stuff is quite a peer pressure deterrent.

 

:lol: This shows how different kids are. Both of mine thought the fact that someone else will carry it in meant they could take more!

 

Ds is a minimalist anyway and took very little. Dd, not so much. She wants to take everything!

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And when you are buying all these things - remember those with allergies and get dye free, scent free, etc.  My oldest always has to reclean and air his dorm room to get rid of scents from febreeze, aftershave, "smelly" soaps & deodorants, room deodorizers, etc.

 

Remember those with ASD that have to cover up unpleasant smells with their preferred air freshener - be it citrus, floral or whatever and give them a break, too. Being unable to function because someone down the hall popped popcorn or heated pizza in their microwave is very distressing and causes anxiety, insomnia, distraction and stress. Yes, to the point where they can function effectively. 

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Please elaborate on why an alarm clock is better than just using his phone.

 

....

 

 

Name written in clothes or not?

What is this hammock you speak of? Like the ones for holding toys?

 

The alarm clock is better because it is across the room and they have to get out of bed to turn it off. Also, if it goes on too long, other students will start banging on the door because it is annoying them. An alarm buzzer is better for ds than one that plays music. 

 

No, don't write the student's name in clothes. Think of it more like independent living, not summer camp! They will either keep up with their clothes or leave them in the laundry room indefinitely, which means they may or may not get them back! 

 

The hammock is a real hammock for hanging from trees! Very popular on ds' campus - there are actually hooks all over campus and kids carry their hammocks in their backpacks. DS' wants an Eno DoubleNest. 

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My two college boys have found no reason whatsoever to have their own printers. There are printing kiosks all over their campuses. Seriously. Like, everywhere.

 

Eta: Student fees cover the cost of using these kiosks, so since we're paying anyway, why not use them?

Edited by Kinsa
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My two college boys have found no reason whatsoever to have their own printers. There are printing kiosks all over their campuses. Seriously. Like, everywhere.

 

Eta: Student fees cover the cost of using these kiosks, so since we're paying anyway, why not use them?

 

Exactly! My son didn't need to print anything his entire first year at school. Electronic submissions have really changed the game. Had he needed to print something, all he had to do was put it on a USB key and take it to the library or one of the many computer centers. He can get in any of the computer centers 24/7 and the library 24/5. 

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The hammock is a real hammock for hanging from trees! Very popular on ds' campus - there are actually hooks all over campus and kids carry their hammocks in their backpacks. DS' wants an Eno DoubleNest. 

 

 

We did get ds that hammock for this past Christmas when I was looking for something fun but useful he would take to college with him.  They are definitely a popular item right now.  The local college here always has kids hanging in the trees.  Lol.  The college ds will attend actually has a hammock club.  

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