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Kids, eyeglasses and water parks


k10coon
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Can you advise?

 

We have a season pass to a water park.  My 13yo ds wears glasses, which I fear him wearing on the slides and such.

 

I want him to have fun, but a blurry world is detracting him from that.  I wear glasses as well, so I understand his frustration.

 

Contacts are not an option at this time.

 

Do "sport glasses" hold up to water parks?  They are pretty pricey. Like REALLY pricey; about $300.  Would regular plastic prescription sunglasses be a better route?

 

Any of you BTDT and can offer some ideas?  

 

Thanks!

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As a child with extremely poor vision, I went to "blurry" water parks (without my glasses). It was just a part of what that experience was, do it didn't bother me. I found that I adjusted to interpreting what was blurry without any trouble; things appeared clearer after about 20 minutes than they did at first. It's a lot like night vision. It just kind of sharpens. All the fun of water parks is physical anyways.

 

I didn't start wearing my glasses in any pool until I started taking my own kids swimming: I needed to be able to see them.

 

I still take them off for water parks or swimming in the ocean.

Edited by bolt.
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Geesh that's a tough one.  I wore contacts starting at 12.  I 100% understand this annoyance. 

 

If you have time and access to his prescription you could get a very affordable pair from an on-line place like Zenni.  Then you wouldn't have to worry so much about something happening to them.

 

 

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As a child with extremely poor vision, I went to "blurry" water parks (without my glasses). It was just a part of what that experience was, do it didn't bother me. I found that I adjusted to interpreting what was blurry without any trouble; things appeared clearer after about 20 minutes than they did at first. It's a lot like night vision. It just kind of sharpens. All the fun of water parks is physical anyways.

 

I didn't start wearing my glasses in any pool until I started taking my own kids swimming: I needed to be able to see them.

 

I still take them off for water parks or swimming in the ocean.

 

See, I absolutely hated it and still do.  Which is why I don't do these things ever.

 

But maybe my eyesight is worse.

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We wear our glasses all day. We use a strap if needed.

I went to water parks as a kid and went in without my glasses and never enjoyed the day as much as I do now with them. 

For some of the slides they required me to take them off and hold them in my hand.

 

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I use a strap on mine for water parks and amusement parks. The thick, nerdy headband kind so those puppies aren't going anywhere, and so it's obvious they're attached to me. I'm legally blind without them, so I wouldn't be able to navigate through the park without them (and would have a major headache very, very quickly). In my experience, prescription goggles only work well underwater, which isn't good for water parks.

 

 

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I have horrible vision and swim a lot.  Didn't want to wear contacts under goggles anymore because it's just asking for problems with dirty pool water--especially at waterparks.  (I know you said contacts aren't an option anyway, OP.)  

 

I hadn't bought Rx goggles because I thought they'd be cost-prohibitive--like hundreds.  

 

About a month ago I bought Speedo Vanquisher prescription goggles at SwimOutlet.com for about $20 (yes, twenty!)  I love them!  I've worn them several times and they're crystal-clear for my vision. They come in Smoke (tinted for sun) or clear.  I can see perfectly with them underwater and out of the water.  They look like normal goggles--especially the clear--so a teen wouldn't be self-conscious about the look.  They're available in a ton of prescription strengths.

 

IMO, $20 is a bit high compared to most kids' goggles but if she's responsible and won't loose them: totally worth it!

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My kids wear prescription swim goggles. We've bought them online for about $10. For my kids with bifocals, we just get single-focus lenses using the prescription for the distance part of the lens.

 

Many pools make them wear the goggles around their NECKS for the slide and I can not imagine how that is safer, but I have yet to pursue this with anyone.

 

ETA: mine have worn glasses since they were little and never had a pair randomly slide off, despite the kind-hearted, sometimes shrill concerns of random strangers.

Edited by SusanC
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I have horrible vision and swim a lot. Didn't want to wear contacts under goggles anymore because it's just asking for problems with dirty pool water--especially at waterparks. (I know you said contacts aren't an option anyway, OP.)

 

I hadn't bought Rx goggles because I thought they'd be cost-prohibitive--like hundreds.

 

About a month ago I bought Speedo Vanquisher prescription goggles at SwimOutlet.com for about $20 (yes, twenty!) I love them! I've worn them several times and they're crystal-clear for my vision. They come in Smoke (tinted for sun) or clear. I can see perfectly with them underwater and out of the water. They look like normal goggles--especially the clear--so a teen wouldn't be self-conscious about the look. They're available in a ton of prescription strengths.

 

IMO, $20 is a bit high compared to most kids' goggles but if she's responsible and won't loose them: totally worth it!

That's great to know. My oldest is a swimmer and wears glasses. So far he's o k without prescription goggles but that could change anytime so I'm excited to know these exist.

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I have horrible vision and swim a lot. Didn't want to wear contacts under goggles anymore because it's just asking for problems with dirty pool water--especially at waterparks. (I know you said contacts aren't an option anyway, OP.)

 

I hadn't bought Rx goggles because I thought they'd be cost-prohibitive--like hundreds.

 

About a month ago I bought Speedo Vanquisher prescription goggles at SwimOutlet.com for about $20 (yes, twenty!) I love them! I've worn them several times and they're crystal-clear for my vision. They come in Smoke (tinted for sun) or clear. I can see perfectly with them underwater and out of the water. They look like normal goggles--especially the clear--so a teen wouldn't be self-conscious about the look. They're available in a ton of prescription strengths.

 

IMO, $20 is a bit high compared to most kids' goggles but if she's responsible and won't loose them: totally worth it!

My DS wears his sports glasses at water parks, for actual swimming he wears regular goggles. It NEVER occurred to me that he probably can't actually see well as a result.

 

Geez, major #mamafail.

 

I'm so glad you posted this. I wonder if I can get him a pair before his first triathlon of the season. Might just make a difference, ya think?

 

*hangs head in shame*

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This thread reminds me of that scene in Notting Hill, where Hugh Grant can't find his glasses for the date at the cinema; the next scene shows him watching the movie in his prescription goggles. :D

 

(2:12-3:00 ... Mind you, there's language that may be offensive.)

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dd is blind as a bat and this is a constant struggle for her, I looked at prescription goggles but they only go up to negative 8 and her vision is worse than that. It would still be super helpful, right?

You would think so. For $10 or $20 it might at least be a worthy experiment!

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How about prescription goggles? A friend got some for her daughter online and they were very reasonably priced. Probably not crystal clear vision, but better than fuzzy.

 

As a kid I wore my glasses at waterparks. And when we went to the beach, I wore my glasses into the ocean so I could see my kids. When we take the kids to the water park, I take the glasses off and keep my eyes on whichever kid I am supposed to be watching, depending on my husband to help because his eyesight is nearly perfect. (And I keep the glasses in the swim bag so I can put them on if it becomes necessary)

 

BUT! I just got some -10 prescription goggles and I'm looking forward to wearing them to the beach this summer. I''ll be able to SEE for the first time. (I wear them lap swimming right now and just enjoy being able to see all the little squares at the bottom instead of a black haze)

 

ETA: Link to -10 goggles; they are blurry but SO much better than usual: http://www.amazon.com/Optical-Prescription-Swim-Goggles-Neoprene/dp/B007DKXFFW?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00

 

Edited by vonfirmath
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I have some of the prescription goggles from swimoutlet and love them. While I would not use them to sit down and read a novel, they are fine for swimming and such and I can actually see! As a sidenote, my vision/astigmatism is really bad, so I was surprised they worked so well. 

Edited by Peach
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ARg - my kids totally have this issue too.  I do think prescription googles are a decent experiment/stop gap for that.

 

My kids started wearing contacts at ages 10 & 12.  They have much more fun at water parks now wearing contacts honestly.  You can't wear googles up and down the slides anyway and they both have decent goggles they use sometimes.  They have daily wear contacts so if they lose one no big deal and stuff doesn't build up on them. 

Edited by WoolySocks
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My son is a baseball player. I was against him having contacts (for many reasons) and considered them a non-option, but I realized that he really did need them to play better and safer baseball.  So at age 12 I let him get contacts FOR BASEBALL ONLY. I bought a small amount, just enough to get through the baseball year. He's now 16 and I still only let him wear them for baseball.  He brings his glasses to the water park, but generally doesn't wear them on slides or in the water - just for walking around, eating, talking.

 

My 11 year old daughter's vision is even worse, as is her maturity level, so I won't even let her wear contacts for sports. She plays lacrosse and wears sports goggles. She tried wearing those to the water park but they kept fogging up and were uncomfortable. She can get by without wearing glasses at the water park, but she doesn't like it or feel comfortable walking around 'blind' - so I bought some inexpensive full prescription glasses online for her to use at water parks, amusement parks, etc. For $15-30 a pair, I'm okay if they get scratched, lost or bent up. And her prescription changes so quickly that they're single-season or -year use anyhow so buying basic lenses and frames is fine.

 

I have very poor vision and have worn glasses since age 6 and contacts since age 10. I'm sympathetic to the kids, but ... not crazy enough to put them in full time contacts given what I know about them (the kids and the contacts).

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My son is a baseball player. I was against him having contacts (for many reasons) and considered them a non-option, but I realized that he really did need them to play better and safer baseball. So at age 12 I let him get contacts FOR BASEBALL ONLY. I bought a small amount, just enough to get through the baseball year. He's now 16 and I still only let him wear them for baseball. He brings his glasses to the water park, but generally doesn't wear them on slides or in the water - just for walking around, eating, talking.

 

My 11 year old daughter's vision is even worse, as is her maturity level, so I won't even let her wear contacts for sports. She plays lacrosse and wears sports goggles. She tried wearing those to the water park but they kept fogging up and were uncomfortable. She can get by without wearing glasses at the water park, but she doesn't like it or feel comfortable walking around 'blind' - so I bought some inexpensive full prescription glasses online for her to use at water parks, amusement parks, etc. For $15-30 a pair, I'm okay if they get scratched, lost or bent up. And her prescription changes so quickly that they're single-season or -year use anyhow so buying basic lenses and frames is fine.

 

I have very poor vision and have worn glasses since age 6 and contacts since age 10. I'm sympathetic to the kids, but ... not crazy enough to put them in full time contacts given what I know about them (the kids and the contacts).

I have worn contacts since age 16 and have had zero problems. I'm wondering what I am not aware do with kids and contacts. two of my teens have just gotten glasses and we are considering contacts for them.

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I have some of the prescription goggles from swimoutlet and love them. While I would use them to sit down and read a novel, they are fine for swimming and such and I can actually see! As a sidenote, my vision/astigmatism is really bad, so I was surprised they worked so well. 

 

Oh darn.  They only have them for nearsightedness.  I googled goggles for farsightedness and it suggested sites for Lasik surgery... :lol:

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The awesome thing with contacts now is that the disposables have really come down in price.  Long ago when I had them at age 12 I could only get the long term wear lenses.  Meaning I got one pair and I better not rip them because that was it.  My parents couldn't afford to keep buying them.  And given I'd rather be dead than be seen in my glasses that was a pretty terrible thing when it happened.

 

 

Edited by SparklyUnicorn
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My friend (who otherwise loathes Wal-Mart) swears by them for prescription sports goggles. They start at around $60 and have a decent warranty. 3/4 of her kids wear glasses and are in contact sports. Sports goggles with a secure strap would have worked better for me at a water park than swimming goggles. I never spent much time under water actually swimming at water parks. :)

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My friend (who otherwise loathes Wal-Mart) swears by them for prescription sports goggles. They start at around $60 and have a decent warranty. 3/4 of her kids wear glasses and are in contact sports. Sports goggles with a secure strap would have worked better for me at a water park than swimming goggles. I never spent much time under water actually swimming at water parks. :)

 

I bought my last pair of glasses there.  No complaints whatsoever.  Got the $9 frames too.

 

They even give you a year warranty at no additional cost.  Lenscrafters charges 10x as much AND makes you pay to have them fixed.  It's less than buying a new pair, but what the heck. 

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We have used prescription goggles for my oldest from this website for several years and have always been very happy with them (and they're reasonably priced.) He is farsighted - by a lot - and they have + diopters up to +8.  

 

He went into contacts at age 9 and though he wears them for most things, he still prefers prescription swim goggles for the pool.  

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We have used prescription goggles for my oldest from this website for several years and have always been very happy with them (and they're reasonably priced.) He is farsighted - by a lot - and they have + diopters up to +8.  

 

He went into contacts at age 9 and though he wears them for most things, he still prefers prescription swim goggles for the pool.  

 

oh darn just for kids though it seems

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I have worn contacts since age 16 and have had zero problems. I'm wondering what I am not aware do with kids and contacts. two of my teens have just gotten glasses and we are considering contacts for them.

 

I've worn contacts pretty much non-stop for 30 years. I love contacts. I didn't have a contacts-related problem until the last five years, and the problem I do have results from years of oxygen deprivation. It's not something or anything wrong with the contacts so much as what I did wrong (to and by) myself by mis-using them. 

 

Knowing my kids, they're likely to make the same (poor) choices I did. So I'm putting off contacts for as long as possible with them. I didn't mean to imply contacts were a questionable choice for all kids or teenagers (or people). 

 

We're learning more and more about long-term contact lens effects ... and they're constantly improving lenses to address the findings ... but I still think the unknown risks of oxygen-deprivation for so many years is not worth the trade-off for my kids at this point. I want them to view contacts as one tool in their box and not as their go-to.  That will likely change when/if their vision gets, like, coke-bottle glasses bad. At that point the trade-off may be worthwhile. But I'd encourage them to still wear glasses at home part of each day, or at least one day each week so their corneas can breath. That's where I went wrong.

 

Things I considered before letting my son get contacts for baseball - does he wash his hands regularly? will he remove the lenses each night? will he use saline, not water, to rinse them? will he disinfect them regularly? I could answer yes to all of those, so he got contacts part time. My daughter is a different story, so she got googles LOL.

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I have very poor vision and have worn glasses since age 6 and contacts since age 10. I'm sympathetic to the kids, but ... not crazy enough to put them in full time contacts given what I know about them (the kids and the contacts).

 

I don't think contacts are for every kid.  But I will say it made a huge difference in success to have my kids fitted at a pediatric optometrist.  The kids did a private 2 hour contact lens class and they had much more follow up to make sure they weren't wearing them excessively, were handling them correctly, etc.  The disposables are much safer to use than the old fashioned long term use ones.  My kids have done much better than expected.  My son wears contacts primarily (he's 15) and my daughter wears them mostly just for dancing.  

 

I actually tried contacts about age 12 but it was a fail for me.  But they kind of tossed a long term wear pair at you and said good luck.  I felt my kids were set up with contacts much better.  I am glad my son has that option.  His glasses look super thick on his face and are just really uncomfortable for him.  He has sensory quirks. 

 

Sorry for the aside.   If parents are considering contacts for kids, I do think working with someone who specializes in eye correction primarily for kids can make a big difference.  It does depend on motivation and maturity level in the kid too.

Edited by WoolySocks
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I've worn contacts pretty much non-stop for 30 years. I love contacts. I didn't have a contacts-related problem until the last five years, and the problem I do have results from years of oxygen deprivation. It's not something or anything wrong with the contacts so much as what I did wrong (to and by) myself by mis-using them.

 

Knowing my kids, they're likely to make the same (poor) choices I did. So I'm putting off contacts for as long as possible with them. I didn't mean to imply contacts were a questionable choice for all kids or teenagers (or people).

 

We're learning more and more about long-term contact lens effects ... and they're constantly improving lenses to address the findings ... but I still think the unknown risks of oxygen-deprivation for so many years is not worth the trade-off for my kids at this point. I want them to view contacts as one tool in their box and not as their go-to. That will likely change when/if their vision gets, like, coke-bottle glasses bad. At that point the trade-off may be worthwhile. But I'd encourage them to still wear glasses at home part of each day, or at least one day each week so their corneas can breath. That's where I went wrong.

 

Things I considered before letting my son get contacts for baseball - does he wash his hands regularly? will he remove the lenses each night? will he use saline, not water, to rinse them? will he disinfect them regularly? I could answer yes to all of those, so he got contacts part time. My daughter is a different story, so she got googles LOL.

Wow. I feel like I live under a rock. I had no idea that this was a thing (the oxygen deprivation). I take mine out every night and always have. Does that reduce this risk? I will wear glasses sometimes for the first hour or two of the day and at the end of a long day if my eyes are really tired but most days I wear them 13-14 hours I would say. Why has this never been explained to me? I go yearly for exams Edited by busymama7
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Wow. I feel like I live under a rock. I had no idea that this was a thing (the oxygen deprivation). I take mine out every night and always have. Does that reduce this risk? I will wear glasses sometimes for the first hour or two of the day and at the end of a long day if my eyes are really tired but most days I wear them 13-14 hours I would say. Why has this never been explained to me? I go yearly for exams

 

Is these new things about contacts why they do not sell gas permeable contacts anymore?  That is what I got in 6th grade. They came off every night. But I LOVED how I saw in them.  I stopped wearing contacts for a while and when I came back, my only option seemed to be these daily soft things. I couldn't ever get used to them so I just have glasses now.  (but even then I NEVER wore them in the water! Not even under goggles!)

Edited by vonfirmath
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Is these new things about contacts why they do not sell gas permeable contacts anymore?  That is what I got in 6th grade. They came off every night. But I LOVED how I saw in them.  I stopped wearing contacts for a while and when I came back, my only option seemed to be these daily soft things. I couldn't ever get used to them so I just have glasses now.  (but even then I NEVER wore them in the water! Not even under goggles!)

 

Interesting.  A doc once ordered me those by mistake.  I could not stand them!  But I had been used to the soft lenses already for many years. 

 

NO clue why they don't sell them. 

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If I had a 12 year old wearing them, I'd be on him every day.  It's just THAT important.  I actually do not think most young tweens or teens are always responsible enough.  Not much different than teeth brushing.  But I would not have a problem with having to do that.  I am THAT thankful for contacts and think they are far better than glasses.

 

 

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I just bought some prescription goggles for me from the Amazon link given her.   They did have + powers.  

 

We bought six flags season passes when they came with season passes to the water park.  So, I imagine we will be going several times as a family.   

 

Goes up to a plus 4.  I need a plus 7.

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Since I was 14 my eyesight has been bad enough that I couldn't tell one short blond woman from another if I were more than 20 feet away(yelling mom, when she's right there in front of you is embarrassing) .  Added to that I was expected to watch my siblings and water parks lost all their entertainment value.  I think a strap would help but really water and glasses just suck.

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Wow. I feel like I live under a rock. I had no idea that this was a thing (the oxygen deprivation). I take mine out every night and always have. Does that reduce this risk? I will wear glasses sometimes for the first hour or two of the day and at the end of a long day if my eyes are really tired but most days I wear them 13-14 hours I would say. Why has this never been explained to me? I go yearly for exams

 

Well, we were living under the same rock until a few years ago!

 

You are wearing your contacts correctly, and using them as instructed. Additionally, your eyes are getting oxygen every day when you wear glasses - even if your contacts are in most of the day.  Yes, these absolutely reduce your risk.

 

I did not wear my contacts correctly, nor did I use them as instructed. When disposables became a 'thing' I switched to those on my doctor's recommendation, and that's when my problems started. I got lazy about taking them out and would go weeks, sometimes months, without removing them - not even to disinfect them. It's like I convinced myself I had perfect vision again. Idiot!

 

I have a very strong prescription so even with the highest hi-index lenses, my glasses are heavy. I can't switch between glasses and contacts mid-day, it gives me a headache. I have to pick one or the other and stick with it all day long. My flat, wide Asian nose doesn't hold up glasses well, so they're always slipping. I have a very round face and there aren't as many frames sized to accommodate it so glasses sometimes feel tight. I really, really hate the feeling of wearing glasses.

 

I looked into reverting back to regular one-pair-for-a-year contacts but my doctor thinks the disposable ones are better for me at this point because they're thinner and more oxygen can get through. And like a good Asian, she shames me into using contacts as directed and wearing my glasses at least one day each week (which I've started to do, but I won't do anything else that day. Not even drive unless it's an emergency because I don't trust my vision. It feels 2D as opposed to the 3D from contacts. I know, can you say issues??!)

 

My eye doctor is amazing. She is passionate about her field, which is saying something because her parents pushed her into it. She's also a long time contact wearer so maybe it's something she's looked into out of personal interest. I don't know, we've only compared notes about having Asian parents and being Asian-American parents LOL.

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If I had a 12 year old wearing them, I'd be on him every day.  It's just THAT important.  I actually do not think most young tweens or teens are always responsible enough.  Not much different than teeth brushing.  But I would not have a problem with having to do that.  I am THAT thankful for contacts and think they are far better than glasses.

 

See, I feel the same way! But I do have a problem with that responsibility falling to me on a daily basis so I just say no or I restrict their use to a situation where I know I can stay atop their proper contact use (like baseball).

 

My kids have such low prescriptions that contacts feel optional and not worth the long-term trade-off. Once those get higher, I'll relent out of sheer empathy if nothing else, and agree to contacts F/T. I just hope we're years away from that, and that laziness and questionable hygiene won't be the issues then that they are now!

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Those that say to just walk around without them just cannot fathom what that is like for people in the -10 range. I can get around my bedroom without my glasses or contacts, the rest of the house... not so much.

 

I'll try and remember to look at the company I used for my scuba masks. After a scary panic attack underwater because my mask flooded and lost both contacts, I had to get prescription masks. One of them is close at -10 (still a half point low) and the other is only -8.5. I can see well enough with the weaker one to be happy, but I can see farther with the stronger ones.

 

I had one that is a fairly weak prescription but is highly sun sensitive. I've yet to find a pair of goggles dark enough for him to be really happy

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Those that say to just walk around without them just cannot fathom what that is like for people in the -10 range. I can get around my bedroom without my glasses or contacts, the rest of the house... not so much.

 

I'll try and remember to look at the company I used for my scuba masks. After a scary panic attack underwater because my mask flooded and lost both contacts, I had to get prescription masks. One of them is close at -10 (still a half point low) and the other is only -8.5. I can see well enough with the weaker one to be happy, but I can see farther with the stronger ones.

 

I had one that is a fairly weak prescription but is highly sun sensitive. I've yet to find a pair of goggles dark enough for him to be really happy

 

*laugh* I de-clutter the floor at night for self-preservation -- I know there is at least a decent chance I'll need to go to a kid in the middle of the night, sans glasses, and I need to be able to make it!

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Well, we were living under the same rock until a few years ago!

 

You are wearing your contacts correctly, and using them as instructed. Additionally, your eyes are getting oxygen every day when you wear glasses - even if your contacts are in most of the day.  Yes, these absolutely reduce your risk.

 

I did not wear my contacts correctly, nor did I use them as instructed. When disposables became a 'thing' I switched to those on my doctor's recommendation, and that's when my problems started. I got lazy about taking them out and would go weeks, sometimes months, without removing them - not even to disinfect them. It's like I convinced myself I had perfect vision again. Idiot!

 

I have a very strong prescription so even with the highest hi-index lenses, my glasses are heavy. I can't switch between glasses and contacts mid-day, it gives me a headache. I have to pick one or the other and stick with it all day long. My flat, wide Asian nose doesn't hold up glasses well, so they're always slipping. I have a very round face and there aren't as many frames sized to accommodate it so glasses sometimes feel tight. I really, really hate the feeling of wearing glasses.

 

I looked into reverting back to regular one-pair-for-a-year contacts but my doctor thinks the disposable ones are better for me at this point because they're thinner and more oxygen can get through. And like a good Asian, she shames me into using contacts as directed and wearing my glasses at least one day each week (which I've started to do, but I won't do anything else that day. Not even drive unless it's an emergency because I don't trust my vision. It feels 2D as opposed to the 3D from contacts. I know, can you say issues??!)

 

My eye doctor is amazing. She is passionate about her field, which is saying something because her parents pushed her into it. She's also a long time contact wearer so maybe it's something she's looked into out of personal interest. I don't know, we've only compared notes about having Asian parents and being Asian-American parents LOL.

 

Regarding contacts...

 

I have worn them for about 25 years and loved them until about 2 years ago.  Started with one-pair-a-year as a teen and have gradually switched to more-disposable types to let in more oxygen.  I think my current ones are supposed to be changed monthly.  I have astigmatism, so I can't do the dailies, from what I understand.  

 

I detest wearing glasses--especially for outdoor activities, working outside, snuggling my kids, reading the alarm clock in the morning--LOL.  Now I'm almost exclusively wearing glasses; I wear contacts about once a week or for special occasions because of issues with them.  

 

In the last couple of years, my eyes almost "reject" contacts, no matter how scrupulous I am about keeping them clean.  They're immediately irritated by them and have become very light-sensitive.  I can wear them for a few to several hours without feeling desperate to get them out.  I don't know if this is completely related to contacts.  

 

I have a lot of bloodshot areas / veins growing around the iris due to oxygen depletion from contacts.  My optician says the veins aren't growing into the corneas so there's no reason to worry.  But they are so red, it's hard to believe there's nothing wrong with these "growing" veins.  He has screened for glaucoma (family history of it) each year and says no worries.  I have tried switching cleaning solutions, use a new case each time I change contacts, etc.  I'm trying allergy drops.  Nothing seems to work.  

 

Any thoughts, Tita Gidge?

 

A friend of mine had history with contacts similar to what you described and told me some alarming things she discovered when she switched to a new ophthalmologist (like she wasn't told of issues that were occurring because of her contacts and almost ruined her eyes permanently.)

 

I think I need to switch to a different eye doctor or ophthalmologist.  

 

(Sorry to derail goggles conversation--)

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