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For various reasons, I'd like to try using Fr. Schoder's Reading Course in Homeric Greek as our family's main Greek curriculum, starting with myself and my eldest.   (The books we have are a mixture of the 1st and 2nd editions, not the heavily revised 3rd edition.)

 

I haven't decided what to do about Greek with the younger ones.  They did learn the alphabet with Code Cracker.  If I have them go on to something like CAP or Hey, Andrew, will that cause confusion if they switch to Homeric Greek later on?  Or do the elementary curricula not really go far enough to get into many of the aspects that are different?   

 

Also, if someone has used the Fr. Schoder series:

 

1) Is there an errata sheet for the original, uncorrected 1940s edition?

 

2) Has anyone recorded audio to go with the lessons?

 

Thank you, and please pardon my ignorance!  :001_smile:

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Thanks for the heads up on this book! I've never heard of it. I'm learning Koine and have been told several times it will lead nicely into Homeric Greek. Galore Park has An Introduction to Classical Greek and there's a hive member who successfully used Athenaze with a 6th grader.

 

https://www.galorepark.co.uk/Classics

 

http://www.amazon.com/Athenaze-Introduction-Ancient-Greek-Book/dp/0195149564?ie=UTF8&keywords=Athenaze&qid=1464400298&ref_=sr_1_2&sr=8-2

 

I want this too, but the price just doesn't work for me.

 

http://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/greek-101-learning-an-ancient-language.html?pfm=pinterest

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Just to make sure we're on the same page -- as I understand it, what's usually studied as "ancient Greek" (Galore Park, Athenaze, etc.) is Attic Greek.  Homeric Greek is older, and is somewhat different.   The series I'm looking at teaches Homeric Greek, and then has a supplement that will take the student from Homeric to Attic. 

 

I'm not looking for curriculum ideas for my younger ones; sorry for being unclear about that.   I was just wondering, in general, if it would be confusing to start them with an elementary Attic (or Koine) series, and then switch to Homeric.   And if so, at what point it would become a problem.  :001_smile:

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Just to make sure we're on the same page -- as I understand it, what's usually studied as "ancient Greek" (Galore Park, Athenaze, etc.) is Attic Greek. Homeric Greek is older, and is somewhat different. The series I'm looking at teaches Homeric Greek, and then has a supplement that will take the student from Homeric to Attic.

 

I'm not looking for curriculum ideas for my younger ones; sorry for being unclear about that. I was just wondering, in general, if it would be confusing to start them with an elementary Attic (or Koine) series, and then switch to Homeric. And if so, at what point it would become a problem. :001_smile:

I was just suggesting them because they're closer (I believe almost identical) to what you want. I did all of my research about 2 years ago, so I'm probably rusty. Unfortunately Greek threads don't get much love here as more people are studying Latin.

 

With my study of Greek and looking at different ages of Greek I believe having your younger children study Koine is an excellent idea. Good luck!

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I think I'll have them start with Harvey Bluedorn's Hupogrammon.   It doesn't look like a big step up from the Code Cracker, but they could use more practice, and it will give me some time to figure out how to proceed.   And being able to write, transliterate, and read aloud are useful skills in themselves.   :001_smile:

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I think you will have better luck asking at Textkit.com about an errata sheet and audio.

 

I own 'Reading Course in Homeric Greek' and have been drooling over it :D.

It does assume you already know Latin, so you might need to make sure that your Latin knowledge is enough.

I didn't feel brave enough to use an English Greek course, so for now we are using a Dutch Attic Greek course, but I very much hope we will have time to work quickly through 'Reading Course in Homeric Greek' too.

Edited by Tress
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As far as I know, one has to study ancient / attic greek before Homeric Greek.

But I'm not an expert :)

 

So far we use Athenaze, and after that I have no idea so :bigear:

This series was used in US Jesuit high schools in the 1940s.  The students would have had some Latin (probably with Henle), but no previous Greek.   The first year is pretty intense, from what I've read, and we'll probably take more than one year to complete it. The idea was that they would make the transition to Attic part way through the second year -- and if they dropped it after the first year, at least they would have read some Homer. 

 

I've found some comments about it in the archives of the Jesuit Educational Quarterly, and from what I've seen so far, it worked out pretty well.  For those who chose to take it, that is.   (I'm not sure if any of their schools still required Greek at that point.)

 

It does put some pressure on us, because I'd like to follow the traditional curriculum that focuses on poetry at age 15 and rhetoric at 16, and would like to attempt to read some of the Attic works in the original.   And at the same time, I don't want to give my child (or myself!) a nervous breakdown.  ;)   But even if we have to make heavy use of translations, or do some things in the "wrong order," I'm sure we'll survive. 

 

I just got a copy of a Greek lyric poetry text, with notes, that would have been used in these schools around the same time.  It's based on a text from Belgium.  :D   The original publisher was H. Dessain, and the book of selections was edited by A. Geerebaert.  The book of vocabulary and notes is adapted by Francis J. McCool, S.J., and also has "P. Collin S.J." in the corner - so it seems that he wrote the original?  I looked him up, and his name is on a lot of books! 

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I just re-read my post, and realized that it was confusing even to me.  :laugh:

 

At the time Fr. Schoder's books were written, the US Jesuits no longer followed their centuries-old curriculum that typically started around age 11 or 12.   They had switched over to four-year high schools, which didn't assume any previous classical language studies, so they couldn't start studying original literature at the traditional age.

 

But the good thing about this era -- from a homeschooler's perspective -- is that they were getting seminarians from various modern schooling backgrounds, so they wrote textbooks that were meant to be used by not-so-expert teachers.  

 

I'm trying to use the later textbooks, with something approximating the earlier sequence of studies.  I think this ought to work, more or less.   But who knows.  :001_smile:

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FYI- Great Courses has Greek course now.

 

This is plan B for me, and plan C for my junior high children.    Plan B for the children is either Athenaze or Crosby -- their choice. 

 

We are going to get some Greek, if we perish trying.  :D

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  • 5 months later...

The Great Courses Greek 101 course is 70% off, and I've read some positive comments about it on the high school board, so it looks like we're going to try that route first.    It's also based on Homer (with some Koine on the side), but unlike the Reading Course, it doesn't assume any knowledge of Latin grammar, which makes it accessible for more people in our family.  

 

I've also relaxed about the overall course sequence.  We're no longer trying to get through rhetoric by age 16, so those Attic dudes can wait for a bit longer.  ;)

 

Meanwhile, my older ones have been doing the Hupogrammon.   It's okay, I guess, but the authors' way of pronouncing Greek doesn't always match Code Cracker's, and their way of pronouncing English doesn't always match our family's.  So the experience ends up being somewhat vague and confusing, which isn't what we were expecting from an "open and go" workbook.   If we were doing it over again (which I guess we will be, with the younger ones), I think I'd start with a homegrown "Greek letter of the day" approach, with some root words thrown in. 

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Link to recent thread on the HS board:

 

Koine versus ancient Greek?

 

And a page that was recommended by a poster in that thread:

 

Aiodio:  Greek Dialects - Where to Start?

 

 

None of this really answers my original question, but it's certainly reinforced my inclination to start with Homeric, aka Epic Greek.  :001_smile:

 

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The Great Courses Greek 101 course is 70% off, and I've read some positive comments about it on the high school board, so it looks like we're going to try that route first.    It's also based on Homer (with some Koine on the side), but unlike the Reading Course, it doesn't assume any knowledge of Latin grammar, which makes it accessible for more people in our family.  

 

I've also relaxed about the overall course sequence.  We're no longer trying to get through rhetoric by age 16, so those Attic dudes can wait for a bit longer.  ;)

 

Meanwhile, my older ones have been doing the Hupogrammon.   It's okay, I guess, but the authors' way of pronouncing Greek doesn't always match Code Cracker's, and their way of pronouncing English doesn't always match our family's.  So the experience ends up being somewhat vague and confusing, which isn't what we were expecting from an "open and go" workbook.   If we were doing it over again (which I guess we will be, with the younger ones), I think I'd start with a homegrown "Greek letter of the day" approach, with some root words thrown in. 

 

Are you sure they are really teaching Homeric Greek in this course?  It sounds to me like they might be trying to give a sort of generalized approach which would, I suspect, be more likely to based on Attic.

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Are you sure they are really teaching Homeric Greek in this course?  It sounds to me like they might be trying to give a sort of generalized approach which would, I suspect, be more likely to based on Attic.

Yes - I was kind of surprised, but according to a poster in the thread on the HS board, the TGC course does primarily teach Homeric Greek.  The approach is said to be based on this old textbook, by Clyde Pharr:

 

Homeric Greek:  A Book for Beginners

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My son was interested in Attic, but Athenaze was a total bust. So I began asking around. Everything seemed to be for Koine. After talking with three different professors, they all said the same thing: allowing kids to begin with Kione is a perfectly fine option. The first two years of beginning Greek are basically ALL the same. Do not go with pronunciations. Those are very different, but the initial learning/grammar/language is all extremely similar.

 

Find a curriculum that your kids will do, think is fun, and work well for them. Do not fixate on which style, era, or whatever. More than likely this will be Koine just because there are so many more curriculums for it. By third year, then you should bring out specific curriculums since they will have enough under their belts to really see the differences.

 

I have enjoyed TGC Greek 101. It moves very fast. It is definitely not enough practice and support for me. However, it would be great for pronunciation. Maybe a combo of Elementary Greek (Koine) and TGC's?

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Thanks for the input.  I think I'm going to hold off on planning any curriculum for the younger children, until we've made some progress with the older ones' course.  Then I can figure out what (if anything!) might be useful as preparation.   

 

"Homeschool can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards."  ;)

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The Great Courses Greek 101 course is 70% off, and I've read some positive comments about it on the high school board, so it looks like we're going to try that route first.    It's also based on Homer (with some Koine on the side), but unlike the Reading Course, it doesn't assume any knowledge of Latin grammar, which makes it accessible for more people in our family.  

 

I've also relaxed about the overall course sequence.  We're no longer trying to get through rhetoric by age 16, so those Attic dudes can wait for a bit longer.  ;)

 

Meanwhile, my older ones have been doing the Hupogrammon.   It's okay, I guess, but the authors' way of pronouncing Greek doesn't always match Code Cracker's, and their way of pronouncing English doesn't always match our family's.  So the experience ends up being somewhat vague and confusing, which isn't what we were expecting from an "open and go" workbook.   If we were doing it over again (which I guess we will be, with the younger ones), I think I'd start with a homegrown "Greek letter of the day" approach, with some root words thrown in. 

 

 

Now I'll have to add the Greek 101 course to my wishlist. Is it bad to just buy it off of Amazon?

 

I like your Greek letter of the day plus root words approach!

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