Jump to content

Menu

Pot luck expectations?


Audrey
 Share

Recommended Posts

If you are invited to a pot luck supper, and the host says in the invitation email to bring "an entree or a salad" and you RSVP within a day (and two weeks before the pot luck) that you would bring an artichoke, roasted pepper and black olive pasta salad would you be annoyed if the host then asked you the day before the pot luck if you would also make another entrée dish that you had once made for a past pot luck and which the host had hoped you would say you would bring?  (forgive my syntax there)

 

This is not hypothetical.  This happened to me.  I know how I feel about this, but I want to know what the Hive says.  How would you feel? Do you think the host's request was out of line?  Is this acceptable etiquette on her part?  What would you do?  Would you make the dish you promised in the RSVP?  Would you make the dish requested by the host?  Would you make both dishes? Would you even go to the pot luck at all? 

Edited by Audrey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to make people happy with food, so I would make the requested dish and be patting myself on the back that someone likes my food! I would probably bring both dishes. But this is what I like to do--I think my love language is food.

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be annoyed by the last minuteness of it, and if the host expected me to make an entree AND my two salads I would think it was completely unreasonable.  I think that offering to bring two things to a potluck is already pretty generous, and I usually do that, too, but don't know many others who do.  However, I like to cook so it wouldn't be a miserable thing to cook a little more if I had time.  YMMV.

 

I would think through whether I could reasonably comply, and reply accordingly.  

 

If I couldn't spare the time I'd answer, "Oh, sorry, I already did my shopping and can't fit in another shopping trip.  So glad you liked that entree--next time I'll remember that!" and just bring the two salads. If I hadn't shopped yet and could fit in the cooking pretty easily, I'd say, "Sure, but next time ask me sooner, OK?" 

Edited by Carol in Cal.
  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be personally flattered that the host liked my dish (from the past potluck) so much that she remembered to ask for it. I would jokingly mention that since she liked it so much, she should have put that dish against my name while making the invitation. I would be slightly annoyed if I did not have the ingredients on hand and would ask my DH if he could stop by on his way home and pick up what I want. I would take the dish that the host requested. I would make my artichoke pasta dish if I were in a good mood and I would not bother if I was more than slightly annoyed on the day of the event by the last minute change.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be annoyed by the last minuteness of it, and if the host expected me to make an entree AND my two salads I would think it was completely unreasonable.  I think that offering to bring two things to a potluck is already pretty generous, and I usually do that, too, but don't know many others who do.  However, I like to cook so it wouldn't be a miserable thing to cook a little more if I had time.  YMMV.

 

I would think through whether I could reasonably comply, and reply accordingly.  

 

If I couldn't spare the time I'd answer, "Oh, sorry, I already did my shopping and can't fit in another shopping trip.  So glad you liked that entree--next time I'll remember that!" and just bring the two salads. If I hadn't shopped yet and could fit in the cooking pretty easily, I'd say, "Sure, but next time ask me sooner, OK?" 

 

It's just the one salad -- pasta, artichoke, roasted peppers, black olives, some other stuff and dressing.

 

And, I really don't have all the ingredients I'd need for what she requested.  We live near a very small town.  The store was already closed for Saturday. They're never open on Sunday and it's a holiday weekend, so even if I were inclined to drive to the next largest centre 50 miles away, they'd be closed this Sunday, too.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to make people happy with food, so I would make the requested dish and be patting myself on the back that someone likes my food! I would probably bring both dishes. But this is what I like to do--I think my love language is food.

 

 

Oh, I love to cook, too.  If I'd been asked for a certain dish, I'd usually be happy to do it as long as I could get the ingredients I needed. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And, I really don't have all the ingredients I'd need for what she requested. We live near a very small town. The store was already closed for Saturday. They're never open on Sunday and it's a holiday weekend, so even if I were inclined to drive to the next largest centre 50 miles away, they'd be closed this Sunday, too.

 

Then I'd reply that no, this won't be possible, and leave it at that. Remember the rule: NO is a complete sentence.

  • Like 20
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends. Is this a good friend who asked you to make it? If it was a good friend, I'd do it.

 

 

It is not a friend at all.  The host chairs a local volunteer group with which I am involved.

 

ETA: The pot luck is for the volunteers.

Edited by Audrey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would depend on my relationship with the host. I would oblige good friends or close relatives as my supermarket is walkable from home and it won't be a financial strain.

 

If the host is someone that tends to ask last minute favors often, I would be exasperated that the host assume I am free to oblige.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She should have replied to your rsvp with her request. 

 

No, I would not spend that much petrol money and a three hour return trip driving to another town for last minute shopping to oblige anyone.

 

 

Unless the anyone was a very ill friend who hadn't been able to eat and had suddenly developed a serious craving. I'd do that, even though they'd probably be over that craving before I got home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would feel flattered that she liked my dish and remembered it. I might be annoyed at the last-minute nature of the request.

 

I don't know about etiquette, but I do not think the request is out of line, assuming that the hostess will accept a no to her last-minute request graciously. Sometimes, everyone wants to bring a salad, and she may just be trying to balance the offerings a bit.

 

I would decide whether it was reasonable for me to make the entree, then let the hostess know either yes, I don't mind switching, or no, I don't have the time/ingredients to prepare that dish, but I'll remember that you enjoy it and maybe make it for the next time.

 

I would go to the potluck with whichever dish I prepared. I might make both if I had the time and energy and ingredients and I felt like it.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's just the one salad -- pasta, artichoke, roasted peppers, black olives, some other stuff and dressing.

 

And, I really don't have all the ingredients I'd need for what she requested.  We live near a very small town.  The store was already closed for Saturday. They're never open on Sunday and it's a holiday weekend, so even if I were inclined to drive to the next largest centre 50 miles away, they'd be closed this Sunday, too.

This changes my reply. It is not worth it to travel more than 50 miles even if the host was a good friend. And traveling that far would be pointless because the stores are not open tomorrow anyway. So, the answer is no. Just make the dish that you originally planned to make.

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She should have replied to your rsvp with her request. 

 

No, I would not spend that much petrol money and a three hour return trip driving to another town for last minute shopping to oblige anyone.

 

 

Unless the anyone was a very ill friend who hadn't been able to eat and had suddenly developed a serious craving. I'd do that, even though they'd probably be over that craving before I got home.

 

 

The bolded is what *I* think should have happened.  Then, I'd have had time to do the shop and plan my cooking time.  The thing she requested takes almost a whole day just to cook, and gets prepped for a whole day before that.  She probably doesn't know how long it takes, though.  

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be at least mildly annoyed, and in your case, where it's not easy to pick up the ingredients for the other dish, I'd be quite annoyed.  I'd probably make the dish if it were reasonably easy to do so, but if not, I would simply reply that my schedule wouldn't allow me to bring that dish this time but that you were flattered that she thought of you, and you'd be happy to bring it another time.

 

I think the request wouldn't be too rude if it had come earlier, but last minute, I think it's a bit rude, unless the hostess had a sudden cancellation.  Maybe someone who was supposed to bring an entree cancelled suddenly, and the hostess thought, "Oh, what am I going to do now?  Wait, Audrey made that dish one time, and it was a big hit -- maybe she can bring it again."  I'd think that maybe she figured that since your dish was well-received and since you'd made it before that it might not be too big of an effort on your part.

 

Also, now I want the recipe for that pasta salad, because those are three of my favorite foods.

Edited by happypamama
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would depend on how I felt and how much time I had.

 

If the request wasn't reasonably feasible given my other plans and budget, I would reply that I regretfully would not be able to do that this time, but maybe next time.  I would make the dish I originally promised, unless I was told it was not OK to bring that dish at all.  (In which case I might just not come, or I might say "then what ready-to-bake casserole would be OK for me to buy?")

 

If I felt like making it and had time, I might do it to please people.  Not out of obligation though.  If I made the new dish, I probably would not bring the dish I originally promised.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be at least mildly annoyed, and in your case, where it's not easy to pick up the ingredients for the other dish, I'd be quite annoyed.  I'd probably make the dish if it were reasonably easy to do so, but if not, I would simply reply that my schedule wouldn't allow me to bring that dish this time but that you were flattered that she thought of you, and you'd be happy to bring it another time.

 

I think the request wouldn't be too rude if it had come earlier, but last minute, I think it's a bit rude, unless the hostess had a sudden cancellation.  Maybe someone who was supposed to bring an entree cancelled suddenly, and the hostess thought, "Oh, what am I going to do now?  Wait, Audrey made that dish one time, and it was a big hit -- maybe she can bring it again."  I'd think that maybe she figured that since your dish was well-received and since you'd made it before that it might not be too big of an effort on your part.

 

Also, now I want the recipe for that pasta salad, because those are three of my favorite foods.

 

 

3 cups quartered artichoke hearts

1.5 cups pitted and halved black kalamata olives

4 large red bell peppers

1 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

juice of one lemon

zest of one lemon

1-2 cloves of garlic, pressed

1 tsp. dried oregano​

salt

freshly cracked black pepper

 

2 500g boxes of farfalle, cooked

about 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley (a generous handful)

about 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil (same as the parsley)

additional olive oil, if needed

 

Seed the bell peppers and roast them under a broiler (or on a grill) until blackened, toss them in a paper bag, then remove the skins.  Slice into thin strips about 2 cm long.  Combine all ingredients except the pasta, parsley and basil.  Let marinate at least 2 days in the refrigerator.  I put this in a large glass jar so I can gently shake it up every now and then. Before serving, add the vegetables to the pasta, add parsley and basil and toss well.  It's best to let it stand for a half hour or so until it comes to room temperature.  You can add a drizzle or more of olive oil if the salad seems a bit dry.

 

ETA:  The measurements on the veggies are rough estimates.  I probably have a bit more than that in the jar. All together, it's a 2 quart jar almost full.

Edited by Audrey
  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be both annoyed at the last-minute request and a bit pleased that something I'd made in the past had made an impact enough to be requested again. :) (and I would probably email and tell them that I'd already gone shopping for the potluck and wouldn't be able to fit in another shopping trip and more time to cook between now and the potluck, and that I would surely make the requested entree the next time)

 

I'm now craving artichoke, roasted pepper and black olive pasta salad. And I see that the recipe has already been requested and posted, so I know what *I* will be shopping for tomorrow to have later this week! :)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are invited to a pot luck supper, and the host says in the invitation email to bring "an entree or a salad" and you RSVP within a day (and two weeks before the pot luck) that you would bring an artichoke, roasted pepper and black olive pasta salad would you be annoyed if the host then asked you the day before the pot luck if you would also make another entrée dish that you had once made for a past pot luck and which the host had hoped you would say you would bring?  (forgive my syntax there)

 

This is not hypothetical.  This happened to me.  I know how I feel about this, but I want to know what the Hive says.  How would you feel? Do you think the host's request was out of line?  Is this acceptable etiquette on her part?  What would you do?  Would you make the dish you promised in the RSVP?  Would you make the dish requested by the host?  Would you make both dishes? Would you even go to the pot luck at all? 

 

depends upon the relationship.

 

close family/friend?  I'd be more tolerant.  I "might" make the extra salad if I had time *and* "felt like it". (close relationships often have more give and take)   

 

casual friend/acquaintance (or even 'not-close' family) - I'd be more inclined to be annoyed at her presumption to change the rules and assign a specific dish at the last minute.  I'd probably be  inclined to reply, "I'm so glad  you like the salad.  I'm so sorry I am not able to make it.  here's the recipe."  (or not if you don't share recipes.)

 

If I were to go or not depends upon how I feel about the other people who are expected  to be there.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I admit I'd feel annoyed, and I do think it's out of line.  Unless it were a close friend or family member who was saying "Help!  I don't think I'll have enough to eat!" I would tell her sorry, I already had all the ingredients for my RSVP'd pasta dish and wouldn't be getting to the store again.

 

If she had wanted you to bring a specific dish, she should have asked you up front, when she first sent the invites.

 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me, potluck is a "bring and share and feast together" event, so I would be glad to help. I'm also usually so glad not to be the host something that I try to call or text to see if anything last minute (ice, extra dishes, chips, etc) is needed that I can bring in addition to my dish.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be a little incredulous about a last-minute request to change potluck food to accommodate the organizer's preference. A need would be different.

 

If I were going to the grocery store for potluck ingredients anyway, I'd be fine with changing what I was making. If I'd already bought the ingredients, I wouldn't and would tell the host that I couldn't because I'd already finished the shopping, especially if the original salad is already marinating two days in advance. She waited too long to ask.

Edited by Amira
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After reading your additional comments, I would say "Glad you liked the dish so much but I'm sorry I can't make it on such short notice".

 

Reading about the time to make the dish and that the ingredients aren't readily available to you at this time, then there is no way I'd put forth the effort to make it for the person.  If she wanted a specific dish, she needed to mention it long before now.  Make your salad and don't give it another thought.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's really rude. My reaction would depend upon who was the hostess and my attitude that day. On one hand it's flattering that they enjoyed your dish so much at a previous occasion. On the other it's rude that they only give you one day notice after you told them you'd bring something else weeks before. I don't always have the ingredients I need on hand so I may or may not be able to make a specific dish. Also, I may or may not feel like/have the time/have the money to get the ingredients needed for the requested dish. I'm thinking that I'd decline the requested dish and bring what I was planning. I may or may not go depending on how the host made me feel after graciously declining to bring the requested dish.  :leaving:

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would find it inappropriate. When you first RSVPed she should have said, "Oh that salad sounds lovely, but I adore dish X that you made for Y party is there any chance you could make that instead? If not, I am looking forward to the salad."

 

At the last minute, it is quite rude, and financial she is asking more of you than other guests. If she is your besty friend, then hey, you can roll with it but if not, I woukd say no.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After reading your additional comments, I would say "Glad you liked the dish so much but I'm sorry I can't make it on such short notice".

 

Reading about the time to make the dish and that the ingredients aren't readily available to you at this time, then there is no way I'd put forth the effort to make it for the person. If she wanted a specific dish, she needed to mention it long before now. Make your salad and don't give it another thought.

ITA. I do want to know what the other dish is, now! You sound like an excellent cook, Audrey.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And, I really don't have all the ingredients I'd need for what she requested. We live near a very small town. The store was already closed for Saturday. They're never open on Sunday and it's a holiday weekend, so even if I were inclined to drive to the next largest centre 50 miles away, they'd be closed this Sunday, too.

Well, then you can't make it. I'd say, "Sorry, I don't have the ingredients for that." Then I wouldn't worry about it. It's just someone asking for a dish they liked. It's not a big deal.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ITA. I do want to know what the other dish is, now! You sound like an excellent cook, Audrey.

 

+1

 

 

 

I would be flattered -- it makes me happy when people enjoy something I make (especially since I don't think I'm a great cook).  But I wouldn't have a problem letting the person know that there isn't time to change plans (lack of ingredients, too far to drive to get them).  That person should of specifically made the request as soon as you RSVP'd.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be annoyed at the timing. 

If I had the ingredients at would make the requested dish simply because I would be thrilled that someone liked my cooking enough to request something.

I don't think it is out of line for the host to request something but the request should have been made when you sent your rsvp not the day before the event.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ITA. I do want to know what the other dish is, now! You sound like an excellent cook, Audrey.

 

I want to know the other dish as well! And possibly a recipe if you are willing to share ...

 

But, yes, I'd say I'm glad you liked that dish, but I cannot bring it this time.

 

But having attended potlucks, I know that sometimes no one wants to bring an entree/main dish. I always try to bring one - just so I know there will be one. Personally I think we should all convert to dessert-only potlucks!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I think it was rude. Asking people to bring either x or y, accepting your offer to bring y, and then coming back at the last minute to say "well, I was really hoping for the z variation of x, can you bring that too?" is truly thoughtless.  (That can actually be passive-aggressive behavior though I doubt that was the case here.)    She should have just asked you for your special dish in the first place, rather than hope you'd sign up to bring it. 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But having attended potlucks, I know that sometimes no one wants to bring an entree/main dish. I always try to bring one - just so I know there will be one. Personally I think we should all convert to dessert-only potlucks!

 

That happened to me once. I used to host a monthly potluck for a couple of mates and we were all too pov to cook enough on any one month. One month we all bought chicken, another month we all made dessert. Meals could be eclectic, but we all got fed. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty much what several others have said: I would feel a combination of flattered (that someone remembered my dish and liked it enough to request it) and irritated (that she didn't put in her request early enough to make it easy for me to comply), but I would have to let her know politely that I didn't have the ingredients on hand for the entree and would not have time to make that happen for her.

 

"Gosh, I wish I'd known earlier! Unfortunately, I don't have the ingredients on hand for that one and can't make it to the store on a Sunday. I promise I'll keep that dish in mind for the next event."

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be annoyed. My active reaction would depend on the other person.

 

The rude person - "Oh, you should have asked me back then. It's too late to get to the grocery and make your request, I have other plans for today. Remind me a week prior and I'll bring it next time."

 

To the clueless person - "Oh, I'm sorry, I have the other dish already made up. I don't have time to do anything from scratch now, but I could pick up something at the market if you really need an extra item. Next time feel free to ask me for a specific dish from the beginning!"

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Annoyed and put on the spot. If she'd asked when the original RSVP was sent, that might have been okay, even flattering that my previous dish was remembered, but last minute? No way.

 

Something like this did happen to me once actually. Potluck, I planned one thing, though I didn't mention it to the host. Day before, the host said, oh, dd was hoping you'd bring your cake that we love. She was a good friend so it didn't bug me. I got that it was a request and not an order. It felt friendly, not offhandedly unthinking. Also, I had the ingredients so I made the cake. But if I hadn't, no one would have been upset or annoyed.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With such short notice, I'd respond that, "alas, I already did my shopping and am bringing the pasta dish I told your of over a week ago."  Then either offer to give her the recipe so she can make it herself if she really REALLY wants it, or ask her to remind you to make it next time.

 

One Thanksgiving I showed up at the in-laws with a pecan pie.  They flat out said they had been looking forward to my (justly famous) APPLE pie.  I was confused - it was Thanksgiving.  I never was asked to make apple nor had I said I would make apple. 

 

 

Edited by JFSinIL
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be annoyed by the last minuteness of it, and if the host expected me to make an entree AND my two salads I would think it was completely unreasonable.  I think that offering to bring two things to a potluck is already pretty generous, and I usually do that, too, but don't know many others who do.  However, I like to cook so it wouldn't be a miserable thing to cook a little more if I had time.  YMMV.

 

I would think through whether I could reasonably comply, and reply accordingly.  

 

If I couldn't spare the time I'd answer, "Oh, sorry, I already did my shopping and can't fit in another shopping trip.  So glad you liked that entree--next time I'll remember that!" and just bring the two salads. If I hadn't shopped yet and could fit in the cooking pretty easily, I'd say, "Sure, but next time ask me sooner, OK?" 

 

I think Carol has the perfect response. I'd be quite irritated at a last-minute nature of the request after I'd RSVP'd with my contribution two weeks before the event. Whether or not I'd go out of my way to shop for the new ingredients and spend the extra hours cooking would depend entirely on my relationship with the person. (If my DH, DC, or mother asked, I'd do it.)

 

You're right be annoyed and under no obligation to put yourself out. By the way, your recipe sounds delicious!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With such short notice, I'd respond that, "alas, I already did my shopping and am bringing the pasta dish I told your of over a week ago."  Then either offer to give her the recipe so she can make it herself if she really REALLY wants it, or ask her to remind you to make it next time.

 

One Thanksgiving I showed up at the in-laws with a pecan pie.  They flat out said they had been looking forward to my (justly famous) APPLE pie.  I was confused - it was Thanksgiving.  I never was asked to make apple nor had I said I would make apple. 

 

Well, now that I have Audrey's pasta salad recipe, I'm going to need dessert. I have trouble with my apple pies. (The apples always end up crunchy and the crust soggy no matter how long I bake the pie.) If yours is justly famous, would you share it with us struggling pie bakers? Hmmm...I'm thinking we need a Hive cook-off thread or something.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be put off by the timing in this case coupled with not having the ingredients on hand.  Don't get me wrong, I love bringing re-requested dishes, I just need time to prepare and budget/shop for most things.

 

That said, dh is notorious for asking me the day before a work potluck for something "they" liked :drool5: ; he is however willing to shop on the way home for the stuff.

 

 

And the artichoke dish would always be welcome on my table :hurray: .

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't be annoyed by a request for a specific dish, but would be annoyed by the last minute request. I would have expected the host to either send me a private email asking me to bring that specific dish, or after I said I'd bring the pasta salad to email back and ask if I'd bring the entree instead. And it all should have been done at the beginning.

 

If it was a good friend I'd say something like "Oh, I wish you would have asked me sooner, but I'll try. No promises though." And then I really would try, but wouldn't make myself crazy over it.

 

If it was not a good friend, as in your case. I'd politely refuse. Again saying I wish she would have asked sooner, but adding that with the other things I need to do at home I just won't have time to get the ingredients and make it, and still do what I need to for my family. 

 

I'm another one who likes to make people happy with food but there are limits. That pasta salad sounds delicious. I believe it will make people happy. :)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't read other response yet, but if it were a problem for me to pull that off I'd have no issue saying "unfortunately, I already am done grocery shopping for the week and I don't have enough time to pull that off this time but I'm glad you enjoyed XXXX.  We'll have to have you over for that some other time".  If I hadn't been shopping and it was easy enough to pull off, I'd probably do it.  It would depend on context/relationship and what the exact dishes involved were. 

 

When I make a nice dish for a potluck, it isn't unusual for me to spend like $30+ to get quality ingredients to make something.  So that comes into my mind too.  Good meat based entrees can be $$$$ to prepare.

Edited by WoolySocks
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, that wouldn't work for me. She should have asked when she made the invite or just after. I live across the street from a 24 hr grocery store and I wouldn't do it. It's too late and that's that. With your location and store access situation it's an even stronger no.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With such short notice, I'd respond that, "alas, I already did my shopping and am bringing the pasta dish I told your of over a week ago." Then either offer to give her the recipe so she can make it herself if she really REALLY wants it, or ask her to remind you to make it next time.

 

One Thanksgiving I showed up at the in-laws with a pecan pie. They flat out said they had been looking forward to my (justly famous) APPLE pie. I was confused - it was Thanksgiving. I never was asked to make apple nor had I said I would make apple.

The same thing happened to me once over not bringing my lemon pie. And another time my brother was upset I hadn't made butterscotch pie. Well, homemade lemon pie is a complicated endeavor and sometimes I just don't feel like it. As to my brother. Well, it's a FAMILY recipe. One which I am known to not even like. Yes, I made it for mom...when she was dying of cancer. Unless you too are dying of cancer make it yourself or ask dad to make it.

 

People can get really pushy with good cooks sometimes.

Edited by LucyStoner
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's just the one salad -- pasta, artichoke, roasted peppers, black olives, some other stuff and dressing.

 

And, I really don't have all the ingredients I'd need for what she requested. We live near a very small town. The store was already closed for Saturday. They're never open on Sunday and it's a holiday weekend, so even if I were inclined to drive to the next largest centre 50 miles away, they'd be closed this Sunday, too.

.

 

In this situation, I would not do it. I would just tell her it was too late and I was bringing the thing I told her I would bring in the first place. I would say it nicely because I would be somewhat flattered that she remembered the thing I made before. But no way would I be turning myself into a pretzel to make it happen at the last minute.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...