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PollyOR

Lord of the Flies - What age?

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RoughCollie mentioned in the the "Twilight...oh my" thread that her 8th grade dd was assigned to read the book Twilight for school. I was not alone in being surprised that it was assigned. I know many people who have enjoyed reading it but studying it for school?

 

This made me think about my 13yodd's request to read Lord of the Flies. I've been putting her off for almost two years, because I didn't think it was age appropriate. Now I'm pondering the fact that maybe I'm not challenging her enough. No, I'm not assigning fluff, but am I holding her back? (BTW, she's flying through The Lord of the Rings at the moment)

 

When would you let your child read Lord of the Flies? I think her older sister was 17 when we both read it.

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I first read that book in 8th grade Honors English. Then I moved and got to read it again in 9th grade Honors English. Then I switched schools and got to read it again in 10th grade Advanced English.

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I gave it to my 12 yo (7th grade) to read last month, and he ended up doing a project on it for his English class in ps. He enjoyed the book and felt it was age-appropriate.

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My son read it in 6th grade and enjoyed it very much.

 

Enjoyed? Hmmm...not exactly my reaction. A valuable book but not one that I enjoyed!

 

Jane

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I studied this in my 9th grade literature class. I remember it took a long time to study because of the many facets to the book. There were many discussions in class about the social aspects and the symbolic significance. My dd is in 5th grade, and while she's an advanced reader, I don't think she is developmentally ready to understand the many facets to this story, nor do I think she would be able to in 6th or 7th grade either. But that's just us.

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My son is 10. He's doing English Prep 2 from Galore Park, and a recent chapter had an except from Lord of the Flies in it. My son was very curious about the book and expressed a mild interest in reading it. If he decides he wants to do so, I would have no problem with it for him. He is, however, a very good reader and a pretty emotionally mature kid.

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I first read that book in 8th grade Honors English. Then I moved and got to read it again in 9th grade Honors English. Then I switched schools and got to read it again in 10th grade Advanced English.

 

You must've been quite the expert by then!!

 

I think I read it for the first time around 8th-9th grade too. I don't think it was assigned, I'd probably just heard of it and was interested -- I loved the idea of reading through a list of great books at that age. I don't think it was too much to handle.

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We read it in 10th grade "G/T English" when I was in high school. I had read quite a few books with mature content, which I wish I had not read (Stephen King, Danielle Steele, etc.), but I remember being quite disturbed by this book. My 10th grade dd will be reading it this year and I'm prepared for some discussions with her. I don't think it's a book just to hand your child to read, but one which you plan on discussing.

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it was assigned reading in my 9th grade honors english, but as mentioned elsewhere there are so many facets to this book i think a kid would get more out of it later in high school. i probably won't assign it till 11th, but mostly cuz there are others i want him to get thru first :)

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I read it at 11 because it was in the house (older sister). I really enjoyed the book and reread it a few times before it was assigned for school.

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We're coming to it late, in ds' Sr year, because we are filling in some gaps. We are comparing and contrasting the Romantics idea of human nature (people born good, society as corrupting influence--Noble Savage idea) with other perspectives. It gives us a good contrast to Queequeg in Moby D and Frankenstein's Monster. So, I'd say any time you are introducing those concepts, it would be good to read.

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Enjoyed? Hmmm...not exactly my reaction. A valuable book but not one that I enjoyed!

 

Jane

 

Let me elaborate. He couldn't put it down because he was fascinated by the story. He enjoyed mulling over the challenges the characters faced and wondering what he'd do in the same situation, and relished the family discussions which stemmed from his reading. So, yes, I'd say he enjoyed the book, as did his father and I when we were his age. It blew our little minds, so to speak. :)

 

ETA: This was not required reading - he read it because he wanted to.

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Wow! I am surprised at how young you all were when you read this! I didn't read it until I was a junior in college. I found the book very disturbing, as did many of my classmates. The professor had us watch the movie of it after we had discussed the book, and that was even more disturbing. I would definitely wait if your dc is at all sensitive. At the very least, I would recommend a lot of discussion, as well as avoiding the movie.

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Oh, how I loathed that book. I have no idea what grade I was in when it was assigned reading ~ 8th? 9th? 10th? I just know I considered it a colossal waste of time and was consequently thrilled to finish it. I suppose I'd say it's best-suited for high school if a student wanted to read it. I'd certainly never assign it, though.

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I'd certainly never assign it, though.

 

I 100% agree! My children will read that on their own as adults should the desire strike them, but I will not be teaching it.

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I read it when I was 10 for English class. I would let dd7 read it.

 

When I got to NC and went to public school for high school, I was shocked that the kids in the 9th grade college prep track were reading this book. Even in CA, the average kids read it in middle school. It is not anywhere near high school level IMO.

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it was assigned reading in my 9th grade honors english, but as mentioned elsewhere there are so many facets to this book i think a kid would get more out of it later in high school. i probably won't assign it till 11th, but mostly cuz there are others i want him to get thru first :)

 

I'm intrigued. What are the books you want him to get through first? I ask because I've always viewed Lord of the Flies as one of the "easier" classics. I'm looking for others to give my son to read.

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Well, I was 40 when I read it for the first time, LOL! But I plan to give it to my 8th grader (13 yo) next year.

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I'm intrigued. What are the books you want him to get through first? I ask because I've always viewed Lord of the Flies as one of the "easier" classics. I'm looking for others to give my son to read.

 

well, as Colleen mentioned, there are some stories we each like, and some we each love ;)

 

I do agree the reading is pretty easy --it's the concepts that I want to delve into deeper w/ a more mature teen.

 

There's plenty of lists of books in the WTM itself that i want to work through first. Sonlight's lists are another that I like.

 

Like jedi mentioned, the books some people assign at higher ages could certainly be handled by others at lower ages, and vice versa. But she has also mentioned that her dd is gifted towards reading, so i wouldn't be surprised that what works for her younger might not work for a typical older student ;)

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