Jump to content

Menu

9th grade - seek accredited program or not


Recommended Posts

My 16yo lost 4-5 credits when we put him in ps HS this year.  He'll still graduate on time, but his transcript won't list chemistry, geometry or algebra II, which is going to look odd.

 

Now, my 15yo is returning home for 9th grade (repeated 8th), so I was going to use an accredited umbrella so the same thing didn't happen to her.  However, she claims there is NO WAY she's ever going back to ps, so that its a waste of money to look at an accredited program.  She says if something happened to mom or dad, she'd still school herself at home (because she says she can't handle the people/language/culture at our public school.)   She plans to enter dual enrollment her junior year (her brother wasn't ready, but there's no reason to suspect she won't be--she has study skills he doesn't.)  So, its just 2 years we're concerned about....9th and 10th grades.

 

Should I consider accreditation for college purposes?  She'll likely have dual enrollment credits, anyway, right?  Am I overlooking anything?  (Her goal is vet school, but she may not be competitive/driven enough to reach that goal...we're likely looking at animal careers that require a 4 year degree.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't need accreditation for college purposes.  Also, are you sure that if your D went back to the public high school at a later date, the high school would accept those credits even if they were taken under the umbrella? 

 

In my state, each local public school has the right to decide what, if any credits, are granted to a homeschooler that enters public school partway through his high school career.  In some districts, the student would have to begin at the 9th grade level regardless of whether his homeschool classes were accredited.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd make sure they'll actually accept the umbrellas you're looking at before spending the money. Just because it's accredited doesn't mean they'll automatically accept it. We know a local boy who was in an accredited school, took formal tests, had online/DVD teachers, the whole works. Mom didn't actually teach anything. The local public school wouldn't accept any of it and he had to start with zero credits.

 

If you know for sure you're going straight to CC accreditation doesn't matter. CC will be more interested in their own placement test.

Edited by SilverMoon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The school said they only accept "accredited credits."  I looked up their accreditation, and looked at umbrellas with the same accreditation (very limiting, and expensive!!)  I eliminated a regional accreditation from across the country because I wasn't sure if the accreditation would be acknowledged here.   I did not go as far as calling the school to get their opinion, because I don't think I'd get an honest answer, if at all.  They seem to avoid parental contact.

 

The plan is CC in 11th grade.  (Which was the plan for her brother, too, 'til he wasn't ready.  But I honestly would have no qualms about her starting CC now, so can't picture the same thing happening.)   Sounds like we'll go it alone!!  (or use an umbrella unconcerned about accreditation, which would be cheaper)

 

So...just double-checking....colleges won't care about accreditation, correct?  Just high schools?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So...just double-checking....colleges won't care about accreditation, correct?  Just high schools?

 

Of the thousands of 4-year universities out there, I've only seen people on the WTM board have trouble with a small handful of schools, requiring an accredited diploma -- mostly a few schools in NY and PA. The vast majority of universities, as well as the US Military accepts parent-awarded diplomas (no accreditation required).

 

I have not seen anyone on these boards mention any community college requiring an accredited diploma. They are generally much more open in admission policies.

 

On the other hand, trade schools and cosmetology schools very frequently insist on the student getting a GED if they do not have an accredited diploma. (This may be a fear-response by the school that drop-outs will call themselves homeschool graduates when they are no such thing.) Just throwing that out there, should DD want to head to a trade school at some point, an accredited diploma will likely be required.

 

So if your student might consider attending a NY or PA university (or a trade school), I'd look into the homeschool admission requirements of those schools now so you can plan accordingly.

 

 

My 16yo lost 4-5 credits when we put him in ps HS this year.  He'll still graduate on time, but his transcript won't list chemistry, geometry or algebra II, which is going to look odd.

 

When DS applies for college, be sure to submit both an official transcript from the public high school, but ALSO your official homeschool transcript that covers all coursework taken for homeschool high school credit. DS's "lost" credits will appear there, as well as any other credits that may have been accepted by the public high school -- which you will want to note on your transcript that those are also appearing on the high school's official transcript. Make sure the word "official" appears in your homeschool transcript title.

 

Colleges want to see the transcripts from ALL schools as part of the required paperwork for admissions, and homeschool is one of those schools. You can include a statement that puts the responsibility squarely on the public high school -- that when DS transferred to the public high school, their policy was to not accept/transfer credits, or that their policy was to only accept/transfer certain credits. :)

Edited by Lori D.
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you!  That's what I needed to know.  Trade school has not been completely ruled out, though she is interested in a 4-year degree after encouragement from her public school teachers (totally different student now than she was a year ago!!)   I will need to think hard about whether we should set her up for that possibility.  A year ago she wanted to be a Vet Assistant, now she wants to be a Vet.  Vet Assistant would likely involve a trade school, though I would love for her to get a 4-year degree instead. Good food for thought -- so now I'm back to undecided!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you!  That's what I needed to know.  Trade school has not been completely ruled out, though she is interested in a 4-year degree after encouragement from her public school teachers (totally different student now than she was a year ago!!)   I will need to think hard about whether we should set her up for that possibility.  A year ago she wanted to be a Vet Assistant, now she wants to be a Vet.  Vet Assistant would likely involve a trade school, though I would love for her to get a 4-year degree instead. Good food for thought -- so now I'm back to undecided!

 

Sorry I had to throw you back into the undecided camp. ;)

 

However, already knowing what your future needs might be should make it easier to research what the requirements are for the trade schools of interest. And, you can research the different accreditation options that would be accepted by both the public high school, and possible trade school. Some cost more than others, and some have more flexibility of curriculum than others.

 

Meanwhile, below are some threads you and your DD might want to read through to get an idea of how best to prep for a future career as a Vet or Vet Assistant or Vet Tech. :)

 

"Is there another side to this that we aren't seeing (Animal Science/Vet Tech)" -- hard realities of vet's job

"Veterinarian - one step at a time"

"Veterinary Science textbook/resources"

 

"Anyone made a 4-year plan for an animal lover?" -- dual enrollment, high school resources

"Rude awakening?? re: college" -- salaries, college debt for vets

 

Chemistry advice for Vet Technician career"

"Real estate or Vet school?" -- vet job availability, college debt for vet degree, realities of vet job

"Vet Tech/Dog Grooming?"

"Approaching our vet's office for DD to volunteer"

 

And here's a Youth Veterinary Science program for teens (I linked the page with all the links to all the resources, but note that there is a homeschool program in that list, which takes you to a new page with the list of materials used for doing the program at home.)

Edited by Lori D.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might also check into high school completion programs at the community college you plan to use. My DD's CC has two course-based high school completion programs plus a GED study program - three different ways to work towards a high school diploma.

 

We didn't do the accredited program in 9th, nor did my DD earn a diploma at the CC. However, it was nice to know that the decision not to jump through accredited program hoops wasn't a "permanent problem" in 9th. If you decide not to pursue the umbrella school option now, there will probably be other paths to a diploma later if you need them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You should also check with your state to see if a home school diploma is afforded the same rights as a diploma issued by a public or private school.  A law was recently passed in my state that requires that entities treat a homeschool diploma the same as a diploma from a private or public school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NARHS is fully accredited now and they're pretty flexible about letting people get credit retroactively, as long as you have kept good records. That way you would only need to pay for it if you needed it. You might even be able to use them to get "accredited credits" for your son's courses the PS wouldn't accept, if that matters to you.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All good info from those responding. Just another point on the curve. We did chose an accredited homeschool high school. We weren't sure what that child would be doing next and we wanted to keep the most number of options open. And open with ease. By that stage I was tired of fighting the system. Many places say they will accept a non-accredited diploma, but in reality, they make it pretty hard.

Also, for one dc, goals at age 15 were RADICALLY different than goals at age 19. I mean, different as could ever be imagined in wildest dreams. (You can tell I'm still processing!). So now I try to keep all options open, cause you just never know...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...