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Would you buy your childhood home?


Janeway
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My childhood home will be going up for sale soon. I am so sad to lose the house. I have such fond memories. I barely go there anymore, but when I go, I feel like I really just decompress when I arrive. My husband feels the same way. He has told me so. 

 

It will be sold for a fraction of what our current house would sell for. We love that house. But it is old. And with all the relatives gone from the area, it might not feel so much like home anymore. It might just feel lonely if we bought it. But, really, it is a small town. Half the town knows me, LOL. It is in the very north. The roads are often shut down during the winter. It has a heating system that has steam though. They had upgraded a lot. It is a split level. It is much smaller than our current house. We like smaller. But it is several hours from a major city. I am not sure we would like going back to actual, real, rural living.

 

Would you just put this in the past and let it be your fond memory? Or would you consider buying the house? It has a lot of pluses. A lot of outdoor areas, a lot of national park type areas. Everyone hunts there though and I am a vegetarian. Hmmm..... The cost is so low though, we would be able to invest our earnings on the house and pay for college for the kids. Or take some vacations. It's near a Laura Ingalls Wilder homestead, some sloughs, pitch dark, fire flies, real lakes, tons of mosquitoes (that is not a benefit, just threw that in there).

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No.

It was on the market the year dd was house shopping, and she remembered it from my mother living there. Someone did an extensive remodel with a cooks kitchen. She loves to cook and would enjoy that. It was even in her search area.

The one she bought has a much better location for her needs.

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I'm actually considering the same thing. My parents are looking to downsize, and we are looking to get out of our rental situation. We were planning to build a house, but have run into (yet another) series of problems.

 

My dh is all for it. My parents have put a lot of work into their home over the past several years. It is a nice house (much nicer then when I was growing up there -- lol!). It is nearby, so we wouldn't be making a major change in that sense, as it sounds like you are.

 

That said, I just don't know. There's a part of me that really thinks I wouldn't be able to truly make that house my own. That in some sense it would always feel like my parents' house. I want to love the idea, but so far I just... don't.

Edited by PeachyDoodle
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I wouldn't necessarily buy it because it's my childhood home. I'd buy it if it met my needs/wants now.

 

It sounds like this house will meet what you want with the added benefit of the sentimentality of it. Having extra money to pay for college sounds wondrous.

 

You and your husband will need to sit down and decide if you really want that house. What if it was not exactly your childhood home, but it was the house next door? And it had all the same pros/cons as your old house that's up for sale? Would you buy it then? Are you only buying it out of sentimentality, or does it just so happen that your childhood home is exactly what you want?

 

Cheaper mortgage, extra money, friends in the neighborhood, land. Those are all good reasons to buy, childhood home or not.

 

Cons? What are the cons? Far from work? Far from church (if you go)? Far from your kids' friends?

Edited by Garga
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Yes and we did.  We bought the house from my parents.  Many things went into the decision: we were looking for a house at the time, we wanted more room and ground, we still lived in the same city, and the price was right.  So, it all lined up.  If it hadn't been the right decision for what we needed, then no I wouldn't have done it.  Even though I have nothing but wonderful memories growing up here and love my childhood home.  It it wasn't a good move, it wouldn't be right.

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Not in a million years. I have very few fond memories from my childhood, and the town in northern Minnesota where I grew up is a dying redneck hellhole.

LOL.. I remember how small this town felt when I was growing up and I just wanted to get out and move to the city.

Edited by Janeway
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I didn't have any childhood home until I was 14 for more than 1 year. From 14-right when I turned 16, we lived in the same place. Then we moved and I left home at 17. The place we lived from 14-16 was this impossibly small 4 room plus a bathroom sized kitchen house. It was in lousy condition. I see it now 2-3x a week when I take my sons to classes in the morning. There's a good food truck that parks 1/2 a block away. It appears to be in worse shape than we left it... I was genuinely shocked to find it still standing. It backs up to a busy road. Would not buy it and would not live there for money. When the owners tear it down (which will be soon enough given the location and value of the land), my younger brother and I would volunteer to demo it for free.

 

I would buy one of the first places I rented as a young adult. We took a 1 year lease to live there for dirt cheap because we agreed to take care of the mail and the cat of a professor couple on sabbatical. It was truly the perfect house for me- old but remodeled enough to be livable. Not too big and not too small. It had a big back yard. Downstairs was a living room, dining room and big eat in kitchen and upstairs were three bedrooms and two baths, one with an antique soaking tub. I would buy it but for the fact that due to the location, I'd now need a cool million dollars to be able to afford it. :P

Edited by LucyStoner
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Yes, I love my childhood home. I don'r really love the house I"m raising my kids in but it comes with the job (and does have a super yard).

 

However, my parents bought it in the 70's for 62,000 and it is now easily worth over a million, even needing a lot of work. That is SO not happening.

 

I'm not sure what I'd do in your position, though.

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I would buy in my hometown or the neighboring town where my parents live now, However, I wouldn't buy any of the houses they've owned. My parents and I have very different tastes in architecture and floorplans. I like Colonial-style and Cape Cod-style houses while they like "Deck" and "Acorn" houses.

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No way. It was a rustic cabin. Insufficient heat and cooling, way too small. And the location is the pits. I mean, for my parents and my youth it was great, but it was rural and remote then, with a lake and lots of empty space for them to play homestead. Now it's a subdivision in the land of strip malls. In a really racist part of Georgia. I mean, the lake is still there. The racists were around when I was a kid. But the dynamics are way different now.

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No, no, and no.  My dad has let the place really run down to where it honestly could use bulldozing.  However, even if it were in a similar condition to my youth, winter there lasts way too long for my preferences.  I enjoy visiting in August.

 

You sound like you're in a different position.  If your family is on board, why not?  One of my sons has indicated he might want this place where he grew up.  It'd be kinda neat keeping it in the family for another generation.

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Where I lived before age 9--no. I'm sure I couldn't get used to the changes in the town.

 

My parents still live in the house they purchased when I was 9. They have updated. Pretty much redone everything. Put on a small addition. Opened up a few rooms. Added a greenhouse. It's fantastic. It's large enough that I wouldn't want the upkeep. Or the yard maintenance. I couldn't afford it anyway. Just thinking about cleaning it out when they die is a bear. My dad has built lots and lots of furniture. I actually live walking distance from the house. 

 

If I could afford to move, I'd stay in this town, but seek something that would work for my youngest living with us longterm. A single family or townhome that has an in-law suite or a space that could be converted to such. The townhouse I am in has area that could be converted somewhat, but I know there are other houses around town that are better for this concept. I'm thinking about 40-50 year old homes, so much smaller than the McMansions of the 90s that all seem to have in-law suites. 

 

So no to childhood home. Yes to home town. 

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I wouldn't buy my childhood home; it's in a rundown city and about 1/2 of the two acres was sold off for development.

 

But, I did buy the house we lived in when I went to high school and college.  We ended up moving within a couple of years, just after we finished updating it from 1970s to 1990s.  it was a good house for us for that period of time, though.

 

I wouldn't let sentiment factor into a decision to buy a house.  If the location, price, etc., are good, and you like the house, great. 

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Hell no (sorry) it's a freaking dump and my mom still lives there (though she's supposed to be getting something new soon). Besides she lives on an island that is nothing but a drama infested rumor mill with few good paying jobs and everything is at least a ferry boat ride and hour drive away.

Edited by MomtoCandJ
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No but that's because my sister recently bought it.  But even if she hadn't it wouldn't be a good fit for us.  House needed a lot a work and neither my DH or I are handy so we would have had to hire someone to fix a lot (my sister on the other hand is fixing it all herself, for her that is stress relief from her day job).  It's a large parcel of land and while it would be nice for the kids we don't have time or interest to do that much yard work and thirdly, it's quite far from job opportunities for DH and neither one of us wants him to spend that much time commuting.

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No. I actually like the house I grew up in just fine and I did have a decent childhood. I do have some nostalgia when we are visiting and a drive by it. I still would not want to live in that town not because it was a bad neighborhood but the personality of the town and schools do not fit us. Plus there is the fact that we could not afford it now. My dh's brother lives in his childhood home.

Edited by MistyMountain
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No.

I think before a homeschooler decides to live in a rural area, they should read up on old threads about the challenges of rural living. If you have a chronic or extended illness, you'll spend all day driving.  Your choices for homeschooling group activities will be severely limited.  Employment options will be extremely limited for the adults and teens. Educational options will be limited.  You may choose to homeschool now, but if you get a point where you want to outsource some of it out of your house, your choices will be extremely limited.

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I moved around a lot as a kid until I hit middle school, so there is no one of the houses we lived in that I really associate with as "the" one.

 

I do feel sentimental about the house my mother grew up in, that her father / my grandfather who was a carpenter built, that I spent weeks in throughout my childhood and can visualize every funny little nook and cranny.  Every so often it comes onto the market.  I email her, or she emails me, and we sigh.... cuz it doesn't make a lick of sense and neither of us would actually do it... but.  Yeah.  Sigh.

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I do feel sentimental about the house my mother grew up in, 

 

I get nostalgic about both of my grandparents houses, mainly because I had such good times visiting them.  I miss not being able to go to them anymore.

 

Neither one fits us for actual buying though - esp locations (NY and FL).

 

If hubby and I were to buy another place it would probably be a condo on a beach somewhere - big water beach.  We toy with that idea actually, but it can't happen yet (financially).

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When my parents moved into their house I had just turned three.  It is the only house I lived in as a kid that I remember.  I loved it growing up and have a lot of wonderful memories and am sentimentally attached to it.  But it would not be a good fit for so many reasons. When my parents sell we will not attempt to buy it.

 

Now OTOH my ILs are selling their house.  DH didn't move there until he was in eighth grade, so I don't think he is overly attached to it, but it was home for him in his teen years until we got married when he was 22.  We discussed offering to buy it from his parents when they let us know they are planning to sell.  It will be going on the market in the next couple of weeks.  It is beautiful house in a good location with a decent yard and neighbors, but it is old.  It would require a lot of repairs that we just aren't prepared to do.  DH doesn't have the time and we don't want to spend the money on professionals.  My kids are very sad.  They would love it if we bought the house, but it just isn't practical for us.

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I liked the house I lived in from 3-12. Not enough to buy it though :)

 

The next house I lived in from 12-22 and hated. I still hate it. I think my mother was the only one who liked it.

 

I'm so in love with where I live now I have no desire to ever move again.

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I loved the house I grew up in. It was a functional and efficient floor plan. When we were looking for a house , I drew the floorplan for my agent and said, This, but on steroids." Wider halls, bigger rooms. And it's pretty much what I got. I loved that house.

 

But I would not buy my childhood home now. Too big a yard to care for, Too much pdating to do, and a single car garage. Aldo, the geology if the area makes for cracked foundations and subsequent repair.

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Yes and we did.  We bought the house from my parents.  Many things went into the decision: we were looking for a house at the time, we wanted more room and ground, we still lived in the same city, and the price was right.  So, it all lined up.  If it hadn't been the right decision for what we needed, then no I wouldn't have done it.  Even though I have nothing but wonderful memories growing up here and love my childhood home.  It it wasn't a good move, it wouldn't be right.

We did the same thing. Been here five months now...my sister lived here with her family before we did. None of us could bear to see the homestead go, I guess! It was too big for her, but it's ideal for us and our homeschool/musical lifestyle. The built-ins are to die for. :D

 

Being rural again (we both grew up in this town) is a little bit of a challenge, but it's not really cut off. Thruway is right here, and it's 30 minutes in either direction to a good size city (where we used to live and my husband travels for work), or a mid-size city with all your typical options.

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When my mother still lived there, No. I know everything that is wrong with that house so it would be worth a fraction of what they say it is worth.

 

The people who bought the house from my mother have totally changed it so it no longer feels like my house.

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No. But we moved every year till I was 12. From 12 - 16, same house. Then parents had an ugly divorce. Not the sweetest memories there.

 

Oddly, I sometimes dream about buying that house. It was (is) beautiful. On the side of a mountain, great place for horses. Close to a commuter train. It's got its good points. The dream always ends badly somehow, though.

 

But no. Not by the light of day. Hotbed for Lyme Disease. I heard recently that at one point every single home on that mountain had some family member with a picc line. During my childhood there, I was horribly ill, missed almost a full year of school - not just once, but twice. It took 20 years to find out what was wrong. No way would I live there again.

Edited by Spryte
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No way! We moved a bit being oil company brats. The last house I lived in before college was 87 years old, drafty in winter, hot in summer, creaky...no way!

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My childhood home will be going up for sale soon. I am so sad to lose the house. I have such fond memories. I barely go there anymore, but when I go, I feel like I really just decompress when I arrive. My husband feels the same way. He has told me so. 

 

It will be sold for a fraction of what our current house would sell for. We love that house. But it is old. And with all the relatives gone from the area, it might not feel so much like home anymore. It might just feel lonely if we bought it. But, really, it is a small town. Half the town knows me, LOL. It is in the very north. The roads are often shut down during the winter. It has a heating system that has steam though. They had upgraded a lot. It is a split level. It is much smaller than our current house. We like smaller. But it is several hours from a major city. I am not sure we would like going back to actual, real, rural living.

 

Would you just put this in the past and let it be your fond memory? Or would you consider buying the house? It has a lot of pluses. A lot of outdoor areas, a lot of national park type areas. Everyone hunts there though and I am a vegetarian. Hmmm..... The cost is so low though, we would be able to invest our earnings on the house and pay for college for the kids. Or take some vacations. It's near a Laura Ingalls Wilder homestead, some sloughs, pitch dark, fire flies, real lakes, tons of mosquitoes (that is not a benefit, just threw that in there).

 

It would be tempting. It wasn't my childhood but the closest I had to it.

 

I'm not the type of person who can't deal with creaky. We don't have anything new anyway. We aren't fancy. Family and history is pretty much all we've got.

Edited by Tsuga
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No. We moved quite a bit but there are 2 residences I'd consider my childhood homes. The first was a 2-bedroom apartment in the middle of the city. While we lived there it was a family-oriented apt complex, but the owners converted the whole thing into efficiency apartments. The second was a townhouse unit on a busy corner in a very busy area. Our street was a loop off a main thoroughfare; the loop had 2 townhouse complexes and 3 high-rise condos. There was never enough parking and too many cars and people going by.

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No, no, no.

 

The first one we lived in is falling down. It was tiny, no heat and air, and didn't have a bathroom until my father built one on. It's in a town of about 200 people, most of whom struggle financially.

 

The second one is on a dirt road. It has a leaky roof, the doors don't lock and my dad says it has a special kind of chimney that never needs cleaning. At least one of us finds a tick on ourself whenever we visit and our allergies are miserable. On top of that, I'm far too liberal and the wrong kind of religious to fit in in the community.

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In my case, NO.  It is falling apart and in desperate need of significant repairs (my mom still lives there). It was built in the 1800s and has had almost no maintenance in the past 20 years.   I don't think it would even pass code at this point in time. (open gaps in plumbing due to the house settling etc).  The roof has leaked for about that amount of time, and it runs into a wall and down to the basement.  I can not imagine the amount of dry rot the house has.  

 

In your case, I still doubt I would do it.  I think nostalgia is one personality trait, that I didn't get.  

 

I don't even go home to visit...I can't imagine living there.  It is just a few hours down the freeway, and I refuse to go there unless I absolutely have to (spent 2 hours there for 2 different funerals in 16 years)

Edited by Tap
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Two of them, definitely (not the first three I lived in, but the 4th and 6th for sure.  Also not the 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th or 10th.  Maybe the 11th, but would need some serious renovations.  Of course, I'd have to move back to San Jose for #4 and #6, which means our income would need to go up drastically, as #4 is now worth roughly $900,000 and #5 is worth in the neighborhood of $2.5 million.

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Now, yes. That's after 20 years of repairs and upgrades made by the owners after my parents. LOL. My parents sold at top of the bubble, people then poured money into the beautiful (but needing help) New England farmhouse....in a great neighbor...in a great town...near Boston. We couldn't afford it, but sure, I'd love to live there!!

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