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If you bring your pet to the grocery store..


Moxie
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Or just... don't.   Please don't bring them.   :(  I cannot understand why everyone thinks they can ignore the no pets allowed signs. :(  (Obviously service animals are and should be allowed.)

 

please don't bring your dog.

 

Some people are allergic... some are deathly afraid of animals, and others of us just don't seen the need for such silliness.   I think it's gross to have Fifi at the store. 

 

And yes, I have seen non-service dogs at the grocery store too. 

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Although given that, basically the company has no power at all to do anything.

 

They can ask the person to leave.  

 

They can  and should if the dog is disruptive at all.  They can not allow it to sit in the cart, sit on tables and chairs and on and on.  

 

One of the questions though was can you ask what disability a person has, HIPPA, information, etc.  No, there are two specific questions a business can ask and these are the two questions.  If a person is faking a service dog they are generally going to get tripped up on question #2 and hopefully make a quick exit.  

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Ditto. Every time. We had a big article in our paper because a man took a snake to a restaurant. Many people complained but the owner told them that he couldn't ask the man to leave because it was a service animal. The article in the paper said that only dogs can be service animals.

 

There is a local woman that used to grocery shop with her snake wrapped her the entire time.  While, I appreciate her relationship with her presumably docile snake, most people don't feel comfortable shopping with one.  I highly doubt it was a service snake.   ;).

 

 

I am NOT a fan of Cesar Millan, but he does have a nice list of stores which generally allow dogs, including Barnes and Noble, Home Depot, and Old Navy. My vet recommended we take our puppy to Home Depot and Tractor Supply, as those kinds of trips provide good opportunities for socialization.  :)

 

I don't take my dog in the grocery store. That said, I've said it before and I'll say it again: I am much more grossed out by kids wearing nothing but droopy diapers in shopping carts or grabbing things off the shelves and chewing on them. Ewww.

 

Barnes and Noble?  Old Navy?  Huh, who knew?

 

 

I'm torn. On the one hand I think America has gotten crazy-over-the-top with its rules. I'd like a little Wild West again where kids can play outside and people can bring their dogs into the store with them.

 

But on the other hand, there are a lot of good reasons for the rules.

 

It depends on my mood. Right now my mood says, "Live and let live. Dogs for everyone!"

 

But tomorrow, I might feel completely differently about it.

 

My mom took her tiny dog to the Grand Canyon when we were there and held him in her arms the entire time. A lot of people smiled at him or asked to pet him, but I did overhear a woman ranting about how people shouldn't bring their dogs out because of allergies. I thought it was a little strange because we were at the GRAND CANYON. There was a whole lotta room there to get away from the dog. It's not like we were all confined in small place. There was miles upon miles of open air.

 

My mom did not take the dog into the bathroom or the visitor center.

 

If one wants to avoid coming in contact with animals because of allergy reasons, the Grand Canyon or other National Parks may not be the best place to visit.  I have a feeling one little yippy dog is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to animals, critters, or just nature in general at the Grand Canyon.  

Edited by Excelsior! Academy
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That is not HIPAA though.

 

The ADA says this:

How can I tell if an animal is really a service animal and not just a pet?

 

A: Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.

 

The theater?!  OK, I can see a real service dog at the theater.   But it seems appropriate to get some sort of documentation for people bringing a dog into a place like a theater.   I don't get why it's not OK to expect people to carry that documentation if they are going to go into a place where pets are not generally allowed.  I have to carry certain documentation places.  (Like driver's license.  Or, students need their school ID to get (speaking of theaters) student rates on tickets.)

 

I have never needed a service dog nor do I have any close friends or family who do. So, I'm asking honestly - would it be a burden for a person who has a service animal to carry documentation that it is legit?    I wouldn't want to place an undue burden on people  who truly need a service animal because of thoughtless folks who would lie about their need to bring their pet into the theater.  Do people really do that?!

 

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I intended to reply to this thread earlier, but I think I didn't.  OP do you live in the USA or Canada? If so, surely they have laws against people taking pets into a supermarket?  State/City/County, etc.  I am assuming we are not talking about legitimate "service dogs" and IMO they can go wherever the owner goes.  If that happened here in Colombia, first, I would scream at the Store Manager.  Then, I would ask my wife to help me figure out which Consumer Protection/Health agency to file a complaint with.  

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The theater?!  OK, I can see a real service dog at the theater.   But it seems appropriate to get some sort of documentation for people bringing a dog into a place like a theater.   I don't get why it's not OK to expect people to carry that documentation if they are going to go into a place where pets are not generally allowed.  I have to carry certain documentation places.  (Like driver's license.  Or, students need their school ID to get (speaking of theaters) student rates on tickets.)

 

I have never needed a service dog nor do I have any close friends or family who do. So, I'm asking honestly - would it be a burden for a person who has a service animal to carry documentation that it is legit?    I wouldn't want to place an undue burden on people  who truly need a service animal because of thoughtless folks who would lie about their need to bring their pet into the theater.  Do people really do that?!

 

 

When we were in Orlando, 2 weeks ago, there was a man with a "Service Dog".  His dog was a Seizure Dog. He told someone who asked the dog was on the mark, about 95% of the time.  The dog had a shirt/jacket that said he was a Service Dog.  I don't know if the man had papers with him, to prove that, but I think it was wonderful that a dog could improve the quality of life for someone with a serious medical issue.   I think this was in one of the parks, but I don't remember where it was. 

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When we were in Orlando, 2 weeks ago, there was a man with a "Service Dog".  His dog was a Seizure Dog. He told someone who asked the dog was on the mark, about 95% of the time.  The dog had a shirt/jacket that said he was a Service Dog.  I don't know if the man had papers with him, to prove that, but I think it was wonderful that a dog could improve the quality of life for someone with a serious medical issue.   I think this was in one of the parks, but I don't remember where it was. 

 

Oh I agree.   I'm just reacting to the stories of people lying about their dog being a service dog so they can take it inappropriate places.   But that's why I'm wondering if it would be a burden to people.  It always seemed obvious to me which dogs were real service dogs, until a poster said anyone can get a vest to put on their dog.  

 

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Last time I was at Sam's Club someone had a medium sized dog walking around the frozen section. It's not just in grocery stores either.

 

It's happening in college dorm rooms. http://alumni.berkeley.edu/california-magazine/just-in/2015-11-10/pet-therapy-students-increasingly-bringing-emotional-support

 

 

And on planes. http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2014/08/03/fliers-scam-airlines-pets-service-dogs/13325733/

Edited by Plum Crazy
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Please, bring a doggy stroller or make Fido walk. No one wants dog butt where they put their food.

 

I made the mistake of mentioning to my spouse in passing, "I can't believe people bring their pets in the store today."

 

Some lady walking her little dog around started haranging me through the store, shouting out that some people have emotional support animals.

 

Whatever.  You seriously need a dog to go buy a few groceries?    No one wants them near the food.  I got in and out as fast as I could and kept my mouth shut. 

 

As a landlord, I heard ridiculous lies about pets that were suddenly service animals or emotional support animals when it was discovered that we don't do pets (which, incidentally, was very clear up front but people can't be bothered to even read). 

 

Edited by TranquilMind
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When we were in Orlando, 2 weeks ago, there was a man with a "Service Dog".  His dog was a Seizure Dog. He told someone who asked the dog was on the mark, about 95% of the time.  The dog had a shirt/jacket that said he was a Service Dog.  I don't know if the man had papers with him, to prove that, but I think it was wonderful that a dog could improve the quality of life for someone with a serious medical issue.   I think this was in one of the parks, but I don't remember where it was. 

 

Maybe it was legitimate, but you can buy papers and jackets from the internet. 

 

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What questions can a covered entity's employees ask to determine if a dog is a service animal?

 

A. In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff are not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

 

I have seen this stated in ADA, but I don't understand how HIPAA would apply in grocery store with a customer. How is that relationship covered by HIPAA as Jean suggested. (Jean, I am not attacking you - just trying to understand the relationship as people say things like this and I don't think that HIPAA applies in this case.)

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I was at Nordstrom the other day and there was a woman with a little dog on a leash.  It lifted its leg and peed on a jewelry display case.  Owner did nothing at all about it. 

A service dog would NEVER do that.  They are highly trained. 

But wow, I'd boot that lady in five seconds, after insisting she clean up her dog's urine. 

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You should see the advice people get on my local FB pages every time they have to move or find a new place that does not allow pets. "Just tell your doctor you need an animal for emotional support and have them write a note. Then the landlord can't deny you or kick you out if they find you have an animal living with you."

 

We take our dog on rides once in awhile,she loves the car, but never into a restaurant or grocery store. Gross!

 

Those scammers who convince the doctor to provide notes calling their pets emotional support animals are a large reason rents are rising.  Just saying. 

 

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Who brings their pet dog to the grocery store? I never see this. Sometimes I see people waiting outside with their dog while another person goes shopping or see a dog waiting outside the store or see a service animal but I've never seen a pet dog at the store. I guess the rules are enforced here.

Go to redmond. The stores have doggy bags- and there are lots of water bowls. I was just chatting with a woman who was happy she could take her dog to the library.
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There's a huge issue with fake service dogs now. People can essentially mail order a paper  & claim their dog is for 'emotional therapy' etc. 

 

My province recently revamped the service dog rules and only physical assistance dogs are allowed everywhere.  They refuse to registered emotional therapy dogs because there's no reputable int'l licencing and accreditation body. 

 

Some home hardware stores allow dogs in the store; though some stores have banned after someone got bit on the nose when leaning over a small dog. 

 

I love my dogs and I do like how it's in Europe where dogs go on trains, buses, and are allowed in outdoor patios of restaurants etc but what's happening in NA is pretty crazy. Poorly trained yappy barky bitey dogs being dragged everywhere - & often the dogs are terrified and unhappy about the whole thing. 

 

 

 

*eta - in our province, for dogs to have access, they do carry a licence. It's issued by the province after proof the dog is qualified for the task. No licence, no access. 

 

Yes, I would actually prefer to see dogs allowed in more settings than they are now, as they are in other places, but grocery stores are not the best idea IMO for many reasons.

 

I really think dogs ought to be allowed in pubs.  They are dog kinds of places.

 

What a temptation for the poor dog though, to be taken into a grocers!  All that meat at just about nose level.

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Oh I agree. I'm just reacting to the stories of people lying about their dog being a service dog so they can take it inappropriate places. But that's why I'm wondering if it would be a burden to people. It always seemed obvious to me which dogs were real service dogs, until a poster said anyone can get a vest to put on their dog.

 

That doesn't mean it's a legitimate service animal.
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I frequently see dogs in stores (Home Depot, B&N).  The first few times I was surprised, but it hardly registers anymore.  I don't think I've ever seen one in a grocery, other than service dogs, though.  I will start paying more attention.

 

Generally, if the dog is well trained, I don't mind.  But a grocery store, No.

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I was at Nordstrom the other day and there was a woman with a little dog on a leash.  It lifted its leg and peed on a jewelry display case.  Owner did nothing at all about it. 

 

This seems to be a small dog thing.  For some reason a lot of people with small dogs don't really house train them.  There are always some crazy people who let animals do gross things inside, but otherwise normal people seem to accept this with little dogs.

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I have seen this stated in ADA, but I don't understand how HIPAA would apply in grocery store with a customer. How is that relationship covered by HIPAA as Jean suggested. (Jean, I am not attacking you - just trying to understand the relationship as people say things like this and I don't think that HIPAA applies in this case.)

 

All I know is what my son, who works at a grocery store, was told in training.  Perhaps they told him incorrectly. 

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That doesn't mean it's a legitimate service animal.

 

Right.  That's why I asked (in another post) about people with service animals carrying documentation so that they can show that their pet is legitimate. Because I would like to see people who are helped by service animals able to do things - like go to amusement parks  - that they might not be able to do without the service animal.  

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Those scammers who convince the doctor to provide notes calling their pets emotional support animals are a large reason rents are rising. Just saying.

 

 

I believe you. I managed my parent's rental property after my father's Alzheimer's diagnosis. I did it for six months and we sold the place. I was done.

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Wouldn't asking what work or task the dog has been trained to do in many cases require the person to disclose the nature of their disability? I've been in the position before of needing to determine if someone's support animal was legit, and I was hung up on this part of the law, as it didn't seem I could require the person to explain to me what their dog was trained to do.

 

I see dogs in stores frequently here, including in carts (on one occasion, two adjacent lanes at target each had a dog in the front seat of the cart, and the dogs got into a big barking match at eachother). The worst incident I saw was at a natural foods grocery store, where someone with an animal with a service vest was looking at the upper bulk food bins, and meanwhile, their service dog was putting his nose in an open lower bin and eating from it :o. Pretty sure that wasn't a real service animal.

The question isn't what is the disability, the question is a yes or no question about whether or not the person has a disability that requires the service of the animal.

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According to the ADA there are numerous disabilities that would qualify for service or emotional support animal. Including stress, depression and anxiety. https://www.nsarco.com/list-of-disabilities.html

 

"Businesses may ask if an animal is a service animal or ask what tasks the animal has been trained to perform, but cannot require special ID cards for the animal or ask about the person's disability.

 

A disabled person who has an emotional support animal (ESA) will need to produce a letter from a licensed mental health professional that prescribes the need for the animal when a business asks for it.

 

Businesses that sell or prepare food must allow service animals in public areas even if state or local health codes prohibit animals on the premises." https://www.nsarco.com/federal-law.html

 

And how exactly does this work?

VI. Reaction/Response of Others

Allergies and fear of dogs are not valid reasons for denying access or refusing service to people using service animals. If employees, fellow travelers, or customers are afraid of service animals, a solution may be to allow enough space for that person to avoid getting close to the service animal.

Most allergies to animals are caused by direct contact with the animal. A separated space might be adequate to avoid allergic reactions.

If a person is at risk of a significant allergic reaction to an animal, it is the responsibility of the business or government entity to find a way to accommodate both the individual using the service animal and the individual with the allergy.

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I've seen tiny dogs in purses, arms, the seat of the shopping cart. It's not very often, and always a small dog. It's never bothered me, but I can see why it shouldn't be allowed in some places. I do see dogs at pet shops and Tractor Supply, and am glad to see them. It's nearly always well behaved pets. The few service dogs I've seen have always been larger breeds, serious about their work.

 

In a related note, my kids and I love the show Dogs With Jobs. The first episode about a service dog for an autistic boy gave me happy tears.

http://smile.amazon.com/Bruno-Police-Dog-Honey-Companion/dp/B0112O9GZC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1462924567&sr=8-1&keywords=Dogs+with+jobs

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I believe you. I managed my parent's rental property after my father's Alzheimer's diagnosis. I did it for six months and we sold the place. I was done.

 

I had excellent experiences for nearly two decades.  But it's harder to find good people today who will take care of the property and not sneak their animals and their friends in. 

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According to the ADA there are numerous disabilities that would qualify for service or emotional support animal. Including stress, depression and anxiety. https://www.nsarco.com/list-of-disabilities.html

 

"Businesses may ask if an animal is a service animal or ask what tasks the animal has been trained to perform, but cannot require special ID cards for the animal or ask about the person's disability.

 

A disabled person who has an emotional support animal (ESA) will need to produce a letter from a licensed mental health professional that prescribes the need for the animal when a business asks for it.

 

Businesses that sell or prepare food must allow service animals in public areas even if state or local health codes prohibit animals on the premises." https://www.nsarco.com/federal-law.html

 

And how exactly does this work?

VI. Reaction/Response of Others

Allergies and fear of dogs are not valid reasons for denying access or refusing service to people using service animals. If employees, fellow travelers, or customers are afraid of service animals, a solution may be to allow enough space for that person to avoid getting close to the service animal.

Most allergies to animals are caused by direct contact with the animal. A separated space might be adequate to avoid allergic reactions.

If a person is at risk of a significant allergic reaction to an animal, it is the responsibility of the business or government entity to find a way to accommodate both the individual using the service animal and the individual with the allergy.

If someone ever forces me to sit next to his stupid cat on an airplane, it is not going to be a good experience for anyone.   If you are that freaked out that you can't fly without forcing your animals on others, stay home.  Drive.  Take a train.  Deal with it, but don't force others to suffer. 

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A disabled person who has an emotional support animal (ESA) will need to produce a letter from a licensed mental health professional that prescribes the need for the animal when a business asks for it.

 

 

But this is what you are missing:   Emotional support animals (ESA) do NOT have public access rights, meaning they can not go into restaurants, grocery stores, etc.  They only things that ESAs may do that regular 'pets' can not do is live in rental housing that pets may not be allowed and fly on planes (in the cabin for free)

 

Emotional support animals do NOT equal service dogs.  Therapy dogs do NOT equal service dogs.  They do not have the same rights.  

Edited by zimom
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Their are constantly dogs at our grocery stores I can't remember the last time I didn't see one.  They are universally small and owned by older women who keep them in a bag.  I feel terrible for those dogs because they are treated like barbie dolls instead of animals.

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The theater?! OK, I can see a real service dog at the theater. But it seems appropriate to get some sort of documentation for people bringing a dog into a place like a theater. I don't get why it's not OK to expect people to carry that documentation if they are going to go into a place where pets are not generally allowed. I have to carry certain documentation places. (Like driver's license. Or, students need their school ID to get (speaking of theaters) student rates on tickets.)

 

I have never needed a service dog nor do I have any close friends or family who do. So, I'm asking honestly - would it be a burden for a person who has a service animal to carry documentation that it is legit? I wouldn't want to place an undue burden on people who truly need a service animal because of thoughtless folks who would lie about their need to bring their pet into the theater. Do people really do that?!

 

You can carry your dog (and whatever gear goes along with the dog), but you can't manage a small credit card size credential (my idea of what should be required) to authenticate your service animal? Silly.

 

(Not you, marbel, general you. Marbel is singing my song so I quoted her.)

Edited by Seasider
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There is a local woman that used to grocery shop with her snake wrapped her the entire time. While, I appreciate her relationship with her presumably docile snake, most people don't feel comfortable shopping with one. I highly doubt it was a service snake

Unless she was Mama Odie from the Princess and the Frog ;).

 

In all seriousness, snakes and lizards are sometimes used in animal therapy programs because they can be used in areas where dogs cannot due to allergies, and kids with autism and teens struggling with depression often really respond well to reptiles. Bearded dragons are sometimes used for "read to the animal" programs for the same reason. And I do know of at least one case where a woman wanted our state herpetology society to support her application to keep her pets in subsidized housing as her Emotional support animals. Her pets were 11 and 12 foot long not yet full grown reticulated pythons, which quite literally required an extra bedroom to house their enclosures. We chose to not weigh in-mostly because even those who find snakes quite emotionally comforting had trouble understanding what benefits two 10+ foot long snakes held that couldn't have been met by, say, a single 4 foot ball python that could live in a fairly small aquarium!

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But this is what you are missing: Emotional support animals (ESA) do NOT have public access rights, meaning they can not go into restaurants, grocery stores, etc. They only things that ESAs may do that regular 'pets' can not do is live in rental housing that pets may not be allowed and fly on planes (in the cabin for free)

 

Emotional support animals do NOT equal service dogs. Therapy dogs do NOT equal service dogs. They do not have the same rights.

Yes. An herein lies another problem. There are financial incentives to acquiring paperwork for the dog. We had friends move across country and take their THREE dogs with them. They took a weekend class for $50, ordered vests, and all three dogs flew for free in the cabin. Hotels can't deny them or charge pet fees, and they were able to obtain housing where otherwise the owners specified no pets. Such obvious abuses are causing problems for legitimate service dogs...and it is blatantly obvious within a few minutes which service animals have been properly trained!

As someone in a wheelchair who could really benefit from a service animal (but can't due to severe allergies) it really offends me. True service animals are incredibly amazing and provide a level of autonomy and independence that is unachievable without them. I would hate to see people lose that due to the abuse of the entitled few...

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Ditto. Every time. We had a big article in our paper because a man took a snake to a restaurant. Many people complained but the owner told them that he couldn't ask the man to leave because it was a service animal. The article in the paper said that only dogs can be service animals.

 

 

 

I made the mistake of mentioning to my spouse in passing, "I can't believe people bring their pets in the store today."

 

Some lady walking her little dog around started haranging me through the store, shouting out that some people have emotional support animals.

 

Whatever.  You seriously need a dog to go buy a few groceries?    No one wants them near the food.  I got in and out as fast as I could and kept my mouth shut. 

 

As a landlord, I heard ridiculous lies about pets that were suddenly service animals or emotional support animals when it was discovered that we don't do pets (which, incidentally, was very clear up front but people can't be bothered to even read).

 

 

 

 

But this is what you are missing:   Emotional support animals (ESA) do NOT have public access rights, meaning they can not go into restaurants, grocery stores, etc.  They only things that ESAs may do that regular 'pets' can not do is live in rental housing that pets may not be allowed and fly on planes (in the cabin for free)

 

Emotional support animals do NOT equal service dogs.  Therapy dogs do NOT equal service dogs.  They do not have the same rights.

 

True, but many seem to think that they CAN bring their ESA dogs and animals wherever they want and no one seems to question them.

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Don't service animals wear a little vest-like thing to show they are legit?

 

I see dogs in Lowe's or Home Depot sometimes.  That seems OK to me - no food, cement floors.  And of course Petsmart and such.  I couldn't even take my crazy dog in there.  He'd get too nervous and lock down or try to pull me to the door. 

 

Anyone can buy a vest off of Amazon, put it on their dog, and look legit. 

 

You can buy ID tags and ID cards too:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Emotional-Support-Animal-ID-Card/dp/B00PV2X1ZI/ref=sr_1_25?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1462939803&sr=1-25&keywords=service+dog+vest

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Their are constantly dogs at our grocery stores I can't remember the last time I didn't see one.  They are universally small and owned by older women who keep them in a bag.  I feel terrible for those dogs because they are treated like barbie dolls instead of animals.

 

:(

I don't try to bring my dog to the grocery store, but I just want to point out that my tiny dog likes his comfy bag.  Other than running around like a Tasmanian Devil for a few minutes a few times a day, all he wants to do is sit near his people.  He pretty much is like a stuffed animal that eats and poops. And loves us.  :D

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I don't know exactly how common it is, but I've heard/read that "seizure dog" is a joke/lie that is used some when people want to claim their dog is a service animal. The joke is that people say they have a seizure dog...when the dog "'seizure' an a-hole that asks about my disability, he barks".

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I don't know exactly how common it is, but I've heard/read that "seizure dog" is a joke/lie that is used some when people want to claim their dog is a service animal. The joke is that people say they have a seizure dog...when the dog "'seizure' an a-hole that asks about my disability, he barks".

 

We have a young woman at our local high school who has had a seizure dog for several years. This dog goes crazy alerting bystanders a few minutes before she has a seizure, which allows the staff to get her to a safe place to have the seizure. I believe there are people who claim their dog helps them with seizures just to keep the dog with them, but seizure dogs are real.

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We have a young woman at our local high school who has had a seizure dog for several years. This dog goes crazy alerting bystanders a few minutes before she has a seizure, which allows the staff to get her to a safe place to have the seizure. I believe there are people who claim their dog helps them with seizures just to keep the dog with them, but seizure dogs are real.

Oh I know they are real, which is why it sucks that people make a joke of it.

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You can carry your dog (and whatever gear goes along with the dog), but you can't manage a small credit card size credential (my idea of what should be required) to authenticate your service animal? Silly.

 

(Not you, marbel, general you. Marbel is singing my song so I quoted her.)

 

That's what I'm wondering. Nobody wants to see people with legitimate service animals given a hard time. Those animals should be welcome. But people who are scamming or bring ill-behaved animals that may be helpful to them but aren't really service animals? They need to keep their animals out of stores and such. (I say this after having seen co-workers cleaning up the trail of mess left on the store carpet by one such animal.) Of course, maybe I'm just really cranky right now because I've had my fill lately of people who believe the rules the rest of us are asked to live under just don't apply to their oh-so-special selves.

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Their are constantly dogs at our grocery stores I can't remember the last time I didn't see one.  They are universally small and owned by older women who keep them in a bag.  I feel terrible for those dogs because they are treated like barbie dolls instead of animals.

This is what I see also.  Never men.  Never women under 55ish.  

 

I watched a woman skulk around Hobby Lobby with one hidden in her jacket a couple of weeks ago.  It was obvious that she was trying to keep it hidden.  The look on her face when I saw the dog peek out was priceless.

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I understand privacy laws, and love pets...However, I would like to see pet licensing and insurance requirements for people who bring them into public places.  

 

One of our Walmarts' is frequented by a man who brings in a big ( around 100lbs) dog that displays aggressive skittish behavior.  The dog growls, occasionally barks, hunches his shoulders and jets his head down; the man with him loves the attention.  

 

Fyi Walmart, I leave the store when that wacko (the owner) is in there.

Edited by Tammyla
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One of our Walmarts' is frequented by a man who brings in a big ( around 100lbs) dog that displays aggressive skittish behavior.  The dog growls, occasionally barks, hunches his shoulders and jets his head down; the man with him loves the attention.

 

Even for service animals, this is not allowed. You can remove somebody from the premises if their service animal is out of control.

 

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