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If you bring your pet to the grocery store..


Moxie
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Or just... don't. Please don't bring them. :( I cannot understand why everyone thinks they can ignore the no pets allowed signs. :( (Obviously service animals are and should be allowed.)

This. Seriously. There is zero reason your pet needs to grocery shop. (Service animals are in a clearly different category)

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Who brings their pet dog to the grocery store? I never see this. Sometimes I see people waiting outside with their dog while another person goes shopping or see a dog waiting outside the store or see a service animal but I've never seen a pet dog at the store. I guess the rules are enforced here.

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Who brings their pet dog to the grocery store? I never see this. Sometimes I see people waiting outside with their dog while another person goes shopping or see a dog waiting outside the store or see a service animal but I've never seen a pet dog at the store. I guess the rules are enforced here.

 

 

I see it every time we go to Wal Mart.  It is so insane how this is now allowed.  A friend said a Wal Mart employee told them they aren't allowed to challenge a pet in the store because it might be a service animal.

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I see it every time we go to Wal Mart.  It is so insane how this is now allowed.  A friend said a Wal Mart employee told them they aren't allowed to challenge a pet in the store because it might be a service animal.

 

Don't service animals wear a little vest-like thing to show they are legit?

 

I see dogs in Lowe's or Home Depot sometimes.  That seems OK to me - no food, cement floors.  And of course Petsmart and such.  I couldn't even take my crazy dog in there.  He'd get too nervous and lock down or try to pull me to the door. 

 

 

Edited by marbel
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I see it every time we go to Wal Mart. It is so insane how this is now allowed. A friend said a Wal Mart employee told them they aren't allowed to challenge a pet in the store because it might be a service animal.

I would hate this. Besides the sanitation issue, my sons are both terrified of dogs. They would get really jumpy about seeing dogs where they are used to not seeing them.

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There's a huge issue with fake service dogs now. People can essentially mail order a paper  & claim their dog is for 'emotional therapy' etc. 

My province recently revamped the service dog rules and only physical assistance dogs are allowed everywhere.  They refuse to registered emotional therapy dogs because there's no reputable int'l licencing and accreditation body. 

Some home hardware stores allow dogs in the store; though some stores have banned after someone got bit on the nose when leaning over a small dog. 

I love my dogs and I do like how it's in Europe where dogs go on trains, buses, and are allowed in outdoor patios of restaurants etc but what's happening in NA is pretty crazy. Poorly trained yappy barky bitey dogs being dragged everywhere - & often the dogs are terrified and unhappy about the whole thing. 



*eta - in our province, for dogs to have access, they do carry a licence. It's issued by the province after proof the dog is qualified for the task. No licence, no access. 

Edited by hornblower
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I see it every time we go to Wal Mart. It is so insane how this is now allowed. A friend said a Wal Mart employee told them they aren't allowed to challenge a pet in the store because it might be a service animal.

Ditto. Every time. We had a big article in our paper because a man took a snake to a restaurant. Many people complained but the owner told them that he couldn't ask the man to leave because it was a service animal. The article in the paper said that only dogs can be service animals.

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I've seen it several times in the Walmart here.  Employees won't challenge the person, probably because of the rules for service animals.  I'm beginning to think there should be required certificates for service animals, but on the other hand, I don't want to put burdensome rules on people who need their help.  Where I worked a few years ago, a women would bring in four dogs on leash but not very well trained claiming all four were service dogs. We were told not to say anything to her.  I've seen trainers with service dogs.  She didn't seem to be training them.  Strange!

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Here is a great page about service dogs and what they can and can not do.  (sorry about the formatting, I tried to make it better)

 

http://www.ada.gov/regs2010/service_animal_qa.html

 

I hope it is ok to cut and paste a few important parts:

 

Q31. Are stores required to allow service animals to be placed in a shopping cart
A. Generally, the dog must stay on the floor, or the person must carry the dog.  For example, if a person with diabetes has a glucose alert dog, he may carry the dog in a chest pack so it can be close to his face to allow the dog to smell his breath to alert him of a change in glucose levels.

Q32. Are restaurants, bars, and other places that serve food or drink required to allow service animals to be seated on chairs or allow the animal to be fed at the table

 

A. No.  Seating, food, and drink are provided for customer use only.  The ADA gives a person with a disability the right to be accompanied by his or her service animal, but covered entities are not required to allow an animal to sit or be fed at the table.Q7.

 

What questions can a covered entity's employees ask to determine if a dog is a service animal?

A. In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff are not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

 

 

​Edited to add:  I keep telling myself I am going to print this out and hand it to managers every time I see a fake service dog.  Every fake service dog makes it harder for real service dogs and their handlers as they are questioned more and more.   The disabled get questioned and stared at enough.

 

Edited by zimom
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You know, I'm not a big "ack, we're doomed!" sort of person, but reading this thread really makes me wonder about where our (US?  North American? Western?  Not sure) culture/society is going, when people will fake having a service animal so they can... what?   What is the big attraction of having the dog or other pet come into an inappropriate place?   Emotional therapy?  Service snake in a restaurant? 

 

It just seems that more and more people need to have something special or different about them.   Is that what it is? 

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You know, I'm not a big "ack, we're doomed!" sort of person, but reading this thread really makes me wonder about where our (US? North American? Western? Not sure) culture/society is going, when people will fake having a service animal so they can... what? What is the big attraction of having the dog or other pet come into an inappropriate place? Emotional therapy? Service snake in a restaurant?

 

It just seems that more and more people need to have something special or different about them. Is that what it is?

Sense of entitlement.

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You know, I'm not a big "ack, we're doomed!" sort of person, but reading this thread really makes me wonder about where our (US?  North American? Western?  Not sure) culture/society is going, when people will fake having a service animal so they can... what?   What is the big attraction of having the dog or other pet come into an inappropriate place?   Emotional therapy?  Service snake in a restaurant? 

 

It just seems that more and more people need to have something special or different about them.   Is that what it is? 

 

Actually I love having my dogs with me at all times. I would do it if it were allowed & if it were places my dogs enjoyed. I've taken dogs to Home Depot etc & they ride in my car (that's a whole other kettle of fish as some people think any dog in any car on any weather day is immediately in danger of heat stroke..... )

 

 I think this is just ongoing battles between the individual and the collective.  There were times when nobody told you where you could and couldn't take your dog. 

 

And I believe we are all special and different.

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You know, I'm not a big "ack, we're doomed!" sort of person, but reading this thread really makes me wonder about where our (US?  North American? Western?  Not sure) culture/society is going, when people will fake having a service animal so they can... what?   What is the big attraction of having the dog or other pet come into an inappropriate place?   Emotional therapy?  Service snake in a restaurant? 

 

It just seems that more and more people need to have something special or different about them.   Is that what it is? 

 

I tend to think so.  It seems to me there are a LOT of self-diagnosed people out there.  I'm sure some of them are right in their self diagnosing, but I'm guessing many of them are wrong or just need attention.

 

I also know that some people who travel a lot with their pets seek out fake service dog vests as a way to avoid figuring out what to do with the pet when it's too hot to leave them in the car.

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don't. 

 

(that's what I thought when I read your title, "If you bring a pet into the store...", just don't. 

 

We have an ice cream shop that let's people bring their dogs into the shop (they sell doggie ice cream!) :w00t: It grosses me out. 

 

(and obviously, service animals are completely different)

Edited by AppleGreen
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You know, I'm not a big "ack, we're doomed!" sort of person, but reading this thread really makes me wonder about where our (US? North American? Western? Not sure) culture/society is going, when people will fake having a service animal so they can... what? What is the big attraction of having the dog or other pet come into an inappropriate place? Emotional therapy? Service snake in a restaurant?

 

It just seems that more and more people need to have something special or different about them. Is that what it is?

You should see the advice people get on my local FB pages every time they have to move or find a new place that does not allow pets. "Just tell your doctor you need an animal for emotional support and have them write a note. Then the landlord can't deny you or kick you out if they find you have an animal living with you."

 

We take our dog on rides once in awhile,she loves the car, but never into a restaurant or grocery store. Gross!

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I am NOT a fan of Cesar Millan, but he does have a nice list of stores which generally allow dogs, including Barnes and Noble, Home Depot, and Old Navy. My vet recommended we take our puppy to Home Depot and Tractor Supply, as those kinds of trips provide good opportunities for socialization.  :)

 

I don't take my dog in the grocery store. That said, I've said it before and I'll say it again: I am much more grossed out by kids wearing nothing but droopy diapers in shopping carts or grabbing things off the shelves and chewing on them. Ewww.

Edited by MercyA
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Sense of entitlement.

 

This.   We may have a right to have our (my daughter's) service dog with us but I still treat her as a privilege.   I realize that there are some that are allergic, some with cultural issues with dogs, some that really question why she should come in a restaurant, just plain hate dogs, and on and on.   So yes, we know having her where other dogs can not go is a huge responsibility we do not take lightly.   

 

When we go into restaurants, we ask to be seated out of the way.   Other diners often comment when we walk out as they never knew a dog was in the restaurant.  Last Friday when we were being seated there was a young baby to the table on our right, we deliberately placed our dog on the other side (that family never saw her) and and I checked with the diners on the other side if they were ok with having her more on their side as she could not be easily be placed all the way under the table.  If not, we would have moved.  

 

We were on a ferry boat last summer with a family that obviously had cultural issue with her.  Through pantomime, although the boat was small, we moved to an area that the mom deemed was ok, I let them disembark before us and when we saw them more then once on River Street, I made sure to give them a clear distance out of respect.  

 

Some of us with real service dogs have this same mentality, some don't.  Likely more with the entitlement mentality also don't give a cr@p about those around them either.  

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Who brings their pet dog to the grocery store? I never see this. Sometimes I see people waiting outside with their dog while another person goes shopping or see a dog waiting outside the store or see a service animal but I've never seen a pet dog at the store. I guess the rules are enforced here.

 

I see it quite often in Safeway.  I suppose the pocket dog in the purse could be a service dog of some kind but I think often they aren't.  Store employees have to be very careful how they word any questions about it due to HIPPA.  Really, anyone can just say it is a service animal and they have to accept that. 

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Actually I love having my dogs with me at all times. I would do it if it were allowed & if it were places my dogs enjoyed. I've taken dogs to Home Depot etc & they ride in my car (that's a whole other kettle of fish as some people think any dog in any car on any weather day is immediately in danger of heat stroke..... )

 

 I think this is just ongoing battles between the individual and the collective.  There were times when nobody told you where you could and couldn't take your dog. 

 

And I believe we are all special and different.

 

 OK, but are you willing to lie about your dogs in order to take them into places dogs are not allowed?   

 

My family loved our dog and we took him places with us where he could be comfortable and where he was allowed.  

 

We have lots of people in our neighborhood who believe their dogs should not have to be leashed, despite the law.  That made walking difficult for my dog, whose anxiety and fear made him bark madly at other dogs coming up to him.  All the while, the moron dog owner is yelling "he's fine, he's friendly" while he continues to stand in his driveway, watching me try to pick up my 40 pound dog to get him away from friendly Fluffy.   I can only imagine how awful that is for a kid who has a fear of dogs.

 

There are good reasons for limits on where animals can go what restraints they have when they are out and about.  Maybe those good old days when no one could tell you where you could and couldn't take your dog weren't so great for some people. 

 

ETA: I want to be clear that I am not complaining about service dogs.  A true service dog knows how to behave in public and is never a nuisance.  I would never begrudge a person a service dog if they need one.  

Edited by marbel
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I thought it wasn't legal to have a dog in a grocery store unless it was a service animal.  I remember when we lived in Iowa, Menards (similar to Lowe's or Home Depot) started adding grocery sections and then posted prominent signs stating pets are no longer allowed to comply with state grocery rules.

Edited by Katy
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 OK, but are you willing to lie about your dogs in order to take them into places dogs are not allowed?   

 

My family loved our dog and we took him places with us where he could be comfortable and where he was allowed.  

 

 

 

oh no, I quite agree with you. I wouldn't lie about my dog & I hate the fake emotional therapy dogs thing. 

 

I also agree with the leash laws - I have one of those dogs too.  It makes it miserable for us to go to places where dogs are supposed to be on leash & some aren't. 

 

I'm all over the place with this....  :lol: 

 

On one hand, I hate how annoying people are. 

 

Otoh, I hate how many annoying rules there are. Strata rules, rental rules blah blah blah. We actually have a petition going now to try to amend the residential tenancy act to make it illegal to discriminate against pet owners. With the very low vacancy rate here, lack of housing is a major cause of pet abandonment.  It's hard to find strata condos that allow pets, it's hard to find rentals that allow pets, and home ownership is out of reach for most which means pet loving folks here are SOL. 

 

On the other other hand, I realize we have all these rules because of the annoying people who are so inconsiderate and don't leash/control/train/clean up after etc....   The crappy people ruin it for all of us. 

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I'm torn. On the one hand I think America has gotten crazy-over-the-top with its rules. I'd like a little Wild West again where kids can play outside and people can bring their dogs into the store with them.

 

But on the other hand, there are a lot of good reasons for the rules.

 

It depends on my mood. Right now my mood says, "Live and let live. Dogs for everyone!"

 

But tomorrow, I might feel completely differently about it.

 

My mom took her tiny dog to the Grand Canyon when we were there and held him in her arms the entire time. A lot of people smiled at him or asked to pet him, but I did overhear a woman ranting about how people shouldn't bring their dogs out because of allergies. I thought it was a little strange because we were at the GRAND CANYON. There was a whole lotta room there to get away from the dog. It's not like we were all confined in small place. There was miles upon miles of open air.

 

My mom did not take the dog into the bathroom or the visitor center.

Edited by Garga
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Don't service animals wear a little vest-like thing to show they are legit?

 

I see dogs in Lowe's or Home Depot sometimes. That seems OK to me - no food, cement floors. And of course Petsmart and such. I couldn't even take my crazy dog in there. He'd get too nervous and lock down or try to pull me to the door.

I don't mind dogs in non-food places. But please, not in groceries or indoor restaurants. (Legit service animals ok, of course.)

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I agree Garga. I think, for me, it boils down to it shouldn't take a law for people to be considerate to each other.

 

I don't see how a little dog visiting the Grand Canyon is a big deal. A small restaurant would be the opposite but really the law book only needs to be broken out when people's social negotiating skills fail which seems more and more common.

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Here is a great page about service dogs and what they can and can not do. (sorry about the formatting, I tried to make it better)

 

http://www.ada.gov/regs2010/service_animal_qa.html

 

I hope it is ok to cut and paste a few important parts:

 

 

Q31. Are stores required to allow service animals to be placed in a shopping cart

 

A. Generally, the dog must stay on the floor, or the person must carry the dog. For example, if a person with diabetes has a glucose alert dog, he may carry the dog in a chest pack so it can be close to his face to allow the dog to smell his breath to alert him of a change in glucose levels.

 

 

Q32. Are restaurants, bars, and other places that serve food or drink required to allow service animals to be seated on chairs or allow the animal to be fed at the table

 

A. No. Seating, food, and drink are provided for customer use only. The ADA gives a person with a disability the right to be accompanied by his or her service animal, but covered entities are not required to allow an animal to sit or be fed at the table.Q7.

 

What questions can a covered entity's employees ask to determine if a dog is a service animal?

A. In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff are not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

 

 

​Edited to add: I keep telling myself I am going to print this out and hand it to managers every time I see a fake service dog. Every fake service dog makes it harder for real service dogs and their handlers as they are questioned more and more. The disabled get questioned and stared at enough.

I don't understand why documentation for the animal can't be asked for. LEOs ask for drivers' licenses when necessary. Passes are used at toll booths. I don't understand how a simple card from a legit certifying organization should be a problem. What am I missing? Edited by Seasider
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Wait.

 

Are pets not permitted in national parks. I haven't brought my dog camping, but if I decided he would be fine on such a trip could I bring him. I would not take him in buildings or to ranger programs. I would assume he'd have to be leashed the whole time.

 

Just from a quick google search:

 

http://petfriendlytravel.com/national_parks

 

U.S. National Parks

In general, pets are permitted but must be restrained either on a leash not exceeding 6 feet in length, caged or crated at all times. Park Superintendents and Managers have the discretion to further restrict areas open to pets (i.e., trails, buildings, campgrounds may be off limits). Visiting National Parks With Pets

 

 

I would check a specific park before going.

 

Here in PA, leashed dogs are allowed in state parks but there are places they are not allowed in some parks.  We have stayed in cabins in a state park and the dog could not stay there.  So, if we were using a park for a day, yeah bring the dog; if staying in a cabin, dog stays home. 

 

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Wait.

 

Are pets not permitted in national parks. I haven't brought my dog camping, but if I decided he would be fine on such a trip could I bring him. I would not take him in buildings or to ranger programs. I would assume he'd have to be leashed the whole time.

 

In many national parks pets are permitted only in parking lots, campgrounds and (perhaps) on some marked trails.  It's for both the pets' protection and the protection of wildlife.

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I see it quite often in Safeway. I suppose the pocket dog in the purse could be a service dog of some kind but I think often they aren't. Store employees have to be very careful how they word any questions about it due to HIPPA. Really, anyone can just say it is a service animal and they have to accept that.

I'll count myself lucky that we have different Safeway locations then. 4 years here, often in Safeway (it's less than a full block away) and nary a visible dog. I know any dog can be deemed a service animal but it hasn't been an issue here. The people I know who have service dogs for emotional reasons seem to have done that (you can get a doctor to sign off) so they can get around no dog rules in rentals but they don't take the dog with them 24/7.

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I see it quite often in Safeway. I suppose the pocket dog in the purse could be a service dog of some kind but I think often they aren't. Store employees have to be very careful how they word any questions about it due to HIPPA. Really, anyone can just say it is a service animal and they have to accept that.

Can you explain how HIPAA comes into play here? I don't understand how a grocery store would be a covered entity.

Edited by school17777
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We went to a half day event as a ritzy conference center. It wasn't on Hilton Head Island, but was another similar resort type of place. During the event, there was a women next to me with her little dog in a stroller. She kept saying, "No, maam," to the dog over and over. She was much louder than the dog. I was glad when she left.

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Can you explain how HIPPA comes into play here? I don't understand how a grocery store would be a covered entity.

 

I assume she means you can't go up to a customer and say why do you have this service dog.  That may require you to tell them your handicap or ailment or whatever.

 

Maybe they are allowed to ask for proof that the animal is a service animal.  Just guessing though.

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It's not actually funny, but it is making me laugh.  I always wish I could bring my (4lb) dog everywhere I go, and then I forget to take him to the places he's allowed, lol.

 

Our favorite amusement park allows dogs, and I've never seen a single problem happen.  But they aren't allowed in covered food areas.  Meanwhile, I hear horror stories about dogs in actual dog parks!

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As far as dogs in public, while I sometimes see a family carrying a small puppy, it is usually women in their 50s-60s bringing their yappy dogs into stores, gyms, gymnastics meets, etc.

 

Why are barking dogs in residential neighborhoods given a free pass, but hens are banned as "noisy"?

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I assume she means you can't go up to a customer and say why do you have this service dog. That may require you to tell them your handicap or ailment or whatever.

 

Maybe they are allowed to ask for proof that the animal is a service animal. Just guessing though.

That is not HIPAA though.

 

The ADA says this:

How can I tell if an animal is really a service animal and not just a pet?

 

A: Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.

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Why are barking dogs in residential neighborhoods given a free pass, but hens are banned as "noisy"?

 

I'm with you.  Our neighbor has a nightmare of a dog.  That stupid dog barks non stop all day.  It's been years and the dog still does it.  I have become so used to that I don't notice unless I make a point to notice.  He gets started at around 5 in the morning.

It's the one time I wish I had a gun.

 

(kidding...I'd never shoot a dog for that reason!)

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I assume she means you can't go up to a customer and say why do you have this service dog.  That may require you to tell them your handicap or ailment or whatever.

 

Maybe they are allowed to ask for proof that the animal is a service animal.  Just guessing though.

 

What questions can a covered entity's employees ask to determine if a dog is a service animal?

A. In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff are not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

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What questions can a covered entity's employees ask to determine if a dog is a service animal?

A. In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff are not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

 

 

Although given that, basically the company has no power at all to do anything.

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I love animals, and so generally they don't bother me. However, I found it amusing the other day when I was at Kohl's. They were having a huge bra sale, and I rounded the corner and there was a lady with a baby stroller that had two small dogs of some sort that were definitely still puppies and were yapping and wrestling with each other in the stroller. She had the top of the stroller mounded over with bras and was just calmly browsing the racks. I thought it was a rather funny scene.

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