Jump to content

Menu

My nutritionist didn't fully support my decision to buy a Vitamix...


sheryl
 Share

Recommended Posts

This morning I had my routine nutritionist appt.  I chose to go to a nutritionist on a semi-regular basis because:

 

1.  Our insurance covers it at 100% anytime with this provider; no  limit - it's free for me!

2.  My sugar level is borderline high and my desire is to not get full blown diabetes

3.  I'm health conscious and have been for years but I want to learn more about food selections, portions, nutrients of foods, etc.

4.  I need to lose weight, lower my bp

 

Etc

 

I just arrived home from my appt. and after I told Stephanie I was going to buy a Vitamix (tomorrow) she threw me a curve ball.  Mind you I do not expect this to be a panacea but there are a lot of good functions in these machines.

 

She went on a few times how she didn't want me to expect this to be a "magic bullet" so she said.   And, she was highly concerned about the high calories found in fruit smoothies.  I retorted with the fact that I'm not going to drink fruit smoothies everyday and I can make veggie smoothies/drinks.  She asked what my protein source was going to be.  I said peanut butter (?).   She said that was not enough protein.  I told her that these drinks will NOT be meal replacements.  They will be snacks or supplemental to meals.  She said their high in calories.period!

 

Give me a break.  I feel I've done my homework and this is a sound investment.  Also, b/c I can grind my own flour now (it's high carb, but I'm not carb-free just watching my carbs with good food choices and daily portions), make almond milk, make nut butters and homemade dressings, etc.

 

I told her that these will be fresh and have no preservatives.  The nutrition content will be high but the calorie count may be high too.

 

I'm ready to scream.  Now I feel like I shouldn't buy one.

 

Ellie, Stacy, ChrisVa, Tammyla, Arcticmama and anyone else, what do y'all say? 

Edited by sheryl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I might consider her comments akin to the hot contents warning label on McDonald's coffee. She pointed out where most folks go wrong when they start adding smoothies to their meal plan. Doesn't mean you will go wrong, but that she feels it necessary to give out the standard disclaimer.

 

Your best response might be to just prove her wrong.

  • Like 26
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 can see her point.  I take her to be saying that having a healthy diet means a balanced approach to food overall.  My guess is that she hasn't seen that so much with Vitimix users.

 

I'm a bit confused that you said on the one hand that you don't want them to be meal replacements, they are snacks, but it is ok if they are high calorie as long as they are nutritionally dense.  To me, a high calorie, nutritionally dense food serving is a meal, not a snack.  And I would not tend to think replacing meals with any kind of smoothie or shake or pill or whatever was a great way to eat.

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think she does have a point if you have blood sugar issues. It's really easy to get too much sugar (natural sugars included) from homemade smoothies or juicing. It is possible to make them with a healthy vegetable to fruit ratio, but the taste isn't super great. 

  • Like 18
Link to comment
Share on other sites

lol, well, she's not the boss of you, is she? Do what you want.

 

I looove my vitamix and I use it for so much more than making smoothies, but I do make several a day.

 

I use it in my cooking all the time.  I make hummus in it, much easier to clean than my food processor.  I puree homemade refried beans, I make sauces in it. I use it to blend waffle batter and use it to pour the batter onto the waffle iron.

 

Honestly, it sounds like she has a stick up her butt.

 

And I wonder what she would say about my elderly mother who adores smoothies.  She makes the crazy veggie concotions..but only veg, not fruit and no protein. Guess what? She is eating more vegetables than she has in her life.  I always thought increasing your vegetable intake was a good thing.

 

If you don't do what her husband does, which is blend a lot of bananas into a huge amount of orange juice and call it a health drink, and not a sugar bomb, you should be fine. 

 

Is she always so worried about calorie intake?  I track calories (it works for me) and I promise I am completely capable of accounting for my smoothies in my daily intake. I also track my protein and carbs. It does mean that I pass on a lot of smoothie recipes I see online.  I allow myself .5 cup of northern fruit or berries in one smoothie per day. I don't use bananas or pineapple or mango. Those a delicious, but a lot of sugar.  I also use whey protein in my smoothies, but I will assume she wouldn't approve.

 

Honestly, the whole thing is weird.  Sounds like she had a bad experience with a blender, lol

Edited by redsquirrel
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think she has a legitimate concern, and she's sharing it with you. Smoothies can be extremely high in calories, even non fruit smoothies. I have found that when I don't have the bio mechanical feedback of chewing, it's easy to consume a lot. When I check in with my body to see if I'm hungry still, I find that I often leave smoothie in the glass.

 

I do use smoothies as a breakfast replacement sometimes. My stomach can't handle heavy food early in the morning, especially protein, but I get sick if I don't put some calories in my system. I add a scoop of whey protein to my smoothies and I've reduced the sugar so it's essentially a slightly sweet, savory drink. I loosely track my calories and I know the general caloric value of what I consume.

 

So long as you're tracking your calories and making sure you're eating more than just smoothies, you'll be fine.

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can also put coconut, coconut milk, avocados and coconut oil in the smoothies, but she might freak out about the fat. The fat, though, will help the sugars in the veggies and fruit have lower/slower impact on blood sugar. The fat will keep your blood sugar more stable and hunger cravings down.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I throw oatmeal, almonds, hemp seeds, and coconut oil into my smoothies. The fiber in the almonds and oatmeal to help with sugar issues.

 

Edited to add: If I do have a smoothie it is a meal replacement not a snack.  I love my vitamix.  I make nut butters, almond milk, salsa, etc.

Edited by kewb
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The question I have for you is will you sit down and eat a bowl of spinach and not go "I know this is good for me but it tastes awful!"?

 

If you can do that and happily eat your spinach, then you may not need the Vitamix. If you are like me, and the thought of eating spinach salads as much as I am suppose to do so, is enough to send me running from my home, then you may want a Vitamix where you can have your spinach and not feel like you are eating something awful!

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love my smoothies, but I use my Vitamix for so much more. I make nut milk, nut butter, and a variety of dips at least once a week. I make soup from leftover veggies and homemade stock pretty much daily. I wouldn't ever think of my Vitamix as a "magic bullet", but it is a darn useful kitchen tool.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She has very valid points. She has also likely seen many many people say the same things you are saying and then do otherwise in regards to smoothies. I'm not saying you will do it but she is wise to warn you of the problems most people have with using a vitamix. But you just need to know yourself and be honest with yourself about if you are likely to end up doing what many people do or if you will use it as a tool to help you reach the goals you've set out for yourself.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My endocrinologist has me use the My Fitness Pal app and measure what I put into my smoothies as part of my overall meal tracking. That way I can track my calories and adjust my diet to keep things low carb.  The nutritionist has a valid point, but I think if you remain mindful of what you are doing, you'll be fine.

 

My standard morning breakfast is one egg and a spinach smoothie made with a spinach, blueberries, almond milk (unsweetened) and flaxseed.  I have a mid-morning snack of one ounce of almonds or red peppers & hummus.

 

Are you using My Fitness Pal? It's free and amazing, and really helped me get a grip on my fat/protein/carb %s.  I tend to get the right amount of protein, but too many carbs and not enough fat. The app helps me choose nuts>berries and avocado>bananas when I'm looking my evening snack to get everything balanced for the day. :)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems to me she has some valid points, but then I've never understood the point of or appeal of smoothies.  They seem to me nothing more than a very, very easy way to over consume calories w/o realizing it.  They're most definitely not my thing, so take my opinion FWIW.

 

ETA for clarification: Despite what I said above, I think you should do whatever you want.  If I've learned one thing about diet/nutrition over the years it's that you have to do what works for you.  You can eat "right" w/o doing it exactly the way someone else does.  Do what works for you!

Edited by Pawz4me
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vitamix is fine in and of itself, but what you don't want to use it for is to add more fruit into your diet and not change anything else, or worse yet, decrease the health of the rest of your diet because you are feeling good about being healthy from your smoothie.

 

I see too many people where they decide they're going to get healthy, and so they start drinking a smoothie every morning with loads of fruit, and then reward themselves for being healthy with a doughnut or similar, and then their weight continues climbing and their sugars don't get under better control, and they get understandably frustrated because they're *trying* to be healthy.

 

As long as you can avoid pitfalls like that, it's a perfectly reasonable way to add more vegetables and fruit into your diet, especially if you don't like to eat them. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't a vitamix just a fancy blender? Maybe use a regular blender to make smoothies or whatever for a few weeks before investing to see about blood sugar changes or health benefits/disadvantages.

 

In general, if you have an apple, vs an already ground up apple smoothie, the whole apple will likely have less impact on your blood sugar (a whole apple takes longer to eat, more energy for your body to eat and digest itself vs an apple smoothie).

 

If you have blood sugar concerns I'd consider eating more veggies, not more fruits, and avoiding more carbs (especially white sugar/rice/wheat). Most adults only need a few fruits (even just 1-2) per day and should have a ton of non starch veggies.

 

I think you can make a lot of those other things with regular blenders/food processors if you have one.

 

Only you know if the majority of smoothies you make will contain a lot of calories from fruit or a moderate or low amount, and certainly you can change this with your recipes.

Edited by displace
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Her bloodsugar concerns are valid since you appear to have some insulin resistance.  I can only have 4 oz. of a protein rich green smoothie at a time or my blood sugar will spike big time.  The issue with bloodsugar is that the more the food is broken down for you, the less your body has to work and the easier it is for your bloodsugar to go up. 

 

Others have made good points on the whole range of what a Vitamix can do, but you should be aware of possible effects on your bloodsugars. 

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get her point about not considering one a "magic bullet."  Nothing is and you need to weigh her rec with your actual use of one.  I would check back with her or do a little research on how to make good protein drinks in one.

 

I do use it to make veggie-fruit smoothies daily, but I do keep them low calorie and use yogurt as my protein.  It's an excellent soup maker too :rolleyes: .   

 

 If I didn't have a Vitamix, my  consumption of fruits and veggies would be 10% of what it is now.  I pretty much eat banana, spinach, kale, carrots, peaches, berries, apples and what ever is in season daily.  And of course ymmv :001_smile:   My hot soups are what ever veggies from the bin aren't super fresh or frozen ones with broccoli and what ever else is found.

 

I love fresh peanut, cashew or almond butter that contains just nuts.

 

I still love mine, but don't have any limits on natural sugars. :001_tt1:     Come over and try my Vitamix.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to agree with your nutritionist. Smoothies and juices are high in sugar. For example, the Kale Blazer Naked Juice (which has no added sugar) has 34 g of sugar. That's almost as much as a can of Coca-Cola! This is not good for someone who has blood sugar issues. Also, like your nutritionist said, they are high in calories. If you get one, I'd suggest adding some good fats to your smoothies (avocado or coconut oil) and a protein powder. Both of those will help with blood sugar.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be fair to the nutritionist, many, many people feel that fruit juice/  fruit smoothies are so healthy their high calorie content doesn't count against weight loss. I know several overweight people who do not admit that you can't drink 500 calories of juice every day. My oldest dd drinks at least 1000 calories a day in addition to regular eating and does not understand that almost no one is active enough to burn that off. She thinks she NEEDS all the juice to be healthy. She is at least a 100lb overweight, but she loves her juice.  I think that is what your nutritionist is probably worried about. If you are going to make smoothies with mostly veggies, use almond milk and low calorie fruits a Vitamix is a GREAT way to spice up your summer eating. Lots of the time I make smoothies with almond milk and strawberries that are very low calorie and taste so good on a hot day  that they really pick me up the way almost nothing else could.

 

A Vitamix is a good kitchen investment overall because of all the things you can do with it. Smoothies are not the only thing I do with my Vitamix.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wanted to add, that to me my smoothie is like a bowl of soup = a meal not a snack, but I don't snack.

I agree with you. I have a small snack most afternoons. It's difficult to get smoothies down to a snack caloric equivalent of a slice of cheese and a small apple.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is a tool to prepare food.  You can use it to prepare all sorts of foods.  It would be like saying, "Don't buy a knife because you could use it to cut cake and cake is bad for you."  I have one and I love it.  I do use it to prepare smoothies made with plain homemade yogurt and frozen berries that we pick in the summer.  This would be no different than eating plain yogurt with berries on top, just in a different form.  Sure, you can use it to make chocolate mousse and eat nothing but chocolate mousse but you don't have to, right?  I find it pretty bizarre to discourage the purchase of a kitchen tool based on what could be made with it.

 

However, she does have a point that sugary smoothies are not low calorie.  Telling you that does make sense.  But that is not Vitamix-specific.  If it was she should also recommend you get rid of (or never purchase) almost any kitchen tool out there.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually agree with your nutritionist in that most things that constitute a smoothie in terms of drinks are too high calorie and sugar for someone who already has blood sugar issues. It doesn't have to be that way but it's easy to be tempted when the toll is there. There are some great protein shakes that can be made lower carb, but even veggie juices usually need a fruit to be palatable and the calories are high compared to the satisfy they induce, so watch for that.

 

The smoothies I make for my kids are kefir based and sweetened with concentrated sucralose. They're very low sugar, just the berries and bananas I add in, but it is still 15-17 grams of total carbs per eight ounce serving. That's great for my kiddos and high for me, so your mileage may vary.

 

I really haven't found my vitamix useful for much else but I rarely cream soups (and use my stick blender for that) or do blender baking anymore. It does both of hose tasks beautifully though.

 

Your nutritionist was being a realist and I think that's great! Most blended drinks are a trap people fall into with drinking their calories and the sugar adds up fast. Being aware of that is the main step in preventing it - stick with lower carb recipes and be aware of your energy intake. You may find a smoothie isn't a great spend of a meal for the satiety it achieves. But with some solid recipes and in a pinch, like running out the door and needing something to go, it can be a lifesaver.

Edited by Arctic Mama
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd als use protein powder before peanut butter in most recipes. Peanut butter is fairly carb and calorie dense and not a good source of protein as it goes. Be cautioned that whey powders can spike your blood sugar, but it is fairly individual. The more complete the protein source, coupled with fat (I use cream with my smoothies to add that component) the better your blood sugar response will probably be. But peanut butter isn't a great way to add protein to a drink - not very protons dense for the calories. On a spoon in a hurry or to make a peanut butter flavored dessert? Sure. But I wouldn't rely on it as some protein panacea, especially with how carby that legume actually is :)

Edited by Arctic Mama
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is a tool to prepare food.  You can use it to prepare all sorts of foods.  It would be like saying, "Don't buy a knife because you could use it to cut cake and cake is bad for you."  I have one and I love it.  I do use it to prepare smoothies made with plain homemade yogurt and frozen berries that we pick in the summer.  This would be no different than eating plain yogurt with berries on top, just in a different form.  Sure, you can use it to make chocolate mousse and eat nothing but chocolate mousse but you don't have to, right?  I find it pretty bizarre to discourage the purchase of a kitchen tool based on what could be made with it.

 

However, she does have a point that sugary smoothies are not low calorie.  Telling you that does make sense.  But that is not Vitamix-specific.  If it was she should also recommend you get rid of (or never purchase) almost any kitchen tool out there.

 

No, it isn't like your knife example.  The glycemic index of food that is blended can be 10 to 15 % higher than the food in its whole food form.  It doesn't mean that a Vitamix (or any other blender) is bad - I have one myself and love it.  But it does mean that you need to be aware of what it does to the glycemic index of food if you have insulin resistance. 

 

Edited because I typed too fast and left out a word. 

Edited by Jean in Newcastle
  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

wow, thanks you all! :)

 

there is so much info. here that I'm electing not to reply to each individual response as it's time consuming. 

 

here's the deal:

 

1.  I used to eat fruit and drink Gatorade until I learned the high carb count in these foods.   It's rare now for me to drink a Gatorade (in a pinch) and I basically don't eat fruits anymore until now, spring, with all of the fresh berries.  Bananas are high in potassium which is good but high in carbs so I really don't eat those anyway (and, in fact, I had to stop buying TJ's plantain chips b/c I was eating too many which are high in carbs!). 

 

2.  I have never ever planned on drinking fruit smoothies everyday.   I do like the idea of veggie smoothies.  Will I ever have a fruit smoothie again?  Yes.  Once in a while is not going to hurt anyone.  It's portion control and what else I've had to eat that day and maybe day before/after.   Moderation is key.  I appreciate the veggie smoothie recipes and will check them out.

 

3.  A few pp's mentioned that the V is not just for fruit/veggie smoothies and it's this idea that sells me on the V.  I can have a fruit sm or veg one once in a while and still use it for so many other functions.

 

I would LOVE to make: NUT BUTTERS, NUT MILKS, DRESSINGS....etc.  I love the pp who mentioned hummus!  YUM!

 

4.  I get that when you super blend there is no bulk.   The body processes more quickly yielding a sugar spike in the bloodstream, perhaps.  But, can you not low or medium blend to keep it chunky then so the body breaks down the "partial food"? 

 

5.  I DO EAT VEGGIES.  I do not eat raw spinach.  It has to be slightly sautéed in stir fry or (I take that back) I will eat some raw leaves in a salad if mixed with other lettuces.  Honestly, I do need to return to eating raw veggies better.  I've been wanting to do this buy cutting up raw veggies and snacking on them.  I posted a year or so ago and Orchid Jade gave me good advice on that.  I eat organic as much as I can but not everything b/c it's expensive and Dr. Weil (have followed him for over 20 years!) promotes the dirty dozen and clean 20 (I don't remember the names; I made a copy of these 2 little charts but haven't referred to it in a while)....roots in moderation, celery, onion, mushrooms, asparagus,  brussel sprouts, cabbage, cucumber, zucchini, butternut, and more.   I LOVE LETTUCE! 

 

Fruits:  I like a lot of them but hardly ever eat them anymore except in the last couple of weeks since fresh ones are coming out! :)    Apples, cantaloupe, honeydew, cherries (LOVE), berries (blue, straw, rasp, black), mango, banana, and more. 

 

6.  One point for consideration though is this - one benefit for blending is the nutritional value.  That was the topic I posted last week was it - putting the "whole" fruit/veggie in to the blender.  I have heard that there are powerful nutrients in some seeds...like lemon and I'm sure more.  But, as y'all said, not all seeds are edible.  Apple seeds are an example.   They do contain arsenic but at what level is it dangerous?  Is it so much in a daily/weekly/monthly amount.  So, is it safe to consume 1 apple seed a day and be ok or 1 a month, etc?   

 

I'm fascinated knowing there are more nutrients out there.

 

So, high calorie vs. the nutritional benefit (anti-oxidants, etc) packed in to the drink with pulp, pith, seed, skin. 

 

Why can't there be a middle ground?  Again, I don't plan to have a smoothie everyday.  I can gain other nutritional benefits from grinding seeds, grains in to my own flour, make salad dressings and hummus that doesn't have all the gunk added to it.  Nut butters and nut milks.....

 

Thanks for reminding me about the high calories in fruits/smoothies.  I know the body needs to eat/chew foods and I'll still do mostly this.   We just like to have a fruit smoothie once in a while to go with our crepe but not every time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems to me she has some valid points, but then I've never understood the point of or appeal of smoothies.  They seem to me nothing more than a very, very easy way to over consume calories w/o realizing it. 

 

:iagree:

 

I'm with you, I've just never been a fan of smoothies. If I'm gonna drink a lot of calories it should be in the form of a milkshake or something completely delicious! But, I know some people truly enjoy them and I can't fault anyone for that. 

 

I am sure there's a place for smoothies and if you're aware of what you're consuming, that can work with any weight loss plan. I can tell you that in Weight Watchers, you can eat all the fresh fruit you want and it won't cost you any points. The only exception to this is if you blend the fruit up into a smoothie and then the points DO count, and they add up really fast. So that just reflects what people are saying. It's a lot easier to down an excessive amount of fruit when it's blended, which condenses it and makes it so much easier to swallow.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Green smoothies were and are part of my weight loss & management plan. 

My rules are: they must be green (well, if you add blueberries they turn a purply grey but ...).  I don't do any smoothies other than green smoothies. I stick to simple things: a whole whack of leafy greens, some frozen berries/grapes/apple and enough water to make the thing mix. That's it. A bit of lemon juice if I'm feeling super fancy. 

Have ~350 ml / day as a minimum. Keep extra in fridge ready made & have ~ 150 ml more before main meal & especially before having any treat.  Done well they're like a watery soup and they fill my stomach up so I don't overeat on the more calorie dense stuff. 

The point for me is twofold: 

-increase intake of leafy greens
-fill up on veg before consuming other things 


 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I drink smoothies but only use a very minimal amount of fruit, such as 1/4 green apple, or 1/4 cup frozen raspberries,  I use water as my liquid.      3TBS of hemp seeds work well for protein too.  Amazon has a good price on them. 

 

I will say that most people think my smoothie recipes are disgusting because they are not sweet at all.   Hey, I like them that way.

 

 

Here's my go to recipe:

 

large chuck aloe vera

1/2 cucumber peeled

1/4 green apple

handful of wheatgrass

mineral drops

1/2 lime squeezed

3TBS hemp seed

2 TBS coconut creme

powder fiber

water

 

 

LOL  :gnorsi:

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh & IIRC in both the US and Canada the term nutritionist & is unregulated so you get a wide variety of people with differing expertise & education & they can all use the term... Doesn't mean it's evidence based or rooted in any sort of research.... 

I would stick with a Registered Dietitian. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just jumping to the end here.  I used a nutritionist for years.  She used smoothies, but the *amount* she would use with a diabetic is SMALL.  Honestly, I wouldn't buy the vitamix.  I'd just go buy small serving smoothies in the organic section.  That way they're portion controlled.  Meanwhile, eat WHOLE fruit, so you're getting the slow digestion, not already broken down by blending it.  A whole apple, that kind of thing.

 

Then, for your fun thing, go buy a really great immersion blender!!  That will change your life.  Amazon.com: Cuisinart CSB-100 Smart Stick Variable ...  This is like what my family got me for Christmas.  It is metal, so you can stick it in a pot of soup to puree or refried beans.  Split pea soup is high fiber and would be good for your weight loss goals.  You can also use the immersion blender to make smoothies.  That's what we use to make ours.  So one device, more uses.  

 

And fwiw, we have a vitamix from before we were married.  We prefer making our smoothies with the immersion blender.   Ditto for dressings, etc.  We do all that with the immersion blender.  We make our hummus in the food processor, but it should work with the immersion blender too.

Edited by OhElizabeth
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a vitamix and use it for lots of things, including smoothies.  Our smoothies are mostly greens with some fruit and protein powder.  We usually make them for breakfast, sometimes afternoon snacks, and occasionally for dinner with popcorn.  

 

I kind of think about making smoothies like I think of making salads.  They can be a healthy addition to our menu, or they can be a calorie-laden not so great addition.  It all depends on how you choose to make them. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks!   Eliz.... I do understand about "whole" food chewing as opposed to drinking puree smoothie.   I'm "not" going to stop eating whole veggies and fruits.  I'd just like a smoothie every now and then.  Still, I'd like to grind my own flour and nut/seed butters/milks.  I didn't think an immersion blender could do that.   ???? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hear what your nutritionist is saying.  When carb counting or calorie counting, something goes very strange with blending fruit. 

 

Having said that, I just bought a Breville Boss and love it!!  Dh uses it for his protein smoothies for breakfast.  I make milk shakes for the kids.  We've made soup a couple times.  Snow cones are fabulous!  I haven't used it for nut butters or grinding wheat yet.  But, hummus is out of this world! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got a vitamix last week. I wasn't planning on buying one ($$$) but my friend was selling a slightly used one for under $100, so I felt it was worth the splurge. I've used it twice for sauces, once to blend soup and once for a smoothie. They make great almond milk too. It doesn't need to be a high calorie smoothie making monster. :-)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A  specialist is paid to advise based on their expertise, including their knowledge and experiences. I think if she hadn't issued those warnings, she wouldn't have been doing her job. 

 

Through the years I've come to realize that there are times I won't see eye to eye with a specialist on every single issue on the table 100% of the time. And it's okay. Honestly.

 

If the stakes are really high--ie major medical--or it's an area that I don't know a lot about, most of the time I'm apt to go along with their advice. If it's an issue that I feel reasonably competent in, or I have thoroughly researched, or sometimes maybe just based  on a feeling deep down in my gut, I might disagree with them. But I am going to listen before making my decisions because they have expertise that I don't. 

 

Take a deep breath. No need to scream here. 

 

If you could see yourself easily falling into the traps she mentioned, don't buy the mixer. 

 

If it's not going to be a problem for you, and it falls within your budget, buy the mixer.

 

If you buy the mixer and it turns out to be a problem, sell it on Craigslist. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe it seems I'm interested in fruit smoothies (only), but I tried to make it clear that I'm interested in using it for so many other things.  

 

Stephanie does not know what a V is so I'm concerned that she answered me so adamantly and quickly on the subject.   Still, in her defense and after I explained what it was, she saw the fruit aspect only.   I referred to it as a blender and she jumped off the deep end with fruits.   I know most fruits are high in carbs, but not all are.  Peaches are one of the lowest glycemic fruits.   So many pp's above mentioned making veggie smoothies with a hint of fruit.  

 

I see the food pyramid.  I eat from all food groups but like most have cut back on carbs (various forms). 

 

AmandaVT and other pp's are right it doesn't have to be a fruit smoothie making machine only.  

 

Do you all not eat fruit here?   I hardly eat fruits anymore BUT one fruit/portion a day is "not" unreasonable.  So, why not eat it whole one day and put it smoothie another?  I don't see what the concern is here.  

I am very familiar with Lose It and paid for the premium acct.  That expired and I need to now get back in to using it/storing info. on it.  

 

It is a good reminder though.  I have a separate and very inexpensive smoothie maker/blender.   It takes A LOT of fruit for 3 small glasses of drink.  One each for dh, dd and myself.  

 

As I see it, I will buy the V.   I'm knowledgeable and experienced with foods, portions, glycemic index, carbs, etc. to a point, just like most of y'all.    I'll definitely be more mindful of the fruit quantity I put in my smoothie and combine with other ingredients as other pp's have mentioned AND drink it once in a blue moon as I'll still eat my "whole" fruits and veggies. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread started out calling into question the competence of your nutritionist. What we've tried to tell you is that she had legitimate things to say. I don't know how severe your insulin resistance is. You might want to consult with a diabetic nutritionist/ dietitian if it is truly a problem for you. FWIW, hummus causes my bloodsugar to sky rocket too. It isn't about fruit as such.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like she took your comment as "Here is a really important addition to my health plan! I'd like your approval."

 

Whereas you were just being chatty about a product you had just purchased / decided to purchase.

 

So that's why her comments were less of, "Great, glad to hear you're continuing to move towards more in-home preparation of whole foods with fruits and vegetables" and more of "okay here is where that is not sufficient as an entire all-encompassing health plan."

 

I would be irritated too but I wouldn't put too much stock in it.

 

Of course your nutritionist was correct, but as you mentioned, you weren't planning on having peanut butter shakes round the clock to top off every meal, or substitute meals, either.

 

I'd take it as, "make them green and low cal for snacks, put protein in if they are for meals, no sugar added" and let it go. She might have just been having a long day.

 

Edit: If she asks about it later, say, "You know, I was really excited about buying something new for the kitchen but that kind of misrepresented how much importance it had in my health plan. I was just thinking of another tool to help me make fresh foods. But I did take your comments to heart."

Edited by Tsuga
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First and foremost, adult women do not need snacks. Most adult women only need around 1500 calories or less per day. One gets only tiny meals, no snacks. That is what the human body is made for.

 

There is no blade that cuts food without damaging nutrients and other vitamins. Normal chewing and digestive juices damages very little, however. In other words, eat the contents of your smoothie whole without chopping it all up to make a smoothie. It is much more nutritious that way.

 

Take the money you were going to spend on the Vitamix and use it to buy good food.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First and foremost, adult women do not need snacks. Most adult women only need around 1500 calories or less per day. One gets only tiny meals, no snacks. That is what the human body is made for.

 

There is no blade that cuts food without damaging nutrients and other vitamins. Normal chewing and digestive juices damages very little, however. In other words, eat the contents of your smoothie whole without chopping it all up to make a smoothie. It is much more nutritious that way.

 

Take the money you were going to spend on the Vitamix and use it to buy good food.

I disagree, I do much better grazing all day long, I exercise & eat probably 2000 calories & am not overweight. Smart choices & a slight deficit are the keys to staying slimmer/losing weight.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

These may be things the nutritionist is thinking:

 

The fiber in pureed food doesn't seem to act like the fiber the gut needs.  Or so I've read.  So blending all the fruits and vegetables might not be the best thing if you need more actual fiber.  (It might result in you eating more overall if it doesn't fill you up)

 

Drinking calories doesn't satiate people as well as eating them.  So people eat more.

 

People tend to add sugar to their smoothies besides the fruit.

 

But if you think it's a cool appliance that you'd find useful (including the occasional smoothie) then it's your call.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First and foremost, adult women do not need snacks. Most adult women only need around 1500 calories or less per day. One gets only tiny meals, no snacks. That is what the human body is made for.

 

There is no blade that cuts food without damaging nutrients and other vitamins. Normal chewing and digestive juices damages very little, however. In other words, eat the contents of your smoothie whole without chopping it all up to make a smoothie. It is much more nutritious that way.

 

Take the money you were going to spend on the Vitamix and use it to buy good food.

 

-Depending on circumstances, there would have been large periods of time when humans and human ancestors essentially grazed on fruits, nuts and seeds. They didn't lug it all home to the cave and eat it 3x/day.

 

-blending at such high speed actually makes many foods *more* digestible. We are not ruminants and we cannot break down effectively many of the leafy greens but the vitamix can and makes more nutrients bio available ( as does cooking but cooking also reduces other things so this IMO is frequently a better option)

 

- I know you've posted before that you eat a lot of fast food meal takeout. I think green smoothies are a convenience food in some ways. I don't have time to sit and chew thoroughly that much raw spinach. I can sip it more quickly - and have it as part of a varied diet.

 

#teamvitamix :D

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Edited by hornblower
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...