Jump to content

Menu

April ACT scores


Recommended Posts

Arg - apologies.  We did get our scores but they are through NUMATS (9th grader, last year for talent search).  Turns out I can't even see them on the ACT site yet, but I bet I will in the next 24-48 hours. 

 

Good luck everyone!  Boy made huge strides from last years score and is a great position for junior year scores.  Homeschooling works and this kid has kept me sweating, but it's paying off now.  :)

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheesh, you got my blood pumping, LOL! I did a double-take and checked the date (it's not the 19th YET, is it?!) Still, I can hardly believe they will start coming out tomorrow. I've gotten none of the emails, even though I signed up for parent emails. I know dd got one (she forwarded), but I don't know if she has gotten any others. 

 

Will they put the actual scores in the email, or will the email just say scores are up, go check?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheesh, you got my blood pumping, LOL! I did a double-take and checked the date (it's not the 19th YET, is it?!) Still, I can hardly believe they will start coming out tomorrow. I've gotten none of the emails, even though I signed up for parent emails. I know dd got one (she forwarded), but I don't know if she has gotten any others. 

 

Will they put the actual scores in the email, or will the email just say scores are up, go check?

 

They will say go to your account and check if I am remembering correctly!  I haven't seen any e-mails from the ACT since the test but did get several right before the test with reminders.   

 

And oops sorry!  I was so excited I forgot about the whole talent search piece for us.  :lol:  :blushing:  I still find it completely bizarre we got ours first.  He tested in a group of typical high schoolers NOT testing through the talent search.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got them this morning  :001_smile:

 

Very pleased.  This is my second ds who is just in 10th grade.  He has been a reluctant/resistant/whatever learner (coming along after a compliant, hard working first born).  He will be taking biology and geometry in 11th grade because he did so little in 8th/9th grade.  A year ago we were discussing what avenues are available to kids that don't pursue college because I figured dragging him through high school would be the most we could hope for.  He, however, has turned the corner maturity wise and has been talking about college and has worked hard at his classes this year.

 

He took the ACT in April and got a 27.  I am really happy.  Definitely good enough to go to college and he has plenty of time to improve and he still hasn't had all the math.  He has been talking about living at home and going to the local Christian U to save money because he wants to go to grad school.  This score will get him enough scholarships to live at home and go for almost nothing. Still plenty of time to change his mind and improve his score but it is nice to have that option in the bag already.  

 

He also is starting dual enrollment at the local university in the fall.  I am nervous about that but this score is well above their average for admitted students.  So, hopefully, he will be OK if he can keep moving forward maturity wise.

 

Lesson learned...the student you have starting high school is not necessarily the one you have finishing it!  

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got ours this morning too. 

 

I am having trouble finding them in the same format that I was expecting from the sample student report on their site.  But got numbers.  not national percentile though.. good thing I don't need that number for anything in record keeping.  the printer version doesn't look like the sample student report.  but hey.. I got the numbers.

 

I am very proud of my slow to average, slow and steady middle child. Her science score was lower than others which tells me she was really tired by the end.  (The number was lower than her practices.)  But, I'm really happy with 24 composite because I know it shows her ability for what it is and higher than our original goal of let's hope for a 21 or 22 composite like the state wants to see for college grant.  I know on this forum there are people of all levels and abilities (my oldest got "only" a 30 for my own example.)  and sometimes the average people are missed, but yeah, o yeah,,  my average (and struggling learner  who wasn't always as high on the charts as average) did great in my perspective.    Oh, she's 11th grade, and still has time to grow and learn and be even more ready in a 1.5 years time. 

 

very excited for her individual accomplishment. fits our goals and demonstrates her ability.

 

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Woo-hoo!  Scores are up.  DD was a bit anxious about the test being timed although we did do timed practice tests at home. I was worried that her anxiety would prevent her from showing her full potential at the exam.

 

I am happy with her score and she will not likely take it again, although she's just a sophomore now.  She made the cut off for the extra merit money from the state lottery scholarship. She'll start dual enrollment at our community college next semester.

 

Wow, it's really hitting me that my "baby" is growing up.   :crying:

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter's aren't up yet, but congrats to all who are getting good news.  I doubt I'll be doing any happy dances when this score does come in, but it should give us an idea of what she can do with some prep.  Fingers cross, and congratulations again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No email, but I checked anyway after reading this thread.  There they are!  Dd did the essay, which isn't graded yet; perhaps that's why we didn't get an official email yet.

 

She was lower than she expected in English, but higher in science.  Composite was a bit lower than she hoped, I think, but very respectable for a sophomore taking the test for the first time.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No email, but I checked anyway after reading this thread.  There they are!  Dd did the essay, which isn't graded yet; perhaps that's why we didn't get an official email yet.

 

We didn't do essay and we didn't get an email either.  I'm thinking the email referenced was from a specific talent search program (which I guess got scores a day earlier) and not from ACT itself.   

 

I'm enjoying hearing all of the stories. hope I don't run out of "likes"

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tickled with DS' scores this morning.  This was a practice round for us.  With Mock this season we didn't study or do any prep at all.  But he needed minimum scores to take a math class at CC next fall. Got that without a hitch (and was surprised to see Math was his weakest score?!)  

 

Today is a good day.  I'm trying to remember how much we raised DD's scores by studying.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18.  Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much.  It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18. Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much. It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up.

An 18 is what kids need to dual enroll at the local university so I think it is considered college ready. It is also the average score at our local high schools for their graduates. It is also the score our local umbrella school requires to graduate with an accredited diploma. So that seems like a good score to have in one's pocket only half way through high school. But yeah...these threads are always hard. Remember the average folks tend not to post. I am sure someone is encouraged that you shared.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

An 18 is what kids need to dual enroll at the local university so I think it is considered college ready. It is also the average score at our local high schools for their graduates. It is also the score our local umbrella school requires to graduate with an accredited diploma. So that seems like a good score to have in one's pocket only half way through high school. But yeah...these threads are always hard. Remember the average folks tend not to post. I am sure someone is encouraged that you shared.

 

Our CC that's not far from me won't let my son take dual enrollment with these scores.  Not that I wanted him to do that anyway.   I always had a hard time coming to this board because I always feel so inferior.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18. Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much. It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up.

I'm sorry you're feeling badly. Do some test prep. I am sure my son would have scored MUCH lower if he had just gone in and taken the test cold. We've been working through this book since January. http://www.amazon.com/Real-ACT-Official-Prep-Guide/dp/0768934400/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1461076810&sr=1-5&keywords=act+prep+book+2016

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are glad to see scores quickly from ACT while still waiting for March SAT scores.  Overall good score but like a pp, ds son was lower in English and Reading with higher Math & Science.  So we are trying to decide if it would be worth testing again.  We hear that it's difficult to get scholarships at Purdue but with his current score he should be accepted.  Yeah!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A speaker at the Midwest Homeschool Convention recommended  http://www.amazon.co... prep book 2016 as a pp mentioned.  One way to do better is to shore up math skills.  She said there will always be 4 trig problems on the test so get through trig. when the test needs to count.  Or skip the trig and focus on the rest that you know to get those right.  The test is designed by nature to not complete on time.  On the reading section, I think, the questions for the last passage tend to be easier but most don't get it completed.  We didn't prep too much but taking a practice test showed us if time management was an issue or content.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our CC that's not far from me won't let my son take dual enrollment with these scores.  Not that I wanted him to do that anyway.   I always had a hard time coming to this board because I always feel so inferior.

 

:grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

Definitely don't feel inferior.  I think there are plenty of kids out there with a range of scores who's parents don't post them.  I won't post my kid's scores.  He scores well for a freshman, but not awesome for a talent search kid that has some very high scores in other venues and doesn't necessarily reflect what I and his teachers see day to day.  Like he got his lowest score in science.  If they let him do that section first, that would be his highest score probably.  Still working on test endurance, focus, and speed.  I'm glad he did it before so we can actually SEE some improvement.  And then see where we have some holes.

 

It's just a baseline and the average of the test is 20 and that's primarily juniors and seniors.  There are probably other parents that are glad you are posted your score!  That score would be perfectly fine for acceptance at all our CCs!  :grouphug: :grouphug:

Edited by WoolySocks
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18.  Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much.  It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up. 

 

I actually don't think that confirms you messed up.   My middle gal that I'm bragging on in this thread got about 19 on her first practice test (taken last fall) with no prep at all.  We practiced and prepped for over 6 months while also doing regular level 11th grade work. That's why I'm over the top excited with 24.  I know there will be people on here who got 32 and higher.  I know there are people who will not except lower than 30 from the child.  So what????  

 

To me? to hear a sophomore with no prep gets 18, doesn't sound like you messed up.  This first score is a baseline with no prep. That's not a homeschool fail at all. really, it is not. 

 

I'll offer hugs for you feeling a bit down.  But I think your report is a good one for a 10th grader who took it with no prep as a baseline.   remember... the only thing to really compare is growth in your child from year to year.  Not whether or not it meets some Hive thing that one drums up.

 

chin up, please.  I'm proud of your son's score as a sophomore with no prep.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually don't think that confirms you messed up.   My middle gal that I'm bragging on in this thread got about 19 on her first practice test (taken last fall) with no prep at all.  We practiced and prepped for over 6 months while also doing regular level 11th grade work. That's why I'm over the top excited with 24.  I know there will be people on here who got 32 and higher.  I know there are people who will not except lower than 30 from the child.  So what????  

 

To me? to hear a sophomore with no prep gets 18, doesn't sound like you messed up.  This first score is a baseline with no prep. That's not a homeschool fail at all. really, it is not. 

 

I'll offer hugs for you feeling a bit down.  But I think your report is a good one for a 10th grader who took it with no prep as a baseline.   remember... the only thing to really compare is growth in your child from year to year.  Not whether or not it meets some Hive thing that one drums up.

 

chin up, please.  I'm proud of your son's score as a sophomore with no prep.

 

:hurray:   Congratulations to you and your dd!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

:grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

Definitely don't feel inferior.  I think there are plenty of kids out there with a range of scores who's parents don't post them.  I won't post my kid's scores.  He scores well for a freshman, but not awesome for a talent search kid that has some very high scores in other venues and doesn't necessarily reflect what I and his teachers see day to day.  Like he got his lowest score in science.  If they let him do that section first, that would be his highest score probably.  Still working on test endurance, focus, and speed.  I'm glad he did it before so we can actually SEE some improvement.  And then see where we have some holes.

 

It's just a baseline and the average of the test is 20 and that's primarily juniors and seniors.  There are probably other parents that are glad you are posted your score!  That score would be perfectly fine for acceptance at all our CCs!  :grouphug: :grouphug:

 

agreeing on all of that.  I like hearing all range of scores. 

  Average ones.  

super wowzers ones.  cool.  I'm glad for them.  Doesn't mean I'm a failure if my child isn't doing that. 

 

and even the student who struggles.   My oldest dd had a homeschool friend who got 17 on her final try.  She got into college and had to take remedial classes in summer and gets tutoring and helps.   No matter how well she did in class (even tutoring) she could not test well on that thing.    and the mom of that student is one of the veteran homeschool moms in my area who is no failure at all.  

 

chin up !!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18.  Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much.  It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up. 

 

- Plenty of people aren't posting actual numbers here.  I sure didn't.  So who knows how many wish they could say they had a sophomore who got an 18, and are totally envious of you right now.

 

- Scores will often be higher if you take it again.  A couple of local high schools are doing practice ACTs for all their students today, probably hoping to capitalize on this.

 

- I know seniors in public school and in homeschool who got a 19, which isn't that far off from what your sophomore got.  

 

- Most of all, for some kids, no matter the age, grade, and prep, 18 is a super, super score, and represents a huge amount of work. Shoot, just showing up and taking the test is a triumph for many of us!

 

Edited to add: I also know kids (ps and homeschool) who scored high (in the 30s) who took a year of college and realized that they were in over their heads and dropped back out.

Edited by GailV
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was going to say, this free math resource has been a big help for us here.  You have to be a little careful, because we have found a number of errors in the answer key.  I had it printed and bound at kinkos.  It's formatted to do 3 ACT math review problems a day.  I just added it to our regular daily math.  Boy's math score went up 7 points this time from his last score which is HUGE.  And one of the holes we were seeing was in the older math.  Adding a rolling review into our daily math made a big difference.  Not to mention, I think it's made his day to day math easier too.  He isn't as tripped up when they pull out an old concept. 

 

He'd just do the 3 questions.  If he got them right, that's it.  If he got them wrong, I'd either work them on paper with him or we'd look up on Khan, etc to cover the concept.  I had him accumulate important equations in one spot as we went on.

 

https://www.math.lsu.edu/nsfgk-12/prACTice%204%20success%20student%20workbook.pdf

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We got ours. Overall, score was up two points from last year (as an 8th grader) and just above the national average.  :hurray:  Unfortunately, math went down! :( I suspect it was the lack of algebra this year. English was the same, and both science and reading were up 4-5 points from last year. Yay! It was great to see that reading sore up 5 points from last year. I think the accommodations were absolutely helpful and the increased scores on those last two tests help confirm that. I think given my kid's misunderstanding on the extra test at the end and the first year of accommodations, all in all we are happy. (Actually, I think kiddo was a little disappointed, thought it might be higher and had we just held ground on math, it would have been, but it's ok).

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our CC that's not far from me won't let my son take dual enrollment with these scores. Not that I wanted him to do that anyway. I always had a hard time coming to this board because I always feel so inferior.

 

FWIW, DE seems to require higher test scores than regular enrollment. My DD wants to apply to a specific high school program, and their minimum ACT to apply is above 75% of the students accepted to the hosting university. I think they really, really want to discourage high school kids from taking classes.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FWIW, DE seems to require higher test scores than regular enrollment. My DD wants to apply to a specific high school program, and their minimum ACT to apply is above 75% of the students accepted to the hosting university. I think they really, really want to discourage high school kids from taking classes.

 

That's the case with a bunch of PSEO programs here too. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18.  Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much.  It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up. 

It was one test, on one day.

 

Please do not think you have messed up homeschooling in any way. My kid tests terribly on regular tests. Seriously, the low working memory bites him on regular class tests pretty much every week. I do not think he has gotten an A on any test this entire school year. I could regularly feel like a homeschooling failure, but my kid can't be defined by a test score or even a year's worth of test scores, nor can our homeschool.

 

The ACT is one measure. At least two states have composites in the 18 range. Your child walked out with absolutely no prep and got an 18; that's a fine baseline! I am assuming he had not even seen the test format, yes? Many people spend lots of time preparing. I am sure even if you did nothing to prep for another test, his score would increase, just because he is more familiar with the format. 

 

Really, it is a snapshot of one four hour time period, not a year or sixteen years worth of learning.  :thumbup1:

 

edited for clarity

Edited by AppleGreen
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FWIW, DE seems to require higher test scores than regular enrollment. My DD wants to apply to a specific high school program, and their minimum ACT to apply is above 75% of the students accepted to the hosting university. I think they really, really want to discourage high school kids from taking classes.

 

Yeah, that happens here, too.  When older dd was in DE classes it wasn't this way.  I do find myself wondering what happened to make them change, since OTOH they often seem really eager to get the high school students and their tuition dollars.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, that happens here, too.  When older dd was in DE classes it wasn't this way.  I do find myself wondering what happened to make them change, since OTOH they often seem really eager to get the high school students and their tuition dollars.

 

I wonder if it's just to keep numbers down?  Or if there's actually some data on maturity and success in that setting (seems doubtful)? 

 

Some kids ARE just good at this type of testing and that doesn't reflect overall maturity and possibly even academic readiness without the transcript background.  My freshman could go to many decent colleges now with his ACT scores but in no way do I think he is mature and focused enough for the rigors of full time college.  On the other side, there are motivated, focused, academically ready kids with lower scores who just don't show their stuff well on this type of test.  I took the ACT once in high school and did reasonably well on it, but it didn't reflect my grades or class standing or eventual college performance by any stretch.  I definitely would have been better served to take it a few times and do at least some minimal prep work.  I did MUCH better when I did testing for grad school and they were much more reflective of where I was at.

 

Anyway, I am the last person who thinks we should tie up too much energy thinking about this number.  If your kid is good at it and it pays off for you, great.  There are lots of options for kids that aren't strong testers too.  It has been helpful for my kids to practice this bubble filling hoop and we're in a homeschool testing state anyway.   I also do think it's helpful to have that baseline no prep score to work from.

 

Edited by WoolySocks
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all, I'm feeling a little better now, as I showed him and he feels good about his score.  Apparently he did better all around that he thought he did.  He thought he'd get a 10.  I guess I'm still getting used to things not working like they did when I was in school.  It was unheard of to take this thing more than once and nobody prepped for it we were all told it was a test you couldn't study or prep for.  Our schools only offered it once and it was only open to Juniors.    I have to remind myself that times are different.  

 

I will add that my son has not finished Geometry, I'm a firm believer in not starting Alg before 9th, so I know that will play a role, but I'm actually quite happy with his Math score, His English is where it bites him in the backside.   

He had never seen practice tests either so to the poster that asked that no, he hasn't seen the format of the ACT, but he has taken standardized tests before so he was at least familiar with the bubble form and how to fill that out. 

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all, I'm feeling a little better now, as I showed him and he feels good about his score.  Apparently he did better all around that he thought he did.  He thought he'd get a 10.  I guess I'm still getting used to things not working like they did when I was in school.  It was unheard of to take this thing more than once and nobody prepped for it we were all told it was a test you couldn't study or prep for.  Our schools only offered it once and it was only open to Juniors.    I have to remind myself that times are different.  

 

I will add that my son has not finished Geometry, I'm a firm believer in not starting Alg before 9th, so I know that will play a role, but I'm actually quite happy with his Math score, His English is where it bites him in the backside.   

He had never seen practice tests either so to the poster that asked that no, he hasn't seen the format of the ACT, but he has taken standardized tests before so he was at least familiar with the bubble form and how to fill that out. 

 

If he is willing, I strongly encourage a test book - we used the Princeton Review one & it was about $20.  It helped our dd so much!  Especially with her time management on each section.  Her composite scores from her first practice test to her last went up 4 points.  

 

Don't be discouraged!!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW...I can't believe they are in so much PAINLESS than the SAT and Psat this year!  :-)

 

I am new to the ACT so what score is considered good?  What type of score do you need for really GOOD scholarships?  Anyone know?  My son was a sophomore this year and took it.  I am not one to post scores either, but he scored I think really high and did well but I don't know much about the ACT?  Thought we would try ACT this year since last year he did the SAT trying to compare on which he liked better and scored better on in anticipation for his junior year.  Thanks for any insights!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is a sophomore, and this was his first attempt at this, (he's an older sophomore because we had him repeat 8th grade for maturity reasons) we did no prep at all, nothing, just to see how he'd do and he got an 18.  Now I know why I tend to not come to the high school board much.  It kind of confirms to me that I totally messed this homeschool thing up. 

 

 

Thank you all, I'm feeling a little better now, as I showed him and he feels good about his score.  Apparently he did better all around that he thought he did.  He thought he'd get a 10.  I guess I'm still getting used to things not working like they did when I was in school.  It was unheard of to take this thing more than once and nobody prepped for it we were all told it was a test you couldn't study or prep for.  Our schools only offered it once and it was only open to Juniors.    I have to remind myself that times are different.  

 

I will add that my son has not finished Geometry, I'm a firm believer in not starting Alg before 9th, so I know that will play a role, but I'm actually quite happy with his Math score, His English is where it bites him in the backside.   

He had never seen practice tests either so to the poster that asked that no, he hasn't seen the format of the ACT, but he has taken standardized tests before so he was at least familiar with the bubble form and how to fill that out. 

 

Absolutely agreeing that you are not a failure and neither is he! You're right that you don't really "study" for this test--the student is not really learning new content. What you ARE doing when you do test prep are things like:

 

1, learn better strategies for addressing multiple-choice tests (some seem obvious or common-sense, but I always found my kids learned something they hadn't thought of)

 

2, learn how to take them faster (by learning how to see what a question is looking for more quickly, learning when a question is going to take too long to figure out and moving on instead, by learning how to rule out answers--sometimes you don't even have to do all the math to get an answer, which some kids think is "cheating" but it's just another test strategy), and so on.

 

3, solidify previous knowledge (you look for patterns of mistakes on practice tests and help the student with things they missed more than once, especially if you think they got confused about a concept etc...)

 

4, help them learn how to read test questions...

 

Both of my kids had increases of several points on most individual tests and at least 2-3 points increase on their composites by doing test prep. It's just not the same as "doing another bubble test." 

 

BUT...this test also does not define a student and does not define your home school. Some kids don't test well and still do great in college. (And I knew a kid in high school who had a 35 composite on his ACT, and flunked out of college--lost a full-ride scholarship and all--because he had never learned to work hard and to study.) 

 

And of course, I know you know that life is much, much bigger than anything the ACT can hope to predict, in terms of character, values, maturity, spirituality--it can be hard when we moms want that validation of that "score," but homeschooling is so much more, even with regard to academics--try to resist the temptation to reduce it and measure it by that. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nukeswife -   :grouphug:

 

I often feel inferior on this board here too!  My oldest was labeled gifted and I assumed he would do really well, but there must be a lot of super kids on this board!   :ohmy:

My middle son I know would never come close to some of these students.  But you know they are all different and are gifted in many other areas...it's not all academic out there!  Makes the world a better place!  I am sure you are doing fine and he is too!  I would be happy with that score without doing any prep, taking a class or studying up will make a huge difference!!  Good luck to you!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nukeswife,

 

I agree with Princeton Review book for strategies on time and how to guess.    and from glancing at Merry's post.. yeah, it's about strategies.

 

We also used the Real Act prep book.  

 

And the free preparing for ACT student guide books.

scroll about half way down for those

http://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act/test-preparation.html

 

and my middle daughter did alg 1 in 9th as well. 

 

I'm glad you feel more encouraged.  :)   It's common to prep for ACT and take it 2 or 3 times.  not more than 12 times though.    Where I'm from, I don't think many student do prep work for PSAT.  But oh, ACT..  you should see some of the boot camps that homeschoolers offer for each other.  There's no way my dd could have handled the prep class!!!  eek.     This is my dd who had to use the student book prep I linked just a moment ago in order to know the obvious stuff like filing in the basic info from the ticket and I let her practice even writing the agreement that they sign.    She was that level of nervous and some stuff isn't always obvious to her.    

 

She also broke into tears for an entire day about 1 week before the test. "math will be the downfall of me. I just know it."    She cried the whole day and not even her cat could calm her.    After the test?  I took her to the animal shelter to just let her hug on every dog in the shelter.

 

that's my middle kid.  does that help with the perspective of what it was like for us?  I had to show her that math of 19 was going to be enough to take college math at community college after she graduates high school.  I had to show her that 21 in our state is good enough. 

 

I get it on the not feeling up to the task of homeschooling sometimes.  My youngest?  I'm in count down mode.  48 more months of homeschooling and I can legally stop.   My very lofty goal for her in high school is to acquire enough regular level (not rigor, not honors, but regular, basics) high school to get a regular diploma and not just special ed. I'm sure we can do special ed and if that is what it is, that is what it is.  But oh my push the limit, raise the bar part of me wants to reach for that regular level basics diploma for her!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I am new to the ACT so what score is considered good?  What type of score do you need for really GOOD scholarships?  Anyone know?

 

There was another thread in the last week about good scores.   All of it of course depends on various goals and various colleges for what good is.   You'll want to look at your state's flagship university, as well as state schools that are less flagship. (example: in TN, look at UT Knoxville, the so called flagship, and U of Memphis, the not so flagship).  What are they giving?   State grants... in TN, for example, a score of 21 composite gets you the lottery based grants.   Then look at fancy private college near you and the less fancy. 

 

Where my oldest attends, ACT of 30 and higher are in the top category where dollar amounts are about 50% of tuition.  However, there are some full ride scholarships at that same school that are based on 21 score, but lots of community leadership.  Then, there's the "you can stack scholarships" aspect.   So my daughter gets over 50% tuition from ACT score, stacked with departmental scholarship (which began at score of 27), plus a state grant, then she got a runner up scholarship for just showing up for the interview for a full ride program and coming in not first place. (they gave out 4 full rides from a total of 100 applicants)

 

At the big fancy private school, a 30 on ACT is chicken feed and barely high enough to be considered worthy to submit the application.  (some places are like that) 

 

It's just too loaded of a question because it varies based on where you're looking.  Hope that will help you know where to begin to look in your area.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW...I can't believe they are in so much PAINLESS than the SAT and Psat this year!  :-)

 

I am new to the ACT so what score is considered good?  What type of score do you need for really GOOD scholarships?  Anyone know?  My son was a sophomore this year and took it.  I am not one to post scores either, but he scored I think really high and did well but I don't know much about the ACT?  Thought we would try ACT this year since last year he did the SAT trying to compare on which he liked better and scored better on in anticipation for his junior year.  Thanks for any insights!!

 

For scholarships, it depends.  I've heard that one of the local-ish schools will give you an excellent scholarship for a score in the upper 20s, but at other places upper 20s would put you in the lower 25% of students attending. 

 

Older dd's score got her everything from an offer of a full ride at one school to a thank-you-for-applying-here's-our-standard-rates at another.

 

We looked at the stats on this About.com page for information on what the middle 50% of students at various universities scored, but I have no clue how accurate it is: http://collegeapps.about.com/od/choosingacollege/a/CollegeProfiles.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am new to the ACT so what score is considered good? What type of score do you need for really GOOD scholarships?

...

Thought we would try ACT this year since last year he did the SAT trying to compare on which he liked better and scored better on in anticipation for his junior year.

Last post of this thread. Last year would be the old SAT. This March onwards is the new SAT. Your son won't be able to superscore SAT from two different formats/versions. He could superscore for ACT if the college he apply does that.

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/602718-random-questions-regarding-the-act-vs-sat/?do=findComment&comment=6944541

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will add that my son has not finished Geometry, I'm a firm believer in not starting Alg before 9th, so I know that will play a role, but I'm actually quite happy with his Math score, His English is where it bites him in the backside.

Geometry takes up at least 40% of ACT so his score can only go up with completion of geometry. The english section emphasize on grammar.

My youngest one can barely finish half the questions in the free sample ACT practice test by ACT when he tried. He is my slow (speed) reader. He is taking in June for a baseline. Your son's score is great for without prep.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do have the test prep books, but originally my husband and I didn't plan on him taking it now.  So we haven't used them.  Now I know I will add it to my agenda for the summer and next year.   I won't put him in the local class I found because I've heard it's crazy boot camp like, and that's just not us.  Most likely he'll go to a community  college or tech school.  What he enjoys doing and the fields that draw him in wouldn't be best suited for a 4 year uni.  They have those degrees of course, but it he could get to the same career  at a CC for less money. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just want to add a reminder that no one's worth is based upon any test score.

 

I rejoice with anyone out there who's rejoicing whether their score is a 36 or a 15.

 

Different scores are needed for different goals.

 

Not everyone needs to be a star quarterback to be worthy.  The same goes for academic pursuits.  My nephew (who couldn't even graduate from high school due to ps tests) is just as worthy as my tippy top stat middle son.  They have different niches in life, that's true, but I have a different niche in life from either of them too.  Does that mean I'm not worthy?

 

To those who opt to post scores (and goals with those scores), I'm positive many homeschoolers coming behind us are happy to have some thoughts for comparison of score to goal.  I'll be brave and thank you for them.  I know on college confidential I appreciated those who shared scores with schools/goals and acceptances/rejections.  Here it seems to be some sort of taboo thing, but here is where it's probably more useful to everyone since homeschoolers don't have access to stats from other homeschoolers (Naviance style).  On an education board where many (not all) are thinking college, this info is worth a bit when considering schools.

 

Then too, I want to add my reminder that an ACT score doesn't correlate all that well with most majors and definitely doesn't show work ethic (which is why some with a 35 can flunk out of college).  It generally correlates well with those I see in high school and how they do in their math/English classes, but that's only one measure of a man/woman.  I doubt that measure correlates at all with happiness or being content with life as an adult.

 

Off my soapbox - and kudos to all who are happy with their scores, baseline, final, or anything in between!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Geometry takes up at least 40% of ACT so his score can only go up with completion of geometry. The english section emphasize on grammar.

My youngest one can barely finish half the questions in the free sample ACT practice test by ACT when he tried. He is my slow (speed) reader. He is taking in June for a baseline. Your son's score is great for without prep.

 

He only has 30 lessons/tests left in Geometry, so he has done most of it.  The English is what killed him.  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did think of deleting the score I posted up thread but the reason I posted it was hopefully to encourage someone that even a disinterested student can turn things around. i really like seeing actual numbers for comparison. I have always posted actual numbers in these discussions. And my kids have had scores all over the place.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well... it's been years since my guys have taken an ACT, but to put their scores where my reasoning is, they got (best composite score):

 

Oldest: 31 

Middle: 34

Youngest: 27

 

All three got significant merit aid at their respective colleges (seen below in my sig).  All got accepted everywhere they applied, except for middle son getting waitlisted at WUSTL (didn't end up his top choice, so no big deal and he didn't opt to get on the waitlist since it wasn't his top).  All got merit aid from every one of their acceptances - some more than others, of course.

 

All three have equal value to me as people/sons.  All three also have different paths they're on.  As long as they don't opt for pimp, illegal drug dealer (or other criminal), or terrorist, we're supportive of the paths they choose.  I love watching my baby birds fly!

 

And I still love my nephew who couldn't graduate from high school too!  He's a truck driver now and loves his job.  He never even took an ACT (or SAT).  If he had, his score would have been at or near as low as it can get.  It has no bearing on his worth as a person.  It just would have let the world know he wasn't really college material at any level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ps  Middle son's main subject score that kept him from reaching perfection was... wait for it... science!  He kept trying and trying to make that better, but the speed that test required for that section was just too much for him.  That lower score pulled his other scores down.

 

He's now a science major with a 3.97 GPA (two A-'s in his career, one in his English class - a section he aced on the ACT) and doing ok (I think) in college. :lol:  He's even over his disgust with himself that he couldn't improve that score.  :coolgleamA:

 

Scores on tests aren't everything - or perfect predictors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...