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Right Start Level E 2nd edition


mamamoose
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Their website says they are on track to release one level each year (E in 2016). I'm assuming that since D was released around September of last year (if my memory serves me correctly), that E will also release around that time. I haven't heard anything else about it, though.

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Yeah, I'm expecting...late August, I think Level D was released?  So probably around then for E, too.

 

Now, the real question is, do we have to wait a whole 'nother year for Level F as well, or is it the same as Fractions??  I'm guessing it's different.  :(

 

But they're not re-doing G, right, so we can buy F and then G at the same time?  Phew!

 

As to what to do right now, how about Beast Academy?  It's good fun!  We spent some time on Beast this year already so we're not as close to being done Level D yet.

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I'd hesitate to go to the 1st edition.  The two editions diverge more as you go higher in the levels.  

 

Is she proficient with her math facts?  If not you could always work on that this summer until E comes out.  Or like PP, play with Beast to keep it fresh in her mind.

 

For each level, Rightstart has been pretty consistent about releasing the 2nd editions at the end of Aug/early September, if i recall correctly.

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I would not freak out about a level D not testing into Beast 4 - really, the BA books go really into depth and are great. I would start with the 3A, I honestly wish they had not put 'grade levels' on the BA books but had done something like, triangle, rectangle, pentagon, hexagon instead or anything other than grade level.

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I would not freak out about a level D not testing into Beast 4 - really, the BA books go really into depth and are great. I would start with the 3A, I honestly wish they had not put 'grade levels' on the BA books but had done something like, triangle, rectangle, pentagon, hexagon instead or anything other than grade level.

Oh, I love that naming scheme for a math course....

 

Point, line, triangle, rectangle etc. Love it!

 

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Hugs!    If she's behind the curve now due to PS instruction but was getting straight As in PS, then she's not any worse off than her peers in the "big" school.  Just remember that your job is to meet her where she's at and with time and patience, she will get to where she needs to be.

 

Another idea for the summer while you wait for book E ... you could do some of the activities from the "relaxed math" thread that is pinned at the top of this forum.  Or perhaps work on some Critical Thinking books to develop logic skills.  We recently tried an online sample of their Math Balance materials, and I thought it was an neat way to develop algebraic thinking without actually using any numbers.  

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Well I'm freaking out a little because I just looked at beast and she won't even test into 4th grade! I wasn't going to worry about it but seriously she got straight A's in public school and she tests so low in everything now!

 

 

How old is she, actually?

 

Beast isn't the same as most other curriculum.  Regardless of her age, if you're using D I'd get Beast 3, and she can do it, and then move into 4.  She might move through it very quickly if she's catching up.

 

The other thing you can do is to play the games from the RS game book.  Just the games.  Lots and lots of games.  You can advance through concepts in the games book.

 

What concerns me, though, is that RS has a pretty set publishing schedule for the next two books, so if you're fretting about levels, that fretting is going to happen again for the next two years...

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She is 10. And what concerns me about the level she is at, is that the particular school she was in did not push anyone to excel so the school was behind and it took something drastic for us to realize what was happening, and now here we are. All three of my kids are extremely bright, as are both my husband and I, and Ibwant to reserve the option of re-enrolling in another school at some point.

 

Maybe I need to consider another math program for her altogether? :/

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We added Beast for my 10 year old and he loves it.  We're RS users, too.  If I were you, I would definitely check out Beast.  The concepts are more in depth and are really challenging (but fun) for him.

 

If I were you, I would do a summer of Beast and lots of RS card games.  It won't do anything but solidify what she has learned in Level D and will prepare her for the challenges to come in Level E.

 

And, she really isn't that far behind, IMHO.  If you spend the summer working through the RS Games and Beast, she will fly through Level E.  She'll be ahead before you know it.  :)

 

 

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Some other factors to consider ....

What are your expectations for your child?  What's your end goal?  Calculus by 11th grade?  Pre-Calculus by 12th grade?  Maybe by working backwards from your desired en point would help ease your anxiety.

 

Is your daughter "up" for working on math through the summer?  In the grand scheme of things, we are talking about 4 months of her academic career.  I'd hate for her to burnout on math or school in those 4 months and then require a long time to recover.

 

Why did you choose RS in the first place?  Can you achieve those same objectives with another program?  

 

Could you wait to accelerate her sometime later in her career?  Maybe taking Algebra II and Geometry at the same time?  Or skipping Middle School Math if she's truly mastered elementary math?

 

However, if you end up switching to a different program, I'd be curious to know what you choose!

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I chose RS because both my older kids were taught at school to count on their fingers and going into 4th grade she couldn't do any mental math for subtraction and addition, and she didn't know her multiplication facts at all. I liked that RS encouraged visualization, and it improved her overall math ability a lot, but I do think it didn't move her along as fast as I thought. I thought she would cruise through D really fast, and was surprised at how much she didn't know. I was hoping E would be ready to start this summer, and that we would be done with E by Christmas.

 

I'll be frank and say that both dh and I have IQs in the 130-150 range and all 3 of my kids appear to be as smart or smarter (ds definitely is as we've had his tested) so I highly doubt it's an ability problem--I think the school was just happy with not having to bother themselves with her as long as she plugged along. There were a lot of students with learning problems and it was a small school and a lot of small town politics and my kids just got the short end of the stick.

 

She loves school work and we are on a year round plan for the most part anyway. Ds can't really afford to take a break with his remediation at this point so we are going for it this summer. Math and reading only, though so it will still be light.

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OK - Here's a possible solution that would need more research:  What about getting a copy of Level D, 1st edition and seeing where you fall in there?  Maybe the difference between D, 2nd edition and D, 1st edition would be just enough to get you through the summer; and then when E, 2nd edition comes out, you'd start somewhere in the middle and hopefully finish by Christmas.  (Hmmm - that idea has potential now that I typed it all out!)

 

I've got a D, 1st edition; so if you want to PM me, maybe we can compare the two editions.

 

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I suggest calling RightStart and asking them what they recommend.  Their customer service is amazing.  I think you probably could move her into 1st edition, but you'd want to talk to them first.  The two edition really diverge at level C so that I doubt you could move straight across from one edition to the other without missing something (I'd guess you still need the last 40ish lessons of 1st edition D before starting 1st edition E... but a friend has our copy right now so I'm not sure.)  But I bet they could figure it out for you if you called RS. 

 

As for Beast, like everyone else said, don't worry about the grade levels or loosing ground there if you switch over.   My DS#1 finished RS (1st edition) A through E and then started in BA 3C.  I thought there would be a bunch of review, but because BA takes each concept so much farther, there really wasn't much.  Sure, he was familiar with the concepts, but it wasn't the same math he'd already done, if that makes any sense.  Plus, BA is set up so that kids are supposed to move into AoPS pre-algebra in 6th, so even if you run 2 whole years "behind", you're still looking at starting algebra I by 9th grade.  However, your DD could probably move considerably faster than one level per grade.  

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Yes to both of your questions.

And I agree with PP that calling RS would be very beneficial.

She hasn't taken the beast placement test yet? Well, if you're considering using Beast, Having her so the placement worksheet would be the first thing I'd do. As mentioned earlier, don't worry about what the label says on the book - it's just a label!!!

 

The two RS editions really diverge at level C. So that's why I'd imagine that you could get a few more lessons from the 1st edition.

 

You could always use the Activities for the Abacus book from RS and make your own lesson "plans" from it. That was the original format of RS before the leveled books came out.

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If there's no division in D, 2nd edition, then I think you could probably get a good deal of material for the summer. (1sr edition and 2nd edition really start to diverge greatly at level c.). And D, 1sr edition has the fundamental concepts of division, which you said was her weak point.

 

When you say she's weak in division - is it just recalling the math facts? Or is it a lack of understanding the concept of division?

 

Did you know that RS doesn't really teach long division like we learned? I haven't gotten to that point yet, so you might want to talk to a RS rep to make sure your expectations will be met.

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She's had almost no division except what she's learned prior to homeschooling. And there is a very small amount in D 2nd Edition but it's almost as if it's expected that she know it, it's not really been taught. I guess I should look back through C and check out what she missed...(she started in D and my son is in C). And I would like to look at some of the division lessons in level D 1st edition...that might be helpful. I will also call right start on Monday. :)

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And I did print off the Beast assessment, but I wanted to make sure she could jump in in the middle. Looks like she will place about 3C or D.

Beast Academy is new.  I used RightStart 1st editions with my dd back in the old days, before BA, etc., hehe.  I would look at those samples and make sure you think that's a good transition.  Given what you're describing, I'm not sure it would be.  She might do better in MUS or BJU.  And sure, go ahead and say her IQ is so high she shouldn't be doing xyz abomination of math.  :D  

 

Math is very personal.  I think you're running out of levels anyway, and you have a dc who is struggling a bit.  She may have some low processing speed, visual memory issues, or maybe just some reason why it's not clicking.  I know you said it's the school.  I'm just saying you *can* be gifted and have another explanation.  My dd16 is super bright, and math for her was that sort of back and forth (very bright, facts not sticking).  We went from RightStart to BJU (good), TT (good), and now MUS (best).  She LOVES MUS.  It's just right for her.  It gives her the independence she wants, and Demme's explanations really click with her.  Maybe your dd will click with BA, dunno.  It really is very personal like that.  I'm just suggesting that you broaden your search a bit and get very real.  There's this "MUS is so horrible" contingent on the boards along with a TT is horrible and other things are horrible crowd.  Whatever.  My dd still has stinkin' good scores.  

 

Personally, I think it's concerning that your dd hasn't done any division yet.  RS 1st edition taught short division (good) and just kissed long division.  It really wasn't a strong point for the curriculum, so that's good they're updating it.  I liked their explanation of short division, but division in general was something where dd bogged down.  It's something most people do with a calculator.  

 

I'm looking at the BA samples, and my ds with SLD math who is gifted could go into it and have fun.  I like what I'm seeing there so much, I'm thinking we'll finish the things we're doing (Ronit Bird ebooks) and go into it.  Like it!  But I think it's really individual.  With what you're describing (bogged down, needing help to visualize the math), I would at least look at MUS.  Super bright kids apply at a higher level on their own.  When my dd was at that stage, we did some of the math olympiad stuff AOPS sells.  It was easy to add that brainier stuff in.  You might also try playing games with her and see what happens.  Have you played Ticket to Ride?  How does she do?  There you'd be seeing issues with working memory.  Since her performance is so unexpected, to me I'd be wondering about working memory issues or visual memory issues.  You could get her screened by a developmental optometrist.  My dd turned to have visual memory problems, which we ended up doing VT for.  

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Beast Academy is new.  I used RightStart 1st editions with my dd back in the old days, before BA, etc., hehe.  I would look at those samples and make sure you think that's a good transition.  Given what you're describing, I'm not sure it would be.  She might do better in MUS or BJU.  And sure, go ahead and say her IQ is so high she shouldn't be doing xyz abomination of math.   :D

 

Math is very personal.  I think you're running out of levels anyway, and you have a dc who is struggling a bit.  She may have some low processing speed, visual memory issues, or maybe just some reason why it's not clicking.  I know you said it's the school.  I'm just saying you *can* be gifted and have another explanation.  My dd16 is super bright, and math for her was that sort of back and forth (very bright, facts not sticking).  We went from RightStart to BJU (good), TT (good), and now MUS (best).  She LOVES MUS.  It's just right for her.  It gives her the independence she wants, and Demme's explanations really click with her.  Maybe your dd will click with BA, dunno.  It really is very personal like that.  I'm just suggesting that you broaden your search a bit and get very real.  There's this "MUS is so horrible" contingent on the boards along with a TT is horrible and other things are horrible crowd.  Whatever.  My dd still has stinkin' good scores.  

 

Personally, I think it's concerning that your dd hasn't done any division yet.  RS 1st edition taught short division (good) and just kissed long division.  It really wasn't a strong point for the curriculum, so that's good they're updating it.  I liked their explanation of short division, but division in general was something where dd bogged down.  It's something most people do with a calculator.  

 

I'm looking at the BA samples, and my ds with SLD math who is gifted could go into it and have fun.  I like what I'm seeing there so much, I'm thinking we'll finish the things we're doing (Ronit Bird ebooks) and go into it.  Like it!  But I think it's really individual.  With what you're describing (bogged down, needing help to visualize the math), I would at least look at MUS.  Super bright kids apply at a higher level on their own.  When my dd was at that stage, we did some of the math olympiad stuff AOPS sells.  It was easy to add that brainier stuff in.  You might also try playing games with her and see what happens.  Have you played Ticket to Ride?  How does she do?  There you'd be seeing issues with working memory.  Since her performance is so unexpected, to me I'd be wondering about working memory issues or visual memory issues.  You could get her screened by a developmental optometrist.  My dd turned to have visual memory problems, which we ended up doing VT for.  

That's just it, and I'm not being defensive or protective, but she hasn't HAD any division. She hasn't HAD any geometry. All students in the school are taught to count on their fingers and their math was very sloppy--it isn't just her. She grasps the content and has done very well with lessons and reviews and assessments this year, but I can only ask her to do so many lessons and spend so much time on it per day. When I looked at BA 4A, I already knew she wouldn't pass it because she hasn't had any of it. She does short division problems now because we have done them aside from RS but I liked how RS taught multiplications in the thousands and had hoped it would teach division similarly so I was really waiting for long division but I guess we are going to have to dive into it on our own. 

 

Dd won't like MUS or TT. She does NOT want a computer/video based program at all. I am considering TT for ds who is very mathematical and doesn't love RS and all the games (he thinks they are hokey and I'm inclined to agree--it feels like worksheets made into games and too much time to figure out the games well anyway). We play cribbage, and Gin Rummy, and war games a lot, and we play yahtzee, etc, and the kids play great with all those. I don't know what Ticket to Ride is...I can google it and see if that's something they might enjoy. 

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If you just want to kill time, you could diverge and do some geometry or applied math for a while.  Have you done any math literature?  That was an age/stage where my dd enjoyed A Gebra Named Al and similar books.  You could do Pet Store math  https://simplycharlottemason.com/scmforum/topic/pet-shop-math/or  MOEMS Contest Problems for Elementary and Middle Schools

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I really wanted to keep going at Right Start. I didn't realize it wouldn't even be an option. She loves RS, and moved through Level D, starting mid-November to now, she was just behind to start with. I had figured E would be ready by May/June/July, for whatever reason I had in my head, and I was wrong and now I am left to figure out what to do now. I am really thinking I will switch curriculum for her. I wish they at least had a potential layout for how E and F will look--that would be helpful. I imagine they are losing customers as a result of leaving people hanging. 

 

ETA: All of the above are reasons we pulled the kids out of public school. We had always considered homeschooling as a very close option to public school, but the school here is K-8 and has 15 total kids, two teachers and an aide. It's broken up into 2 classrooms, and the lower grades (K-3) have had 4 teachers and one teacher, the year before last school year, didn't do much teaching at all. She got fired in March as a result and the kids were left with the aide for the remainder of the school year. Then, last year, the teacher had catch up to do and was really in over her head with the kinds of problems some of the students had (I think she had 4 out of 6 students with special needs of some kind). We should have pulled them out last year, but honestly, dh wanted them involved in all the "extracurriculars" the school had to offer and I stuck it out. Now we are paying a price. I really thought if she could stick with RS and get through E by December of next year, we would be okay and on track. I still think that's the case. She is game for school all summer long--we will do 3 weeks on and a week off to make it less intense.

Edited by mamamoose
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No.  Stop.

You CAN keep going in Rightstart.  Absolutely.

But you need to do something with your time in the middle, or you need to switch to first edition.  That's fine!

 

Or you can choose to switch away from it if you prefer.

 

Now, Beast Academy: it starts in 3, so there's no "jumping in" there.

I frankly wouldn't try to skip her ahead in Beast.  Start at 3A, and just go through it faster if she's mastered.  It is a challenge program, and if she's really bright it will probably be delightful for her.

 

 

ETA:  Actually, 3A is one of the hardest parts.  So maybe start at 3B and go back to 3A later--but don't skip 3A, you'll want the geometry in it!

Edited by Kiara.I
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A third (fourth?) option would be to both BA and RS.  That's what I'm doing with my DS#2 right now.  He's very, very bright, but doesn't handle the challenge of BA well all the time, and while he picks up mathematical concepts quickly, he's not the kind to make those leaps on his own.  He wants/needs someone to spell it out for him first.  It works well for him to be introduced to a concept the way RS does it and then really dive into the subject with the intense challenge of BA.

 

If your DD is fluent with her multiplication facts, I don't think she'd need to do 3A or 3B in BA.  You could start her in 3C or 3D.  RS is pretty solid on geometry.  The takeaways from the 3A shapes chapter are right, acute, and obtuse angles, the ways to classify a triangle by angle and side length, and the different kinds of quadrilaterals (generally these are covered well by RS, IMO).  There is a bit of review in the 4A shapes chapter,  the distributive property is gone over again in the 4A multiplication chapter, perfect squares are worked into the 4A chapter on exponents, and kids doing RS usually understand basic perimeter and area well enough (you might want to go over what a rectilinear shape is and how you can used opposite sides to figure out missing side lengths).  

 

But I still think RS is a viable option, especially if your DD is loving it.  Just call them and find out where to go next.  

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Moose, have you done any standardized testing?  Depending on how old she is, doing RS might not be a guaranteed "back on track" kind of thing.  They're bolstering the 2nd edition, yes, but still the best way to evaluate where she is objectively is to do standardized testing.

 

Yes, I meant you could try those other things while you wait for E to come out.  Oh, duh, another good one to do while waiting for E would be Hands-on Equations!!!  Like that's a DEFINITE do, mercy.  They'll eat it up, and it's really valuable, not just killing time.

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A third (fourth?) option would be to both BA and RS.  That's what I'm doing with my DS#2 right now.  He's very, very bright, but doesn't handle the challenge of BA well all the time, and while he picks up mathematical concepts quickly, he's not the kind to make those leaps on his own.  He wants/needs someone to spell it out for him first.  It works well for him to be introduced to a concept the way RS does it and then really dive into the subject with the intense challenge of BA.

 

If your DD is fluent with her multiplication facts, I don't think she'd need to do 3A or 3B in BA.  You could start her in 3C or 3D.  RS is pretty solid on geometry.  The takeaways from the 3A shapes chapter are right, acute, and obtuse angles, the ways to classify a triangle by angle and side length, and the different kinds of quadrilaterals (generally these are covered well by RS, IMO).  There is a bit of review in the 4A shapes chapter,  the distributive property is gone over again in the 4A multiplication chapter, perfect squares are worked into the 4A chapter on exponents, and kids doing RS usually understand basic perimeter and area well enough (you might want to go over what a rectilinear shape is and how you can used opposite sides to figure out missing side lengths).  

 

But I still think RS is a viable option, especially if your DD is loving it.  Just call them and find out where to go next.  

She is definitely fluent with multiplication facts, for the most part. She has a few she gets hung up on, but she gets how to figure those out quickly. She's also great at multiplying one digit numbers by 5-6 digit numbers. She knows right, acute, and obtuse angles because we just recently taught her those. I think we will finish up the last 10-15 lessons in right start next week and do the mammoth math work texts I bought to go alongside, and then maybe try beast. 

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Moose, have you done any standardized testing?  Depending on how old she is, doing RS might not be a guaranteed "back on track" kind of thing.  They're bolstering the 2nd edition, yes, but still the best way to evaluate where she is objectively is to do standardized testing.

 

Yes, I meant you could try those other things while you wait for E to come out.  Oh, duh, another good one to do while waiting for E would be Hands-on Equations!!!  Like that's a DEFINITE do, mercy.  They'll eat it up, and it's really valuable, not just killing time.

She was required to participate in standardized testing at her school and was on track, and I just had her take the intro test for TT and for Saxon and she tested into both 5th grade levels of those, so maybe it was just the Beast and the fact that RS wants students through E for 4th grade. My purse for Right Start was really to break bad habits (the way she borrowed for subtractions and carried for addition/multiplication was backwards and she didn't really understand the reason behind it at all). RS has definitely cured those, and I guess looking at the big picture, that's the whole point of HSing. I really just wish I had caught it 2 years ago. :/

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I would chevk the RightStart placement test for edition 1 and switch her. She might place into D or E. If she placed into D there might be a lot of lessons she could zoom through.

 

RightStart does teach long division in level E in edition 1, but it isn't practiced a lot, it is more like an introduction to it.

 

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OK - I admit; I've gotten too invested in this thread and feel like i MUST respond.  ha ha! :D

Personally, I think it's concerning that your dd hasn't done any division yet.  RS 1st edition taught short division (good) and just kissed long division.  It really wasn't a strong point for the curriculum, so that's good they're updating it.  I liked their explanation of short division, but division in general was something where dd bogged down.  It's something most people do with a calculator.  

 

 

I'm not sure about being concerned about her level of proficiency in division.  If the student has a really firm understanding of the concept of multiplication, then the concept of division should be straightforward to pick up.  Do you agree or disagree?  (I haven't taught division yet, so I'm interested in hearing your opinion.)

That's just it, and I'm not being defensive or protective, but she hasn't HAD any division. She hasn't HAD any geometry. All students in the school are taught to count on their fingers and their math was very sloppy--it isn't just her. She grasps the content and has done very well with lessons and reviews and assessments this year, but I can only ask her to do so many lessons and spend so much time on it per day. When I looked at BA 4A, I already knew she wouldn't pass it because she hasn't had any of it. She does short division problems now because we have done them aside from RS but I liked how RS taught multiplications in the thousands and had hoped it would teach division similarly so I was really waiting for long division but I guess we are going to have to dive into it on our own. 

She hasn't had any geometry?  Bingo!  Now you have one thing you can do while you wait for E to appear.  You already have C, 2nd ed, so look in there for anything that she hasn't been taught yet.  Turn that lemon into lemonade, gal!   :p

 

I really wanted to keep going at Right Start. I didn't realize it wouldn't even be an option. She loves RS, and moved through Level D, starting mid-November to now, she was just behind to start with. I had figured E would be ready by May/June/July, for whatever reason I had in my head, and I was wrong and now I am left to figure out what to do now. I am really thinking I will switch curriculum for her. I wish they at least had a potential layout for how E and F will look--that would be helpful. I imagine they are losing customers as a result of leaving people hanging. 

Like PP said, you CAN do Right Start; it will just take a little creative, out of the box thinking to achieve this.  (Hey, this would make a great example to talk to you daughter about problem solving and how we go about solving challenging problems or when things don't go according to plan!)  RS has laid out their methodology and approach to math two times now ... (1)  the original Activities for AL Abacus and (2) RightStart Lessons, 1st edition.  The information and methodology is out there; we just need to figure out how to piece it all together for you in the best possible way for your family.

 

A third (fourth?) option would be to both BA and RS.  That's what I'm doing with my DS#2 right now.  He's very, very bright, but doesn't handle the challenge of BA well all the time, and while he picks up mathematical concepts quickly, he's not the kind to make those leaps on his own.  He wants/needs someone to spell it out for him first.  It works well for him to be introduced to a concept the way RS does it and then really dive into the subject with the intense challenge of BA.

 

If your DD is fluent with her multiplication facts, I don't think she'd need to do 3A or 3B in BA.  

Yes!  Working on challenging problems is invaluable.  I recently started 3B with DC more for the challenge rather than for the mathematical concepts which RS has already introduced.  

 

This sparked another option --- why not use Beast to teach division?!?  I'm not very familiar with the different levels of BA.

 

Edit:  Oops!  Too much time has elapsed since I started the post and finished the post.  :)

And we still don't really know, is your DD fluent with her multiplication facts?  If not, then there's something else you can work on for the summer.

 

Other things to think about:  

  • Is your main objective to (a) get her doing long division ASAP or (b) to give her a firm understanding of the concepts of arithmetic?  If it's option a, then you may be right in that RS won't achieve that for you (in other words, long division the RS way would not be ASAP).  If it's option b, then I'd see what you can piece together with the RS materials already on the market. 
  • What about spending her time this summer developing her critical thinking and logic skills ... Critical Thinking's Balance Benders or Prufrock Press' Logic Puzzle books  or playing chess or studying Cryptography or ?!?!  
  • Math isn't the be-all-end-all of her education, and we are talking about how to spend 4 months of her remaining 6(?) years of education.  You need to determine (a) what are your "must-haves" and "like-to-haves" in her education, (b) what is the end goal of the education you give her, and © where is she now compared to your end goal.  Once you clearly define the problem, then you can work towards a solution that may or may not include Rightstart.

 

Edited by domestic_engineer
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She hasn't had any geometry?  Bingo!  Now you have one thing you can do while you wait for E to appear.  You already have C, 2nd ed, so look in there for anything that she hasn't been taught yet.  Turn that lemon into lemonade, gal!

 

She has only had minimal geometry. I was JUST this comparing Level C with where she is in Level D and she is moving into Level D and I think it will cover nicely what she missed in Level C, and I am teaching ds that very thing in Level C right now! So yes, this is a gap I can fill asap! 

 

 

 

Is your main objective to (a) get her doing long division ASAP or (b) to give her a firm understanding of the concepts of arithmetic?  If it's option a, then you may be right in that RS won't achieve that for you (in other words, long division the RS way would not be ASAP).  If it's option b, then I'd see what you can piece together with the RS materials already on the market.

 

My main goal is definitely NOT that she learn division, lol. I want her to grasp and understand the concept, and she already understands the basics (the dividing into groups part of it, if that makes sense), and it certainly seems like she's ready for more, but I actually really like RS and its method of teaching as well as the sequence, so I am not discouraged with that part of it. I am discouraged we can't fall right into E and catch up to be ready for what comes next, if that makes sense. I think BA will be a good change of pace for the summer, though. She looked at it and it looks fun to her, and I know it will be a challenge because the placement tests really made her think outside the box! I am in love with it too.  :thumbup1:  I think it will be good for ds, too--he is already a math thinker (taught himself how to multiply and the concept behind it, taught himself large mental math, etc), so its an investment. Dd6 is already doing the first grade math mammoth work texts and isn't through RSA. Anyway, my point is, I think Beast will be a good divergence when we finish D and wait for E and maybe we will find something else in the interim if that's where we are supposed to be. I really love how y'all helped me walk through this!

 

By the way, I love the CTC--we are doing their Reading Detective and Word Roots and I bought Inference Detective for the summer (only because she LOVES Reading Detective so much).

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Just want to throw out there that your DD will enjoy BA a lot more if she is *fluent* in her math facts (can answer each in 3 seconds or less).  So a little Xtra Math (free) or reflex or whatever could be something you might want to consider adding into your summer plans.

 

And by math facts, I mean addition, subtraction, and multiplication (if you start after 3B).  Obviously she wouldn't need to be fluent in division facts yet...

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I called RS this morning and it sounds like they are shooting for August for level E. It also sounded like when we finish E we can go right into G, rather than wait for F, and then bounce back to F, so that sets my mind at ease. I ordered the level 3 packet for Beast. I have 3 kids so figured it would be worthwhile to have all 3 levels, and she can start where she needs to be, and we can fill in any gaps, if necessary.

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I called RS this morning and it sounds like they are shooting for August for level E. It also sounded like when we finish E we can go right into G, rather than wait for F, and then bounce back to F, so that sets my mind at ease. I ordered the level 3 packet for Beast. I have 3 kids so figured it would be worthwhile to have all 3 levels, and she can start where she needs to be, and we can fill in any gaps, if necessary.

 

Ooooh, we can go straight into G?  That's AWESOME information, thank you!

 

Seriously, start her in either 3A or 3B, and if you start in 3B do go back and do 3A.  I know they're labeled grade 3, and I know that's scary, but I have to learn the math before I can help my son with the problems--and I'm GOOD at math.  They are challenge/puzzle levels, so she'll learn a ton even if some of the basic questions are review for her.

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We received our Beast Academy Level 3 books today and she is in LOVE!!! She did the first two lessons on her own after her regular school work--I decided to just let her play with 3A for now as much or as little as she wants until she's completely finished with Level D and then we will hit it for the summer--this is such an engaging program!

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