Jump to content

Menu

Ok, one more time. Healthy eating.


Night Elf
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to figure this out. My mom, who is 73 and has type 2 diabetes, said she eats full fat everything because it's healthier than low fat. I think I'm stuck in old fashioned thinking because this seems wrong. I just read that even whole milk is considered healthier than skim. I lost just over 50 lbs. eating low fat and maintain by continuing to eat the way I did during my active weight loss. I require few calories to maintain my weight because I'm a sedentary person. If I eat more calories, I gain weight. It's as simple as that and that scares me. I don't want to gain all my weight back. But she's insisting I should be using whole milk, full fat yogurt, real butter, full fat peanut butter and avacodos (my favorite that I don't eat anymore). Those things would increase my caloric intake a great deal. How does one eat full fat without gaining weight?

 

I honestly don't see my activity increasing. Exercise puts me in a bad mood because I hate it so much. Every now and then I try walking and that never lasts more than a couple of weeks. It's just horrid!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have accomplished and held weight loss, you don't need to listen to anyone else about your body. You are magical and fantastic. Close your ears, nod and smile.

 

In general, diabetics try to decrease carbs/sugar, and don't worry as hard about fats. Lowered fat foods sometimes increase carb ingredients or salts as a compensation which is bad for diabetics. Also higher fat foods help some body types feel fuller longer: meaning those people end up eating less overall.

 

Meaning: there are reasons people say those things, and maybe it does work for some... But you have concrete data on what works for you. You don't need to listen to other people's theories.

Edited by bolt.
  • Like 28
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have accomplished and held weight loss, you don't need to listen to anyone else about your body. You are magical and fantastic. Close your ears, nod and smile.

 

In general, diabetics try to decrease carbs/sugar, and don't worry as hard about fats. Lowered fat foods sometimes increase carb ingredients or salts as a compensation which is bad for diabetics. Also higher fat foods help some body types feel fuller longer: meaning those people end up eating less overall.

 

Meaning: there are reasons people say those things, and maybe it does work for some... But you have concrete data on what works for you. You don't need to listen to other people's theories.

 

I agree with this.  I've done extensive research on nutrition for my family.  My son has multiple food allergies, and my father is a type 2 diabetic with heart disease.  What your mother is saying is the conventional wisdom (at the moment) and how my particular family is eating. However, if you found something that works for you, and you are happy and healthy, I'd just smile and nod. ;)

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. Your mom's way is what works for me because I also have blood sugar issues, so I'm not just concerned with calories in/out, but also maintaining a healthy glucose level. But it doesn't work for everyone. If low fat works for you and you are healthy and happy with it, then stick with that and ignore everyone else. There is no one right way.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with your mom, BUT I don't think you are being unhealthy and if that works for you then don't mess with it. 

 

For a diabetic the sugar/carb intake is important.  Low fat products tend to have more sugar and carbs.  For example, a tablespoon of fat free sour cream is 1.9 grams, but regular is .3.  This is not a huge difference for this one item, but overall this could add up.  Stuff like fat free salad dressings often use sugar and carbs as fillers. 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that different people's bodies are happier with different foods. If you want to eat avocados though, that's something I would look at how to add in. For me, carbs are the issue. If flat calories are yours, make swaps to eat the avocado. Example: if you're making Mexican, 1 cup of rice has about the same calories as 100g of avocado. I'd rather eat the avocado! Skim milk isn't worth the calories at all for me, so I'd drink water and put those to something worth it.

 

There's some plan that does low fat with carbs and high fat with low carbs. Trim Healthy Mama maybe?

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess a big part of this is why has there been a shift in thinking about fat?  In part it is because quite a few of the ideas that people had about the way it might be unhealthy seem to be wrong.  It's effect on the body, totally aside from weight, doesn't seem to be as bad as what people thought.

 

The other thing is that in many cases people have made poorer diet choices as a result of cutting out fat.  A lot of low fat foods have high sugar or salt, or are actually just really processed. (What is that 0-fat sour cream?  It looks like it is made with corn starch.)  Things like margarine are probably not very good for you, maybe they aren't even really food.  Or - they cut out fat by leaving out things like salad dressing or butter on veg and then end up eating far less veg which are in fact healthy.

 

Also - we have a better idea now that fats and proteins are typically very satisfying and lead to a feeling of fullness for longer, and can signal the body to stop eating.  And that they do a lot of healthy things for the body.

 

So - I think in light of this, it could be worthwhile to look overall at your weight-loss diet, and see where it could be tweaked.  If you are eating a lot of processed stuff or sugar or carbs, maybe changing things up a bit might be healthy.  If there are places you could introduce a little healthy fat, try it, especially if it is something you especially enjoy.  Do it slowly and see your results.

 

 

Edited by Bluegoat
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They often add sugar to low-fat products to make them taste better.  My DH has blood-sugar issues, so we avoid low-fat/fat-free products as much as possible.  Whole fat products tend to be less processed as well.  

 

DH recently gave up processed sugar and refined grains and has lost 35 pounds in less than 2 months.  He isn't calorie counting, and none of us feel like it's a "diet".  All he does is take 14,000 steps per day and limit his sugar.  I've lost a few pounds without trying (and still enjoying a bit of sugar when DH isn't around).   :blush:  I'm convinced fats aren't the big problem...although moderation is never a bad thing.

Edited by Holly
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a difference between eating to lose weight and eating to maintain a healthy weight. Once you're at your goal weight, I see no reason you shouldn't add back avocados, or anything else you like, in moderation. Full fat foods are often healthier than their processed, low fat counterparts, in part because many 'low fat' foods (packaged stuff) have added salt and sugar because you lose all the flavor when you remove the fat. I have also heard that you are more satisfied with full fat foods, so you eat less of them. 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haha! I do too. I want to love them, but so far, no.

 

Oh good.   I'm not alone.  I really don't get the allure .

 

I don't like a lot of foods that seem to be trendy now.  I don't like olives, feta cheese, avocados, capers, cilantro....barf!!  These foods all taste like a total salt lick to me except cilantro which tastes like soap.  Avocados taste like I dunno dirty feet or something.  Not that I've eaten dirty feet.  LOL

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh good. I'm not alone. I really don't get the allure .

 

I don't like a lot of foods that seem to be trendy now. I don't like olives, feta cheese, avocados, capers, cilantro....barf!! These foods all taste like a total salt lick to me except cilantro which tastes like soap. Avocados taste like I dunno dirty feet or something. Not that I've eaten dirty feet. LOL

They taste like rotten grass! And don't even get me started on the texture. I don't like any of the things you mentioned either. Cilantro I can eat in very small quantities. (When it's barely noticeable.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They taste like rotten grass! And don't even get me started on the texture. I don't like any of the things you mentioned either. Cilantro I can eat in very small quantities. (When it's barely noticeable.)

 

So I think we are describing something similar here.  Grass that has rotted because someone walked on it with dirty feet.  LOL

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I eat full fat.  I pick and choose based on good fat vs. bad fat.  It works for me.  I've found that often "low-fat" products have fillers in them that sabotage health instead of aiding it.  If I'm going to eat, I want real food.  I want simple food.  I want to know what's in it.  I don't want fillers or crazy concoctions. I'm not going to go out of my way to add fat to my diet, but I won't ignore it, either.  If I have a salad, you can bet I'm going to go for the olive oil/vinegar/honey/lime/spices dressing over the full fat Kraft Ranch.  Can read ingredients vs. can't.  Fresh vs. not.  I'm not adding bacon to it or anything else that is going to change the purpose of the salad.  I will use greek yogurt (non-fat, naturally) instead of sour cream when I can.  It's just about choosing the most real.

 

FWIW, full fat milk is only 3%.  Reduced is 2%.  I don't see a difference, really.  Even less of a difference if you drink water. LOL

Edited by HomeAgain
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. Your mom's way is what works for me because I also have blood sugar issues, so I'm not just concerned with calories in/out, but also maintaining a healthy glucose level. But it doesn't work for everyone. If low fat works for you and you are healthy and happy with it, then stick with that and ignore everyone else. There is no one right way.

 

I agree with everyone that if this is working for you, you should continue your low calorie eating.  

 

But, as you get older if you find your weight harder to maintain on a realistic number of calories you could start moving to a lower carb/higher fat diet. If your mom has type 2 diabetes, then its possible you will have some insulin resistance in your future.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Onions have to be TINY for me to eat them.  We are picky food twins. :lol:

 

Oh forget it.  I won't even eat something with onion powder in it. 

 

And people have tried many times to trick me because they don't believe it.  They don't like the result. 

 

I don't think I'm that picky.  The list I gave you and the onions are pretty much the only things I'll outright refuse to eat.  Add to the list herring.  Herring is vile. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, when you eat something that has higher fat (or high protein) at the same time as carbohydrates, the body takes longer to digest the meal (including the carbohydrates in that meal), so the diabetic body doesn't get as fast of a sugar dump into the bloodstream.

Ruth

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, I really thought about it and I don't really eat that many low fat foods anyway! I do eat some processed food, but not a lot. Like white bread. I'm sorry but I haven't yet found a whole wheat bread that tastes good. I wish I could. There is some kind of brown bread served at Outback that is pretty good, but I have no idea what it is. I think even the bread at my local grocery store bakery isn't 100% whole wheat. I'll look when I go today.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh good.   I'm not alone.  I really don't get the allure .

 

I don't like a lot of foods that seem to be trendy now.  I don't like olives, feta cheese, avocados, capers, cilantro....barf!!  These foods all taste like a total salt lick to me except cilantro which tastes like soap.  Avocados taste like I dunno dirty feet or something.  Not that I've eaten dirty feet.  LOL

 

I've said the same thing about cilantro. Yuck!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very often, fat free or low fat products are full of sugar so they taste like something (flavored yoghurt for example) or contain artificial ingredients to maintain texture (all kinds of thickeners in fat free yoghurt). They are not intrinsically more healthy.

I far prefer real, full fat foods and use them in moderation. Full fat foods are more satisfying and I need to eat less of them. I'd rather have a small quantity of excellent cheese than  a large quantity of low fat low quality cheese.

Edited by regentrude
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, I really thought about it and I don't really eat that many low fat foods anyway! I do eat some processed food, but not a lot. Like white bread. I'm sorry but I haven't yet found a whole wheat bread that tastes good. I wish I could. There is some kind of brown bread served at Outback that is pretty good, but I have no idea what it is. I think even the bread at my local grocery store bakery isn't 100% whole wheat. I'll look when I go today.

 

If it is working, seriously do not mess with it!

 

Some people take stuff to extremes.  There is lower fat and then there is fat free everything.  At the height of the fat free craze I had a friend who thought that she could eat anything so long as it was fat free.  They make fat free cookies, fat free cheese, fat free fat, etc.  It didn't work for her.  And it's really not healthy to eat zero fat.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to eat low fat, vanilla yogurt from Trader Joes because I could not stomach the low/no fat plain.  I could only eat it if I added spoonfuls of (very high in sugar) homemade strawberry jam to it.  Otherwise, it made me gag.

 

I read somewhere that full fat yogurt, even plain, was much more palatable, filling, and healthy, so I switched to full-fat, plain yogurt and I happily eat it with sliced banana and Joe's Os!  Much better for me!

 

Youngest ds eats full fat vanilla with frozen blueberries or the full fat plain with the afore mentioned sugar laden strawberry jam (he hates bananas), but he uses less jam than he did when I bought low/no fat plain.  As a growing teen, he'll eat half (or 3/4) of a container in one sitting, but it does fill him up.

 

I think if you are happy with what you are eating, and how you look/feel, then carry on.  Nod and smile is a great response!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, I really thought about it and I don't really eat that many low fat foods anyway! I do eat some processed food, but not a lot. Like white bread. I'm sorry but I haven't yet found a whole wheat bread that tastes good. I wish I could. There is some kind of brown bread served at Outback that is pretty good, but I have no idea what it is. I think even the bread at my local grocery store bakery isn't 100% whole wheat. I'll look when I go today.

 

The Outback loaf is just white bread with molasses and food coloring. ;)

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd rather have full-fat than non/low fat.  most low fat stuff makes up the flavor difference by adding inordinate amounts of sugar. I can drop all my numbers in a short time by doing nothing more than eliminating sugar. (including honey and agave.  they're still 'sugar'. nothing artificial either.)  I can eat all the fat I want - and do.  I use real butter.  margarine is nothing but hydrogenated (re: artificially soild) oil.

 

I think sugar is a bigger problem than most people realize,  and/or are willing to do anything about.  It was never meant to be a major part of the diet.   I was recently at the home of a couple where both have type 2 diabeties. their freezer was loaded with ice cream.  I just smh.  he'd recently had to have his lower leg amputated, and they're still hardly changing their diet.

eta: these people are both very SLIM, and had been very physically active in their younger years.

Edited by gardenmom5
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd rather have full-fat than non/low fat.  most low fat stuff makes up the flavor difference by adding inordinate amounts of sugar. I can drop all my numbers in a short time by doing nothing more than eliminating sugar. (including honey and agave.  they're still 'sugar'. nothing artificial either.)  I can eat all the fat I want - and do.  I use real butter.  margarine is nothing but hydrogenated (re: artificially soild) oil.

 

I think sugar is a bigger problem than most people realize,  and/or are willing to do anything about.  It was never meant to be a major part of the diet.   I was recently at the home of a couple where both have type 2 diabeties. their freezer was loaded with ice cream.  I just smh.  he'd recently had to have his lower leg amputated, and they're still hardly changing their diet.

eta: these people are both very SLIM, and had been very physically active in their younger years.

 

Yep.  It drives me crazy how much sugar is put into stuff.  Even stuff where sugar has no business being.  I once read the back of a bag of frozen cauliflower and there was freaking sugar in it!!!  Why?! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I eat full fat.  I pick and choose based on good fat vs. bad fat.  It works for me.  I've found that often "low-fat" products have fillers in them that sabotage health instead of aiding it.  If I'm going to eat, I want real food.  I want simple food.  I want to know what's in it.  I don't want fillers or crazy concoctions. I'm not going to go out of my way to add fat to my diet, but I won't ignore it, either.  If I have a salad, you can bet I'm going to go for the olive oil/vinegar/honey/lime/spices dressing over the full fat Kraft Ranch.  Can read ingredients vs. can't.  Fresh vs. not.  I'm not adding bacon to it or anything else that is going to change the purpose of the salad.  I will use greek yogurt (non-fat, naturally) instead of sour cream when I can.  It's just about choosing the most real.

 

FWIW, full fat milk is only 3%.  Reduced is 2%.  I don't see a difference, really.  Even less of a difference if you drink water. LOL

 

Greek yogurt is not nonfat naturally. It's the same as milk; there are whole, lowfat, and nonfat options.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep.  It drives me crazy how much sugar is put into stuff.  Even stuff where sugar has no business being.  I once read the back of a bag of frozen cauliflower and there was freaking sugar in it!!!  Why?! 

I've always made  my own spaghetti sauce.

 

someone gave me a big bottle of sauce from costco.  it was sickeningly sweet.  it was loaded with HFCS.

 

eta: one of the things I've learned - and may be part of why manufacturers use so much - the more sugar you eat - the more you eat.  it messes with the part of the brain that recognizes satiety.

Edited by gardenmom5
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greek yogurt is not nonfat naturally. It's the same as milk; there are whole, lowfat, and nonfat options.

 

Right, but mine is.  It's non-fat milk and cultured bacteria.  Not milk, cream, and cultures.  Or still others, which have gelatin added to create the right texture.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always made  my own spaghetti sauce.

 

someone gave me a big bottle of sauce from costco.  it was sickeningly sweet.  it was loaded with HFCS.

 

eta: one of the things I've learned - and may be part of why manufacturers use so much - the more sugar you eat - the more you eat.  it messes with the part of the brain that recognizes satiety.

 

It's also cheap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If what you are doing works for you, there's no need to mess with it.

 

I prefer full-fat because I'm satisfied with less of it (so the net calories would be the same, but I like it better). Anything marketed as low-fat can have not just added sugars, but in many cases, artifical flavorings (including MSG and its friends disodium guanylate and... I forget now what the other one is--something inosinate?) to make it taste better.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am someone who does better with less fat and fewer carbs in her diet. I've tried a lot of different things, but everything else causes weight gain. 

 

I think the whole 'low fat is bad for you' is correct if you are using "low fat" as a way to eat junk. For example, 'Low fat cookies'.  Well, how many people have eaten a whole box of 'low fat' cookies telling themselves its ok because it is low fat?  When has it EVER been a good idea to eat a box of any kind of cookie?  Low fat ice cream and low fat mayonaise etc are all examples of 'fake food' and usually have a lot more sugar to make up for the missing fat.  Fat transmits flavour, so if you take out the fat your going to have to do something to give it flavour. In those cases, I tend to go without or find another substitute. For mayo, I use plain, fat free greek yogurt. I tend to skip ice cream altogether.
 

It's like the low carb thing, when people started coming up with low carb substitutes for snack/junk food.  A low carb doughnut (is there such a thing?) is still not a good idea.  I remember seeing 'low carb' candy.  Ok, if your caloric needs are such that you know eating candy is a bad choice for you, then low carb candy won't make it better. It's still just empty, and probably unnecessary, calories.

 

I am a smoothie lover, but I see so many people making a smoothie full of sugar and calling it healthy. My step dad makes a 'smoothie' of orange juice and bananas. It's nothing but a sugar bomb, but he sucks it down by the pint calling it healthy. He'll even offer to make one of oranges and pineapple, saying it's 'better for you' because it's 'low fat' without the banana.  How is a pint of orange juice and pineapple 'healthy' if you don't account for the sugar and calories?  It might be 'fat free' but its still a glass of sugar. 

 

I don't think skim milk is bad for you and whole milk is healthy for you.  Soda is a poor choice and milk is a healthier choice. And, yes, if you can't digest milk or are allergic or sensitive then you do you, but if you can safely consume milk then it is a better choice than soda.

 

My mom buys this stuff for her coffee called 'fat free half and half'.  I have pointed out that it is an oxymoron, but worse than it's crime against language, it is stuffed full of sugar. She might be 'saving' on fat, but she is making up for it with carbs.

 

Some people do ok with a higher fat intake. I have to keep my eye on both fat and sugar or my weight goes up.  It's just a fact of life for me.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A few things.

 

First, if you enjoy avocados, you certainly should eat them, at least in moderation. Yes, they're high in fat (and cost), but they're also high in fiber, vitamin K, folate... They're really a nutritional powerhouse. Obviously the word "moderation" is important. There is a huge difference between having a single serving of avocado weekly and having ten servings of guac with sour cream every day.

 

I would also add that real butter is usually better than margarine, because the fats in margarine are super bad for your body. It's not just an issue of weight loss. But you shouldn't be eating very much butter OR margarine! (Likewise, a single serving of peanut butter won't ruin your diet... but a serving of peanut butter is much smaller than many people realize.) It's when we overindulge that things go haywire.

 

Secondly, nutritional science is very much in flux. We don't know for sure the absolute best way to eat and why it's best. One thing we're starting to find is different people have different ideal diets... like, wildly different. I really have to start dinner, but I'll drag up some links later. If the way you're eating is working for you, then that's all you need to worry about.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I think full-fat real foods in moderation are healthier than fake low-fat alternatives.  Once upon a time I remember believing that an entire package of Red Vines wasn't bad for you because it was "fat free."  That's terrible for your blood sugar.  A person would be better off (IMO) eating a candy bar with some nuts and fat in it because it's not going to hit their blood stream like pure sugar will. 

 

What you're doing is probably working because you're also counting calories and not over-eating in general. For a long time we believed that "fat made you fat" and people would justify eating a lot of sugary low-fat foods. Refined carbs and sugar make us far fatter and that's what we need to be watching instead.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm in the- I'd rather eat less real food- camp but if you enjoy what you eat and have good health nothing else really matters.

 

 

Secondly, nutritional science is very much in flux. We don't know for sure the absolute best way to eat and why it's best. One thing we're starting to find is different people have different ideal diets... like, wildly different. I really have to start dinner, but I'll drag up some links later. If the way you're eating is working for you, then that's all you need to worry about.

Amen to this! I really, truly wish that people would realize this, why there is a push to get our diets all the same I can't understand. What works for you may not work for your neighbor(with so many varying diets in the world why do we think this). So many people think that if someone fails on their favored diet they must have done it wrong, diet has become religion for too many.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I lost just over 50 lbs. eating low fat and maintain by continuing to eat the way I did during my active weight loss. I require few calories to maintain my weight because I'm a sedentary person. If I eat more calories,

I'm the same, without the amazing weightloss. Congratulations! I think it general the more 'natural' a food is the better it is for you. I read ingredients. Has something gone into the food when the fat came out? What was it? I make a case by case decision. For instance, neither my low fat milk nor my light coconut milk have additional ingredients. Common sense trumps the latest food fad!

 

I did want to question your avoidance of avocados. I lost weight on a calorie controlled diet and many of the recipes featured avocado: it's a healthy fat, it's filling and satisfying. For instance, 2 slices of toast, 50g of smoked salmon and 1/4 avo make a 300 cal breakfast. If you love avos it might be worth double checking your research on that one.

 

And again, congratulations on the weightloss.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...