Jump to content

Menu

bored / intellectual challenge? s/o SAHM


regentrude

Recommended Posts

The topic of boredom came up on the SAHM thread. Some people commented how they cannot believe one could be bored at home. One poster mentioned "always finding something to do... even just browsing in the bookstore"

So, let's do a spin-off.

 

I am bored. There, I said it.

 

I work; I teach physics at a four year STEM university.  I homeschool a high school junior who is very independent and does not need me most of the time. My oldest is away at college.

I can "find something to do":

I work on my self education. I consume copious amounts of Great Courses lectures while driving with DH. I read, am in a Great Books club run by the English Department, work on my French (not as much as I should). I am on the board of a local non-profit, am part of a women's circle, sing in choir, do Zumba every week at the women's community center. I hike every weekend and do nature photography, have created and maintain a website for hiking in our state, run a facebook page that goes with the website. I run my household, cook from scratch every day, house is company ready pretty much any time. I throw dinners and parties. I spend way too much time on this board and know more about homeschool curriculum than I will need to know for the rest of my homeschooling career. I am wasting time online, sigh.

 

So, "stuff to do" (but still not enough people interaction to satisfy my extrovert needs), and it does not bring me real satisfaction. I love my job, love the interaction with the students - but I would like to do something where I can stretch myself intellectually and give myself a genuine challenge, so that I can have a sense of accomplishment.

 

For those of you past the all consuming intensive stage of parenting/homeschooling: what do you do to give yourself the gift of an intellectual challenge, mental stretch, sense of accomplishment?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 235
  • Created
  • Last Reply

The topic of boredom came up on the SAHM thread. Some people commented how they cannot believe one could be bored at home. One poster mentioned "always finding something to do... even just browsing in the bookstore"

So, let's do a spin-off.

 

I am bored. There, I said it.

 

I work; I teach physics at a four year STEM university. I homeschool a high school junior who is very independent and does not need me most of the time. My oldest is away at college.

I can "find something to do":

I work on my self education. I consume copious amounts of Great Courses lectures while driving with DH. I read, am in a Great Books club run by the English Department, work on my French (not as much as I should). I am on the board of a local non-profit, am part of a women's circle, sing in choir, do Zumba every week at the women's community center. I hike every weekend and do nature photography, have created and maintain a website for hiking in our state, run a facebook page that goes with the website. I run my household, cook from scratch every day, house is company ready pretty much any time. I throw dinners and parties. I spend way too much time on this board and know more about homeschool curriculum than I will need to know for the rest of my homeschooling career. I am wasting time online, sigh.

 

So, "stuff to do" (but still not enough people interaction to satisfy my extrovert needs), and it does not bring me real satisfaction. I love my job, love the interaction with the students - but I would like to do something where I can stretch myself intellectually and give myself a genuine challenge, so that I can have a sense of accomplishment.

 

For those of you past the all consuming intensive stage of parenting/homeschooling: what do you do to give yourself the gift of an intellectual challenge, mental stretch, sense of accomplishment?

You do a lot of stuff! :) So is the issue boredom or rather dissatisfaction with what you are doing? It seems like you could stretch intellectually at a huge amount of what you listed in different ways so I'm stumped on how you would challenge yourself more......

Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I can think of that might work for you is pursuing coursework in a new area, so you could hash out ideas with classmates.  Does your university offer graduate work in philosophy?  Maybe political science?  I know those areas are probably touched on in your Great Books group, but maybe a couple courses would take it deeper.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids are young so there's that, but they go to school part-time... but just a thought... I'm an analyst/stats person and almost every paper I work on is a huge intellectual stretch.. most of the time I'm incredibly far from my comfort zone because I'm working with people from across the university and sometimes around the world. Is there a group that you could collaborate with, something parallel where you come in on a number of different papers/projects as the [insert your type of physicist here]? Only caution is that I think that if you are a take-charge person you will often end up in charge of driving every such project which is the bane of my existence.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This semester I'm taking Ethics, which is taxing my brain in many ways. My pursuits are more creative and internal, I'm working on a novel - or I'm supposed to be when I'm not doing schoolwork. I try to get with my advisor about once a week or so and as my mentor we generally just discuss something I'm working on for him. He also teaches a special invitation only class with two students - me being one. He's able to go into depth on an issue we need and he is the expert in our school. I'm pretty sure he finds that intellectually stimulating to move beyond the routine of a general studies course. 

 

Do you have any students that you mentor? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved how you said teaching calculus based physics at the university wasn't intellectually stimulating. It reminded me back to when I was in grad school for a degree in special education. I had a tests and measurements class that I was bored with. I regularly flipped to the end of sample tests to solve the calculus problems (to this day I've never heard of student who got that far on those assessments). Then was scolded by my classmates when I stated that a child who prefers solitary math games to joining a group for soccer was not disturbed. 

 

I do a lot of nonfiction reading, but I don't consider that heavy intellectual pursuits. I am working toward entering a fourth career (aside from homeschool parent/SAHM). I guess I like to try knew things, which means I don't stick to the new thing to the point that it becomes a longterm status quo. One of my previous careers was patent attorney. My undergrad was Chemistry and my undergrad research was sponsored by NASA. Based on both my work in patents and undergrad research, I can say to anything I try "it's not rocket science, but if it becomes rocket science, I know what to do."

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I can sympathize. I'm about six years behind you, but I am already gathering ideas. I'm a bit terrified at how boring life will be when my kids don't need me so much; I derive so much purpose and satisfaction from teaching/mentoring them. The three things at the top of my list are 1) get my masters degree, 2) write a novel, 3) start a cottage school (a long-term dream a friend and I have discussed together). Maybe all three.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The topic of boredom came up on the SAHM thread. Some people commented how they cannot believe one could be bored at home. One poster mentioned "always finding something to do... even just browsing in the bookstore"

So, let's do a spin-off.

 

I am bored. There, I said it.

 

I work; I teach physics at a four year STEM university. I homeschool a high school junior who is very independent and does not need me most of the time. My oldest is away at college.

I can "find something to do":

I work on my self education. I consume copious amounts of Great Courses lectures while driving with DH. I read, am in a Great Books club run by the English Department, work on my French (not as much as I should). I am on the board of a local non-profit, am part of a women's circle, sing in choir, do Zumba every week at the women's community center. I hike every weekend and do nature photography, have created and maintain a website for hiking in our state, run a facebook page that goes with the website. I run my household, cook from scratch every day, house is company ready pretty much any time. I throw dinners and parties. I spend way too much time on this board and know more about homeschool curriculum than I will need to know for the rest of my homeschooling career. I am wasting time online, sigh.

 

So, "stuff to do" (but still not enough people interaction to satisfy my extrovert needs), and it does not bring me real satisfaction. I love my job, love the interaction with the students - but I would like to do something where I can stretch myself intellectually and give myself a genuine challenge, so that I can have a sense of accomplishment.

 

For those of you past the all consuming intensive stage of parenting/homeschooling: what do you do to give yourself the gift of an intellectual challenge, mental stretch, sense of accomplishment?

I'm so not past the intensive parenting stage. I am so jealous of your life! So many activities. Please tell me you were not this active/productive when you had littles. I need something to look forward to. Today I'm home with a sick baby and feeling very much stuck on the couch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I can think of that might work for you is pursuing coursework in a new area, so you could hash out ideas with classmates.  Does your university offer graduate work in philosophy?  Maybe political science?  I know those areas are probably touched on in your Great Books group, but maybe a couple courses would take it deeper.

 

I have toyed with the idea of going back to school to get another degree. Something that has absolutely nothing to do with physics! Alas, my STEM oriented very lopsided uni does not offer many graduate programs in the humanities.

Still, it is in the back of my mind for when my schedule is more flexible once DS is off to college.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so not past the intensive parenting stage. I am so jealous of your life! So many activities. Please tell me you were not this active/productive when you had littles. I need something to look forward to. Today I'm home with a sick baby and feeling very much stuck on the couch.

 

No, of course not with littles! After four years as a SAHM, I have always worked part time - but my one "me" thing was one night of choir. No time or energy for anything else. Then with older kids, more time and more energy, but more scheduling constraints because I was the chauffeur. Once they can drive themselves, it's amazing how many hours you suddenly get back and how many things you can attend.

Hang in there.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have toyed with the idea of going back to school to get another degree. Something that has absolutely nothing to do with physics! Alas, my STEM oriented very lopsided uni does not offer many graduate programs in the humanities.

Still, it is in the back of my mind for when my schedule is more flexible once DS is off to college.

 

 

Do they at least have a French class?  Not exactly "stimulating" in the way I think you're seeking, but it might at least help you meet that other goal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I intend to pursue another postgrad for interest sake. However I do need to get my foreign bachelors transcript evaluated first to apply for the local postgrad courses. I also intend to learn more musical instruments preferably the harp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not bored-bored. Just kind of bored.

 

It takes a lot of work to homeschool and supervise my kids' education. Course selection, curricula choices, teaching them how to manage their time, guiding their learning, etc. I use a lot of my brain quantity on these tasks. But, my brain *capacity* isn't challenged. Does that make sense? So, while I am very busy with things that are important to my family and me, and I don't wish to cut corners in any of these areas, it's not like my mind is enormously fulfilled.

 

I am also the type of person who feels very duty-bound to my family. So, while pursuing work outside the home sounds fun to me sometimes, I know it's not in the best interest of my family right now. So, I stay focused on the tasks at hand and give it my all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids are young so there's that, but they go to school part-time... but just a thought... I'm an analyst/stats person and almost every paper I work on is a huge intellectual stretch.. most of the time I'm incredibly far from my comfort zone because I'm working with people from across the university and sometimes around the world. Is there a group that you could collaborate with, something parallel where you come in on a number of different papers/projects as the [insert your type of physicist here]? Only caution is that I think that if you are a take-charge person you will often end up in charge of driving every such project which is the bane of my existence.

 

Nope, that ship has sailed. Being away from active research for 19 years means no chance of returning, ever. My "type of physicist" is not exclusively "instructor".

Just to clarify: I am not bitter with my choice; it was the right choice for our family and I do not regret it. But it is also a fact that some choices are irreversible.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do they at least have a French class?  Not exactly "stimulating" in the way I think you're seeking, but it might at least help you meet that other goal.

 

They do, but the timing conflicts either with my own teaching or with the time during which I can work with DS. It will have to wait until I am done homeschooling :)

I would also enjoy getting back into Russian... I was fluent many years ago and lost most of it because I did not use it. That is another language taught here (we do not have many choices)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we have to be careful to not assume

 

not busy=bored.

 

We can do endless tasks that can keep us busy all day long and still be bored.  Bored often has to do with not being satisfied on an intellectual level.  Some people require more more complex intellectual challenges to alleviate boredom.  (Think of Sherlock saying, "Bored. Bored. Bored..." then shooting the wall and saying, "The wall had it coming.")

 

I think OP, a group like MENSA (my husband is a member) might be a route to interact and network with people who are at your intellectual level in related fields who might know of opportunities that you would find adequately challenging and satisfying. You never know what they've got going on and they may want you to be a part of it.
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have any students that you mentor? 

 

I have two students who are doing an honors option of the regular course which basically involves some added independent study and meetings with me. I am also an undergraduate advisor.

Nice, but no intellectual challenge there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh wow!!! You do so much! Made me tired to just read it. How fun about photography, hoping some day I'll get to enjoy that. I am never bored. There are different stages in my life, and I pray, hope and trust God that I am fulfilling my vocation, what He wants of me at certain points in my life. Right now I firmly believe my calling is to homeschool and stay home... not an easy feat, but it gives me peace of mind and serenity to feel I am answering God's call. In the future that vocation might change, as the kids grow. As long as I am fulfilling God's plan for my life I'm good. I don't have time to be bored :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

. I love my job, love the interaction with the students - but I would like to do something where I can stretch myself intellectually and give myself a genuine challenge, so that I can have a sense of accomplishment.

 

For those of you past the all consuming intensive stage of parenting/homeschooling: what do you do to give yourself the gift of an intellectual challenge, mental stretch, sense of accomplishment?

I get some of this from my current career.

 

However, I don't feel like I need it anymore. 

I feel like I have kind of outgrown the need to have accomplishments to feel good about myself that I used to have.  (Not that you necessarily have that.)  So although I enjoy accomplishments, I don't need them to feel like I have a productive life.  It is hard to overstate how different this is than I was in my 20s through mid30s or so.

 

I think that for me, motherhood and focusing on being in the moment kind of got me over that.

 

I still work hard at many things, and I still am death on keeping my word/commitments to others and on doing things right.  But I also now feel that it is enough just to *be*. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see where the traditional research academician ship has sailed.

 

But is there some other role you could play, working in a lab, a museum, editing manuscripts for physicists whose forte is not writing, working on one research project at your uni? I wonder if you talked to colleagues about wanting more if some sort of hybrid opportunity might open up. 

 

Amy

Link to post
Share on other sites

What is your personality type? It sounds like you have a lot to do and also quite a lot of intellectual stuff so maybe it's more of a social outlet you need?

 

I know you can't get back into active research by employment, but is there anything you can do privately on your own? I guess this could be hard with physics, as you probably need sophisticated equipment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

So, "stuff to do" (but still not enough people interaction to satisfy my extrovert needs), and it does not bring me real satisfaction. I love my job, love the interaction with the students - but I would like to do something where I can stretch myself intellectually and give myself a genuine challenge, so that I can have a sense of accomplishment.

 

For those of you past the all consuming intensive stage of parenting/homeschooling: what do you do to give yourself the gift of an intellectual challenge, mental stretch, sense of accomplishment?

 

 

Yes, I know those feelings, and I'm not half as busy as YOU!  I NEED an those things too and am always looking out for the next opportunity that will not compromise my peace & health or my family in the process.

I've finished my training as a CASA volunteer and go to court tomorrow for the first time.  I hope to make a difference to at least one child at a time (maybe more but we'll see). 

 

http://www.casaforchildren.org/site/c.mtJSJ7MPIsE/b.5301295/k.BE9A/Home.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites

I get some of this from my current career.

 

However, I don't feel like I need it anymore. 

I feel like I have kind of outgrown the need to have accomplishments to feel good about myself that I used to have.  (Not that you necessarily have that.)  So although I enjoy accomplishments, I don't need them to feel like I have a productive life.  It is hard to overstate how different this is than I was in my 20s through mid30s or so.

 

I think that for me, motherhood and focusing on being in the moment kind of got me over that.

 

I still work hard at many things, and I still am death on keeping my word/commitments to others and on doing things right.  But I also now feel that it is enough just to *be*. 

 

Thanks for sharing your perspective. This is interesting.

For the most part I can be content to just be - but I feel I am not living up to my potential.

 

My last accomplishments for which I had to work hard were singing a very difficult solo part in a performance last year, and creating a complete set of physics video lectures for an online course two years ago - on my own, from scratch, including hand drawn art work and demos, doing all recording and editing. I had never done such a thing before and had to make it happen in a comparatively brief span of time.

 

Just doing a very good job at my daily routine is not as satisfying. It's not hard. I know I can do more. I am not even fifty... there are decades ahead of me and I don't want to "just be".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you get summers off? There are some awesome summer intensive courses. Berkeley has summer Latin and Greek workshops that sound thrilling.

 

I really loved bar exams. A three day test that was both a marathon and a sprint, covering a huge body of law. That's when I felt I was truly firing all cylinders. I may have taken a few more than I really needed, just because it was so much fun. I'm not sure I'd recommend law school just to take the bar, but I wonder if there are some other sort of test you could study for? Aren't there French certificates etc?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you get summers off? There are some awesome summer intensive courses. Berkeley has summer Latin and Greek workshops that sound thrilling.

 

I really loved bar exams. A three day test that was both a marathon and a sprint, covering a huge body of law. That's when I felt I was truly firing all cylinders. I may have taken a few more than I really needed, just because it was so much fun. I'm not sure I'd recommend law school just to take the bar, but I wonder if there are some other sort of test you could study for? Aren't there French certificates etc?

 

Yeah. Three years of very expensive school to take a three day test. Although, then you can take the test each state at six month intervals. It could be like those people who try to run a marathon in all fifty states. I don't think there's a fifty state club for bar exams. Oh, and with the OPs background she can take the patent bar too--that one was fun because some of the questions didn't seem like the author communicated well in English and part of the assessment was deciphering what was being asked.

 

(I had a massive headache after the state bar)

Link to post
Share on other sites

What is your personality type? It sounds like you have a lot to do and also quite a lot of intellectual stuff so maybe it's more of a social outlet you need?

 

ESFJ  

http://www.personalitypage.com/ESFJ.html

 

Extremely pronounced E; I am an absolute people person.

I need a combination of social outlet and intellectual stimulation; I would not be content socializing in a gossippy women's club.

 

 

 

I know you can't get back into active research by employment, but is there anything you can do privately on your own? I guess this could be hard with physics, as you probably need sophisticated equipment.

 

Actually, I don't need equipment because I am a theorist. But I have no motivation to embark on solitary research, because I am so extroverted. I would not stick with it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you get summers off? There are some awesome summer intensive courses. Berkeley has summer Latin and Greek workshops that sound thrilling.

 

I do, but we usually travel a large part of the summer; all our family is overseas. Last year, I taught summer school and while that gave me something to do to fill my time, it was not fulfilling, just more of the same.

 

I will keep summer programs in mind.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've finished my training as a CASA volunteer and go to court tomorrow for the first time. I hope to make a difference to at least one child at a time (maybe more but we'll see).

 

http://www.casaforchildren.org/site/c.mtJSJ7MPIsE/b.5301295/k.BE9A/Home.htm

Yeah. Let me know how it goes. One of our current foster boys has a CASA worker. There are so many ways to support foster children, esp teens that no one ever needs to be bored.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope, that ship has sailed. Being away from active research for 19 years means no chance of returning, ever. My "type of physicist" is not exclusively "instructor".

Just to clarify: I am not bitter with my choice; it was the right choice for our family and I do not regret it. But it is also a fact that some choices are irreversible.

Yeah, I can see that... you might be able to get something unpaid but I'm not sure you want to embark on that.

 

Sometimes I feel like I went the wrong way, for what it's worth. My job is a huge intellectual stretch but it's so insecure because even when I'm on someone else's project, it's still soft money. I can't say I "regret" it, but I definitely see the downsides now. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohmygoodness... I'm raising six boys (including one with special needs)... there is never a dull moment. I am NEVER bored.  Seriously.  I can barely keep up most of the time.

 

that is why I specifically stated "For those of you past the all consuming intensive stage of parenting/homeschooling"

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

My children are younger, but I also teach part-time at a university and about a year and a half ago I decided to try and restart my research agenda, which had been more or less on hold for about 7 years.  I applied to a (relatively nonthreatening) conference, was accepted, and went and presented.  It was a huge shot in the arm and very motivating.  I then spent about a year revising my dissertation into an article, which I just sent out for review last week.  

 

I did all this by waking up at 4:30 am every morning and working before everyone else got up.  It was sort of insane, given that nobody but me cares a whit whether I write anything, ever.  Like you, I am an instructor (well, a 'lecturer,' but it's the same deal) and there are zero publication expectations.    But I care.  And I realized that actually, I have things to say about my subject, and I want to get them out in the world.  It was not like I was 'bored' before, but working on this academic project fed me in a way that other things just don't.   I am already thinking about my next project.

 

From what you say, it sounds like this sort of reentry just isn't possible in your immediate field.  But like others, I wonder if there are other angles for pursuing original research -- about the teaching of physics, perhaps?  Or something related to the design of physics citizen science projects?  

 

I hope you can find what you're looking for.  

 
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

My children are younger, but I also teach part-time at a university and about a year and a half ago I decided to try and restart my research agenda, which had been more or less on hold for about 7 years.  I applied to a (relatively nonthreatening) conference, was accepted, and went and presented.  It was a huge shot in the arm and very motivating.  I then spent about a year revising my dissertation into an article, which I just sent out for review last week.  

 

I did all this by waking up at 4:30 am every morning and working before everyone else got up.  It was sort of insane, given that nobody but me cares a whit whether I write anything, ever.  Like you, I am an instructor (well, a 'lecturer,' but it's the same deal) and there are zero publication expectations.    But I care.  And I realized that actually, I have things to say about my subject, and I want to get them out in the world.  It was not like I was 'bored' before -- I'm pretty much never bored -- but working on this academic project fed me in a way that other things just don't.   I am already thinking about my next project.

 

That is cool!!! very inspiring.

May I ask what your research area is?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered doing something not academic?

 

Like learning a brand new, completely different musical instrument. Lilke if you're already a string player pick up...IDK, the bassoon?

 

Or taking a sculpture class?

 

Or maybe acting in a play at a community drama theatre?

 

Of course there is value to intellectually satisfying your brain, but stepping outside the norm for you might be a challenge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is cool!!! very inspiring.

May I ask what your research area is?

 

 

Thanks!  I teach at a law school and have a J.D., but my Ph.D. is in political science.

 

The fact that I'm working in this sort of half-baked way obviously limits my choice of research topic --I dream of a lot of projects that I just cannot do right now -- but OTOH the large-scale digitization of government documents has been a tremendous boon.

 
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered doing something not academic?

Like learning a brand new, completely different musical instrument. Lilke if you're already a string player pick up...IDK, the bassoon?

Or taking a sculpture class?

Or maybe acting in a play at a community drama theatre?

Of course there is value to intellectually satisfying your brain, but stepping outside the norm for you might be a challenge.

 

I have been making a conscious effort to step out of my comfort zone and try new things.

I am absolutely not artsy/crafty and never had the desire to make anything with my hands, but last year I attended a crochet class, learned how to crochet, and got quite good at it. I have attended art workshops at a local studio. I took several months of dance lessons last year until the teacher stopped. I am, for the first time in my life, regularly attending an exercise class.

Pottery lessons are on my list of things to try when they work with my schedule.

 

I am trying :)

 

ETA: And when I am trying something, you can bet that I give it my all. My inner perfectionist says "must excel".

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got wee little ones but I'll just throw this out there.

 

Half the time (+) when I say I'm bored what I mean is that everyone I talk to is boring. Little kids are miraculous! Blessings! But they are so boring. Yes, my love, I want to hear about your day at work that was just like the previous 9000 days, but its sooo boring. Okie dokie neighbor tell me about your new diet but its alarmingly boring. Yes, father, you did tell me you got a new door for the bathroom Etcetcetc

 

Likewise, I get SO BORED of the same old stuff coming out of my own face all. the. time.

 

Sooo if we are voting, I vote you angle to meet some new people, as opposed to trying a new activity. Unless the activity leads you to meeting new people. And truly new/new. Not old/new. So more along the lines of joining a walking meditation circle (or something, I don't know!) than taking on another academic subject. Get a little weird.

 

Ymmv, obv.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered doing something not academic?

 

Like learning a brand new, completely different musical instrument. Lilke if you're already a string player pick up...IDK, the bassoon?

 

Or taking a sculpture class?

 

Or maybe acting in a play at a community drama theatre?

 

Of course there is value to intellectually satisfying your brain, but stepping outside the norm for you might be a challenge.

 

I was thinking this, too. You mentioned perhaps getting a degree in something entirely unrelated to STEM. That's probably a good idea. Take up something you're bad at and see if you can improve. If you're bad at singing, take up singing. Bad at an instrument, take up an instrument. Bad at painting, etc. Do something that is a real challenge to you instead of taking up something that you're already inclined toward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sooo if we are voting, I vote you angle to meet some new people, as opposed to trying a new activity. Unless the activity leads you to meeting new people. And truly new/new. Not old/new. So more along the lines of joining a walking meditation circle (or something, I don't know!) than taking on another academic subject. Get a little weird.

 

LOL. I have, in fact, joined a circle that does meditations and drumming and other odd things and is not academic at all, and I have met people whom I would not have otherwise met.

I have gotten involved in the new women's community center and met new people through this.

I have met new people through my involvement in the English book club and now have friends who are in the humanities (instead of just people from the physics bubble)

 

So definitely yes to weird things and new people!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm... are you looking for something with output? I know I enjoyed a Coursera class, but without making some tangible output myself I feel like the work is lacking. I look at "interesting" things I'd like to pursue but always end with, "But what would I do with it?" 

 

Emily

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm... are you looking for something with output? I know I enjoyed a Coursera class, but without making some tangible output myself I feel like the work is lacking. I look at "interesting" things I'd like to pursue but always end with, "But what would I do with it?" 

 

Exactly. I want some outside accountability to real people. Not to a computer system. I could be a model student :)

I have zero desire to self study in the solitude of my home. I know I could... just no motivation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was bored beyond belief.

 

It was so hard to go from working an intellectually stimulating, well-paying job to being dependent and stuck at home with a baby.  It didn't help that I moved to a new city right after the birth of my son, either.

 

I think this lasted until about the time when DS4 was born and I found some PT work.   It was virtual...but still...it helped a lot.  Things also improved as the kids got older and I made friends of the parents of some of their friends through activities like Scouts. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you need to find something that challenges you.  Something you're not sure you're capable of accomplishing. Of course you can comprehend a Great Course.  You're smart.  Try something you're not at all confident in.  It could be:

  • a new academic field
  • a physical challenge
  • reviving a passion you had when you were seven.  Ballet?  High dive?  Tumbling class? 
  • Triathlon?
  • Starting a new business
  • Starting a new charity
  • Becoming some sort of activist and improving the world in whatever way is important to you
  • finally finishing the Great American Novel.
  • Learning to paint.
  • Learning to sail
  • Getting a black belt in a martial art of your choice.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was happiest after 3rd was born and worked part-time. So bored until oldest got to about 4th grade and academics were more interesting. But realty, the stuff that had to be done, food, clothes, picking up and nagging everyone is so so boring. Just because there always more to dip, doesn't mean it's interesting or fulfilling.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly. I want some outside accountability to real people. Not to a computer system. I could be a model student :)

I have zero desire to self study in the solitude of my home. I know I could... just no motivation.

Local theater, then.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with those who said that being bored doesn't mean there's nothing to do. I have tons of stuff to do...more than I can ever get done. And yet I've often felt bored at various stages in my life. The things that I *have* to do are not always interesting to me. I just plod through them feeling bored out of my mind while doing them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...