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Any other Myers-Briggs nerds here? I know there are. :) 

 

I just posted a LONG post about the style of each Myers-Briggs type, along with their strengths and weaknesses. I think it helps so much to know your own type and to lose the guilt of not "measuring up" to the ideal of some other type. We can't be it all and do it all. 

 

If you play to your type you'll feel more energized, less guilty, and less angsty. Pair that with knowing your kids' types suddenly you have mind-blowing clarity. :) More posts are going to follow, including the right book on classical education for your personality type. :D Because it's just too much fun to pour over my books and condense it all into a system - I am an INTJ. This is what I do for fun. :)

 

http://www.simplyconvivial.com/2016/homeschool-personality

 

Does it ring true for your type? How do you express your own personality in your homeschool? 

 

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I am XNTP (come out INTP or ENTP depending on the time of the month). I don't homeschool but after school and as always with Meyers-Briggs, yes. It's like they know me.

 

" they are happiest choosing a ready-to-go program that supports their commitment to wide and varied study."

 

Okay, I have to comment on this. For me, this was WTM (before I knew my kids and how energetic and extroverted they would be). One ready-to-go simple program would never do it. I wanted a program, but I was seriously nonplussed by nearly every HS program out there. WTM was comprehensive and flexible enough to be perfect.

 

I am fortunate that we live in an area that encompasses most of the basics in the public schools so I can supplement.

Edited by Tsuga
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I am one of these harping-on-type people and I think you're way way off about INFJ. I have never read anything in my life that described INFJ's as full of self-doubt! In fact, it is a commonly understood facet of INFJs to "just know" what is needed without any hemming or hawing.

 

You write:

 

An INFJ homeschools to provide her children a safe, loving, understanding home environment. She listens to her children and is a mentor-guide to them. She tends not to trust herself, even though her instincts are highly-tuned; she lacks confidence, even though she’s always committed to doing the right thing regardless of personal cost. Because of her self-doubt, the INFJ will generally be most comfortable sticking to a planned curriculum from a source she trusts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's one:

Because the INFJ has such strong intuitive capabilities, they trust their own instincts above all else.

 

 

 

And another:

 

They are decisive and strong-willed,

 

 

And another:

 

NFJs grow to trust its judgments and insights

 

 

 

Further, INFJs are all about individuals. "boxed" Curriculum would never do, nope.

 

they have a talent for helping others with original solutions to their personal challenges.

 

 

Let's get Scarlett's son in on this. I bet he'll be like "It's such an INFJ thing to do, to look up all these websites to refute that blurb." :lol:

Edited by OKBud
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Awesome! Thanks for that feedback, okbud. The INFJs I know are not ones that make up their own plan, so perhaps I let my experience with individuals color my generalization about the type. 

 

I will be looking back over my books and editing that section. I wonder if the self-doubt I have seen (I've talked several INFJs through homeschool choices) is because they have multiple children and want to do what's absolutely best for each one and feels pulled in multiple directions.

 

INFJs hate conflict though; refuting people on the internet is more an INTJ thing to do. ;)

Edited by Mystie
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Learning about Myers-Briggs a few years ago really helped me understand myself and others. I first heard about them in the book Motherstyles, which is similar to Mystie's post in that it shows the different strengths and weaknesses related to mothering. It really did help me to quit comparing myself to others, and also to understand why certain family members drive me crazy. :D (They are S's, I'm an N.)

 

I'm an INFJ, and I'm a real mix of self-doubt and confidence. When it comes to HSing though, I'm independent and know what I'm about, and would never use boxed curriculum if I could help it!

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Awesome! Thanks for that feedback, okbud. The INFJs I know are not ones that make up their own plan, so perhaps I let my experience with individuals color my generalization about the type. 

 

I will be looking back over my books and editing that section. I wonder if the self-doubt I have seen (I've talked several INFJs through homeschool choices) is because they have multiple children and want to do what's absolutely best for each one and feels pulled in multiple directions.

 

INFJs hate conflict though; refuting people on the internet is more an INTJ thing to do. ;)

 

At only 1-2% of the population, you can not know very many, so I'd say that's a coincidence. Plus INFJ's are notoriously mysterious. Whatever that means. I take it to mean hard to get close to.

 

Certainly I and the one single other INFJ person I know irl have experienced the troubling phenomenon of people saying things about us that are not remotely copacetic with how we actually think, hundreds of times.

 

Perhaps insofar as you are seeing something interpreted as "doubt," that it is actually "authenticity checks." A gut-check. Wherein one is not actually feeling self-doubt, but rather talking through a thought-process for the benefit of the listener. INFJs tend to make snap decisions (and be right about them) but find other types want them to spell it out.

 

[Also please note that there is almost no way of speaking about being an infj that doesn't sound "full of it" to other types. There are a lot of really terrible free, self-published, kindle books about just this thing. Square pegs and all that. We KNOW how we sound, but what can be done?]

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INFJs hate conflict though; refuting people on the internet is more an INTJ thing to do. ;)

 

False. INFJs hate  inauthenticity more than anything else. In themselves, but also in others.

 

INFJs never wink. :001_rolleyes:

 

A signature feature of INFJs (and INTJs) is a deep concern for quality.

 

 

 

Because Counselors initially appear so gentle and reserved, they may surprise others with their intensity when one of their values is threatened or called into question

 

 

Edited by OKBud
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I'm an ISFJ and that description was almost dead on. I think you are right about how I choose curriculum. However, I'm way to stubborn to outsource. We did though start with a packaged curriculum that I then tweaked and I completely modified our day to accommodate her dance classes. I'm excited to see what book on classical ed you think works best for my personality.

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I could never get the same results on the meyer briggs quizzes other than consistently borderline on the E/I.

 

Going purely by the descriptions on page, I would be a blend of INTJ, ENTP, ENTJ for strengths & struggles, a blend of INFP, ENFJ for style.

 

Edited by typing mistake.

Edited by Arcadia
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I've always been INFP, but I've been creeping more towards INFJ over the past few years. I think since I began homeschooling?? I found the INFP vs INFJ comparisons helpful. 

 

http://www.personalityhacker.com/infp-vs-infj/

http://www.preludecharacteranalysis.com/types/infj/vs/infp

 

 

Edited by Plum Crazy
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INTJ

Your description matched me well in most things.  Overall, a well done (and enjoyable) post! 

I'm definitely a researcher, and system maker.  And yes, my own systems do become tedious to maintain (mostly because I don't live with other INTJs who see the system is awesome and follow it willingly  :001_rolleyes:)

Also, because I do not live with other INTJs I do have lots of outside commitments, most of which I helped initiate because I know they need them (even if I don't).

Definitely don't handle noise and hubbub well  :wacko:

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INTP, I do read all the books, and sometimes read curriculum if I don't have a good book and am bored.

 

But, I do not like too scripted or read to go, but I am very much a P.  I have been tweaking things and making curriculum and resources for 22 years starting with my phonics tutoring.  As the children get older and I have less time, I do use more things that are a bit more ready to go, but I still supplement and tweak.

 

Just this month I am making some Greek and Latin Word root resources!

 

When I read my own scripted phonics lessons while recording my online movies, I even feel boxed in and feel the need to deviate a bit, thinking, "Who is this telling me exactly what to say...wait, that was me."

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I am INTX, and I think both the INTP and INTJ descriptions fit me well. They're certainly not mutually exclusive.

 

ETA, so you're an INTJ... no wonder I like your blog so much! But then I just glean from it what I want and go do my own thing anyway. ;)

Edited by carriede
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I am INTX, and I think both the INTP and INTJ descriptions fit me well. They're certainly not mutually exclusive.

 

ETA, so you're an INTJ... no wonder I like your blog so much! But then I just glean from it what I want and go do my own thing anyway. ;)

 

Just like everyone should. :)

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INTP, I do read all the books, and sometimes read curriculum if I don't have a good book and am bored.

 

But, I do not like too scripted or read to go, but I am very much a P.  I have been tweaking things and making curriculum and resources for 22 years starting with my phonics tutoring.  As the children get older and I have less time, I do use more things that are a bit more ready to go, but I still supplement and tweak.

 

Just this month I am making some Greek and Latin Word root resources!

 

When I read my own scripted phonics lessons while recording my online movies, I even feel boxed in and feel the need to deviate a bit, thinking, "Who is this telling me exactly what to say...wait, that was me."

 

There are certainly differences based on the number and ages of kids, too, or the number of other things going on. Even for me, I find myself outsourcing more or starting with someone else's plan more than I would normally as I add more students.

 

"Who is this telling me what to do" is how I feel every time I look at my plans. :)

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INTJ. Pretty close. I'd say I like problem solving more than I hate foolishness. I research, but perhaps much, much less than I used to. Now I just want the ideas, a basic scaffold of a plan or curriculum and then get out of my way. I'll fix it. But I'm not the type to go off without a plan. I want one, even if I haven't got the slightest intention of following it in more than the right direction.

I would say that I think I don't struggle with reading physical and emotional cues from myself or my students. However, it may be because I am right between the T and the F. Like 50-50. And I have some other factors that turned me into a people watcher. I think I'm pretty good with my immediate family. Not with strangers, however.

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I'm INFJ and I only know one other person who is.  I would prefer to have another personality type! ha!

It seems like I'm a social introvert and I'm not too deeply introverted on the scale.

My issue with homeschooling is that it seems like a lot of homeschoolers are so busy or so introverted they don't have the same need for friendships or relationships on a more constant basis that I do.

Friendships and relationships are important to me.  My dh is INTJ and in that regard he is the same.

We are sending our older 2 kids to 2 day hybrid next year as it seems the only way to develop steady relationships.

They are both in high school at that point and needing more social interation as well.

 

 

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I'm INFJ and I only know one other person who is. I would prefer to have another personality type! ha!

It seems like I'm a social introvert and I'm not too deeply introverted on the scale.

My issue with homeschooling is that it seems like a lot of homeschoolers are so busy or so introverted they don't have the same need for friendships or relationships on a more constant basis that I do.

My boys are social introverts too. Oldest wilted when we pulled him out of B&M public school. We ended up paying for lots of outside classes to compensate after all emotional health is so worth it. He was bored in school but moody out of school.

 

We found company with afterschoolers kids and parents instead which are quite a social bunch :)

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Not to be a downer, but the Myers Briggs Test is really no more scientific than astrology. It wasn't even created by psychologists, and the only reason the fad won't die is because it makes a huge amount of money as a business racket and (like astrology) it's general enough that it can appeal to everyone.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/brain-flapping/2013/mar/19/myers-briggs-test-unscientific

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I agree that personality is far more complex than any test. In addition to our human environment shaping us as we grow and as to what is modeled around us.  

I do find some benefit to these type of tests though.

I had never heard of Myers Briggs until I had my first child and I was in a mother group and one of the moms was a psychologist.  She administered the test to us and gave tips on how you can use it help you in your mothering/sahm style.  I found it quite helpful in that regard.  

I do cringe at companies using it to pigeon hole people into stereotypes.

 

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I'm INFJ and I only know one other person who is.  I would prefer to have another personality type! ha!

It seems like I'm a social introvert and I'm not too deeply introverted on the scale.

My issue with homeschooling is that it seems like a lot of homeschoolers are so busy or so introverted they don't have the same need for friendships or relationships on a more constant basis that I do.

Friendships and relationships are important to me.  My dh is INTJ and in that regard he is the same.

We are sending our older 2 kids to 2 day hybrid next year as it seems the only way to develop steady relationships.

They are both in high school at that point and needing more social interation as well.

 

I am INTJ, and my DH (totally not an N) are getting to know a couple that have the INFJ/INTJ thing going. They are SO FUN! Some of my favorite people are INFJs (yep, I know a couple, and also know at least one person that is right on the INFJ/INTJ border--excellent listeners, insightful, thoughtful, and fun). 

 

OP, I think you pretty much nailed INTJ. Critterfixer's and Targhee's comments are right on as well. 

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False. INFJs hate inauthenticity more than anything else. In themselves, but also in others.

 

INFJs never wink. :001_rolleyes:

Most definitely an INFJ here so I can say with certainty that some INFJs do occasionally wink. ;)

 

I don't like inauthenticity either, but I do also prefer to avoid conflict.

 

I think it's important to remember that each letter represents a continuum. So some of us with the same type will manifest that more or less strongly depending where we fall on the continuum. And of course there are many other factors that play into behavior as well. It's never cut and dried.

Edited by Mrs. A
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I'm an ISFJ and that description was almost dead on. I think you are right about how I choose curriculum. However, I'm way to stubborn to outsource. We did though start with a packaged curriculum that I then tweaked and I completely modified our day to accommodate her dance classes. I'm excited to see what book on classical ed you think works best for my personality

I am ISXJ and am also too stubborn to outsource. Or perhaps my budget is too stubborn. . . .

But yes I can see myself in the ISTJ and the ISFJ. I. Love. Checking. Boxes.

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Myers-Briggs IS just one way to examine personality, but so is any other typing. I find Myers-Briggs useful because the typing is simple to complete, and because the 4 axis measured cover a broad range of dimension.

 

I do think it is very stilting and limiting to use only this metric. The books The Way They Learn and Discover Your Child's Learning Style were both very helpful for me not only in understanding and accommodating my children but also myself and other people generally - each covers multiple dimensions of personality. Also, learning about another metric, conative strengths, was very useful.

 

The point is though that they are all human constructs which attempt to organize personalities based on particular dimensions (must have created by INTJs - haha), and the poster was never making claims about their validity. Rather, she was using a metric and applying it to the context of homeschooling. And I think she did a great job!

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Very interesting article, Mystie.

 

I'm primarily an ISFJ, but very close to both INFJ and ISTJ.  I thought the ISFJ fit me pretty closely, as did the ISTJ and the INFJ, except that I'm not great at routine and consistency, not like I'd like to be.  (But then I feel frustrated if I don't get to everything I've intended.)  I do use some packaged curricula, but I tweak it some, or I create my own.  But starting completely from scratch hasn't quite appealed to me.  Maybe that's the lack of confidence; I do suffer from that.

 

The ENFP mom -- that'll be my daughter.  "Yes, sure, let's go!"

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I like your INFJ revisions, OP. Especially these parts:

 

  • Strengths: dedication, relationship-building, understanding each of her child’s unique needs and abilities, a sense for how to help each child over his own difficulties [...] leaves room for deep conversations, moments of beauty, and her own children’s personal flourishing.

     

     

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I am another INTP who wouldn't love a ready-to-go curriculum :) I am totally unable to follow a recipe without tweaking something. I see glimpses of myself in other descriptions, but INTP goes for the most important one, so it does fit the best.

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Wow, a lot of INTJs here!  I'm also INTJ and I think the description was pretty accurate.  I research everything to death, make intricate plans... and then rarely actually follow those plans exactly.  Basically no outside activities, though my super extroverted DS#1 will be changing that soon.  

 

But, I actually do really like scripted stuff.  I don't necessarily follow the script, but I do like having a blue print for what to say and do that I didn't have to put energy into myself -- besides carefully analyzing the scope and sequence, reading every curriculum sample I could find, and reading review upon review upon review, of course.

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Any thoughts on this from those of you who know and love personality typing?  

 

I've taken the Myers-Briggs several times.  I think I'm INTJ but score so closely that I could also be INFP...or maybe INTP or maybe INFJ...(LOL)  

 

Never been able to figure it out.  I've come up "square-" or "star-" shaped on other personality and career tests as well (as in, close/tied scoring in certain areas.)  

 

Reading Mystie's post, things from INTJ, INTP, INFJ, INFP all sound so close--

 

I'm sure about the "INxx" but how would one go about figuring out the other 2 parts?

 

Thanks!

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Any thoughts on this from those of you who know and love personality typing?

 

I've taken the Myers-Briggs several times. I think I'm INTJ but score so closely that I could also be INFP...or maybe INTP or maybe INFJ...(LOL)

 

Never been able to figure it out. I've come up "square-" or "star-" shaped on other personality and career tests as well (as in, close/tied scoring in certain areas.)

 

Reading Mystie's post, things from INTJ, INTP, INFJ, INFP all sound so close--

 

I'm sure about the "INxx" but how would one go about figuring out the other 2 parts?

 

Thanks!

Some people are harder to type because they straddle one or more of the modalities. A couple of my kids are that way. One thing that helps is to remember the way you were as a child. Everyone changes as they age. They learn to play up their strengths and mitigate weaknesses. But the Meyers Briggs is intended to describe nature and preferences. You may be a thinker who has trained yourself to be more empathetic as you raised your children, but that doesn't mean you've suddenly turned into a feeler. You have to ask yourself, do I have a harder time stirring up empathy for people I don't know (T) or do I have a harder time putting aside my feelings to see a situation for what it really is (F)? Do I have a harder time setting aside work to have fun (J) or do have a harder time setting aside fun to get to work (P)?

 

Another way to figure it out is to take the test for children. What were you naturally like as a child? That's often more accurate because as an adult we naturally learn to express our weaker traits. That's self-actualization. Go back as far as you remember. That's your nature--your natural preferences. Personality is environment working on and with your nature.

 

Lastly, another way to figure out what you are is to figure out what you aren't. Every nature has a shadow. The shadow is what comes out under stress. So if you suspect you are an intj, th negative traits of ESFP come out under duress. So you can google Meyers Briggs shadows and see which sounds like you when you're stressed out.

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INTJ. Pretty close. I'd say I like problem solving more than I hate foolishness. I research, but perhaps much, much less than I used to. Now I just want the ideas, a basic scaffold of a plan or curriculum and then get out of my way. I'll fix it. But I'm not the type to go off without a plan. I want one, even if I haven't got the slightest intention of following it in more than the right direction.

I would say that I think I don't struggle with reading physical and emotional cues from myself or my students. However, it may be because I am right between the T and the F. Like 50-50. And I have some other factors that turned me into a people watcher. I think I'm pretty good with my immediate family. Not with strangers, however.

 

Critter, if you don't mind me asking, what did you do to get better at reading cues? I know that I miss these with my kids, even though I don't (at the time) realize I am doing it.

 

For example, my oldest sometimes comes down with a sore throat. But she doesn't initially say anything. She just gets quiet, and perhaps a bit resistant to working, and (rarely) a bit emotional. And I think, "What's wrong with this kid today? Just do the math lesson!"

 

After the whole day has gone by, she'll say, "My throat hurts." And that is it, so there's just not much to go on, except the cues (which I now am able to recognize). However, I still have to practice tuning in to these cues in a way that triggers an empathetic response, if that makes sense. Like, I have to stop plowing through the "to do" list for the day and notice the unusual quietness of my usually chatty child. And decide that it means something.

 

So annoying, actually! Not that she is quiet about it, just that I am dense.

 

I need to know how to change this. I think I'm actually better at "reading" strangers, because I'm not focused on accomplishing anything with them.

 

Oh, and for Mystie -- I absolutely use scripted stuff. CLE (Math), FLL, WWE, WWS, AAS, MOH, SOTW, SCM artist portfolios, anything that is open and go. But I make my own plan, for everything, every year. Boxes are anathema to me. HTH.

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Barb_: thank you so much!  

 

ETA: Some of the ways you put things and taking a test for children confirmed INTJ.  And, yes, I can see that we are born one way (nature) and then learn many things along the way to adulthood to become better or more balanced in various skills/areas of life.  

 

Thanks!

Edited by vonbon
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I'm an INFJ.

 

While most of the description from your post (below) fit, the bolded did not fit me. No, I don't get overwhelmed by details, but rather, thrive on deep digging coupled with deep thinking -- so the more details, the better!  :) Also, I LONG ago (while still in elementary school) learned to let go of perfectionism. :) I also think I differ a bit from this description because I so absorb different curricula and information on whatever topic we studied that, other than math, I ended up developing our own from multiple sources, or, so severely tweaked a curriculum that it was not using the program anywhere close to "as-written". ;) That stemmed as much from MY need / gift / strength / love to create something new from other sources, as to design something to fit DSs' unique (and extremely different) needs. -- Actually, okbud's post up-thread really sums it up succinctly: "Further, INFJs are all about individuals. "boxed" Curriculum would never do…" Yes; this exactly.

 

Finally, just wanted to add that I also agree with okbud up-thread about INFJs -- they are not at all "full of self-doubt" -- but because they are so intuitive and think/analyze so deeply, they are sure/secure in their assessments, and just avoid conflict by not bothering to contradict others or feel that they have to "set them straight". That can make it appear (to OTHERS) as though INFJs "waffle" or "must have self-doubt because they do one thing, but seem to agree with others who say something different".

 

I did find it helpful to figure out my children's personality types early on in our homeschooling journey (DH and I had both been tested early in our marriage, and found it a helpful relationship tool), as well as DSs' (very strong, and strongly *different*) learning styles/brain dominances. Thanks for posting your article, as an encouragement and help for homeschoolers! :) Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

 

An INFJ homeschools to provide her children a safe, loving, understanding home environment. She listens to her children and is a mentor-guide to them. She tends to be hard on herself because the real world never matches up to her envisioned ideal. She’s so committed to doing the right thing for her kids regardless of personal cost that she is easily burnt out. Because she gets overwhelmed by details, the INFJ will generally be most comfortable starting with a planned curriculum that she can adapt according to her own needs. Her children trust her and know she’ll always be there for them, on their team.

  • Strengths: dedication, relationship-building, understanding each of her child’s unique needs and abilities, a sense for how to help each child over his own difficulties
  • Struggles: tendency to ignore her own needs while serving others, conflict avoidance, perfectionism
  • Style: prefers a trusted, loose curriculum that leaves room for deep conversations, moments of beauty, and her own children’s personal flourishing.

 

Edited by Lori D.
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Off topic, but since you are here.....

 

This was on the Homeschooling Around the World FB group.

 

"~Calling all homeschooling parents~ HELLLLPPPPP!!!! My 12 year old daughter is asking for help on her science fair project. She is interested in seeing if there is a correlation between MBTI personality type and being a homeschooling parent. (Originally, it was on MBTI personality type and preference in cats or dogs, but she decided to switch to something more unique.) She put together a survey for homeschooling providers. So far, she has only has 261 responses and she is trying to get 1000 responses. Could you please help her out by taking the personality quiz and her survey?

Thanks!!!"

 

This is her survey. It's 4 questions, no personal info.

http://freeonlinesurveys.com/s/HG6atcdU

Edited by Plum Crazy
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Critter, if you don't mind me asking, what did you do to get better at reading cues? I know that I miss these with my kids, even though I don't (at the time) realize I am doing it.

 

Watching body language would be the first step. In the same way that an injured animal will sit hunched up with the painful place as protected as he can get it, a child might present a similar picture of withdrawing to nurse some hurt, physical or emotional. Frustration generally shows in an increased breathing rate before the arms fold over the middle and the mouth starts going down. Once you hone in on the physical cues, you index them with what you know about the emotional (or physical) cause that might lead to that manifestation. Then you test. You start asking leading questions based upon your index of suspicion. 

I would say that working with animals has helped me to become watchful. I also try to do an emotional response profile for every character I write into a story. I am forced to consider the emotion of sadness, and to figure out what I must do to convey that emotion to the reader in a visible way (show, don't tell). I've also been forced by clinical depression to spend time looking back at journals, reactions and sensations to help me dig deeper into how my emotions manifest themselves. 

Can I be wrong? Oh, yeah. But at least I've got somewhere to start. I long ago gave up on the idea that I can tell what people are thinking, but I'll use what I see to start gathering all the information I can. 

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