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school17777
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High school dd has never been one to eat breakfast even when she was homeschooled.   She is on a medication that makes her not hungry during the day, until after school.  So, she doesn't eat breakfast and then by lunchtime, she has no appetite.  Her dr would like her to take a smoothie type drink for lunch because even though she has no appetite, she can still get down a drink.  She refuses a real smoothie and the only one she will drink is a carnation breakfast.  She also would like snacks that I am happy to provide, IF she was eating real food in addition to them.  I feel like if she could eat those, then she should be able to eat something healthy in addition or instead (dr would like those calories to count, not empty ones).  Her response is that she eats that stuff after school - fruit & veggies, and leftovers.

 

Beginning next week, she won't be coming home after school until May because of track, so I won't know what she is eating after school.  She very likely won't eat anything, unless it is junky.  She is very picky about taking things to eat because she doesn't like things if they get warm and should be cool (like cut-up fruit and veggies).  She says she doesn't have room in her bag for the cooler type lunch bags that I have to keep food cool.  So, she just brings junk.

 

She doesn't like eggs, tuna fish, pb&j, cheese, nuts.  Now with track starting next week, she will probably say she can't eat much after school because of making her sick while running.

 

What do I feed this girl?  Do I give in and go ahead and buy the junk food for her so at least she is eating something?

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How does she feel about hummus? Could you send her with hummus and pita chips or cut up pita wedges? Or in a wrap with veggies? 

 

How about luna bars? Or kind bars? A yogurt, luna bar and an apple would at least give her some nutrition. 

 

Peanut butter crackers?

 

Baked oatmeal squares? Something like these? http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/baked-oatmeal-squares

 

Homemade muffins? You can get a lot of fruit into muffins and cut back on the sugar. Mashed banana and applesauce in place of some of the egg and oil sneak some fruit in. Or grated zucchini or carrot. 

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Since she will be doing track, she probably will want to eat not later than 2 hours beforehand, not right before practice.

 

I would not give in on junk, but I have no experience with a difficult eater. She's going to have to learn that her body needs fuel--high school track is pretty competitive and if for no other reason (excuse?) she's going to need the energy to train properly.

 

I would concentrate on proteins and severely limit the carbs, especially since her diet is so unbalanced. There are all kinds of small cooler containers she can take to school--check out Amazon for ideas. Are there NO kinds of nuts, cheeses or meats that she likes?

 

Snacks can and should be "real food". In such an extreme case, I would talk with coach who can not only give you suggestions, but perhaps have a talk with the team about nutrition and good choices. My son's coaches make a point of it every year.

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She does not like humus or granola type bars, except the kind that are more like a candy bar.

 

I can't remember if she likes pita bread.  That's a good idea though.  Trader Joe's has small ones that maybe she will eat since they wouldn't be as overwhelming as a sandwich.

 

I don't think she will eat a veggie wrap as I have suggested that.

 

She doesn't like yogurt.

 

We have several coolers and lunch containers (I love that kind of stuff!), so I don't think I really need to go buy anything else - she just has a reason why they are no good (gets stuff in her packback wet (other kids say it doesn't), too heavy, no room in her backpack, doesn't want to store it in her locker, etc...).

 

She is in two gyms classes at school everyday, plus track, plus soccer training a couple of evenings.  She needs the calories.

 

eta:  re muffins - She won't eat the muffins if I make them "too healthy". 

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My youngest is extremely picky. My definition of junk is probably not as strict as most--I need to get calories into her first and foremost. It is especially important for her to have a snack bag on meet days--meets can be out of town and go until 6 pm--she may not be home until 7:30. Snacks that work for her:

-certain granola bars. At the moment she likes Clif Z-bars, either chocolate brownie or the iced oatmeal

-applesauce in the squeezable pouches.

-fruit leather

-gatorade energy chews (i think these are mostly sugar, but that's actually okay before intense physical activity)

-cheese covered breadsticks that the bakery of a local grocery store sells.

-homemade muffins or even cookies (made with whole grains, decent ingredients)

-chocolate milk. One of her soccer coaches prefers this to anything else for recovery after a game.

 

We try to do carbs before the activity for energy and protein after for muscle recovery. There have been times when I've told her that she has to either up her calorie intake or drop an activity--she does soccer and running (track or cross country) and burns a ton of calories, all while trying to grow (currently 5'3" 95 pounds). So I allow foods others might not just because she will eat them. Oh, and the carnation breakfast drinks would thrill me. My disabled dd needed to have either that or pediasure for awhile, so I know they're okay nutritionally.

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Can you get input from her too? I agree with MEMama - have you guys talked about how she needs the food as fuel to get her body through the practices and to keep everything running in good order? I had a gymnast who used to start every gymnastics practice with a large coke and fries from McDonalds. It took many pre-practice conversations to start getting her to understand that soda and fries aren't helping her gymnastics and they're detrimental to her becoming better at her sport. If you approach it from that angle with her, maybe she can help brainstorm? 

 

Does she like avocados? Veggie sushi would be yummy. Tortilla chips (either store bought or they're really easy to make homemade) and guac? 

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She does not like humus or granola type bars, except the kind that are more like a candy bar.

 

I can't remember if she likes pita bread.  That's a good idea though.  Trader Joe's has small ones that maybe she will eat since they wouldn't be as overwhelming as a sandwich.

 

I don't think she will eat a veggie wrap as I have suggested that.

 

She doesn't like yogurt.

 

We have several coolers and lunch containers (I love that kind of stuff!), so I don't think I really need to go buy anything else - she just has a reason why they are no good (gets stuff in her packback wet (other kids say it doesn't), too heavy, no room in her backpack, doesn't want to store it in her locker, etc...).

 

She is in two gyms classes at school everyday, plus track, plus soccer training a couple of evenings.  She needs the calories.

 

eta:  re muffins - She won't eat the muffins if I make them "too healthy". 

 

What about something like a wrap?  Turkey and cheese or whatever she likes on a tortilla?  My super picky kid will eat that (although without cheese).  And you figure it's easy to eat.

 

How about dried fruit or that trail mix stuff?  I know, not super duper health food here, but easy to eat and can sit all day.

 

Nuts?  Maybe those 100 calorie nut packs.  It's in a pack so maybe she thinks it's junk food.  LOL

 

Sounds like my kid. 

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My dd's favorite muffin. They're so good that you would never guess they have healthy stuff like whole wheat flour and wheat germ in them. The original recipe called for raisins or dried fruit instead of chocolate chips, and I like those too, but my family vastly prefers the chocolate chip version. The picky eater won't eat them with raisins. I've entered the recipe into MyFitnessPal and the numbers are per muffin: 219 calories, 9 gm fat, 4 gm protein, 3 gm fiber--those numbers are fine for my standards. Dd will eat 2 during the day if we have them around.

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Muffins

 

1 cup whole wheat pastry flour

2 Tbs. wheat bran

2 Tbs. untested wheat germ

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup white sugar

1.5 cup quick cooking oats

1 cup buttermilk

1 egg

1/4 cup oil

1 tsp vanilla

1/2 cup boiling water

3/4 cup chocolate chips

 

Mix dry ingredients together (through oats). In a separate bowl mix buttermilk, egg, oil, and vanilla. Add dry ingredients. Add boiling water and let sit 15 minutes--preheat oven to 350° during this time. Stir in chocolate chips after the 15 minutes, then spoon batter into greased muffin pan (makes 12). Bake for 20 minutes.

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It sounds like she's really active- is she getting her calories by eating junk food or is she cluster feeding when she gets home from school? Dd has never been able to eat breakfast and she's juggling two jobs so some days she doesn't eat until it's been almost 24 hours since her last meal.  She had lunch yesterday, went to work last night, then other job early this morning, and at lunchtime today ate a ton of food. She's back at work and won't eat when she gets home unless she has a Lara bar or something. While it drives me nuts, she's healthy and it works for her.  She eats good food. 

 

So I can't tell whether your main issue is that your dd only wants to eat junk food or that you think she just needs to eat more food.   

 

There are  small tortillas to use to make wraps- a cold roast chicken wrap, turkey and avocado, or even a BLT wrap would travel well.  When the kids were younger I made these and cut them into bite size pieces- like a roll up- and they could grab a piece even if they were studying or talking.  Mine loved homemade chicken tenders coated with panko and baked- cold, dipped in honey mustard or bbq sauce was always a hit.  Apple slices and grapes are good 'on the go' foods.  Basically, the easier it is to eat the more likely it is a busy teen will eat it. 

 

Good luck- breaking the junk food habit seems really hard but once it's done it's so much better.  After we went through it I compared it to teaching the babies to put themselves to sleep. It was a miserable few weeks but once we turned the corner, I felt so accomplished.g 

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My dd's favorite muffin. They're so good that you would never guess they have healthy stuff like whole wheat flour and wheat germ in them. The original recipe called for raisins or dried fruit instead of chocolate chips, and I like those too, but my family vastly prefers the chocolate chip version. The picky eater won't eat them with raisins. I've entered the recipe into MyFitnessPal and the numbers are per muffin: 219 calories, 9 gm fat, 4 gm protein, 3 gm fiber--those numbers are fine for my standards. Dd will eat 2 during the day if we have them around.

 

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Muffins

 

1 cup whole wheat pastry flour

2 Tbs. wheat bran

2 Tbs. untested wheat germ

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup white sugar

1.5 cup quick cooking oats

1 cup buttermilk

1 egg

1/4 cup oil

1 tsp vanilla

1/2 cup boiling water

3/4 cup chocolate chips

 

Mix dry ingredients together (through oats). In a separate bowl mix buttermilk, egg, oil, and vanilla. Add dry ingredients. Add boiling water and let sit 15 minutes--preheat oven to 350° during this time. Stir in chocolate chips after the 15 minutes, then spoon batter into greased muffin pan (makes 12). Bake for 20 minutes.

 

 

She might eat these.  Other girls will for sure.

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Personally, I would not give in to the junky food. I would require that she suck it up and choose some healthier items to take and eat after school if she's going to refuse breakfast and possibly lunch too or she would have to drop the sport altogether.

 

Some ideas:

 

Pita bread or chips dipped in hummus, nut or seed butter, spaghetti sauce, refried beans, or cheese

Pizza on a mini bagel

Soft pretzel (these can be made with whole grains)

Cheese stick plain or wrapped in meat

Tortilla chips w/Guacamole

A thermos of soup, pasta, leftovers etc.

Celery and apples w/nut or seed butter

Kebabs with meat, cheese, veggies etc. Each one is a very small portion and should be doable even on such a small appetite

Mini muffins

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If really no nuts, what about homemade trail mix? Pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, dried cranberries, raisins, mini chocolate chips...

 

Does she like dried fruit like apricots or dates?

 

Pasta salad with diced veggies (no mayo)? Quinoa salad? Couscous?

 

Smoked salmons rolls? Jerky?

 

Soup-in-a-cup? Kinda junky (high sodium, not much nutrition) but might be something at lunchtime if she has access to hot water.

 

Oatmeal? Make ahead and keep in a thermos.

 

Since you said no peanut butter, what about almond or any other nut butter? Add a Baggie with whole grain crackers.

 

Pancakes rolled up with nut butter inside? As easy (though not as healthy) as a wrap. Filling, if not nutritionally dense.

 

I love the sushi idea a PP suggested. So easy on the go.

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It sounds like she's really active- is she getting her calories by eating junk food or is she cluster feeding when she gets home from school? Dd has never been able to eat breakfast and she's juggling two jobs so some days she doesn't eat until it's been almost 24 hours since her last meal.  She had lunch yesterday, went to work last night, then other job early this morning, and at lunchtime today ate a ton of food. She's back at work and won't eat when she gets home unless she has a Lara bar or something. While it drives me nuts, she's healthy and it works for her.  She eats good food. 

 

So I can't tell whether your main issue is that your dd only wants to eat junk food or that you think she just needs to eat more food.   

 

There are  small tortillas to use to make wraps- a cold roast chicken wrap, turkey and avocado, or even a BLT wrap would travel well.  When the kids were younger I made these and cut them into bite size pieces- like a roll up- and they could grab a piece even if they were studying or talking.  Mine loved homemade chicken tenders coated with panko and baked- cold, dipped in honey mustard or bbq sauce was always a hit.  Apple slices and grapes are good 'on the go' foods.  Basically, the easier it is to eat the more likely it is a busy teen will eat it. 

 

Good luck- breaking the junk food habit seems really hard but once it's done it's so much better.  After we went through it I compared it to teaching the babies to put themselves to sleep. It was a miserable few weeks but once we turned the corner, I felt so accomplished.g 

 

 

I would say she is cluster feeding, eating when she gets home.  She is not eating much junk food because I stopped buying it when I realized that was all she was eating at school.

 

I am not sure which I am more concerned about myself!  I am posting about this today because she was sent home by the nurse to come home to eat.  I have never heard of someone being excused from school before to come home to eat.  She was weak and dizzy and refused to eat for the nurse, although she did eat some pretzels while I was on my way to get her.  Dd said it was just because she didn't feel good at all and had no appetite (she has been eating fine since I got her home), but nurse made me feel like it her not feeling well is because she is not eating much and does not like that she is not eating breakfast or lunch on a regular basis.  I offered to bring her something to eat and leave her there, but the nurse wanted her to come home and eat and rest for the rest of the day.

 

What is very frustrating is that I fed the older three children (which she is one) very well when they were younger and junk food was just a treat.  Now two of them (which she is one), wants junk food to be their main food source and real food to be a treat.

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Can you get input from her too? I agree with MEMama - have you guys talked about how she needs the food as fuel to get her body through the practices and to keep everything running in good order? I had a gymnast who used to start every gymnastics practice with a large coke and fries from McDonalds. It took many pre-practice conversations to start getting her to understand that soda and fries aren't helping her gymnastics and they're detrimental to her becoming better at her sport. If you approach it from that angle with her, maybe she can help brainstorm? 

 

Does she like avocados? Veggie sushi would be yummy. Tortilla chips (either store bought or they're really easy to make homemade) and guac? 

 

 

We are brainstorming together.  She does know what food she needs to fuel herself.  In addition to what we tell her at home, the school does a good job in the required health classes and the coaches and trainers reinforce healthy eating.

 

I ordered some Kind bars that she does like for an afterschool snack and she gave me some more ideas for lunch that we will try.

 

She does not like avocados.  (I didn't realize how picky she really is until I typing out what she doesn't like!)

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I would say she is cluster feeding, eating when she gets home.  She is not eating much junk food because I stopped buying it when I realized that was all she was eating at school.

 

I am not sure which I am more concerned about myself!  I am posting about this today because she was sent home by the nurse to come home to eat.  I have never heard of someone being excused from school before to come home to eat.  She was weak and dizzy and refused to eat for the nurse, although she did eat some pretzels while I was on my way to get her.  Dd said it was just because she didn't feel good at all and had no appetite (she has been eating fine since I got her home), but nurse made me feel like it her not feeling well is because she is not eating much and does not like that she is not eating breakfast or lunch on a regular basis.  I offered to bring her something to eat and leave her there, but the nurse wanted her to come home and eat and rest for the rest of the day.

 

What is very frustrating is that I fed the older three children (which she is one) very well when they were younger and junk food was just a treat.  Now two of them (which she is one), wants junk food to be their main food source and real food to be a treat.

 

I guess I would be concerned. Once I realized my youngest dd's cluster feeding works for her, and I got over my own hang up that she needed to eat several times a day, I was able to clearly see there's not a real problem with her diet. 

 

However, my oldest had an eating disorder when she was a teenager so when youngest started cluster feeding it made me concerned that she was developing an eating disorder. But the two kids were totally different.   

 

So it's a little worrisome when your daughter not eating is being brought to the attention of the school nurse. And the fact that she was weak and dizzy is concerning. If she's open to eating something during the day then great, but it's really hard to tell whether her protests about not wanting certain foods or taking food being too difficult is an attempt to not eat or whether she really just doesn't like the hassle of taking an insulated bag. 

 

So...is it that she's rebelling against you removing her junk food? Or truly no appetite? Or perhaps pressure to maintain or lose weight?  

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Will the doctor refer you to a nutritionist? Maybe one who works with athletes to help with the track aspect. Then it's not MOM yapping about food, kwim?

 

 

I am not sure.  Hopefully, after our brainstorming session this afternoon and once I have a chance to get everything later in the week, we will see if that helps.  When the nurse called me today, I was thinking that I needed to take her to the dr, but after I picked her up and we talked about what she will eat, I think it will be fine.  I guess next week when she adds track in the mix, is when we will see if she is really eating enough.  If she still seems to not be eating enough, I will take her to the dr to see what he suggests.

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We are brainstorming together. She does know what food she needs to fuel herself. In addition to what we tell her at home, the school does a good job in the required health classes and the coaches and trainers reinforce healthy eating )

That's a good start, but if she KNOWS and is willfully not DOING, there seems to be a disconnect? I agree that getting her to see a nutritionist seems to be an important first step. Getting everyone of authority who isn't you on board would be my first line of defence at this point. Growing, athletic bodies cannot thrive on so few nutrients.

 

Good luck. Your situation makes my heart hurt.

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So it's a little worrisome when your daughter not eating is being brought to the attention of the school nurse. And the fact that she was weak and dizzy is concerning. If she's open to eating something during the day then great, but it's really hard to tell whether her protests about not wanting certain foods or taking food being too difficult is an attempt to not eat or whether she really just doesn't like the hassle of taking an insulated bag. 

 

Yes, it is hard to tell.

 

So...is it that she's rebelling against you removing her junk food? Or truly no appetite? Or perhaps pressure to maintain or lose weight?  I don't know.  She looks like she is losing weight and I did have the nurse weigh her.  She has lost some weight since the nurse weighed her for school, but I don't remember when that was, nor was it significant - could just be a difference to clothing/time of month.  The dr monitors her weight due to the medication, so we will see at her appt.  She does eat at home, it is when she isn't home that I am concerned about and beginning next week, she won't be home much.

 

She just started the two gym classes this semester - yoga and regular gym, in addition to her soccer training (about 3x a week).  So,  her weight loss (if any) could be attributed to that.

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What about making those cheese biscuits?  They are calorie dense and have a lot of cheese in them, but are good at room temp.  If you keep them in the fridge overnight, she can put a few in a bag to take with her and by lunchtime they will be room temp.  If she buys a carton of milk, and has a tangerine as well or a little bag of sweet 100 tomatoes, she will have a reasonably balanced little meal.  And cheese biscuits are similar in taste appeal to junk food while being healthier.  (I wouldn't go so far as to call them healthy, but they are certainly better for you than bagged snacks.)

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What about making those cheese biscuits?  They are calorie dense and have a lot of cheese in them, but are good at room temp.  If you keep them in the fridge overnight, she can put a few in a bag to take with her and by lunchtime they will be room temp.  If she buys a carton of milk, and has a tangerine as well or a little bag of sweet 100 tomatoes, she will have a reasonably balanced little meal.  And cheese biscuits are similar in taste appeal to junk food while being healthier.  (I wouldn't go so far as to call them healthy, but they are certainly better for you than bagged snacks.)

 

 

She doesn't like cheese or tomatoes, unless on a pizza!

 

I appreciate the idea though!

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Sounds like an eating disorder. I would contact her doctor.

I have had problems with anorexia, bulimia, and binging so I may be seeing something that isn't there.

The picky eating and not eating outside the house is a flag though. Also the excessive exercising. Feeling weak/dizzy and still refusing food as well.

 

What will she eat? Can you have her keep a very detailed food journal with your help? This helped me to realize how little I was actually eating.

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Sounds like an eating disorder. I would contact her doctor.

I have had problems with anorexia, bulimia, and binging so I may be seeing something that isn't there.

The picky eating and not eating outside the house is a flag though. Also the excessive exercising. Feeling weak/dizzy and still refusing food as well.

 

What will she eat? Can you have her keep a very detailed food journal with your help? This helped me to realize how little I was actually eating.

I was thinking this as well. A good friend's young daughter was diagnosed with anorexia recently. They caught it early. There is an eating disorder dealing with avoidant/restrictive eating as well.

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Sounds like an eating disorder. I would contact her doctor.

I have had problems with anorexia, bulimia, and binging so I may be seeing something that isn't there.

The picky eating and not eating outside the house is a flag though. Also the excessive exercising. Feeling weak/dizzy and still refusing food as well.

 

What will she eat? Can you have her keep a very detailed food journal with your help? This helped me to realize how little I was actually eating.

 

 

This is what I don't want to hear, but it is something that I am worried about.  I am so afraid of handling this wrong and turning it into one.  I don't want to put thoughts in her head.

 

When we brainstormed today what I could get for her to pack, we agreed to:

 

Carnation breakfast (which was already happening, when we had it)

salad with my homemade dressing (I prepped everything this afternoon and made the dressing)

Nutty Buddy

Kind bar (plus bar with peanut butter and dark chocolate) for afterschool snack

sucky applesauce (the kind in bag that you suck down)

vanilla Greek yogurt (surprised me that she wants this - we will get on Thursday from Wegman's)

small pita bread with lunch meat

 

We are going to Wegman's and Trader Joe's on Thursday evening to try to figure out more snacky stuff for her to eat at school.  I also made granola tonight that hopefully she will bring that too.  I am going to make the muffins posted tomorrow.

 

She does eat the dinners I make for dinner.  After school, she eats at least one grapefruit a day (or more!) and leftovers or cereal.  

 

When I picked her up today, she was around the 10th student sent home for illness by noon.  One of the boys sent home passed out in her 1st period class, so I am wondering if her current weakness/dizzy is something going around.

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That's a good start to a list. Is there any way you can get her to eat more protein? I'm seeing almost entirely sugars and carbs there and very little substance (unless the daily salad is loaded). Idk what a nutty buddy is.

 

I'm assuming she will eat all of this each day at school?

 

Very glad to hear she's working with you. I would still want to get help for making sure she branches out though. My son would faint on so little food for the day (even with a hearty dinner).

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I have a super picky son, so I'm always looking for healthy snacks. This one isn't super healthy, but he loves them. I cut the sugar a little.

 

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/almond-cranberry-quinoa-cookies

 

I second the jerky recommendation. We make our own from grass fed organic beef. I buy roasted edamame with dried fruit (he doesn't like the plain edamame). He runs and plays hockey and has found eating a banana beforehand gives him good energy without making him feel sick. Dark chocolate? (try to get at least 72%--Endangered Species have some really yummy flavors) Lara bars are the cleanest of the bars, but they're still sugary, so those are a rare treat.

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That's a good start to a list. Is there any way you can get her to eat more protein? I'm seeing almost entirely sugars and carbs there and very little substance (unless the daily salad is loaded). Idk what a nutty buddy is.

 

I'm assuming she will eat all of this each day at school?  Yes, this is the list to eat at school for lunch and after school.

 

Very glad to hear she's working with you. I would still want to get help for making sure she branches out though. My son would faint on so little food for the day (even with a hearty dinner).

 

 

I agree that it is sugar/carb loaded.  The salad is not loaded, just lettuce and veggies.  I would like her to add beans, but she doesn't like them she says.  I should see if she will eat the Perdue chicken slices with it.

 

A nutty buddy is a lunch dessert - a peanut butter waffer cookie type thing covered in chocolate.  That I am only buying if she takes a salad.  She would like to just eat this alone.

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I have a super picky son, so I'm always looking for healthy snacks. This one isn't super healthy, but he loves them. I cut the sugar a little.

 

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/almond-cranberry-quinoa-cookies

 

I second the jerky recommendation. We make our own from grass fed organic beef. I buy roasted edamame with dried fruit (he doesn't like the plain edamame). He runs and plays hockey and has found eating a banana beforehand gives him good energy without making him feel sick. Dark chocolate? (try to get at least 72%--Endangered Species have some really yummy flavors) Lara bars are the cleanest of the bars, but they're still sugary, so those are a rare treat.

 

 

Those look good!  I will have to make those.  What is the texture like with cooked quinoa in it?

 

I forgot that she likes jerky.  I will have to pick some up form the Amish Market this week.

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Honestly, I'd probably let her eat something junky at school, both at lunch and before practice.  Send the carnation smoothie and let her pick one snack to go with it.  

 

Then, let her have another junky snack before practice.  Sure it's not ideal, but if she's that picky, she really needs to eat a little something to get her through.  Eating disorders are real, and medication can set it off in a hurry.

 

Before school and after practice, you can provide a very healthy, protein heavy meal and call it good.  

 

Your high school daughter likely has access to junky food all the time. Pretty soon she will be heading to college where she will have to make her own choices.  I'd back away, take her shopping, and let her choose two junky snacks/ day that she will actually eat, then do my best to stay out of it.  She may decide she needs something healthier on her own.  But I'm not really sure that a healthy snack of hummus and veggies is all that much better than a baggie of Cheese Its in the long run.  Especially if she won't eat the hummus and veggies.

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Those look good!  I will have to make those.  What is the texture like with cooked quinoa in it?

 

I forgot that she likes jerky.  I will have to pick some up form the Amish Market this week.

 

You can't taste the quinoa at all, which is why ds likes them. The cookies end up being right between chewy and crunchy, with the quinoa adding a tiny bit of the crunchiness.

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When you are dealing with an active or high metabolism person, erase the complaint of "empty calories" from your worries. Yes it is better to get nutrition from nutrition AND calorie dense foods, but if she eats calorie dense foods at school and nutrition dense foods at home, accept that as an ok baseline and then slowly work towards replacing super junky choices with healthier, still caloric, choices. We can't live like that as we age, but in college I accidentally dropped 10 lbs in a month by getting rid of all empty calories. I realized that at that time for me, my version of eating healthy was not to follow standard guidelines but to eat a variety of healthy things and then whatever else sated my hunger.

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One of mine also takes meds that prevent him from eating during the school day. He really just can't eat, even if presented with one of his favorite foods. He does eat a lot in the evenings after his meds wear off.

 

If I were you, I would focus on developing the habit of eating breakfast before she takes her meds. She's not going to want to, since she is not used to it, so you will need to work on it. If she is willing to talk to you about her eating, I would help her make some breakfast goals. Start with just eating something very small or drinking the Carnation drink in the morning, and have her work her way into a greater amount of food over time.

 

My son does also resist eating breakfast sometimes, and we have found that he is more willing if it is something savory and not a typical morning food. He likes leftover pizza, baked potatoes, cheese sticks, slices of lunch meat, or any leftovers that sound good to him. Last week he had reheated chicken enchiladas for breakfast.

 

I would guess that her problem is more related to skipping breakfast and the meds than an eating disorder, since she will eat substantially later in the day. Talking to a nutritionist might help her, because the guidance would be coming from an expert instead of from her mom.

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Thanks for all the new replies from yesterday.

 

So the only thing that she ended up eating yesterday in the lunch that I packed was the carnation breakfast and half of the nutty buddy. She ate the rest once she got home. She says that she just isn't hungry at lunch and can't eat even if she wants to.

 

I will try making breakfast in the mornings. That's tough to because she won't eat eggs, the easiest thing to make! She also is going to fuss about having to get up earlier because she has her routine down so she's out the door in 15 minutes or so since she has to leave so early at 6:55. I don't think she can eat on the bus, but maybe she could eat her breakfast once at school before home room (she has about 8 minutes I think) and her medicine shouldn't be kicking in yet. I know it doesn't yet because our local Chickfila gave away free breakfast Oct-Dec once a week, so I took a van full of kids every week and she ate just fine. Maybe dh would be willing (in our budget) to do this once a week to help get her used to eating breakfast again.

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Just sharing our experience.  DD is on ADD meds that affect her appetite.  Basically we reached a breaking point.  I understood that she was not hungry, but she was going to have to eat a certain amount of food to sustain herself or we were going to have to take her off the medicine.  It was not a good answer to me to trade school function for her health.  She did not want to end up off the medicine, so she agreed to eat.

 

 

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I feel your pain.  We do soup / leftovers in an insulated food jar (smaller than traditional Thermos).  My youngest has specific packed lunch criteria, and is bothered by the scent of eggs & tuna in a packed lunch, which eliminated those cheap & easy protein sources. The food jar has saved lunch. I agree with the hummus suggestions. Put in a small container, with the cut veggies already in; you can eliminate a container that way. She will also pack cashews and almonds. Easy, no scent foods.  There is barely room in her bag for these items. Her water bottle is clipped to the shoulder strap of the bag.

 

I've also resorted to protein bars a couple of times a week, on her longest days.  I try to get the lowest sugar/high protein; they are not my first choice, but they are easy. I shoot for 12 grams of protein to offset some of the sugar.  I'm rationalizing.  I stick with Luna or Cliff bars, and I am always reading labels on others and searching for one that doesn't offend me.  I saw so many new -to-me bars at Whole Foods recently. I spent a long time reading those tiny labels, and I have no idea why these aren't just called candy bars. I don't care what it says: raw, kale, organic, green -whatever- it's all a vehicle for sugar. That includes the ones I buy. ;)

 

And a whole industry here screams, "take my money!" 

https://www.water-bottle.co.nz/product-category/eco-lunchware/food-jar-insulated-thermos/

Edited by LibraryLover
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Does anyone have an energy bite/ball recipe that doesn't have nut butter? Or, doesn't have a strong nut butter flavor?

I make homemade Lara bars. No nut butter, but I do use cashews. I make lots of variations but they generally follow this idea:

 

2 c. Dates

2 c. Cashews or almonds

3/4-1 cup other fruit (dried apricots, cranberries, dried cranberries)

1-2 tbs chia or hemp seeds

Depending on my mood, maybe 1-2 tbs unsweetened cocoa or a handful of mini chocolate chips.

 

Purée in a food processor, spread evenly on a lined cookie sheet and chill to set. I wrap individual slices in parchment paper.

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I make homemade Lara bars. No nut butter, but I do use cashews. I make lots of variations but they generally follow this idea:

 

2 c. Dates

2 c. Cashews or almonds

3/4-1 cup other fruit (dried apricots, cranberries, dried cranberries)

1-2 tbs chia or hemp seeds

Depending on my mood, maybe 1-2 tbs unsweetened cocoa or a handful of mini chocolate chips.

 

Purée in a food processor, spread evenly on a lined cookie sheet and chill to set. I wrap individual slices in parchment paper.

 

thanks, she hates dates though.  

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