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Opinions please--would I be doing my 9th grader a disservice to...


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All along I've been considering doing the typical preparation for college highschool sciences. 

 

My plan has been to use BJU Science DVD's for highschool since we live overseas and it's pretty impossible for me to do the lab sciences here at home.

9th--Physical Science which is considered an Integrated Chemistry and Physics course according to the boards here

10th--Biology

11th--Chemistry

12th--Probably Physics or allowing her to do something more along her interest levels, like an advanced Anatomy class or doing some community college science course

 

But lately I've been looking at all the other great science courses out there and longing for her to have one year to do something that interests her, either Earth Science/Astronomy or a History of Science course with the Tiner books that Master Books has put together. 

 

Am I shooting her in the foot by doing that?  She plans to go into some sort of graphic design, but does enjoy science and math.  So she may decide to Veterinary Technician or something along those lines instead.  Of course, she still has time to change her mind.

 

Or maybe it's just me not wanting her to grow up...

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I don't think so. Actually, my friend's dd is in her first year freshman year studying graphic design. She goes to a strong college (not "elite" but selective). She did physical science, bio and 0.5 credit in Chem. She got into both colleges that she applied to, with merit scholarship.

 

Many colleges just require 2 sciences with lab. If she is going vet tech, you would want chem and bio.

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I don't think that your hurting your daughter in any way. I agree with the post above that maybe she would like to do something that she is interested in rather than doing the physical science course. 

 

Both my son and my daughter have had 3 years of science.  Neither my son, who is in college now, nor my daughter - a senior this year, have had any problems being admitted to the colleges where they applied. The colleges didn't even know whether their planned majors were STEM related or not as they both applied without declaring their intent, and it didn't raise an eyebrow.

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Sounds fine to me!

 

I haven't seen what Master Books has put together. On their own, I'd think of the Tiner books as more junior high level, but depending on what they are pairing with them, they may be adaptable to high school level work. 

 

I think having 1-2 years of elective science along with Biology and Chemistry would be just fine.

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I think the four year plan sounds fine, but I wouldn't use Tiner as a high school course for an average student. The Master Books guide has a schedule, more comprehension exercises than are in the book, and activity ideas. The Tiner books themselves are just reading the history of the science and answering a few multiple choice or true/false questions. The sweet spot for using them in my house was around 5th-6th grade.

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I considered doing the Tiner books with the 101 videos.  I realize many here won't think it's enough though.

 

I was the first one to call no Tiner for a high schooler, and I wouldn't use 101 with an average high schooler, but so much depends on the situation. Tiner doesn't teach actual science concepts, but rather biographies of the scientists who made the major advancements in those fields. Even my "science is krytonite" kid finished Biology 101 set in less than 9 weeks, but if it weren't for those 101 videos I don't think he ever would have been able to say he finished high school biology. Insisting he get through a typical stack of high school science textbooks would be setting him up for failure. (But he can read Old English poetry and mythology!) On the other hand I wouldn't consider Tiner/101 "enough" for my rising 6th grader (precocious side of life). Very different kids. Very different needs.

 

You are the expert on your kid and you know what they're capable of. :001_smile:

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Fwiw, I'm thinking of putting together a Tiner/Master books/ 101 schedule for Physics next year for the three I'll have in high school.  I'm considering it to be a lighter science credit.  All three will do biology and chemistry with labs at our co-op at some point during high school and the youngest (STEM-inclined) will probably do Physics in his senior year. The older two will never take Physics, but I think they'd enjoy and benefit from the introduction.  I agree that the Tiner books aren't high school level, but when I had one of my kids reading them in 9th grade, he was constantly sharing them with the rest of us because he found them so interesting.  That's the kind of learning that sticks.  

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