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Gisele Marie

Homeschooling after 18

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Our daughter was diagnosed with FASD/Sensory Issues many years ago, and now that she is an adult, she has been issued a graduation diploma for completing a "modified" education.  She currently functions academically between 1st and 5th grade. She is working part-time at a company that created a job for her (thank you Lord) and she still receives hippotherapy.  I've questioned whether or not to continue some focus on academics-given her struggles. I would love to hear from anyone who has continued to homeschool into adulthood! 

Thank you!

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Maybe work on life skills, including basic money management with scaffolding.  Perhaps even basic investment and savings possibilities.  Help her with whatever skills will help her to function fairly independently or as independently as possible.  

 

Also, if there are any subjects that she actually enjoyed doing and would like to continue (maybe history or science or something) then definitely continue those, even if she stays at a basic level.  Learning happens forever if you will let it, and can help in so many ways.  

 

Does she have a hobby?  I would work on finding outside interests that might also hone skills.  For instance, maybe woodworking if she has the fine motor skills, or learning how to lay tile or paint a room.  Certainly cooking/food prep would be helpful and if she got really good at this she could earn some money.  

 

If she likes read alouds or audio books, I would definitely help her keep going with those.

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We have friends that are in roughly your stage of the game or are getting very close. I agree with OneStep on maybe working on a lot of lifeskills (and academics that come up in that context)--the concerns I hear aside from employment (yay that you have that settled right now!!!) are boredom, understanding money, and finding friends who can be true peers and are also able to do stuff together (use transportation, have money to go places together, etc.). I also hear a bit of worry about the kids being too independent before they are ready (the son or daughter assuming that turning 18 means, "I'm free") and worrying they will be taken advantage of in some way. I know one mom that is trying to help her kids be good judges of character--how to figure out if someone is a good friend or not, talking about circles of friendship--close friends, acquaintances, etc. One organization (Christian based but also works with public schools, I think) is Celebrate Kids: http://www.celebratekids.com/. This is one resource I'm thinking of that might give you ideas if you are interested in these kinds of talks with your kids: http://shop.celebratekids.com/curriculum/relationships-to-friendships-brochure/ .

 

I know someone with a SN sister. The sister is married to a man with SN as well, but her parents have guardianship of her. The couple lives independently (I can't remember if it's in a set of apartments that has a supervisor who helps or not, but I think this was the case when she was younger). The family has taught the husband some basic financial literacy, and he was thrilled to learn--he'd never been taught in school. I guess it's made quite a difference for them for him to learn these skills. I don't know if it's translated to understanding the value of money (which some of these adults have trouble with as well), but I got the impression that it helps them do a better job of managing their money and understanding at least the comings and goings and bills and such.

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