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Kinsa

s/o: What trends/styles do you wish would come back?

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Cars with real personality, like wings on the back and big, skinny steering wheels, and in all sorts of shapes. Cars from the 50s. Cars today are little oval blobs of metal. Sure, they might be aerodynamic, blah blah...but they don't have style.

 

Factories in America so that everyone doesn't have to go to college if they don't want to. They can work their way up in a factory and earn a great living that way. Car factories and cabinet factories and factories that make instruments and furniture, etc.

 

In fact, any job that you can work your way up in and you don't hit a wall where you need a degree to do something that you can clearly do, but the lack of degree stops you.

 

Beautiful art. Not contemporary art. Well, we can have some of that for the people who really do enjoy it, but I was so disillusioned when I went to the museum last summer. One piece of art was of a strand of the artist's hair put in a frame and another piece of art was where the artist put a worm in red paint and then let it roll around on the canvas. I want to see a modern Rembrandt. I want a statue carved like Michelangelo did it. No blobs of hair or painted worms; something that requires years of study and looks beautiful when it's done. I want beauty to be the goal, not just to "show a feeling" or "make a statement."

 

Pantyhose was the first thing I thought of when I read this. I still wear them defiantly, but the winter is best because then I wear tights and can relax and know I'm not out of style. I'm good until Spring hits.

 

Shoes with wide toes and big sturdy heels. Some people have toes that come to a point, but people like me have toes that are all roughly the same length and come to a square.

 

Sweat pants. I remember everyone wearing baggy sweatpants when I was in school in the 80's. Not every day, but often enough. Yoga pants are comfy and I wear them, but sometimes I'd like a big ol' pair of baggy pants where the butt is supposed to be saggy so I don't have to worry about it.

Edited by Garga
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Beautiful art. Not contemporary art. Well, we can have some of that for the people who really do enjoy it, but I was so disillusioned when I went to the museum last summer. One piece of art was of a strand of the artist's hair put in a frame and another piece of art was where the artist put a worm in red paint and then let it roll around on the canvas. I want to see a modern Rembrandt. I want a statue carved like Michelangelo did it. No blobs of hair or painted worms; something that requires years of study and looks beautiful when it's done. I want beauty to be the goal, not just to "show a feeling" or "make a statement."

 

We live rural and real art is well over 4 hours away at an university. I was SO excited when I found there was a local art gallery only 90 minutes away. I called and confirmed there really was an art exhibit, explained I lived a drive away and I had small kids (oldest were 8 + 6, plus littles). It was fine, come!

 

We get there only to find... Wtf! It was an indoor skate park built inside the art gallery-and you couldn't walk around to look at the art "couch splattered with paint" and "bottle caps on nightstand". In order to view the art you had to have a skateboard-which the gallery doesn't supply. I was FUMING mad.

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Well I adore the messy bun so I hope that doesn't go anywhere soon. But I love the closed concept house. We just bought our first house and I looked at so many houses thinking I really wanted the open concept, but when it came down down to it, I just need walls and separate spaces. I hadn't realized it before because I hadn't ever really chosen my living space. My house now is just about the right degree of closed offness. I won't be advocating for pantyhose anytime soon but I love big hair on other women, I am far too lazy to do that to myself though.

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Although I'm far too lazy, I would love to see big 80s hair back.  I have always loved big hair.

 

And your pantyhose wants make me shudder.  Free the legs!  (Actually, to each her own.  I loathe pantyhose but respect your right to like them.)

 

I also like high waisted pants and peasant skirts.  It would be great for those to be back in.  I wear the pants anyway (thanks, llbean!), but at least I'd look cool!

 

Ooh, and nifty 80s sweaters.  

 

Hmm.  I'm sensing a trend.  I <3 the 80s!

 

I'm pretty sure high waisted pants are in now, at least some kinds.  I've seen quite a few skinny-jeans or trousers with quite high waists, like a rockabilly style, or Audrey Hepburn style. 

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That logical design is common here in older homes. Heating is expensive so you have to be thoughtful about design. I like my little rabbit warren of a house. I like having many rooms. They've all got lovely names, too. Some were called what they are called when the house was built. Others came to be as the house evolved over its lifetime. I love being able to say, "let's adjourn to the parlour for some music" and there's really a room called the parlour and we do keep the piano and all the music gear in there. There's the butler's pantry (my laundry/cleaning/mud room). There's a library off the parlour we use for school, and an upstairs library, too, which is really just an unused bedroom, but was always called a library as far as dh can remember. I use it for an office. I suppose the house could be made all open, but it would lose its charm and coziness.

Now I want to come to your house! I want to adjourn to the Parlor!

 

In Bill Bryson's book "At Home," he goes into intricate detail, as only Bill Bryson can, about the purpose and arrangement of each room in his very old English home. I loved reading that book and imagining all those purposful rooms, and hearing the origin or things like "cupboard" and "Chairman of the Board." Fascinating.

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Dresses from 150 years ago and earlier. I would love to dress like that every day all the time.

 

Skirts that are narrow at the top and flounce at the bottom.

 

Underwear with more coverage. I wish the cashier did not give me funny looks when I bought them.

 

Denim jumpers to wear while I homeschool. :). I know, but they do look comfortable.

 

Polka dots.

 

Ribbons in the hair, even for older women.

 

Velour.

 

Scrunchies

 

Fabric purses.

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Agreed on closed concept. Ours is sort of open sort of closed, and my parents kept trying to convince me to walk down the full wall that separates the living room/dining area from the kitchen. I said NO! Yes, I have to walk further to get from one room to another to use a door, but I don't need everyone seeing my dirty dishes. And at the time I had a toddler and wanted to be able to baby gate him in where we were...can't do that well without actual rooms. 

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I miss roll-down car windows.  There was something very satisfying in rolling the glass pane until it topped out.  No power assist, no one-touch actuation.  At least I'd like it as an option ...

 

We have roll-down car windows (and no power locks) in one of our cars. It always cracks me up to drive kids places because the first time they are in our car they are all amazed by the windows. I've had so many kids tell me that our car is "really cool." :) 

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Agree on not completely open concept house.

I looked great in pleated pants. Miss those.

 

Wider toe box in shoes.

 

Flared skirts, midi or maxi, but narrow in the waist. In a fabric that doesn't get all tangled up with my knee socks.

 

Frye boots.

 

Tucked in shirts. I have very little going for me in the beauty department, but I have kept a trim waistline and the overblouse doesn't show it off. Lol.

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Yup!  We even put french doors on our living room doorways so that we could shut off noise from the rest of the house (and we can heat spaces separately this way). 

 

We did this too.  The people who owned this house last put a nice sitting room on, but left an open arch between it and the front hall.  We put glass doors onto it that can fold and open completely.  Right now (it's 7am) the heating hasn't come on yet, but I have the fire going in the sitting room stove.  I'll sit in there with my cup of tea, the room will warm up, then I'll open the doors to warm the rest of the house for the day.

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Scrunchies! I still wear them, but I know I look stupid doing it. 

 

Casual dressing that was still mostly covered. I grew up in the era of Jeans and a v-neck teeshirt being my standard wardrobe, and it still is but it's no longer in fashion. Often with a flannel tied around the waist :)

 

Men in hats, definitely. 

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The old Lee jeans that were high waisted and were eventually called "mom jeans".  They fit comfortably and did not show anything when you bent over.   Chic also made excellent great fitting jeans back in the day.  And they weren't overly expensive either.  

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Houses in Scotland are rarely open-plan: heating large open spaces with high ceilings is crushingly expensive. We use central heating to keep most of the house at around 15 degrees C, then heat the sitting room with a wood stove to a higher temperature. When that room is warm, we open the doors and the rest of the house warms slowly.

I'm reading this and thinking thank goodness that in some corner of the world there are still stoic manly men (and manly women :d) who bundle up in sweaters and tartans against the bracing cold, and have their central heating (my first clue that something was amiss) set down to 15 C.

 

Then I did the conversion. That's 59 F.

 

Maybe I need to look to Mongolia? ;)

 

Bill

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I'm reading this and thinking thank goodness that in some corner of the world there are still stoic manly men (and manly women :D) who bundle up in sweaters and tartans against the bracing cold, and have their central heating (my first clue that something was amiss) set down to 15 C.

 

Then I did the conversion. That's 59 F.

 

Maybe I need to look to Mongolia? ;)

 

Bill

 

Yes - we actually used to have it set to 13 degrees, but my 91yo Mum is staying at present, so it's a 15 and she has an extra heater in her room.

 

I still wear sweaters, fleece-lined trousers and Smartwools indoors.....

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Pocket doors were great.  They roll sideways into the wall, so when they are open they don't take up any room.  I especially like the ones with French door type windows in them.

 

Also, what about heavy stretch velvet shirts?  Those were fantastic.  Rich colors, just the right fit--kind of skimmish without being oversized, not see through at all, warm but dressy.  Great with everything from jeans to business suits to fancy long velvet skirts for evening wear.

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Yes to hats.

 

I had a bunch and I loved them.  They're much harder to find these days.  I don't want it be required like it was in the 40s, but an option, definitely.

 

So, I know that people down here in Florida rarely wear pantyhose, but I didn't realize it was a nationwide trend.  Even in the winter?? Brrrrr.

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I loved the styles worn by women in the 1940 and 1950s. People used to dress up to go out. It was so classy. Now you run into the pajama pants and a sweatshirt moms. Hoping not to offend anyone, but it always make me shudder. 

 

 

Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

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Yeah I never cared for the open concept idea.  I always wonder, how does one not have greasy curtains in their living room.  I like to contain the kitchen mess in the kitchen and not have it spread to the rest of the house.  If my kitchen is a mess, I don't want to have to see it while I'm watching TV.  And yeah heating such a room is extra expensive. 

 

Our house is not open concept anyway.

 

 

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I loved the styles worn by women in the 1940 and 1950s. People used to dress up to go out. It was so classy. Now you run into the pajama pants and a sweatshirt moms. Hoping not to offend anyone, but it always make me shudder. 

 

 

Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

 

 

Oh see I always prefer to be called by my first name.  It drives me especially nuts when a parent insists their child call me Miss First Name.  Yuck. 

But I do think people should generally be called by whatever their preferred name is.  So if you wanted that, I'd respect that. 

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I loved the styles worn by women in the 1940 and 1950s. People used to dress up to go out. It was so classy. Now you run into the pajama pants and a sweatshirt moms. Hoping not to offend anyone, but it always make me shudder.

 

 

Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

Same here. I still, to this day, address my elders (and some peers) as Mr./Mrs. So-n-so. And I've raised my kids to do the same unless specifically requested to do otherwise. If I don't, it just feels so... so... wrong, somehow. (LOL)

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I thought it was weird, but in Texas where we went to church, none of the girls or women wore panty hose, rarely tights. Here in the mid-Atlantic, every lady and some girls and teens wear them. These are fashion-conscious ladies so I started wearing black hose and tights again, as well as finding some nice panty hose with a design on them. It definitely helps to keep me warmer.

 

Pride & Prejudice. The way they spoke: complete sentences, no slang, polite (mostly), formal. The clothing I love, the dances, the music.

 

Oh, too far back? Sorry :lol:

 

 

 

 

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Agreed on closed concept. Ours is sort of open sort of closed, and my parents kept trying to convince me to walk down the full wall that separates the living room/dining area from the kitchen. I said NO! Yes, I have to walk further to get from one room to another to use a door, but I don't need everyone seeing my dirty dishes. And at the time I had a toddler and wanted to be able to baby gate him in where we were...can't do that well without actual rooms. 

 

Right?!  How do people cook with toddlers underfoot? 

 

Also, I really like being able to have an adult conversation without being in the same room as the kids (without necessarily having to go hide in the bedroom), whether that's with dh or with company.  The kids can be in one room and the adults can be in another.  Or even when it's just regular conversation, I don't have to yell over the kids to be heard. 

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Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

 

I do miss this. I love being called "Mrs" and it almost never happens :(

 

But, I do have my kids call adults "Miss/Mr First Name" so I'm just as guilty as everyone else. 

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I'm reading this and thinking thank goodness that in some corner of the world there are still stoic manly men (and manly women :D) who bundle up in sweaters and tartans against the bracing cold, and have their central heating (my first clue that something was amiss) set down to 15 C.

 

Then I did the conversion. That's 59 F.

 

Maybe I need to look to Mongolia? ;)

 

Bill

 

We don't have central heating, our rooms are individually heated. So we keep the living room a pretty comfortable 65F, the part of the house that we call "the core" (rooms with water pipes) at about 50F, bedrooms pretty much don't get heated, unless it's uber cold, and then only when people are in them they get heated to about 45F (with plenty of warm blankets piled on that is really very comfortable).

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I loved the styles worn by women in the 1940 and 1950s. People used to dress up to go out. It was so classy. Now you run into the pajama pants and a sweatshirt moms. Hoping not to offend anyone, but it always make me shudder. 

 

 

Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

 

You are not a snob.  Children have no business calling adults by their first names.  I am blown over every time it happens.  Absolutely no home training.

 

ETA: for that matter, I don't call all adults by their first names, either.  The immediate familiarity that many people assume kinda makes me uncomfortable.

Edited by TammyS
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Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

 

I taught my kids to call adults/elders Mr./Mrs. Last name unless instructed otherwise.  Usually I don't care if I am called by first name and will instruct  child to call me by my first name after they call me Mrs. Xyz.  If I friend of my child called me by first name the first time they met me I instructed them to call me Mrs. Xyz.

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The old Lee jeans that were high waisted and were eventually called "mom jeans".  They fit comfortably and did not show anything when you bent over.   Chic also made excellent great fitting jeans back in the day.  And they weren't overly expensive either.  

 

Yep. I wore those Lee jeans in high school and I looked good! :coolgleamA: I can't stand low-cut jeans, especially on little girls who are constantly exposing their backside without being aware of it. 

 

I wear skirts now and don't miss jean shopping, at all. 

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We left an open concept house and now live in one that is the perfect combination of open and closed. I did not want to feel boxed in by walls but I didn't want wide open like we'd had. When we toured this house we walked in and I was so excited we'd found exactly what I'd envisioned. A kitchen you couldn't see into from every direction!

 

We have a closed concept house. Also known as a bungalow.  5 rooms, all separated and individual.  :laugh:

 

 

Yes! Or, dare I say it, banana clips? My hair looked great in a banana clip. If it didn't scream old lady reliving Saved By The Bell and if I could find one, Id probably wear it.

 

I LOVED banana clips.  I have long, wavy, extremely thick hair.  Banana clips were the best and looked great. I can also feather my hair super-easily but I didn't discover how to do that until long after high school.  Oh well.

 

I can't do high waisted jeans though.  I'm very short-waisted.  Low rise jeans hit me where normal jeans should.  High waisted will hit my bra strap.  Not a good look.

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Yes! Or, dare I say it, banana clips? My hair looked great in a banana clip. If it didn't scream old lady reliving Saved By The Bell and if I could find one, Id probably wear it.

 

I still have a banana clip and sometimes where it around the house  :coolgleamA:

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I agree with whoever said scrunchies. I loved scrunchies, and it was a sad day when my fashion-conscious younger sister informed me in her not-so-subtle way that scrunchies went out of style a decade before. (LOL)

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If I like something, I wear it and I don't really care that it's out of style.

 

Yes, I perhaps say this because I still wear banana clips. If you saw my hair, you'd know why!

 

I have friends who dress right out of other eras. They look fantastic but I seriously don't have the time or money for that.

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I still use scrunchies, wear sweatshirts at the grocer, and my huge pet peeve is children using only my first name instead of "Ms/Mrs. Moocow. I also enjoy 80'a slang. :)

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I prefer kids to call me Mrs Lastname and it seems most people do teach their kids that.  I don't like it when chidlren treat me like a peer. 

 

On the other hand, once a child reaches adulthood I prefer they call me by my first name.   So at some point once I feel I have an adult relationship with a person I knew as a child, I tell him or her that they are welcome to call me Margaret, if they want to and can make the transition.  There is usually a little awkwardness at first but they get over it.

 

It's funny - we know a lot of graduate students because of my husband's involvement with a seminary, first as student, then as staff.  They call my husband by his first name, but being polite people they call me Mrs. Lastname.   I cry foul when they do that.  Unfair of them to treat my husband as a peer but me as an older lady. 

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Baggy jeans on teenagers. I think teen girls look adorable in them. (Okay, and I'm a bit disturbed by the tightness my dd prefers.) 

 

Scrunchies.

 

Floral-print rayon dresses.

 

Tretorns.

 

 

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I agree with whoever said scrunchies. I loved scrunchies, and it was a sad day when my fashion-conscious younger sister informed me in her not-so-subtle way that scrunchies went out of style a decade before. (LOL)

 

I still love scrunchies for my long hair. My favorite is black velvet.  You know you can make them... instructions on youtube.

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Baggy jeans on teenagers. I think teen girls look adorable in them. (Okay, and I'm a bit disturbed by the tightness my dd prefers.)

 

Scrunchies.

 

Floral-print rayon dresses.

 

Tretorns.

So, you miss the 1990s? I bet we are fairly close in age. :)

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That logical design is common here in older homes.  Heating is expensive so you have to be thoughtful about design.  I like my little rabbit warren of a house. I like having many rooms.  They've all got lovely names, too.  Some were called what they are called when the house was built. Others came to be as the house evolved over its lifetime.  I love being able to say, "let's adjourn to the parlour for some music" and there's really a room called the parlour and we do keep the piano and all the music gear in there. There's the butler's pantry (my laundry/cleaning/mud room). There's a library off the parlour we use for school, and an upstairs library, too, which is really just an unused bedroom, but was always called a library as far as dh can remember.  I use it for an office.  I suppose the house could be made all open, but it would lose its charm and coziness. 

Audrey, quite some time ago you were looking for ideas on decorating your old farm house, making it not look period style.

What did you decide on? Did you remodel?

I was recently in the one home I was telling you about...my friend who is an interior designer (among many other hats he wears) is also an artist and the place still looks wonderful. Bare wood floors, any kind of art, modern furnishings.

 

I'm curious.

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Audrey, quite some time ago you were looking for ideas on decorating your old farm house, making it not look period style.

What did you decide on? Did you remodel?

I was recently in the one home I was telling you about...my friend who is an interior designer (among many other hats he wears) is also an artist and the place still looks wonderful. Bare wood floors, any kind of art, modern furnishings.

 

I'm curious.

 

No major remodelling but I took a page out of the Scandinavian book and came to a combo of clean lined furnishings, soft textiles in mostly primary and neutral colours, and left all the period architectural details.  It's cozy and I like it. :)   I do want to completely remodel the kitchen some day, but that's not in the budget yet.

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Agreed on closed concept. Ours is sort of open sort of closed, and my parents kept trying to convince me to walk down the full wall that separates the living room/dining area from the kitchen. I said NO! Yes, I have to walk further to get from one room to another to use a door, but I don't need everyone seeing my dirty dishes. And at the time I had a toddler and wanted to be able to baby gate him in where we were...can't do that well without actual rooms. 

 

Every time my uncle, who is a builder, comes over he wants to take down the wall between my kitchen and dining room.  It's odd to me because you can actually have a conversation between them now, and it's only a small wall and would make little difference.

 

In fact last time he said that he felt like we were living in the past, because we are five people in a 1950 house with no significant updates to the floor plan.  I can't figure out hw people have changed that what was a family home in 1950 can't be one now.

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I loved the styles worn by women in the 1940 and 1950s. People used to dress up to go out. It was so classy. Now you run into the pajama pants and a sweatshirt moms. Hoping not to offend anyone, but it always make me shudder. 

 

 

Also, I can't tell you how many children call me by my first name. I was taught to address my elders by Mr. and Mrs. as a form of respect and I also teach my children to speak this way to adults. I don't know, sometimes I wonder if I'm a snob. :confused1:

 

I think this comes from the adults for the most part.  Many don't want to be called by their last names, and don't introduce themselves that way.  So - that has become usual.

 

It's also really common for adults to not bother to introduce themselves, so kids only have what they hear others say.

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I was in my 20's in the 90's and I still much prefer the loose fitted grunge style.  Overall shorts/shorts with bibs, really soft well worn flannels  that you stole out of your dad's closet, big black combat boots or those shoes that resembled slippers, rockport sandals. Wearing really flowy long dresses with boots and either a brown leather bomber jacket or ratty cardigan from the thrift store.

 

Grunge is out?  Uh oh...  

 

I always stole my dad's flannel shirts, loved it.  

 

I'd love to see everyone dressing like the 1930s, but I personally prefer to dress in baggy jeans (but that fit at the waist, no undies hanging out!) and a more fitted tee.  

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I think this comes from the adults for the most part.  Many don't want to be called by their last names, and don't introduce themselves that way.  So - that has become usual.

 

It's also really common for adults to not bother to introduce themselves, so kids only have what they hear others say.

 

 

Yes I think this is true for the most part.

 

We lived on the east coast all of our lives. ( I'm from LI. and hubby from NJ) Basically all the children would call you Mr. and Mrs. so and so. I grew up expecting that and teaching it to my children as a form of respect. 

 

When we moved to the midwest a couple of years ago I was astounded by how it was not the custom in my area. I even suggested to a couple of friends children that I preferred to be addressed this way and they literally laughed at me and continued to to it right in front of their mom. Of coarse these were the same kids that would open my fridge without asking. :glare:  

 

My others friends children didn't even have to be told they just did it, I assume, because of the way my boys addressed their parents.

 

 

I know they address teachers here by Mr. and Mrs. and I always think teachers deserve that respect but parent don't? Obviously it is used as a term of respect at least in the educational setting.

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Yes! Or, dare I say it, banana clips? My hair looked great in a banana clip. If it didn't scream old lady reliving Saved By The Bell and if I could find one, Id probably wear it.

 

They sell these in 3-packs at my local rite aid pharmacy and walmart.

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Wearing a banana clip right now.  Banana clip, fitted t-shirt over wicking tank, leggings with an attached mini skirt, Keen trail runners and a dark blue hoodie.  I've started putting on my workout clothes first thing in the morning and then changing after I have met my exercise goals.  Morning meetings mean that will be later this afternoon. 

 

Not feeling judged.  Do not care if I am the best dressed mom.  

Edited by LucyStoner
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Wearing a banana clip right now.  Banana clip, fitted t-shirt over wicking tank, leggings with an attached mini skirt, Keen trail runners and a dark blue hoodie.  I've started putting on my workout clothes first thing in the morning and then changing after I have met my exercise goals.  Morning meetings mean that will be later this afternoon. 

 

Not feeling judged.  Do not care if I am the best dressed mom.  

 

I like the sound of leggings with attached mini-skirt.  I've never seen those...like these?

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Katie- I definitely find that tactic useful for getting in a workout! Or I did before I started homeschooling and gave up on things like going outside LOL

 

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