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2016-2017 Out-of-the-Box Planning Thread (Dare I say...with a hint of unschooling?)

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Afternoon Project: For his big project, he wants to do two things which may evolve separately or together. He wants to have more time for movie making (stop-motion, animation, documentaries, live action—everything). To inspire him, I got The Imaginary World of...DS9!

 

 

I just showed this to my 9 year old, he wants all of her titles!  What a great resource to foster creativity.  Thank you for sharing. :)

 

(We have some doodle books with prompts along the same lines, but these seem a little more sophisticated.)

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Is it OK to drag this thread back up to the top? I've been chewing over some ideas for next year (darned old February always makes me want to drop what we're doing now and start planning next year instead!). I have kids at high school and middle school ages--no littles any more, too bad. One of mine is really interested in urban planning and design, so we are going to do a big project centred around that, I think: lots of architecture and planning books, history of town planning (back to the Romans and ahead through time), historical and contemporary landscape design, urban forestry and various ecology/environmental studies things, alternative transportation, mapping, and game theory and statistics for math. So that should be neat, I think. We'll still have to keep French in play--not sure I can integrate that into the big project. Plus music, sports, volunteering, etc.....

 

I may or may not combine the others for a "North" year; several years ago we did an "Extremes" year that everybody loved--we learned about Antarctica, the Challenger Deep, the Arabian desert, Mount Everest, things like that--hottest, coldest, highest, lowest, fastest, slowest--and we did literature, history, and science that way--and added math and French on top for everybody. For our "North" year, we want to use Glenn Gould's famous radio talk "The Idea of North" as our jumping-off point, and look at what north means in our national psyche (we're Canadian). So lots of history of our country, plus looking at other northern nations, learning about indigenous northerners in various places, northern art and craft, climate change and what impact global warming is having on the Arctic, geology of the Arctic, northern flora and fauna, technology developed in and for the north, and northern literature old (Norse sagas etc.) and new. Plus math and French, of course, and their usual extracurrics.

 

So that is what I'm doing when I should be cleaning the house...it has been fun to read everybody's plans!

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If there were no repercussions and your kids would be 100% prepared for college regardless of what you did, what would you do with them next year? 

 

As far as I can tell, we have that situation here. For one thing, we are in NJ (no reporting) and for another, the girls are solid in so many basic skills. Also, they would only be in 6th & 4th grades next year, so no real pressure for high school transcripts or college prep.

 

This year (5th & 3rd) is lined up to be quite traditional and academic. I realized early in this school year that I had lined up enough work for at least 18 months (seriously). At the same time, we traveled out of state to visit extended family for the entire month of November, then came back and were at "half-pace" for December. All of that really has been just fine. It was okay to take that time for what we did, and no one is behind in anything in any way. But we're just not going to complete the "whole plan" by June or July.

 

What I'd like to do is complete about two-thirds of this year's school work plan, then break for July & August. We would come back in September for 6th & 4th to complete the final one-third of the work that is already planned & prepped, along with "doing other things."

 

We have plenty of ideas for filling out the rest of the school year. As we get closer to next year, we'll nail down more exactly what we want to aim at, and how we plan to incorporate these things in with the remaining academic work. Obviously, we'll need to edit the list! ;)

 

Some of what we want to do will be a continuation of what we are currently doing (just another level, or another set of books), but some of these goals are more out-of-the-box than what we've done in the past. I suppose it's all the things we feel as though we rarely "get to" because we're doing so much academic seat work.

 

Here are some of the possibilities:

  • Christian Discipleship -- Bible study, Bible memory work, prayer, worship, personal devotions (cultivate this habit)
  • Mathematics -- continue with the next level of our current math course (CLE 400 & 600), possibly explore Hands-On Geometry and/or Hands-On Equations
  • Book Club -- continue to read aloud our choice of chapter books (By the Shores of Silver Lake, Prince Caspian, Betsy & Tacy Go Downtown, Shakespeare play [not sure yet which one], Anne of Green Gables, maybe one other book [we'd still have some books left over from this year])
  • Homemaking Skills -- meal planning, cooking, baking, organizing, clothing care, painting a room (one daughter's bedroom)
  • Handicrafts -- crocheting, knitting, hand sewing, machine sewing
  • Art -- See the Light Art Class DVDs, visit an art museum
  • Music -- piano lessons (at least for one daughter who has a strong interest), attend a concert, continue participating in choir
  • Games & Strategy -- chess (DVD course), other strategy games, problem-solving books
  • Computer Skills -- typing (continue learning), word processing, some basics of using the Internet safely
  • Agriculture -- yard work, gardening, how our food grows, farm visits
  • Grandparents -- working sleepovers (helping with chores), photo timelines, time together
  • Physical Fitness & Skills -- exercise, fitness goals (balance, flexibility, strength, endurance), biking (just do it more), Y membership for 6th grader (free for one year), hiking, discussions on puberty & sexuality, first aid & safety
  • Trips & Travel -- we have some places selected that we'd like to visit (day or extended)
  • Outside Activities -- Awana, Church Midweek, Choir, Church
  • Study Units (not unit studies, just "units" that we would pursue for a limited number of weeks) -- Chemistry, French, Boating & Canoeing, Camping, Kites, Christian Doctrines

So, basically, for all of next year we would do:

  1. A full level of math
  2. Our remaining individual work in reading, composition, grammar, spelling, vocabulary, Latin, and French (1/3 of a year)
  3. Our remaining group work in Bible, Literature, History, Geography, and Science (1/3 of a year)
  4. Anything else that we choose from the list above
Edited by Sahamamama
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Ok, I feel like my regularly scheduled "send them to school crisis" has passed. I have asked my kids about what they would *love* to study next year. 

 

In the past I have done some independent areas of interest studies for my now 12 year old. That particular child is great at self direction and loves working independently. Last year we studied Ancient China, the Aztecs, and chocolate using this method and the request was for more studies like that. It has elements of 8's Homeschooling at the Helm

 

I love AV's idea of morning skill work and afternoon time dedicated to pursuing those passions. I know she said it much more eloquently. Ok so here's what I've got...

 

rising 10th grader: pretty standard course of study, although we have not yet determined history. We will have completed a year of World History, so I am not really sure where to go next. We discussed a couple of options for electives, possibly Creative Writing with WTMA in the spring. There was some discussion on studying amusement parks, the history of them or something along those lines. I really have no idea what that would look like, but I will ruminate. There was also an interest expressed in coding.

 

The rising 7th grader sent me a list in response to my question. Lol  :001_smile: Baking, chemistry, French, the British side of the Revolutionary War and possibly an ancient civilization. So, tons to play with and explore! I can do a lot with those suggestions. 

 

The rising 5th grader is rather indecisive, but really loves stories and art. Reading, writing and listening to stories are all areas of interest. She has an amazing gift for words, but gets caught up in perfectionism, which gets in the way. We are working on that, and I think the tincture of time is the best remedy. 

 

The rising 2nd grader will mostly be working on skills, reading, math and copy work. We try to include several picture books a day and two of the older siblings regularly read aloud from their assigned chapter book. There is a strong science interest, so I will probably plan some science focused units or get a monthly STEM kit to serve as a launch pad.

 

Lots of fun areas to explore. I will probably do some poking around on Amazon for some inspirational resources, although if anyone knows of anything that would be exceptionally fun and solid, send 'em my way!

 

Off to soak in inspiration from y'all!

 

Thanks, AV, for the invitation to dream.  

Edited by AppleGreen
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I may or may not combine the others for a "North" year.

 

[snip]

 

For our "North" year, we want to use Glenn Gould's famous radio talk "The Idea of North" as our jumping-off point, and look at what north means in our national psyche (we're Canadian). So lots of history of our country, plus looking at other northern nations, learning about indigenous northerners in various places, northern art and craft, climate change and what impact global warming is having on the Arctic, geology of the Arctic, northern flora and fauna, technology developed in and for the north, and northern literature old (Norse sagas etc.) and new. Plus math and French, of course, and their usual extracurrics.

 

I love this idea. You might enjoy this blog.

 

http://mylittlenorway.com/norwegian-christmas/

 

Also, this and this.

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Oh, thank you, sahamamama, for sharing. In particular, what wonderful recipes there are on that blog--exploring northern food will be a great addition to what we'll do!

Edited by Emerald Stoker
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I don't know what we'll be doing, but for a starting place I asked DS 7 what he wanted to do in school.

 

He wants to learn to weld, build robots, and make stop motion animation cartoons. He wants to hike, camp, learn to use a knife, learn to whittle, and go fishing regularly. He wants to write a book with drawings and other information about the fish he catches. He wants to play board games and math games and do more puzzles. He wants to play video games, learn to do magic tricks, and learn how to make balloon animals. He wants to keep learning karate, go swimming more often, learn rock climbing, and maybe take a gymnastics class. He wants to try Boy Scouts. He wants to learn to read. He wants to do science with hands on learning every day. He wants to practice drawing and get better at it. He never wants another history lesson again. He wants to use a telescope and a microscope.

 

Maybe I should just say here's a few non negotiables and let him plan a project each/week and devote my creative energy to supporting that. He doesn't care if handwriting, reading practice, spelling are fun or not. He's fine doing math worksheets.

Edited by MrsBasil
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One of mine is really interested in urban planning and design, so we are going to do a big project centred around that, I think:

 

I may or may not combine the others for a "North" year

I love both of these! DS13 would love a year for urban planning. I like the idea of North too....might be tempted to steal that for a unit and do North, South, East, and West.

 

Anything else that we choose from the list above

 

 

I always love the idea of purposefully getting to what always seem to get pushed aside. Sounds fun and liberating!

 

8's Homeschooling at the Helm

 

rising 10th grader: There was some discussion on studying amusement parks, the history of them or something along those lines. I really have no idea what that would look like, but I will ruminate.

 

The rising 7th grader sent me a list in response to my question. Lol  :001_smile: Baking, chemistry, French, the British side of the Revolutionary War and possibly an ancient civilization. So, tons to play with and explore! I can do a lot with those suggestions. 

 

The rising 5th grader is rather indecisive, but really loves stories and art. Reading, writing and listening to stories are all areas of interest. She has an amazing gift for words, but gets caught up in perfectionism, which gets in the way. We are working on that, and I think the tincture of time is the best remedy. 

 

The rising 2nd grader will mostly be working on skills, reading, math and copy work. We try to include several picture books a day and two of the older siblings regularly read aloud from their assigned chapter book. There is a strong science interest, so I will probably plan some science focused units or get a monthly STEM kit to serve as a launch pad.

Ooooh, the chemistry of French baking! :lol: That would be fun!

 

I have some amusement park books wish-listed for my oldest. I think it's a great idea for a study! I will link them tomorrow if you would like.

 

Does your 5th grader want to write and illustrate stories? That could be fun. Or she could do art projects interpreting her favorite stories. I have a book of modern illustrators' visions of their favorite picture books. Very inspiring!

 

I do think the older they get, the easier it is to do studies like this. Everything in the early years looks so much like pure play, which is as it should be. :)

 

He wants to learn to weld, build robots, and make stop motion animation cartoons. He wants to hike, camp, learn to use a knife, learn to whittle, and go fishing regularly. He wants to write a book with drawings and other information about the fish he catches. He wants to play board games and math games and do more puzzles. He wants to play video games, learn to do magic tricks, and learn how to make balloon animals. He wants to keep learning karate, go swimming more often, learn rock climbing, and maybe take a gymnastics class. He wants to try Boy Scouts. He wants to learn to read. He wants to do science with hands on learning every day. He wants to practice drawing and get better at it. He never wants another history lesson again. He wants to use a telescope and a microscope.

Maybe I should just say here's a few non negotiables and let him plan a project each/week and devote my creative energy to supporting that. He doesn't care if handwriting, reading practice, spelling are fun or not. He's fine doing math worksheets.

Wow! He has so many big ideas! I love it! Your idea to do a project a week sounds perfect for a kiddo with such diverse interests!

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I asked the kids the other day what they enjoyed most about school and what they would like to learn more about.

 

Ds:

Fav's: NitroType and Reading (history, science and lit)(happy for confirmation as I plan a heavy lit-based approach for next year)

Want to study: Rocketry and Mechanics

 

Dd:

Fav's: Cursive

Want to Study: Sewing and Art

 

I didn't ask my 2 youngest, well that is not really a conversation to have with a 3yo but I should ask my 6yo, she is always right there in the thick of it all, she is my comedian and actress and her and dd3yo have the best times with imaginative play.

 

We've done basic rocketry for the last few years with ds- we've built and launched 3 different sizes of rockets, ds recently just did some more launching in Jan and took a merit badge class on it. I guess it is time to take it deeper, my first thought is looking at the book put out by 4H(no club around here) and delving into that. I need to ask dh about this, see what ideas and experience he has- he did all kinds of stuff as a kid. 

 

Mechanics is already on the list of things to do because- (1) life skills (2) its an interest of dh's and (3) I think everyone will enjoy it BUT we don't have the funds or time yet for the project we have planned- building a Sand Rail from the ground up. I need to talk to dh about this, I think it needs to be moved up the priority list for next year(I can imagine the look of glee on dh's face!).

 

I also did some thinking about mentors we have available for ds- my fil is retired and lives next door, my dad is retiring in Dec and we have a wonderful retired neighbor up the road that has a ranch. I think I'd like to look at ds spending some time with them- there's a lot of estrogen around here- I know he would enjoy a break some time. My dd1 seems to find her own- she latched on to her sewing teacher like crazy and she is always going down to talk to my mil about something- showing her projects- borrowing this or that or any reason she can think of at all.

 

Dd1, well, she threw me a curve ball this week and said she wants a break from sewing! Ha! Anyway, coincidentally some art classes are starting up so both her and ds will be doing those (my other 2 are too young- they'll be doing story time with me instead-memories!). She is always my one working on something, she's a dabbler like me :) I mostly stand back and get supplies and look out for projects here and there.

 

I'm not sure what next year will bring, who knows, I like the idea to keep a day(or most of a day) open to projects and interests, whatever they might be. Sometimes it is good just to go with the flow. I've scheduled the book club that ds requested and also a nature study group meeting(which is an interest of mine and something they all enjoy)- not sure if those will end up being long term or not. The kids all just love poetry too, not sure if we should just keep going with our laid back study or make it into something more- perhaps we need to up our game on memorization of poems next year. I'd love an outlet for recitation- ds especially just eats that up and the others enjoy it as well. I'd also like to do some genealogy with the grandparents- this has been a HUGE interest for my MIL especially since she has retired and she is always researching more and visiting cemeteries looking for local relatives- I'd like to join her in this study a bit.

 

I looked at this book from CAP,  Essential Theater: A Page to Stage k-12 guide for schools and homeschools, which sounds like a good introduction for me (although the idea of me running a theater seems preposterous- I have no idea what I'm doing). I don't know perhaps it might work for next spring- fall is entirely too busy with Robotics.

 

So, it looks like this spring it is bookclub, nature study and art- looking at adding in some rocketry :) I also have big plans for gardening- we built a sunflower bed last year and the kids have asked if we are doing it again- I have plans for doing something a bit different this year (ideas from Roots, Shoots, Buckets and Boots) it will be gardening time soon enough. We are continuing on with our cultural studies as well- onto Italy now and then Mexico- having such a blast with this. Oh, and dd1 has been working hard on her fort she has been building- this is somewhat a team effort but she leads the charge. Her and a friend were busy chopping down trees the other day and trying to build furniture- I need to get some spare lumber supplies for them to build with.

 

eta- I forgot about dd's baking work, ds is working on his cooking merit badge and we are taking a big vacation to the Pacific Coast (seeing the mountains, beach and wonderful Sequioas so we are diving in and learning about it too).

Edited by soror
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I don't know what we'll be doing, but for a starting place I asked DS 7 what he wanted to do in school.

 

He wants to learn to weld, build robots, and make stop motion animation cartoons. He wants to hike, camp, learn to use a knife, learn to whittle, and go fishing regularly. He wants to write a book with drawings and other information about the fish he catches. He wants to play board games and math games and do more puzzles. He wants to play video games, learn to do magic tricks, and learn how to make balloon animals. He wants to keep learning karate, go swimming more often, learn rock climbing, and maybe take a gymnastics class. He wants to try Boy Scouts. He wants to learn to read. He wants to do science with hands on learning every day. He wants to practice drawing and get better at it. He never wants another history lesson again. He wants to use a telescope and a microscope.

 

Maybe I should just say here's a few non negotiables and let him plan a project each/week and devote my creative energy to supporting that. He doesn't care if handwriting, reading practice, spelling are fun or not. He's fine doing math worksheets.

 

This sounds amazing!  *I* want to do this stuff!

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We cleaned out our basement yesterday and decided to sell some things. (Like the play kitchen that only I played with. :lol: ) We all agreed we would like more room for projects, and a nice art easel. It's sad to see some stuff go, but I'm using the money to build up a creative space that I think will much better serve us. I'm getting really excited for next year!

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I asked the kids the other day what they enjoyed most about school and what they would like to learn more about.

 

Ds:

Fav's: NitroType and Reading (history, science and lit)(happy for confirmation as I plan a heavy lit-based approach for next year)

Want to study: Rocketry and Mechanics

 

Dd:

Fav's: Cursive

Want to Study: Sewing and Art

 

I didn't ask my 2 youngest, well that is not really a conversation to have with a 3yo but I should ask my 6yo, she is always right there in the thick of it all, she is my comedian and actress and her and dd3yo have the best times with imaginative play.

 

We've done basic rocketry for the last few years with ds- we've built and launched 3 different sizes of rockets, ds recently just did some more launching in Jan and took a merit badge class on it. I guess it is time to take it deeper, my first thought is looking at the book put out by 4H(no club around here) and delving into that. I need to ask dh about this, see what ideas and experience he has- he did all kinds of stuff as a kid. 

 

Mechanics is already on the list of things to do because- (1) life skills (2) its an interest of dh's and (3) I think everyone will enjoy it BUT we don't have the funds or time yet for the project we have planned- building a Sand Rail from the ground up. I need to talk to dh about this, I think it needs to be moved up the priority list for next year(I can imagine the look of glee on dh's face!).

 

I also did some thinking about mentors we have available for ds- my fil is retired and lives next door, my dad is retiring in Dec and we have a wonderful retired neighbor up the road that has a ranch. I think I'd like to look at ds spending some time with them- there's a lot of estrogen around here- I know he would enjoy a break some time. My dd1 seems to find her own- she latched on to her sewing teacher like crazy and she is always going down to talk to my mil about something- showing her projects- borrowing this or that or any reason she can think of at all.

 

Dd1, well, she threw me a curve ball this week and said she wants a break from sewing! Ha! Anyway, coincidentally some art classes are starting up so both her and ds will be doing those (my other 2 are too young- they'll be doing story time with me instead-memories!). She is always my one working on something, she's a dabbler like me :) I mostly stand back and get supplies and look out for projects here and there.

 

I'm not sure what next year will bring, who knows, I like the idea to keep a day(or most of a day) open to projects and interests, whatever they might be. Sometimes it is good just to go with the flow. I've scheduled the book club that ds requested and also a nature study group meeting(which is an interest of mine and something they all enjoy)- not sure if those will end up being long term or not. The kids all just love poetry too, not sure if we should just keep going with our laid back study or make it into something more- perhaps we need to up our game on memorization of poems next year. I'd love an outlet for recitation- ds especially just eats that up and the others enjoy it as well. I'd also like to do some genealogy with the grandparents- this has been a HUGE interest for my MIL especially since she has retired and she is always researching more and visiting cemeteries looking for local relatives- I'd like to join her in this study a bit.

 

I looked at this book from CAP,  Essential Theater: A Page to Stage k-12 guide for schools and homeschools, which sounds like a good introduction for me (although the idea of me running a theater seems preposterous- I have no idea what I'm doing). I don't know perhaps it might work for next spring- fall is entirely too busy with Robotics.

 

So, it looks like this spring it is bookclub, nature study and art- looking at adding in some rocketry :) I also have big plans for gardening- we built a sunflower bed last year and the kids have asked if we are doing it again- I have plans for doing something a bit different this year (ideas from Roots, Shoots, Buckets and Boots) it will be gardening time soon enough. We are continuing on with our cultural studies as well- onto Italy now and then Mexico- having such a blast with this. Oh, and dd1 has been working hard on her fort she has been building- this is somewhat a team effort but she leads the charge. Her and a friend were busy chopping down trees the other day and trying to build furniture- I need to get some spare lumber supplies for them to build with.

 

eta- I forgot about dd's baking work, ds is working on his cooking merit badge and we are taking a big vacation to the Pacific Coast (seeing the mountains, beach and wonderful Sequioas so we are diving in and learning about it too).

 

Love it all! That theater book looks interesting!

 

ETA: I had to look up the sand rail thing. Amazing idea for a project!! 

 

I think what I bolded is true. As the kids' interests evolve, it's fun to watch the projects they undertake evolve as well. I imagine the studies we create will take many different turns. Already, as I've been researching plants and animals for DS9, I've stumbled into so many conservation books, which are of interest to all three kids (especially after reading about the recent plight of the penguins :( ). So now with DS9 wanting this to be part of his project and DS13 wanting to do biology, I think maybe they can all incorporate some ecology/conservation studies. 

Edited by Alte Veste Academy

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We cleaned out our basement yesterday and decided to sell some things. (Like the play kitchen that only I played with. :lol: ) We all agreed we would like more room for projects, and a nice art easel. It's sad to see some stuff go, but I'm using the money to build up a creative space that I think will much better serve us. I'm getting really excited for next year!

 

I just tried and failed to find you a link to a fabulous article I clipped (in June 2008 from the sadly out of business Wondertime magazine) about a workshop a mom created for her 9yo son. So cool! Painted pegboard walls, an adjustable drafting table, chalkboard/bulletin board, workbench, bins for cardboard/plastic/all manner of recyclables. It was so cool and very inspiring to me that year, as DS13 was 5. I think a creative space will serve you much better than the old toys.

 

(I had a hard time parting with our play kitchen too. I let go of it in a move in 2012.)

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I just tried and failed to find you a link to a fabulous article I clipped (in June 2008 from the sadly out of business Wondertime magazine) about a workshop a mom created for her 9yo son. So cool! Painted pegboard walls, an adjustable drafting table, chalkboard/bulletin board, workbench, bins for cardboard/plastic/all manner of recyclables. It was so cool and very inspiring to me that year, as DS13 was 5. I think a creative space will serve you much better than the old toys.

 

(I had a hard time parting with our play kitchen too. I let go of it in a move in 2012.)

 

I would LOVE to do this.  We are looking at buying a house this year.  Even if we don't have room in the house... perhaps this could be in a small workshed.  

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I just tried and failed to find you a link to a fabulous article I clipped (in June 2008 from the sadly out of business Wondertime magazine) about a workshop a mom created for her 9yo son. So cool! Painted pegboard walls, an adjustable drafting table, chalkboard/bulletin board, workbench, bins for cardboard/plastic/all manner of recyclables. It was so cool and very inspiring to me that year, as DS13 was 5. I think a creative space will serve you much better than the old toys.

 

(I had a hard time parting with our play kitchen too. I let go of it in a move in 2012.)

 

Our new house MUST have room for a homeschool/creative space!

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Next year will be my first year of official grade school (transitional kindergarten). I'm now looking at doing only science projects integrating math and manuscript handwriting, with the occasional lesson in a traditional math book, for core subjects. I can't think of anything out of the box for cursive though.

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Next year will be my first year of official grade school (transitional kindergarten). I'm now looking at doing only science projects integrating math and manuscript handwriting, with the occasional lesson in a traditional math book, for core subjects. I can't think of anything out of the box for cursive though.

 

I think cursive would be easy to "out of the box.' Just off the top of my head:

 

1) maps with compass

2) scrolls with an invitation to a party (birthday, open house, play date) (My homeschool neighbor kids used to bring a scroll over with fancy calligraphy and leave them on our doorstep inviting us to join them for a royal picnic, etc.)

3) Thank You cards

4) Christmas/Other holiday cards

5) Journal (My six year old is currently doing a 100 Things That Make Me Happy list in his journal with an illustration for each item. Gratitude lists are great also.)

6) Penpal (I require one item of correspondence due each Wednesday.  This could be a picture or anything he'd like to mail.  If he doesn't write on the item/letter he must work on addressing the envelope.)

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Ok, dd9 just informed me that her life dream is to move to Africa and study wild cats.  And that is what she would like to study.

 

:huh:

 

Mango Languages does offer Swahili!  :lol:

 

Anybody got any favorite resources for studying big cats, African geography, or related subjects?

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Ok, dd9 just informed me that her life dream is to move to Africa and study wild cats.  And that is what she would like to study.

 

:huh:

 

Mango Languages does offer Swahili!  :lol:

 

Anybody got any favorite resources for studying big cats, African geography, or related subjects?

 

My DD will be right over with her luggage and permission slip...  :auto:

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Ok, dd9 just informed me that her life dream is to move to Africa and study wild cats.  And that is what she would like to study.

 

:huh:

 

Mango Languages does offer Swahili!  :lol:

 

Anybody got any favorite resources for studying big cats, African geography, or related subjects?

 

Do you live anywhere near a zoo?  We live near a zoo.  If my dd or ds asked to study big cats, I'd call the zoo and ask to meet the zoo keeper for the cats.  Even if you don't live quite close to a zoo, maybe it could be an upcoming trip.

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Ok, dd9 just informed me that her life dream is to move to Africa and study wild cats.  And that is what she would like to study.

 

:huh:

 

Mango Languages does offer Swahili!  :lol:

 

Anybody got any favorite resources for studying big cats, African geography, or related subjects?

 

DS10 wants to work at an African national park and focus on painted wild dogs. DS6 wants to work with bush elephants. I feel for you! I would recommend French as a good language option, as well.  :willy_nilly:

 

  • One thing that has been amazingly popular for us this year is citizen science, specifically this project: https://www.wildcamgorongosa.org/ 
  • Combine it with PBS's awesome (really, so amazingly awesome) documentary series about the park: http://www.pbs.org/gorongosa/home/Scroll down to the bottom for timeline, animal family trees, and maps. 

 

After spending time with Gorongosa this year, I might just sign up to go as well!

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Ok, dd9 just informed me that her life dream is to move to Africa and study wild cats.  And that is what she would like to study.

 

:huh:

 

Mango Languages does offer Swahili!  :lol:

 

Anybody got any favorite resources for studying big cats, African geography, or related subjects?

 

 

 

DS10 wants to work at an African national park and focus on painted wild dogs. DS6 wants to work with African forest elephants. I feel for you! I would recommend French as a good language option, as well.  :willy_nilly:

 

  • One thing that has been amazingly popular for us this year is citizen science, specifically this project: https://www.wildcamgorongosa.org/ 
  • Combine it with PBS's awesome (really, so amazingly awesome) documentary series about the park: http://www.pbs.org/gorongosa/home/Scroll down to the bottom for timeline, animal family trees, and maps. 

 

After spending time with Gorongosa this year, I might just sign up to go as well!

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DS10 wants to work at an African national park and focus on painted wild dogs. DS6 wants to work with bush elephants. I feel for you! I would recommend French as a good language option, as well.  :willy_nilly:

 

  • One thing that has been amazingly popular for us this year is citizen science, specifically this project: https://www.wildcamgorongosa.org/ 
  • Combine it with PBS's awesome (really, so amazingly awesome) documentary series about the park: http://www.pbs.org/gorongosa/home/Scroll down to the bottom for timeline, animal family trees, and maps. 

 

After spending time with Gorongosa this year, I might just sign up to go as well!

 

Awesome!!! She will love this.

 

French, I think I could handle.  She has expressed an interest in that in the past (she is anti-Spanish, which is the language I know best.  Of course.)

 

So I need to research some French options, too.   :auto:

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Ooooh, the chemistry of French baking! :lol: That would be fun!

 

I have some amusement park books wish-listed for my oldest. I think it's a great idea for a study! I will link them tomorrow if you would like.

 

Does your 5th grader want to write and illustrate stories? That could be fun. Or she could do art projects interpreting her favorite stories. I have a book of modern illustrators' visions of their favorite picture books. Very inspiring!

 

I do think the older they get, the easier it is to do studies like this. Everything in the early years looks so much like pure play, which is as it should be. :)

 

 

Wow! He has so many big ideas! I love it! Your idea to do a project a week sounds perfect for a kiddo with such diverse interests!

Yes, please! I would love any ideas in that direction. It seems a little indulgent to spend a semester studying amusement parks in high school (how would I even list that course? I guess just a straight up elective)

 

Yes, the 5th grader would love to write and illustrate stories, but like I said, the whole perfectionism thing tanks the momentum. Can you send along the name of the modern illustrators' interpretations of their favorite picture books? That sound great and would pair nicely with Artist to Artist, which we own. We are on the Read-Aloud Revival member site mostly for the the live author events. She really enjoys those and is so excited for some of the upcoming authors (Andrew Clements! Frindle is adored around here). I love the idea of interpreting favorite stories with art. Were you the person who recommended the monthly art program? That sounded really great and art is definitely something she enjoys.

 

I was totally thinking of something along the lines of the chemistry of baking, and I think the French twist is perfect since there is an interest in that. There is a strong desire to study French, which I initially said "nah" to because I do not speak French, nor have any experience with it (although my DH took 4 years of French in high school, so maybe he could help a little), but I am reconsidering. Admittedly, it is just hard for me to let go of Latin. This particular child is having a difficult time, and I really think I need to let go a bit in the school department and bring back some joy and love in learning. 

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 It seems a little indulgent to spend a semester studying amusement parks in high school (how would I even list that course? I guess just a straight up elective)

 

 

Special Topics in Landscape Architecture...or something like that! :001_smile:

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Yes, please! I would love any ideas in that direction. It seems a little indulgent to spend a semester studying amusement parks in high school (how would I even list that course? I guess just a straight up elective)

 

Yes, the 5th grader would love to write and illustrate stories, but like I said, the whole perfectionism thing tanks the momentum. Can you send along the name of the modern illustrators' interpretations of their favorite picture books? That sound great and would pair nicely with Artist to Artist, which we own. We are on the Read-Aloud Revival member site mostly for the the live author events. She really enjoys those and is so excited for some of the upcoming authors (Andrew Clements! Frindle is adored around here). I love the idea of interpreting favorite stories with art. Were you the person who recommended the monthly art program? That sounded really great and art is definitely something she enjoys.

 

The book we have about illustrators reinterpreting their favorite children's book is called The Art of Reading. We have Artist to Artist as well, and I really love that one. 

 

ETA: Posted too early!

 

Here are the amusement park books I've got wish listed (Disney heavy for obvious reasons):

 

The Immersive Worlds Handbook: Designing Theme Parks and Consumer Spaces

 

Theme Park Design: Behind the Scenes With An Engineer

 

The Global Theme Park Industry

 

Coasters 101: An Engineer's Guide to Roller Coaster Design

 

Designing Disney: Imagineering and the Art of the Show

 

Walt Disney's Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park

 

Walt Disney Imagineering: A Behind the Dreams Look at Making the Magic Real

 

Walt Disney Imagineering: A Behind the Dreams Look at Making More Magic Real

 

The Imagineering Way

 

The Imagineering Workout

 

The Imagineering Field Guides are cool too, presented as a guided tour of different parks with an Imagineer explaining details to you.

 

I would be very tempted to call the course Imagineering!

 

If he is interested in the art of customer service at amusement parks, there is Disney U: How Disney University Develops the World's Most Engaged, Loyal, and Customer-Centric Employees.

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The book we have about illustrators reinterpreting their favorite children's book is called The Art of Reading. We have Artist to Artist as well, and I really love that one. 

 

ETA: Posted too early!

 

Here are the amusement park books I've got wish listed (Disney heavy for obvious reasons):

 

The Immersive Worlds Handbook: Designing Theme Parks and Consumer Spaces

 

Theme Park Design: Behind the Scenes With An Engineer

 

The Global Theme Park Industry

 

Coasters 101: An Engineer's Guide to Roller Coaster Design

 

Designing Disney: Imagineering and the Art of the Show

 

Walt Disney's Imagineering Legends and the Genesis of the Disney Theme Park

 

Walt Disney Imagineering: A Behind the Dreams Look at Making the Magic Real

 

Walt Disney Imagineering: A Behind the Dreams Look at Making More Magic Real

 

The Imagineering Way

 

The Imagineering Workout

 

The Imagineering Field Guides are cool too, presented as a guided tour of different parks with an Imagineer explaining details to you.

 

I would be very tempted to call the course Imagineering!

 

If he is interested in the art of customer service at amusement parks, there is Disney U: How Disney University Develops the World's Most Engaged, Loyal, and Customer-Centric Employees.

Be still my heart! You rock and get the special out-of-the-box trophy. This is seriously a great list AND we are going to Disney late in 2016, which was sort of the impetus for considering this as a class. Oh my, there are a dearth of resources, now I need to figure out how to make it a half credit worthy class. 

 

Thank you, thank you!

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I have a question about implementing this type of out of the box learning....

 

This year we tried something new:   We school for 3 weeks on (regular, CM mixed with classical type schooling) and then one week off.   My vision for the 1 week off would be that the kids would have time to explore their own interests, complete projects, read a lot, etc.   I thought we would 'unschool' for a week.   In reality, this isn't happening.   We all sit around doing nothing special.   The older kids fight a lot, my one middle daughter complained that she was bored (I hate to hear those words!), etc.   Besides some much needed rest, I feel like these weeks aren't really as productive as I had hoped.  

 

What tips do you have for me?  Do my kids need some structure with their unstructured time?    Should I be scheduling more field trips, nature hikes, or skewing things around more?  Should I go so far as to assign quiet reading time during these weeks?   Assign open ended projects or activities?  Assign a certain amount of nature study, etc.?   

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Oh, thank you, sahamamama, for sharing. In particular, what wonderful recipes there are on that blog--exploring northern food will be a great addition to what we'll do!

 

I know, the recipes! Just looking at those gorgeous creamy cakes makes me gain ten pounds.

 

I enjoy that blog (mylittlenorway) because there is such a variety of topics, and the writing is so down-to-earth. Every now and then, the husband joins in and posts something. He's Norwegian, and she's an Aussie transplant, so it's an interesting blend of perspectives.

 

I like your idea of a year of "North." It might be fun, too, to explore the way English was impacted by the Vikings and other northern influences. Enjoy your year! :)

 

http://mylittlenorway.com/?s=vikings

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Applegreen - does your pal listen to Communicore Weekly? Cause their regular segments on theme park history may be of interest and George (imaginerding) is a fantastic librarian with lots of great book reviews in the area -- check his blog @ imaginerding.com

 

And the Disney Dish podcast with Len Testa and Jim Hill ...

 

And if you're not already familiar with them the Science of Disney Imagineering videos are geared way younger but are quite fun and present an interesting insight into the interplay of science, engineering and entertainment.

 

I've actually given thought to doing basically the same sort of class.

 

The Unofficial Guide Disneyland Story is a good one. Really anything with Sam Gennaway focuses on the Urban Planning side.  http://samlanddisney.blogspot.com/

 

 

 

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Applegreen - does your pal listen to Communicore Weekly? Cause their regular segments on theme park history may be of interest and George (imaginerding) is a fantastic librarian with lots of great book reviews in the area -- check his blog @ imaginerding.com

 

And the Disney Dish podcast with Len Testa and Jim Hill ...

 

And if you're not already familiar with them the Science of Disney Imagineering videos are geared way younger but are quite fun and present an interesting insight into the interplay of science, engineering and entertainment.

 

I've actually given thought to doing basically the same sort of class.

 

The Unofficial Guide Disneyland Story is a good one. Really anything with Sam Gennaway focuses on the Urban Planning side.  http://samlanddisney.blogspot.com/

Excellent! Thank you so much for these great leads. I am only familiar with one or two of these resources, so this is perfect. Seems like we could absolutely make a class out of this.

 

Y'all rock!

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I have a question about implementing this type of out of the box learning....

 

This year we tried something new:   We school for 3 weeks on (regular, CM mixed with classical type schooling) and then one week off.   My vision for the 1 week off would be that the kids would have time to explore their own interests, complete projects, read a lot, etc.   I thought we would 'unschool' for a week.   In reality, this isn't happening.   We all sit around doing nothing special.   The older kids fight a lot, my one middle daughter complained that she was bored (I hate to hear those words!), etc.   Besides some much needed rest, I feel like these weeks aren't really as productive as I had hoped.  

 

What tips do you have for me?  Do my kids need some structure with their unstructured time?    Should I be scheduling more field trips, nature hikes, or skewing things around more?  Should I go so far as to assign quiet reading time during these weeks?   Assign open ended projects or activities?  Assign a certain amount of nature study, etc.?   

 

I think this is one of these areas in which every kid/family may differ. I also think that, for the most part, too much access to passive electronics/screens is detrimental to creativity and "maker" behavior. So if you think that might be an issue, maybe it's not the schedule that is the problem but the easy path being available. If screens are not the issue, then yes I would guess that the kids need more structure.

 

My DS13 absolutely thrives on structure. DD11 benefits from structure but does OK without it (in an OK, what do I have to do to be able to do whatever I please kind of way). DS9 seems more and more to be a work before play kid. (He's just easy that way. LOL) So really, they have only slightly differing needs and are easy enough to bunch together to structure their days. 

 

So as far as unstructured time goes, the kids know that they can't just do anything. That's for their free time/play time. Unstructured school time is project time. These are things that have been discussed and are planned, either in advance or by the seat of the kid's pants, but they have merit (which I get is a vague term and very subjective, but that's the best way I can think to put it). They are not watching TV, playing with a device, etc. And there are fine lines all around this...I'm not putting it well...because they can watch a documentary about something they are studying or play with the Intuos tablet learning Adobe apps on the computer or watch a Youtube video about a woodcrafting technique... 

 

Anyway, in your situation I think the fix isn't to assign because that's too regimented, and it's not just to set aside time and hope they fill it productively because that's too loosey-goosey if they're new at this. I think the fix is to sit down with each of your kids and ask them what they want to study, bounce ideas off of them (you know their interests after observing for years), search for resources, help them come up with a basic outline for a project which they can then flesh out on their own during the scheduled project period.

 

And, yes, I strew the heck out of things here. Honestly half the things my kids read they didn't know I planned for them to read. Mwahahahaha... Personally, I wouldn't worry about planning extra field trips to give them ideas, although I love field trips so I would do them just for fun anyway. :D

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I must also recommend Homeschooling at the Helm by 8Filltheheart. I don't know the web address, but it's linked in her signature. It lays out the creation of a personalized study from start to finish. It's not so much project-oriented as personalized coverage of the subjects we all typically cover for school (science, history, literature, etc.), but you could easily use her basic framework to design a project based study. 

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re: free time- 

 

When kids get a bit too much of the "I'm bored"

 

- too much screen time in general- even if it is not during this time- the more it is curtailed all the time the better

-they might need some inspiration- sometimes all it takes is starting a little bit of something with them for it to take off also some supplies, books, magazines etc

- I also have my own hobbies- seeing me excited and interested about things is a boost to them too- we did the backyard bird count- 2 days of 15 or so minutes of counting birds and now they are obsessed with birding and have to yell at me every time they see a new bird. I already have a fabulous birding app but I was looking at some books to buy as I wasn't happy with any from the library. Who knows how long it will last but the point is to me time and again I've seen that they are primed and ready I just need to find some fuel there are so many very wonderful things in the world to learn and be and do- they just can't even grasp the possibilities and neither can I really- which is why we must keep growing and learning too!

 

 

I try to keep an eye out for anything for any kind of project, resource, event etc that I think may interest them. My dd1's big thing right now is her fort so I went down there the other day at her request and did some work with her. We sawed an old pallet apart and made a gate and tried to hang the hammock. She was thrilled to have the help as sometimes they have ideas but cannot figure out how to make them work. Yesterday her and ds were working on a new fort and having some difficulty. I was just thinking I need to look at some fort books and find one for them, it will make a great Spring project and kids need forts!!!

 

I guess those are 2 examples one more schooly and one more life in general. I want both in our life. I started a thread once about creating an atmosphere of learning and that is what I keep in mind about what I'm trying to create here, sometimes I do really well(especially so when my own brain is working well) and sometimes it is rough. 

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I must also recommend Homeschooling at the Helm by 8Filltheheart.

I purchased this last weekend and heartily recommend it, especially for those of us who have wanted more explanation from her and other posters. I do understand that some posters have reiterated things over and over and don't want to keep saying things repeatedly, but I wasn't getting the "whole picture" from them. I really appreciated having everything in one place, spelled out for me. Good use of $6!

 

So, maybe because it is February, I'm leaning this direction for next year.

 

DD (will be 9/10, 4th grade) would like to base her studies off of the "I Survived" book series. Will give a broad history overview and disaster-type science topics. Geography will be based on each disaster. Looking forward to finding what else we can pull from those. Also she wants to read about cats and dogs. And all things Titanic. :)

 

DS (will be 11/12, 6th grade) would like to focus on inventors, inventions,chemistry, physics, engineering...we will need to hone the word "focus", lol. He also wants to study all things Microsoft, Apple, Linux, video games, etc.

 

We will have some focus on modern history. That is the only WTM "year" we haven't studied, so Type A mom is going to make sure we get that in. That being said, a lot of the disasters in the "I Survived" books are modern, I believe, and many inventors and scientific advancements are, as well, so I think it should all mesh nicely. I think it could work...

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I must also recommend Homeschooling at the Helm by 8Filltheheart. I don't know the web address, but it's linked in her signature. It lays out the creation of a personalized study from start to finish. It's not so much project-oriented as personalized coverage of the subjects we all typically cover for school (science, history, literature, etc.), but you could easily use her basic framework to design a project based study.

Thank you for mentioning this! I bought it, and now I have to decide if I want to revise my plans for next school year.
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First, want to say I love, love this thread.

 

Second, ~Phoenix, I think that "I Survived" thing is awesome. I have thought a couple times that you could expand out from the Magic Tree House series in a somewhat similar way, but neither my son (or more importantly me) like those books enough to get into that.

 

Finally to AppleGreen on the amusement park thing, I was inspired. I have a couple ideas for you though I'm not sure you or your child will like any of them. One, I don't have any resource off the top of my head, but there's a lot of physics in amusement park rides, and I think there are some videos (YouTube, Netflix) as well as books/articles that incorporate that sort of thing if you want to inspire a little extra educational rigor. The second idea (which you may or may not like depending on viewpoints) is video games. I'm thinking of the Rollercoaster Tycoon series, where you build and manage an amusement park. I don't have any experience with it honestly, but I have a lot with Zoo Tycoon. (I know the age difference is very large) but my almost 7 year old saw a documentary on the titanosaur on Nature this weekend and immediately wanted to make a new zoo with dinosaurs. It works as far as being fun and internally motivating and I find it educational for habitats etc. But as far as Rollercoaster Tycoon - if it's like Zoo Tycoon a large aspect of it is money management - ticket prices, concessions, upkeep costs, construction costs. I think you might be able to take that and encourage something in the business/finance/accounting arenas (would have some math too). Why are Disneyland tickets as expensive as they are, how much is profit, what are the biggest costs involved, look at annual reports from Disney, also 7 Flags is public. You could do an analysis of the locations across the country of amusement parks and figure out how big of a population is needed to support one. So those are non-history ideas. As far as history, what about rather than strictly amusement parks, you were to think about something like "The Rise of the Leisure Class" by Thorstein Veblen. Is the reason that there weren't amusement parks because of technology or because too few people had the means to use/attend due to the changing nature of the economy and society (i.e. since Adam Smith). That's a big part of history in the late 19th century particularly - and you could tie it in to many other things too. Anyway, needless to say, I love the idea.

 

ETA: or what about making a comparison to other societies - do amusement parks serve the same function as the arena in Rome - what was "mass" entertainment in other countries/time period that would be comparable - can you make a case (persuasive essay or speech?) why one is the "best"?

 

 

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First, want to say I love, love this thread.

 

 

Finally to AppleGreen on the amusement park thing, I was inspired. I have a couple ideas for you though I'm not sure you or your child will like any of them. One, I don't have any resource off the top of my head, but there's a lot of physics in amusement park rides, and I think there are some videos (YouTube, Netflix) as well as books/articles that incorporate that sort of thing if you want to inspire a little extra educational rigor. The second idea (which you may or may not like depending on viewpoints) is video games. I'm thinking of the Rollercoaster Tycoon series, where you build and manage an amusement park. I don't have any experience with it honestly, but I have a lot with Zoo Tycoon. (I know the age difference is very large) but my almost 7 year old saw a documentary on the titanosaur on Nature this weekend and immediately wanted to make a new zoo with dinosaurs. It works as far as being fun and internally motivating and I find it educational for habitats etc. But as far as Rollercoaster Tycoon - if it's like Zoo Tycoon a large aspect of it is money management - ticket prices, concessions, upkeep costs, construction costs. I think you might be able to take that and encourage something in the business/finance/accounting arenas (would have some math too). Why are Disneyland tickets as expensive as they are, how much is profit, what are the biggest costs involved, look at annual reports from Disney, also 7 Flags is public. You could do an analysis of the locations across the country of amusement parks and figure out how big of a population is needed to support one. So those are non-history ideas. As far as history, what about rather than strictly amusement parks, you were to think about something like "The Rise of the Leisure Class" by Thorstein Veblen. Is the reason that there weren't amusement parks because of technology or because too few people had the means to use/attend due to the changing nature of the economy and society (i.e. since Adam Smith). That's a big part of history in the late 19th century particularly - and you could tie it in to many other things too. Anyway, needless to say, I love the idea.

 

ETA: or what about making a comparison to other societies - do amusement parks serve the same function as the arena in Rome - what was "mass" entertainment in other countries/time period that would be comparable - can you make a case (persuasive essay or speech?) why one is the "best"?

Boo. I just typed a response and promptly lost it.  :closedeyes:

 

I was planning on bolding the ideas that really spoke to me, but realized i would have to bold the whole post! LOL I love all the avenues for exploration you provided. There are some real gems in here, areas I never would have thought to pursue. I love your non-history suggestions. Lots of great food for thought. I am really seeing how this topic can give us a lot of options and explorations. Thank you, thank you!

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I purchased this last weekend and heartily recommend it, especially for those of us who have wanted more explanation from her and other posters. I do understand that some posters have reiterated things over and over and don't want to keep saying things repeatedly, but I wasn't getting the "whole picture" from them. I really appreciated having everything in one place, spelled out for me. Good use of $6!

 

So, maybe because it is February, I'm leaning this direction for next year.

 

DD (will be 9/10, 4th grade) would like to base her studies off of the "I Survived" book series. Will give a broad history overview and disaster-type science topics. Geography will be based on each disaster. Looking forward to finding what else we can pull from those. Also she wants to read about cats and dogs. And all things Titanic. :)

 

DS (will be 11/12, 6th grade) would like to focus on inventors, inventions,chemistry, physics, engineering...we will need to hone the word "focus", lol. He also wants to study all things Microsoft, Apple, Linux, video games, etc.

 

We will have some focus on modern history. That is the only WTM "year" we haven't studied, so Type A mom is going to make sure we get that in. That being said, a lot of the disasters in the "I Survived" books are modern, I believe, and many inventors and scientific advancements are, as well, so I think it should all mesh nicely. I think it could work...

 

I LOVE modern history so much more than I ever imagined I would, maybe because it meets up with current events, which is my absolute favorite thing to teach here. I think their ideas are great and, yes, will mesh beautifully!

 

First, want to say I love, love this thread.

 

Second, ~Phoenix, I think that "I Survived" thing is awesome. I have thought a couple times that you could expand out from the Magic Tree House series in a somewhat similar way, but neither my son (or more importantly me) like those books enough to get into that.

 

Finally to AppleGreen on the amusement park thing, I was inspired. I have a couple ideas for you though I'm not sure you or your child will like any of them. One, I don't have any resource off the top of my head, but there's a lot of physics in amusement park rides, and I think there are some videos (YouTube, Netflix) as well as books/articles that incorporate that sort of thing if you want to inspire a little extra educational rigor. The second idea (which you may or may not like depending on viewpoints) is video games. I'm thinking of the Rollercoaster Tycoon series, where you build and manage an amusement park. I don't have any experience with it honestly, but I have a lot with Zoo Tycoon. (I know the age difference is very large) but my almost 7 year old saw a documentary on the titanosaur on Nature this weekend and immediately wanted to make a new zoo with dinosaurs. It works as far as being fun and internally motivating and I find it educational for habitats etc. But as far as Rollercoaster Tycoon - if it's like Zoo Tycoon a large aspect of it is money management - ticket prices, concessions, upkeep costs, construction costs. I think you might be able to take that and encourage something in the business/finance/accounting arenas (would have some math too). Why are Disneyland tickets as expensive as they are, how much is profit, what are the biggest costs involved, look at annual reports from Disney, also 7 Flags is public. You could do an analysis of the locations across the country of amusement parks and figure out how big of a population is needed to support one. So those are non-history ideas. As far as history, what about rather than strictly amusement parks, you were to think about something like "The Rise of the Leisure Class" by Thorstein Veblen. Is the reason that there weren't amusement parks because of technology or because too few people had the means to use/attend due to the changing nature of the economy and society (i.e. since Adam Smith). That's a big part of history in the late 19th century particularly - and you could tie it in to many other things too. Anyway, needless to say, I love the idea.

 

ETA: or what about making a comparison to other societies - do amusement parks serve the same function as the arena in Rome - what was "mass" entertainment in other countries/time period that would be comparable - can you make a case (persuasive essay or speech?) why one is the "best"?

 

Very cool! Thanks for this. My wheels are still turning too. 

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We frequent theme parks as a family... usually one visit a week but it slows down in the warmer months.  (I know, that is A LOT!) 

 

On the physics side of theme parks:  Linear Gs vs. Vertical Gs.  Most coasterjunkies like myself usually have a preference.  My daughter can't explain them in detail but she knows what they feel like and the basic science.  She knows which ones are her favorite. 

 

You can look at marketing... Like why are Disney tickets front loaded (more expensive) for the first few days but it is much less expensive to add days on to the end?  Why does Disney offer the Magical Express service to pick up resort guests from the airport and transport them straight to the resort?  How does Disney attract customers year round?  You could compare their discounts to see which one is the best for a certain scenario. 

We've also listened to presentations about how Christmas/Winter holidays are done around the world from Epcot.  We've studied each country in Epcot and spoken to the employees that are from the countries that they work in.  

 

We've looked at landscaping (topiary making is especially fascinating with my crew.)  We've talked about safety plans that amusement parks have to have in place in case of a natural disaster or other issues.  

 

We've talked about continuous load rides vs. non continuous loading rides and how they effect capacity.  And now, how Disney has changed the wait times and demands with their tiered Fastpass+ technology.  Fastpass+ technology alone is interesting.  Biometrics is another option... 

 

We've studied psychological barriers vs physical barriers at amusement parks and zoos.  We've done LOTS of animal behavior observation and individual animal observation and then research.  

 

We made friends with Rachel Reenstra, who hosts The Wildlife Docs after meeting her at Busch Gardens.  They've been able to ask her how she went about entering the world of television hosting and through Facebook we follow along on some of her gigs as she shares.  

 

You can even get into the ethical debate of having animals in captivity.  Does it increase awareness or hurt the animals in the long run?  

You can compare DL to WDW.  What did Disney learn about DL that they changed for WDW?  Who are they trying to attract to their other parks (DisneySea, etc.)  

And to think, my kiddos think they are playing hooky on Wednesdays!

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I'm trying to decide what to do for my oldest daughter.  She is ALL animal based this and has her eyes set on a local Vet Tech program.  

 

She hasn't had a very deep biology class yet.  I think she would love it as long as she could see the long term advantage.  I'm actually pretty interested in an online class like this, but I want her to have a physical text so she wouldn't be shackled to the computer constantly. But I don't want to bore her to death either. 

 

I think she would be much happier in a Zoology type course.  But then she would have to take an Intro to Zoology class for the Vet Tech program.  So I don't want to wear that topic too thin. 

 

Of course there is a credit by examination program.  I just can't find a syllabus for the courses so we aren't going in blind.  Anyone done this? 

 

 

Edited by GAPeachie

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I'm trying to decide what to do for my oldest daughter.  She is ALL animal based this and has her eyes set on a local Vet Tech program.  

 

She hasn't had a very deep biology class yet.  I think she would love it as long as she could see the long term advantage.  I'm actually pretty interested in an online class like this, but I want her to have a physical text so she wouldn't be shackled to the computer constantly. But I don't want to bore her to death either. 

 

I think she would be much happier in a Zoology type course.  But then she would have to take an Intro to Zoology class for the Vet Tech program.  So I don't want to wear that topic too thin. 

 

Of course there is a credit by examination program.  I just can't find a syllabus for the courses so we aren't going in blind.  Anyone done this? 

 

I don't know about credit by exam. Biology is great, my personal favorite. I wonder if she would also enjoy a class on conservation/ecology. Or maybe an intro biology that leans that way?

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I don't know about credit by exam. Biology is great, my personal favorite. I wonder if she would also enjoy a class on conservation/ecology. Or maybe an intro biology that leans that way?

 

Well I purchased a few college texts an edition behind what is currently being used.  I purchased Zoology and Veterinary Medical Terminology. 

 

And then I picked up an Apologia Biology.  A US history book, and Dave Ramsey's Person Finance text.  

 

This year will be interesting to say the least.  

 

I just need to decide on Math for her.  

 

Ohhhhh and Disney raised ticket prices so that is something else to discuss for a theme park unit. :)

 

I'm also hoping to use FLVS for keyboarding so that she learns the proper way to type so that her computer work won't be so laborious. 

Edited by GAPeachie
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