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Pre-K 3 planning 2016-2017


3 ladybugs
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Anyone planning for this age? 

 

My son will be 3 in July. Right now he is just doing ABC Mouse when I can get him to focus (ironically around 10:00PM generally). I also recently got him pre-reading Bob books, but he is only limited interested in them now. Oh and he is doing swimming lessons every week. :)

 

So if you are in my boat, what are you thinking?

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A 3yo should be playing. 

 

ETA: I get it.  Smart kids are smart kids.  BUT..............you are writing your post like you are leading your 3yo and not the other way around.  There is a limited amount of time for kids to be, well, kids, and learn at their own pace, picking and choosing what they want to discover.  It is great to introduce new things to them.  If they pick it up and run with it, run with them.  But for the love of childhood you can't make a lesson plan for a 3yo!  They are 3.  It is not in their nature to follow where you want them to go.  They are scientists, explorers, and pioneers.  They want to be independent and learn through their own way - usually hands on, not hands on a mouse or a book.

 

I have smart kids.  I will still defend the need for play at age 2 and 3.  I'll defend it for age 4 and 5, though academics creep in because some gravitate that direction.

 

You want to plan for age 3?  Get toys.  Get tools from For Small Hands.  Put down the mouse and leave the Bob books in a basket where he can choose to get to them.

Edited by HomeAgain
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My DS will be 2.5 at the beginning of the year.  I plan on using BFIAR with him and setting up some "tot school" type activities as well.  We keep a booster seat at our school table for him to work at.  So far I've come up with a few activities, some of which he got for Christmas: Play-dough, Melissa & Doug paint with water book, Bristle blocks, Color Wonder markers & books/paper, etc.  Right now they keep him busy for 15 minutes or so (on a good day).   :lol:

 

My mom rounded up two sets of beanie babies, one farm animals and one woodland animals.  There is a cute board book to go with each set.  She put them in small laundry bags, and I really liked this idea.  I may pick up some more laundry bags to organize his toys with!  We get these out during the day and I read while he finds the animal on that page.

Edited by Holly
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My current 3 year old isn't interested in anything academic, but my son was. Our favorite things were/are:

 

Magnatiles

Geopuzzles (his map skills are amazing)

Phonogram cards if interested

Sonlight 3/4, particularly the treasury books and the Wee Sing Nursery Rhymes

C-rods

Sketch books so he could look back at old work

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I'm planning to get the mfw activity cards with Lauri toys for my 3 yo next year. I want to introduce him to a little structured time while my olders are doing school. We'll also do a music and movement program called Making Music Praying Twice. He's really musical.

 

I don't know why doing purposeful, fun things with 3 yo's is so taboo on these boards. I guess people assume we will be authoritative and rigid, doing seat work for 10 hours a day while the child is in tears. I'm personally planning on ten minutes a day of mom-led fun. The play initiative is trying to get parents who schedule their kids for all their waking hours to allow a couple hours of unstructured time. We are going from all waking hours unstructured to ten minutes of structure and the rest unstructured.

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School is completely optional for my ds (newly 3). I don't even suggest it. However, he often comes to me and asks to "do school" like his brother. When he asks, we play with the following:

 

- Scissors (his absolute favourite)

- crayons, pencils, markers, paint, glue

- wikki stix alphabet (fine motor skills)

- salt in a tray (fun texture to play with, and he tries to trace letters in it)

- lotion on a tray (like finger painting, but allergy friendly)

- bambinoluk (visual perception, critical thinking)

- AAS pre-reading (crafts and reading together)

- play dough, lacing cards, magnatiles, blocks, Discovery Toys Busy Bugs (patterns)

- playing with c-rods (stacking and sorting)

- "science", which is pouring water between different containers in the sink

- The Reading Lesson (5 minutes at a time, only if he is interested)

- Leapfrog Letter Factory DVDs

 

For Christmas I made him continent boxes. Each box has several picture books from or about a continent, Toob animal figurines, a satellite picture and map of the continent, pictures of relevant food, landmark cards, flags, and several items originating from that continent. He loves the boxes and we often spend time reading together from these books while he is playing with the animals and other items. I make food from different countries and we bring out the applicable continent box and find a food card that matches, or we take a picture of our meal and add it to the box.

 

His brother does music theory lessons at home and little ds has started participating when he is interested. He also plays the glockenspiel.

 

Ds8 does a weekly nature study outing for which little ds tags along. He learns about nature, listens to the book read during the trip, and if he wants he can colour while the big kids complete their nature journals (or he can run around and play).

 

For Easter he is getting the Kumon books for Easy Mazes and First Book of Tracing. He is also getting the Usborne Very First Reading Pack set of books. In September we will start Picture Book Activities (similar to BFIAR).

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One of the things I was really glad I did for DD's PK3 was come up with a long book list before the year started.  It helped me make sure we had quality read alouds (along with just following her lead and letting her pick books).  We've discovered great authors, enjoyed stories we might have otherwise missed, and really dived deep into some non-fiction subjects. 

 

The second thing we enjoyed was storytelling.  Every week, I'd ask her to tell me a story and I'd transcribe it.  She still asks me to read it out loud, and it's fun to see how her language developed over the year.  It wasn't really overt teaching as it was letting her think about storytelling and how we share ideas.

 

 

 

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A 3yo should be playing. 

 

ETA: I get it.  Smart kids are smart kids.  BUT..............you are writing your post like you are leading your 3yo and not the other way around.  There is a limited amount of time for kids to be, well, kids, and learn at their own pace, picking and choosing what they want to discover.  It is great to introduce new things to them.  If they pick it up and run with it, run with them.  But for the love of childhood you can't make a lesson plan for a 3yo!  They are 3.  It is not in their nature to follow where you want them to go.  They are scientists, explorers, and pioneers.  They want to be independent and learn through their own way - usually hands on, not hands on a mouse or a book.

 

I have smart kids.  I will still defend the need for play at age 2 and 3.  I'll defend it for age 4 and 5, though academics creep in because some gravitate that direction.

 

You want to plan for age 3?  Get toys.  Get tools from For Small Hands.  Put down the mouse and leave the Bob books in a basket where he can choose to get to them.

I am SOO glad you said that because now I know I shouldn't strap him down and force him to learn his ABC's, 123's and shapes!    (sarcasm)

 

I don't believe anyone that is looking for help on teaching a child is looking for or expecting a 3 year old to behave like a 3rd grader or even a K'er. For me I want to make sure my son's play time is as filled with educational opportunities as possible. For me that requires planning. Most peoples houses are not set up in the Montessori way. I need to purposefully create environments that will stimulate my 3 year old (by then), while also discouraging my 8 year old (by then) from doing all the work for him. Preferably where he can be semi able to work alone at his own rate and pace.

 

Yes my son is smart. But that isn't why I am pushing him. I am pushing him because he seems to need to be challenged more, as when he isn't, he tends to destroy. Which is a bad thing in my book. 

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When my son was three (June birthday) I read a few library books about the Montessori approach and sort-of used their ideas about organizing educational toys at toddler eye level. We got lots of wood toys (I found a lot of Melissa and Doug over time at goodwill), jigsaw puzzles and of course books. We started going to library story time regularly. I made a playlist of educational songs for the car that we still listen to sometimes (my baby is now 3) that includes dinosaur train songs, preschool type songs, classics (take me out to the ball game) and nursery rhymes. I also came up with a list of educational things to do from books, blogs and forums. Then I made up a schedule to rotate activities throughout the week. I included one-on-one time with my son when the baby was sleeping.

 

For example, Monday mornings I would ask him if he wanted playdough, scissors and paper or finger paint. He would do the activity until he was done. Or another day we would choose between songs and dancing, kid yoga (lol), go for a walk or playground. I wasn't super strict about this at all. The schedule was stuck to the refrigerator and when I was like - what do I do? I would read through it and pick something both me and my son were ok with at that time. Other times, on good days, we followed the schedule a bit more. He also played with abcmouse.com but eventually he got tired of it and we moved on to starfall which I think is better. Abcmouse is good and I suscribed for a couple of months once in a while to change things up a bit.

 

If your child is interested in letters and sounds, I see no trouble on sitting with him and going over the sounds using the Bob books. It is quality time  as long as all are enjoying it. I have not been as organized about preschool with my second child but she is still exposed to the same toys and activities as my son was (is) and I do certain things as part of the routine like story time and so on. In fact, she told the librarian that mommy reads aloud too much lol.

 

Here on the pre-K/K forums someone posted a link to a webinar on teaching numeracy in early childhood that I found useful. They talk about how to teach numbers starting around age 2 or 3. They cover the normal stages of learning, the types of errors you can expect and strategies/games you can use to teach the numbers. It is meant for preschool teachers but I think I learned something. I recommend it. :)

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My 2 year old is really into numbers and letters right now. He taught himself to count to 30 (UmiZoomi?) And, he already knows all letters and sounds. We've been loosely following ABCJLM. We've already done 2, and mid 3. I've been pondering what to do with him next year as well. I know he's just 2, but he enjoys tracing, and pretending to read. Right now we do lots of cutting, coloring, pattern blocks, puzzles, reading books, riding tricycles and climbing of course! He especially likes the stories in the Beginners Bible.

 

I made the mistake of trying to teach reading too early to one of my kids already, so I'm torn between which way to go. I'm thinking we'll do Sonlight P3/4, and add on ETC A, B and C, and Singapore Essentials K when he starts asking for more "schoolwork." I know that sounds nuts, but my dd (6) begged at 3.5 and she did those by 4.5 basically on her own.

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Anyone know anything about Learning Box Preschool? http://learningboxpreschool.comIt looks like something that I can cancel Koala crate and do for a year before I go more into my curriculum that I want to do with him. Hmmm...

I'd never heard of this before!

 

If you are in the market for "preschool in a box" then have you ever heard of these other brands:

Mother Goose Time

A Year of Playing Skillfully

Grow: Hands on Lessons for Active Preschoolers

Beyond Centers and Circle Times

 

I've looked at them briefly but in the end I don't feel that we were better off paying for the subscription right now because Jr is still pretty engaged and excited with the low-tech home made stuff we put together and fortunately for everyone involved Hubby does most of the heavy lifting in the curriculum design area!

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I'd never heard of this before!

 

If you are in the market for "preschool in a box" then have you ever heard of these other brands:

Mother Goose Time

A Year of Playing Skillfully

Grow: Hands on Lessons for Active Preschoolers

Beyond Centers and Circle Times

 

I've looked at them briefly but in the end I don't feel that we were better off paying for the subscription right now because Jr is still pretty engaged and excited with the low-tech home made stuff we put together and fortunately for everyone involved Hubby does most of the heavy lifting in the curriculum design area!

I just found Mother Goose right before I saw your message! That may actually be better for us as we don't do most secular holidays, though we do some as I am rather patriotic. 

 

BOY is that expensive! I guess you get a lot, but for 1 child and $75 a month! ((jaw drop)) I am not sure we need a curriculum everyday too. Hmm... I do like the thought everything layer out for me though. My older son is kinetic learner so he has lots of hands on stuff. Open and go would be great. 

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Okay I have spent the last 24 hours trying to justify $75 (gulp) a month for a curriculum for the little guy. This is what I came up with: 

 

RR has a curriculum that is "all inclusive"(Ready Made Curriculum). The base price for that is $379.95 but doesn't include all the books that you need for the program. That is another $125 (unless you go to the library, which we have a small handful of books needed, but our library is good only if you don't need something specific, there are no interlibrary loans there either). So that program would be $504.95 plus shipping (which RR this would be free). However once looking at it, they say they have a 9 X 12 envelope per month of stuff that you would need. PER MONTH!! They also say that the whole curriculum would take about 30 minutes to do 4 days a week. It looks like to me that most of the stuff is paper/worksheets which are nice, but I would prefer more other stuff other then worksheets. I can go to Costco and get workbooks for him for $20 if that. 

 

Then I figured out what 9 months of MGT would be without the shipping. 9 X 60.99 X 0.85 (discount for multiple months) = $466.58 (or 57 but companies never round down). So I could pay $504.95 and get a paper filled curriculum or $466.58 and get something that is about 4 times as long EVERYDAY, and is 6 weeks longer, and 5 days a week. Granted this is before shipping which isn't small amount with MGT at $14 a month!

 

However it gets better. In my family 3 days a week is realistic for me to do with my younger son. My older son is very hands on still and I need to make sure he gets done with what he needs to get done with. However on Saturdays, my older son goes to German class, so we as a family are normally stuck in a high school cafeteria for 2.5 hours while our son learns. This has been a challenge (as you can imagine) this year with a 2 year old. We have taken to bringing his Koala crate to do during that time, but that is only once a month. :( We could make MGT have day, where we don't really do all of the circle time stuff (or abbreviate it) and then he has something to keep him busy the WHOLE time his brother has class! If we did that we would have 5 extra days (German is only 31 weeks, but some of that time we are doing things with him like concerts so it may be a few more in there), plus 36 extra days at the end of May. Which if I divide evenly would be 3 day week during the summer!

 

So this is how I am able to say that $75 per month (for 9 months) is actually cheaper then other programs. LOL ;)

Edited by 3 ladybugs
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Spencer will be 3 next year.

 

My curriculum for him...

Things he already does that will continue:

Listen to our breakfast read aloud

Lots of sandbox and sensory tub time

Happily play independently for about an hour each day

Weekly speech therapy

 

Next year he will also:

Learn to dress and undress himself

Try a fun YMCA sport or swim class

Join the big boys for art time

Finish learning his letters through play and Leap Frog videos

 

I find my boys go through a very rough period around age 3.5, so I would not be surprised if Spencer devotes the second half of the year to Advanced Tantrum Throwing just like his brothers did.

 

Wendy

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Anyone know anything about Learning Box Preschool? http://learningboxpreschool.comIt looks like something that I can cancel Koala crate and do for a year before I go more into my curriculum that I want to do with him. Hmmm...

 

That is like Science in a Nutshell but for preschool.  Neat idea.  Great idea.

 

However.

 

It is way over-priced for what you get! I am better off buying a bunch of activity books, toys, fingerpaints, playdoh, crafting supplies & glue.  How much would it cost to spend a weekend making your own monthly boxes?  Would you put different stuff in the boxes?  I'm going to be thinking this through now.

 

My plans for my 3yo include actually writing down a list of books to read aloud to her.  It is to keep ME on track, not forgetting her in the busy days of our home. :thumbup1:

 

She has a rolling cart with 12 drawers.  I keep that stocked with educational toys & craft supplies.  I want to teach her to use the cart like workboxes in the future. Getting it out, putting it away, and working independently are skills that I want to teach.  So, even if the items in the drawers are toys, it is fulfilling my goals for her.  kwim.  (For 75$ per month, I could stock her rolling cart VERY well.)

 

Things to stock the cart:  (I am looking for new ideas. :lurk5: )

 

I made a set of Sandpaper letters.  We've started on those. She enjoys matching upper & lowercase letters.

 

She will start Happy Phonics soon. There are a few games that she can begin.

 

Cuisenaire rod play.

 

paper/scissors/glue  (and buttons/poms/random junk to craft with)

 

paper/watercolor paints

 

playdoh

 

puzzles

 

 

I think my 3yo is maybe ready to have a small chore in her workboxes.  

 

I like the idea of making a weather chart out of a calendar.

 

OK - I'm going to make up a little planner for the Three Year Old.  (That sounds more fun than cleaning today.  :lol: )

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I know I can piece together something for him. I even have a piece of paper from a community college to say I can (I have an AAS in Early Childhood Ed). My point is, how long would it take me, and how much other stuff would I have to get? 

 

My older son is 7 years old. I have learned with him, that I have to have lab kits for science. If we don't have a lab kit, I run into problems with doing the activities. I have scissors, glue, construction paper in the house, the rest of the ad nosieum (sp?) of things that you need, we just don't normally have. We do have odd things but all things. So when an activity comes up like the camel that my son needed to make out of an egg carton this week for his Elemental Science, we didn't have a paper egg carton because our eggs come in plastic. Seams like a simple thing to have, but depending on where and how you shop it is an unbelievable obstacle. 

 

Also how much time would it take to assemble all of these things for the week. Right now with my older son I spend about 1-1.5 hours every weekend lesson planning for him. Then I spend about 20 minutes every night getting ready for the next day. Part of what I do on the weekends is make lists so that my day of the week planning is so the planning in the week is ONLY 20 minutes. 

 

My point is, I am curious how other mom's do it? How do you not spend all your time lesson planning? How do you not end up spending more on craft supplies then the cost of the program? If someone has an idea I am all for spending less money. I know that would make my husband happy. :giggle: 

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My point is, I am curious how other mom's do it? How do you not spend all your time lesson planning? How do you not end up spending more on craft supplies then the cost of the program? If someone has an idea I am all for spending less money. I know that would make my husband happy. :giggle: 

 

 

I hear you.  :iagree:

 

This was my turning point for Van Cleave Science books on the CHEAP vs Science in a Nutshell Kits.  I totally get it, agree, LIVE it.

 

Right now, I don't plan anything for my 3yo.  It's all "do whatever keeps her happy & safe while we work."  She paints and plays playdoh a TON!  I'd love to have some more structure for *her* built into our days.  The kits are appealing in that aspect, but tbh if I made my own boxes they would look very different.  I want to see more hands-on fm work (I don't care if she has something that looks great, I want to see fm skills addressed.).  I want ideas for activities to build gross motor skills.  I want 3yo level, engaging problem solving (puzzles, riddles...).  Where are the storybooks?

 

Maybe I'm not seeing everything in the tote, but these are my criticisms.

 

 

And, I think I seriously will make something like this for my dd.  I'll make seasonal totes, starting with what we already have.  It will take a couple of hours to gather what I have around the house.  Several hours(4-5) to plan for what I want to add.  Several more hours to create anything needed (??? depends upon how creative I get).  I'll have to keep purchases down to less than $100.  It will take an hour or so to print off any printables and file them in the totes.  Organizing the actual totes...another hour or two.  And, I wouldn't try to plan as I go, not with 3 school age kids in my house.  This is something I'll work on over weekends and breaks from school. It is doable if I spread the work out (and the purchases!) over several weekends. It's work I enjoy, so there is that.  I have a workbox rolling cart and easily half of all the supplies needed, so my cost will be minimal.

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Okay, your post intrigued me. So I have went based on what I can tell about MGT and the curriculum to price it out for me.

 

This is every month:

New story book - $12

I can read book - $10

Bilingual book - $8

Ink and paper (this is because I would be printing off a lot more then I currently do especially in color) - $15

Bags (ziplock to put daily stuff in so I could plan a month in advance) $2

New music CD (download) $14

Crafts $10

 

I am at $62 and I haven't got to the science, games or word puzzles, or math manipulatives (that we likely have), nor my time (which I say is $6 an hour but DH says it is more like $15 😘). Using your time estimates I would need 9 hours to complete this (low end) so that is $54 right there. Now we are at $116.

 

Am I off in my costs?

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Okay I ordered MGT for March. I wanted the November one but I didn't want it for multiple children. March was the only option for 1 child. 

 

When I get it I am planning on doing a video on opening it, a few photographs during the time that we use it and our set up, and then I am going to itemize everything that is included and not included that you need. I didn't find a review anywhere that told me this. I think this will help me and others with seeing the value of the program (or lack there of, as the case may be) It is suppose to ship in about a week so it will be a bit over a month before I have my review ready. However anyone can ask me things about it before then. :) I will post the complete review on my blog. I will also note, that while I have had my blog for 10 years, I paid for this out of my pocket. So this is a paid for program review!

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I'll play devil's advocate.   :biggrinjester:

 

 

Okay, your post intrigued me. So I have went based on what I can tell about MGT and the curriculum to price it out for me.

This is every month:
New story book - $12   I already own a library...and we visit the public library often.
I can read book - $10     See above.
Bilingual book - $8         Interesting...
Ink and paper (this is because I would be printing off a lot more then I currently do especially in color) - $15  Got me here...
Bags (ziplock to put daily stuff in so I could plan a month in advance) $2      I can just scavenge from the grocery budget for those.
New music CD (download) $14     Youtube, but actually...I prefer to do my own music. I'm picky.
Crafts $10   I'm not convinced dd isn't better off free-crafting with whatever supplies I find?

I am at $62 and I haven't got to the science, games or word puzzles, or math manipulatives (that we likely have), nor my time (which I say is $6 an hour but DH says it is more like $15 😘). Using your time estimates I would need 9 hours to complete this (low end) so that is $54 right there. Now we are at $116.

Am I off in my costs?

 

 

Science?  Tag along with our nature studies.

 

Games & Puzzles?  G-r-a-n-d-m-a...spoils her rotten.

 

Math manips?  Got those covered already.

 

Time?  What else am I going to do?  Laundry?  Mop the floor?  Ha! :smilielol5:

 

 

 

I'm talking myself out of this...talking out loud.  I really am interested in seeing your posts on it though.   :drool5:

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I just got the box on Saturday. I created a video of it but it is quite comical and have yet to post it. It started out with my 2 year old singing Wheels on the Bus, and ended with him in tears as I wouldn't let him play with the manipulatives RIGHT THEN! I may post it as it is realistic as to what opening the box in a "real" house is like. LOL

 

I went through the box the last few days and the list of "things you need". Most of which I think a "normal" family would have, but we didn't. So I placed an order with Amazon for some things we didn't have, or didn't have much of. Washable paint, clear glue (didn't even know they made this!), gold paint (yeah I could have used yellow but for $2 I can get the gold when I am placing an order), a stapler (ours died), and bubbles (my boys love bubbles in the summer and we hadn't replaced our supply). I still need to get sand and shallow storage boxes (to mess with sand in), liquid starch and eventually some food items (there are 3 food activities in the 20 + 1 days in March). 

 

I did preview the music and download it to my phone. I am singing one of the songs in my head right now. GREAT music. I mean great as in, my older son and I (as well as when I was a nanny) did Music Together and I loved that music, this to me is even better! My estimate above may be a bit cheap for what you get as far as this. 

 

We will be starting on March 2nd. I have went through the lessons and we will be going Monday through Saturday every week with Tuesdays off (swim class in the morning). Saturdays my older son has German so I have mixed up a few lessons so the ones that could be done outside the home, are the ones we do on that day as my son's German class is 2.5 hours and we are there the whole time. There is an easter party extra lesson. Has nothing to do with Jesus, but it looks fun so we will do that on Good Friday with Daddy as he has that day off. Doing this and not working on Saturday (the Saturday before Easter, older son doesn't have school) we should finish the whole month on the last day of the month.

 

I am really excited to get started and I am sure my family is tired of me talking about it.  :lol: Oh I forgot to mention that I also got 8.5 by 11 inch label sheets so I can cover over the spanish with german. I am going to use circle time for both children to learn more German and hopefully build my older son's confidence in German as he is afraid to talk in class.  :crying:

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Let us know how you like it! Ages 3/4 is so fun!!

 

Will Do! I think I might start a new thread when we get into it. That way I can say how the day went. 

 

My son is not 3 till July but he has a BIG vocabulary. So we will have to see. Today I get my stapler and some other supplies. I can't wait! Then I can start setting up. YAY!!

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My daughter just turned 4.

 

Math: For about six months now we've been going through the Mathematical Reasoning (beginning level), which she has really enjoyed. We don't have a set schedule, but sometimes we just pull the book off the shelf and "do math," and she almost always asks to keep going even after I've suggested we stop. At this point, the book is getting a little easy for her, but it's still good for basic reinforcement.

 

Reading: Mainly I just read to her every day, as much as possible, to build her vocabulary and background knowledge. We haven't done much formally with letters. She recognizes most of them and their sounds, but she's not 100% with them -- unlike my son, who knew them all by age 2.5. So now we are trying to give them a little more attention with her, too. She has a LeapFrog fridge magnet toy where you can put each letter into the bus and it will say the sound and sing a little song (she loves); I point out letters to her occasionally as we're reading; a few times I've used flashcards (which she liked). 

 

Writing -- We do almost nothing, and I regret it. We both work full-time and so this has just gotten neglected. She can ever so vaguely write her name (no one would recognize it but us), but her fine motor control is poor. This is going to be an area of focus for us this year.

 

History/Science -- We read all kinds of books, including non-fiction, and go to the museum, etc. 

 

 

 

 

 

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My daughter just turned 4.

 

Math: For about six months now we've been going through the Mathematical Reasoning (beginning level), which she has really enjoyed. We don't have a set schedule, but sometimes we just pull the book off the shelf and "do math," and she almost always asks to keep going even after I've suggested we stop. At this point, the book is getting a little easy for her, but it's still good for basic reinforcement.

 

Reading: Mainly I just read to her every day, as much as possible, to build her vocabulary and background knowledge. We haven't done much formally with letters. She recognizes most of them and their sounds, but she's not 100% with them -- unlike my son, who knew them all by age 2.5. So now we are trying to give them a little more attention with her, too. She has a LeapFrog fridge magnet toy where you can put each letter into the bus and it will say the sound and sing a little song (she loves); I point out letters to her occasionally as we're reading; a few times I've used flashcards (which she liked).

 

Writing -- We do almost nothing, and I regret it. We both work full-time and so this has just gotten neglected. She can ever so vaguely write her name (no one would recognize it but us), but her fine motor control is poor. This is going to be an area of focus for us this year.

 

History/Science -- We read all kinds of books, including non-fiction, and go to the museum, etc.

I just wanted to encourage you and say that it sounds like you are doing an excellent job. As far as writing, most of my daughters friends cannot write their names. We just had a valentine exchange and the kids were supposed to write their names on them. Out of a class of 15, only 4 could write their names well enough for others to read. The other 11 ranged in making random markings to what looked like letter formations. All of them are in the normal range. It sounds like your daughter is a math person which is great. Each kid has their strength.

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Has anyone used Miquon at the PreK level? I don't see it mentioned that often for this level...But I know that some pages/topics he could start to do this summer. I'm thinking if I introduce the c-rods starting now we could begin using parts of it starting in PK3. Jr is learning counting, comparing and place value now, I think that Miquon could sort of 'fill out' his number sense. I want to make sure he's not just pattern matching and patterning because he's doing some things that are more advanced than are usually expected for his age. Another nice thing is that c-rods let us by-pass much of the handwriting. (Hubby wants to delay handwriting for a couple of more years if possible)

 

Currently we are doing the whole integrate math into real life thing that I mentioned earlier but Jr. loves a good worksheet every now and then. And honestly I kind of want to buy something new and shiny and the convenience of having a ready to go math program for the summer sounds nice. We are doing a lot of math already, but I work FT outside of the home and now that Jr. goes to PreK its harder for us to be spontaneous. I think that a program might help. RS and Saxon K-3 have too many manipulatives for my tastes. I don't want a workbook driven approach though.

Do you think that Miquon could be the math program for me?

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I'm starting PK in the fall w/ DS, who just turned 3. He is a very mathmatical / spatial kid & an early reader. We'll focus on the "3 R's" with one additional, rotating subject daily (art, poetry, music, science, culture).

 

Reading: LOE Foundations, HOP K, NIR Books

Fine Motor: LOE Foundations, Kumon

Math: RightStart A, MEP 1, Miquon Orange, Living Books, Singapore Essentials

Specials: ArtTango, BFSU, Living Books

Edited by Expat_Mama_Shelli
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My boy will be three in August. I'm currently looking for the best play dough recipe, gathering nursery rhymes, contemplating a seasonal book basket and display (may wait until he is 4), researching how to potty train boys, and putting together his "school notebook," basically a binder with paper that is all his own.

 

Edit: he will also play lots and learn how to be a helpful big brother. And share. Fingers crossed. Haha!

Edited by Kristie in Florida
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