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1st Grade Planning Thread 2016/2017


hands-on-mama
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My upcoming first grader will be seven in September, so he's on the older side:

 

Tapestry of Grace Year 1 – Grammar Stage

Sonlight Readers Grade 3

Writing With Ease Level 2

Winning With Writing Level 2

First Language Lessons Level 2

Growing With Grammar Level 2

Handwriting Without Tears 2

All About Spelling Levels 2 and 3

Singapore Standards: 2A, 2B

Life of Fred: Dogs, Edgewood, and Farming

Elemental Science Biology for the Grammar Stage

Song School Latin 1

Critical Thinking Company Building Thinking Skills Level 1

Critical Thinking Company Mind Benders Book 3

Pfeiffer House Music 1 and 2

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So far the plan is

Language arts - Dictation Day By Day, copy work, continuing our slow move through GrammarLand, and any readers and read alouds that suit us.

Math- MEP

Science - undecided still. Maybe BFSU? We may just do Catestrophic Science since it's chronological to fit in with SoTW.

History - SoTW

Art - Artistic Pursuits & Meet The Masters

Music - continuing composer studies, hopefully adding an instrument

Logic - various games and continuing chess

Language - SSL and Duolingo Spanish.

Would you mind sharing that which Dictation day by day and Copywork for first grade you are using?

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Would you mind sharing that which Dictation day by day and Copywork for first grade you are using?

 

It's the 2nd grade one, about 4x a week.  I have a strong reader, but I've compared it to the Dolch lists and it uses mostly words from the first three: pre-primer, primer, and 1st grade.

 

For copywork, it's whatever suits.  I have the first semester of next year scheduled out and I've put copywork on the schedule 3x a week - pulled from history review, our literature book, and occasionally a silly riddle or poem.

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My plans are not quite set yet, but here are my current thoughts:

 

Phonics: LOE Foundations (end of B and then C) + some extra readers

 

Handwriting: I do not love the handwriting with LOE foundations, so I am still deciding what to do instead of or in addition to it... Maybe Draw Write Now?

 

Lit: Loads of books!  Picture books, chapter books- whatever suits our fancy

 

Math: I am thinking a Miquon and Singapore combo

 

History: Bede's History of Me 

 

Science: Behold and See1

 

Fun stuff: Poetry tea time, piano lessons and maybe some handbells too, artistic pursuits, and plenty of time to play!!

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First grade 2016-2017:

 

Seton 1 English

Seton 2 Phonics

Seton 2 Handwriting

Seton 1 Religion

Singapore Math Standard 1

Spelling Workout B

Literature with MP guides: Storytime, More Storytime, Prairie School, and Animal Folk Tales

Enrichment: MP 1st grade read aloud, arts, and poetry, Abeka Science 1 & History 1, and Maps Charts&Graphs A.

SOTW 1 audio.

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1st grade plans for DS#2, subject to change, lol:

 

Math: continue in Beast Academy 3 (he won't finish it this year), and/or maybe begin Singapore (3?)

Reading: McGuffey's 3rd Eclectic Reader

Writing:  WWE2

Handwriting:  beginning cursive -- maybe HWOT or maybe mom-made cursive based on the McGuffey style; continuing typing instruction, but switching from Keyboarding Without Tears to Mickey's Typing Adventure

Grammar:  FLL3

History:  SOTW2

Science:  undecided.  We're using BFSU now, but I think we may need to switch to something more open-and-go

Music: hopefully we'll begin piano lessons

Languages: continue Song School Latin 1.  May continue ASL, but DS#1 wants to do Spanish instead, and DS#2 usually decides to want whatever his older brother wants

 

Not planning anything for P.E. or spelling yet.  I figure it's okay to put off spelling another year or two

 

 

 

Two months later and I'm already changing things, lol!

 

Latest 1st grade plans for 2016-2017:

 

Math: Finish Beast Academy 3, start BA 4, supplement with Singapore for extra practice

Reading/vocab: Bits of McGuffey's 3rd Eclectic Reader and CT's Beginning Reading Detective

Writing: WWE2 and EM 2nd grade 6-trait writing

Spelling: AAS 1

Penmanship: Modified HWOT cursive and Mickey's Typing Adventure

Grammar: FLL3

History: SOTW 2

Science: Mystery Science!!!!!!!! (I cannot put enough exclamation marks after that)

Geography: EM Daily Geography grade 3

Extras: Undecided on music... piano or guitar lessons, hopefully, but depending on the budget.  Beginning Spanish on an as-interested basis.  Also considering something to teach logic.

 

ETA: something I forgot

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Starting to think about next year, and here's what I have so far:


 


Math: he'll finish MM2 in a few months, so I'm leaning toward introducing topics w/MM3 and then following that with the corresponding chapter in BA3 (in retrospect this approach would have alleviated some stress with DD this year) + Process Skills, Dreambox, XtraMath, and he's recently fallen in love with Prodigy, too.  :crying: 


 


Spelling/Grammar/Reading/Writing: Logic of English Foundations C & D + "I See Sam" and Treadwell & Free Readers


 


Literature: keeping it simple; we'll discuss our read-alouds (kids choose among a list I select, and it appears they are all-Harry-Potter-all-the-time until we finish the series)


 


Science: Nature Center classes and interest-led documentaries and Youtube clips; he may tag-along with DD's more formal science (botany), but I'm not going to force it.


 


Misc: Scripture read-aloud & discussion + my homebrew devotions, memory work, piano, swimming


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Can you all tell me what the abbreviations stand for ELTL, WWE,AAR,AAS,OPGTR, TOG, ETC, RLTL? I am new to the forums and I feel like you all talk a different language!!!

 

 

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ELTL: English Lessons Through Literature

 

AAR/AAS: All About Reading/All About Spelling

 

OPGTR: Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading

 

TOG: Tapestry of Grace

 

ETC: Explode the Code

 

RLTL: Reading Lessons Through Literature

 

 

 

 

It takes a while, but eventually they all start to make sense!

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Can you all tell me what the abbreviations stand for ELTL, WWE,AAR,AAS,OPGTR, TOG, ETC, RLTL? I am new to the forums and I feel like you all talk a different language!!!

 

 

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There's an abbreviation sticky post at the top of the k-8 curriculum board. They all refer to different curricula.

 

OPGTR= Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading

WWE= Writing With Ease

AAS= All About Spelling

etc.

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Can you all tell me what the abbreviations stand for ELTL, WWE,AAR,AAS,OPGTR, TOG, ETC, RLTL? I am new to the forums and I feel like you all talk a different language!!!

 

 

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Abbreviations from my post not already explained:

 

FLL - first language lessons

SOTW - story of the world

BA - beast academy

CT - critical thinking (company)

HWOT - handwriting without tears

KWOT -keyboarding without tears

EM - evan-moor

 

The abbreviation sticky is HERE, though the link at the top doesn't seem to be working... if you read through you'll get a lot anyway.

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Can you all tell me what the abbreviations stand for ELTL, WWE,AAR,AAS,OPGTR, TOG, ETC, RLTL? I am new to the forums and I feel like you all talk a different language!!!

 

 

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That drove me crazy when I was new too! You can always type the acronym in Google and you can usually find the answer fast. If nothing comes up add homeschool after it.

 

Don't let it discourage you, before you know it you will know what they all mean and be using them yourself.

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Some of your children are doing third grade and fourth grade work in first grade at what age did you start that a six year old would be doing such advanced work? At that pace they will be done with elementary at 8. Will you move on your kids to middle school subjects at that point? I think certain mental maturity is needed for those higher levels. Just curious!!

 

 

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Some of your children are doing third grade and fourth grade work in first grade at what age did you start that a six year old would be doing such advanced work? At that pace they will be done with elementary at 8. Will you move on your kids to middle school subjects at that point? I think certain mental maturity is needed for those higher levels. Just curious!!

 

 

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I have a 6yo who will be doing 3rd/4th for some subjects (or is already).  The thing is, we can always go deeper, wider, take time for other pursuits.  A large bulk of elementary work is memorization: spelling, phonics, math facts, grammar...and sometimes kids can pick things up quickly, but then require more time with them.  So we use different, non-grade level work.  Our tentative plan includes extras:

-blew through Mystery Science, so TOPS guides can be used for 2nd/3rd, Intellego for 4th, and maybe DIY along with Creek Edge Press for 5th.

-going through MEP at 1.5 levels per year, so if the pace continues we can use things like Hands On Equations, Anno, This Is Not A Math Book, etc. to play with math for a bit if an algebra course is too difficult just yet.  Or take 2-3 years for algebra 1.

-reads well, comprehends well, okay, so we will skip through reading comprehension curriculum and just read good books together and I'll expect narrations.

 

We can always slow down, back track, or stop learning new skills to focus on what has already been learned and applying it.  A quick pace now doesn't always mean a quick pace later.  A lot of kids hit 3rd grade and, as it is the year where memorization is expected to be applied, they'll need to slow down, absorb it all, and spend their time practicing using it.

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I am taking it slow even though my child is advanced. We do bot do more than one hour of school a day. Childhood is too short and adulthood a whole life time. I want my kids to enjoy being a kid. Seems like alot of people here are in a race! My kids play and do interest led stuff all day. I could move my four year old to first grade level math right now since she is done with k level but I decided not to. There is no rush. Only because they can do something does not mean they should. We all need to take into account emotional maturity and how all this will affect child inside. Best wishes.

 

 

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.........You are right, emotional maturity comes into play, but a lack of an appropriate education, no matter the age, is a disservice to a child.  There are a hundred thousand ways to explore concepts in age-appropriate manners.  Withholding information for the sake of grade level can be a petty way to approach a personalized education.  The ability to ebb and flow is quite necessary to keep a child actively engaged and not spending years in tears from either boredom or frustration because the work is too low or high.  Many here do not spend hours each day on sit down work.  They simply provide exercises at the right pace for their own child. 

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Some of your children are doing third grade and fourth grade work in first grade at what age did you start that a six year old would be doing such advanced work? At that pace they will be done with elementary at 8. Will you move on your kids to middle school subjects at that point? I think certain mental maturity is needed for those higher levels. Just curious!!

 

 

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My dd is 5 and doing 3rd grade work in math, and is about at a third grade reading level, so I can answer some of your questions. 

 

In our home we start at non-negotiable school at 4yo. That's not to say they spend tons of time on it, they just don't get to opt out after that. We do a 10-15 minute reading lesson from OPGTR and a math lesson from our math book and a page or two from their handwriting book. That's it at 4. This is about 4 days a week, year round.

 

As soon as they finish their handwriting (HWT PreK and K), they start writing lessons through Writing With Ease and spelling lessons with All About Spelling. Neither of these takes very long either. DD5 spends about 15 minutes total on WWE and AAS in a given day.

 

Once they turn six, I add in grammar, and if they are reading well enough, I add in Geography. Again, these don't add much time to our day. Maybe 15 minutes or so.

 

So DD5 is on lesson 160ish in OPGTR, and can read books like Boxcar Children with very little help. Almost 2 years of regular instruction got her there. 

 

As for math, we started 1st grade math once it was clear she understood basic math concepts. We have a very math-rich home. My 3 year old counts to 100 for fun and does little math problems for fun. We listen to skip-counting songs. We do little informal math problems and discuss fun math concepts throughout our day. They watched the standard PreK television shows that emphasize shapes and colors. There was no reason to spend extra time on a Kindergarten curriculum when she already understood it. It would be busy work and I being bored with school was one of the main things that drove me to homeschool in the first place. So, around 4yo, dd5 (almost 6) started 1st grade Miquon math. She does two pages a day. I pick one, she picks one. Over almost 2 years of doing this, that got her to halfway through 2nd grade math. Math comes easy for her and she enjoys it. Somewhere along the way, I decided that I wanted to make sure her concepts were solid, so I added in MEP. Then, a few weeks ago, I realized that she was ready for more challenge so I looked at Beast Academy and realized she had the skills for it. What's more, she saw me looking and fell in love with it. So I bought it and decided we would do it so long as she seemed capable. She begs for it, even after her other school work is done. Before BA, she spent maybe 45 minutes a day on math, very happily. Now it is closer to a little more than an hour.

 

So, to answer your question, she's grade level with writing, spelling, etc. Math she's a bit ahead but she loves math and loves spending extra time on it. She's still a little girl and often does school work in a princess costume and loves to play outside with her sisters. She gets plenty of time to play, spending maybe 2 hours on school (when I include piano).

 

That's not to say every kid will be like that. Her older sister is 7, almost 8, and is still on 2nd grade math (grade level for her), despite doing a similar path as her little sister. Math doesn't come as easily for her and we've had to be sure to go slowly and get things solid as we go. So, a lot of it depends on the kid. DD5 is very mature, loves it, and is naturally inclined that way, so why not?

 

Oh, and to answer your other question about finishing elementary at 8, I also plan to go wide and deep rather than farther, when it comes to math. That's why we are doing 2.5 math curricula with her. If she ends up in algebra early, oh well. She's still an elementary student in other ways. And if she needs to slow down, we will. I want my children to develop a love of learning, so I'm very careful to pay attention to feedback from them. But, I also think that going too slowly can also make them hate school and think it is just boring. It is a fine line. 

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I agree but I think there is a huge misconception in his forum that more is better that advancement is better. Every situation is different. The question to ask does that child love learning? Or the moment that child has free reigns will they run as far as they can from books? The experience the child is having at home will be a memory that will last a lifetime. This could be a good or bad thing it all depends on what you are doing at home. Scarcity thinking is the belief that more is better. It is not letting a kid be bored but its also not exploiting. There has to be balance in all that is done. In Finland children do not start school until seven bit despite this late start by the age of 15 they out perform most countries in international assessment and yes this includes the United States. So in Finland a child's curriculum at six is PLAY. and they still are among the smartest in the world.

 

 

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I agree but I think there is a huge misconception in his forum that more is better that advancement is better. Every situation is different. The question to ask does that child love learning? Or the moment that child has free reigns will they run as far as they can from books? The experience the child is having at home will be a memory that will last a lifetime. This could be a good or bad thing it all depends on what you are doing at home. Scarcity thinking is the belief that more is better. It is not letting a kid be bored but its also not exploiting. There has to be balance in all that is done. In Finland children do not start school until seven bit despite this late start by the age of 15 they out perform most countries in international assessment and yes this includes the United States. So in Finland a child's curriculum at six is PLAY. and they still are among the smartest in the world.

 

 

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I get what you are saying.  I really do. 

 

Homeschooling boards are always going to skew demographics.  Some are here for religious reasons.  Some are here because the school expects non-developmentally appropriate milestones.  Some are here because the educational system simply does.not.work.for.our.children.

 

At age 4, my child learned how to read.  By 4 years and 3 months, he was reading at a second grade level.  By 5 years, he was diving into chapter books occasionally and had picked up the Greek alphabet.  By 5 years, 6 months, he was reading well in Spanish and teaching himself the Ukrainian alphabet for fun.

At age 4, school consisted of learning about cultures, working on fine motor skills and gross motor skills through activities like painting, climbing, building, paper folding, etc.  He began learning how to write individual letters.  He explored math concepts freely, occasionally playing with a Montessori app and having the same tools available in real form.

At age 5, he skipped Kindergarten math.  He blew through MEP 1 and most of 2. 

It's April, and he is now 6.  He can multiply, add & subtract multi-digit numbers in his head, loves logic puzzles and codes. He can write sentences from dictation, but only simple words.  He plays chess quite well. He loves Greek mythology and Percy Jackson.  His heroes are NDG and Sheldon Cooper.  He also spends several hours a week climbing trees, doing art, playing legos, building with blocks, enjoying picture books, swinging swords and digging in the dirt.

 

The lecture on play is insulting.  Your starting point is not ours, nor is your journey the same.  To insinuate that it is wrong to have children who are doing appropriate level work for their ability is unbelievably rude and smacks of judgement of parenting that you are not qualified to make.

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I agree but I think there is a huge misconception in his forum that more is better that advancement is better. Every situation is different. The question to ask does that child love learning? Or the moment that child has free reigns will they run as far as they can from books? The experience the child is having at home will be a memory that will last a lifetime. This could be a good or bad thing it all depends on what you are doing at home. Scarcity thinking is the belief that more is better. It is not letting a kid be bored but its also not exploiting. There has to be balance in all that is done. In Finland children do not start school until seven bit despite this late start by the age of 15 they out perform most countries in international assessment and yes this includes the United States. So in Finland a child's curriculum at six is PLAY. and they still are among the smartest in the world.

 

 

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Yes, I totally agree it is important for a child to play. I disagree that accelerating a child who is ready and eager means that they aren't playing. Out of the 15 or so hours a day my child is awake, she only does school for 2 of them. 80% of her day is spent in play and living.  And that's only school days, which averages 4 days a week with frequent weeks off. And for her, a lot of school IS play. Like I said, she loves her math. She asks to do extra. This is why I homeschool. I want her to be able to do academic work at her level and still have time to be a kid. If I sent her to school, that two hours would be spent in the commute and brainless busywork homework, not counting the hours of boredom she'd have sitting there in class all day. That's what I remember from my childhood.

 

It is a false dichotomy to suggest that acceleration=no childhood joy. Heck, my 3 year old sits in on our readings of the Beast Academy comic book for fun. She thinks it is silly and likes it. Do I make her? No. To her, that is fun. You are implying that I am somehow doing my daughter an injustice and killing her childhood. We will just have to agree to disagree. Also, I don't really care about Finland. I think their model is great for them and if I was putting my daughter in school with no plans to worry about individualizing her instruction, I would very much like it if our school system was like theirs. But their system doesn't really have any effect on me and mine. For an institution they are great. Our family's homeschool isn't an institution, it is 4 little girls and their mom who knows them and spends countless hours thinking about them and their individual needs. And once my kids turn 7 (when they would be in school in Finland) they get even more time to play than the kids there do. Maybe I should step it up a notch to keep up with the Finnish. ;)

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Only time will tell how this acceleration will affect young children. As for me I am OUT of this race. My kids are enjoying being kids and I am enjoying being a mom! My brother got into Harvard and at six we were playing outside! That was our curriculum! while some were doing work! And our friends that were doing work did NOT get into Harvard. They were burnt out well before that. Burnt out is a real phenomena. More work and acceleration does not equal success. Its beyond that.

 

 

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Only time will tell how this acceleration will affect young children. As for me I am OUT of this race. My kids are enjoying being kids and I am enjoying being a mom! My brother got into Harvard and at six we were playing outside! That was our curriculum! while some were doing work! And our friends that were doing work did NOT get into Harvard. They were burnt out well before that. Burnt out is a real phenomena. More work and acceleration does not equal success. Its beyond that.

 

 

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Of course burn out is a real problem. I am very aware of it. Even a bit of a victim of it. Did you not read what I said, though? Approximately 8 hours a WEEK is spent on school in our home for my accelerated daughter. That is almost equivalent to one day of brick and mortar school (and is if you include homework and transportation). She enjoys it. You are being insulting saying that I am burning out my child. She is fine. Happy. Doing well.

 

I am enjoying being a mom too! My kids are enjoying being kids too! My kids spend HOURS a day playing outside. I don't see where you would think otherwise. 

 

Obviously there is no room in your mind for differing opinions and situations. I am not judging you for your "better late than early" philosophy. Please extend the same courtesy. I suggest if you want to discuss this further, that you start a new thread so we won't derail this one. I might take a bit to respond. DD5 is currently tugging on my sleeve for me to go do math with her. ("Mom, come on!!!")

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Burn out is VERY real and it does not show now it shows up later on when they get older. Right now they just do as we say it shows up in the teen years. By then its too late to start over. Best wishes and becareful!

 

 

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Jadde, if I remember correctly, you're the one who went through MUS primer with a 4yo, correct, and wanted to know if it would be better to move to Alpha or Singapore?  And then was talking about accelerating the classical timeline to begin SOTW with a 5yo?


I will be sure to take all of your concerns about my child's playtime into consideration.  I do thank you for all of your thoughts in this thread - it has helped me quite a bit to see our balance from an outsider's perspective.

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Burn out is VERY real and it does not show now it shows up later on when they get older. Right now they just do as we say it shows up in the teen years. By then its too late to start over. Best wishes and becareful!

 

 

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I think you have definitely missed all the "better late than early" threads. There is a large contingent that agrees with you and they always chime in when someone innocently asks for advice on something regarding younger children. When I first started reading these boards and couldn't understand all the acronyms I was shocked by how "advanced" so many children seem, but now as my DS is getting older I understand it better. I started off very gently with DS and had no intentions of being all Tiger Mom but he needs more. I never intended for him to be spelling so well at newly 6 or wanting to advance in math or wanting more and more of everything. That's just him. I think it's one of the wonderful gifts of homeschooling that we get to follow his interests. I'm not mathy or sciency at all but he is so I read him stuff I don't understand but he totally gets and explains to his Dad and tries to teach DD. Like the others his school "day" is very short and he is the one asking me to do more when it's his time to "play" and do whatever later on.

 

DD is young and thinks everything DS does is interesting and fun. She is now running around and spouting off math that she has learned from DS' lessons (there are 4 people here but Daddy left so now there ar pe 3, etc). I imagine with all her subliminal learning at such an early age it will be the same for her. This is in no way forced or going to lead to "burn out."

 

I have fancy degrees and left an intense profession to be at home with my kids. Burn out was from the competition constantly to go from one thing to the next. SATS to get into the right university, LSATS to get into the right law school...etc. my kids will have no idea what "everyone else is doing." They just know they're having fun. Your brother might have gotten into Harvard because that's HIM and he might have done so regardless of his upbringing. I did well in school with parents who didn't care if I went but certainly most kids would have done better with support.

 

Finland has its own way but it doesn't make it best for everyone. DS wanted to write stories, should I have just ignored his wishes and told him to go play? Let him start off writing incorrectly only to work more later to fix his bad habits?

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Some of your children are doing third grade and fourth grade work in first grade at what age did you start that a six year old would be doing such advanced work? At that pace they will be done with elementary at 8. Will you move on your kids to middle school subjects at that point? I think certain mental maturity is needed for those higher levels. Just curious!!

 

 

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Kids don't necessarily need to start very early to be doing advanced work by 1st grade.  

 

DS#2's 1st grade plans are in this thread.  He's got a fall birthday, so he's on the older side for his grade level; but he's socially and emotionally an average kindergartner, so that's his grade level now.  He started RS level A (kindergarten level) a little before his 5th birthday (right when he was "supposed" to start kindergarten according to the local school) and was ready for C by his 6th birthday.  Now he's 6.5yo and almost done with RS C along with the first quarter of Beast Academy 3.  I'm not working him very hard or requiring huge amounts of time on lessons.  He just picks things up quickly.

 

My kids spend hours upon hours upon hours playing every day.  There's nothing I could possibly do to prevent them from playing!  They are never ever bored.  I've taken away all of their toys and come down in the morning to find that they formed pictures ALL over the entire living room floor out of our math manipulative tally sticks, used a long line of floss to create a "zip line" for "ninjas" formed from scraps of paper from the waste basket, are sword fighting with chop sticks, are "bowling" with a potato and stacked drinking cups, or have used our library books to build something like a fancy paper-card house.  

 

They play when they work too.  My 6yo sings and makes up rhymes while he empties the dishwasher, draws earmuffs on all his fours, recites poems and parts of speech while marching around the living room, pretends to fight "bad guys" while sweeping the dining room, and folds his pages with copywork into paper airplanes, frogs, or other other origami-like creations.

 

I DO try to keep their academics appropriately challenging.  If that means middle school level work at 8yo, that's fine with me.  There will ALWAYS be more to do and learn.  I'm not one tiny bit worried about running out of things to teach them -- it's not going to happen!  

 

I'd rather keep them comfortably challenged than leave them to do work that is much too easy and boring.  I don't want them to skate through school, thinking that everything is easy, only to be hit hard when they suddenly must apply themselves when they get to college.  I don't want them to think that everything should come easily or to come to the conclusion that if you're smart things are easy and if something is hard you must not be smart (a common problem for gifted people).  I'm not trying to "race" them anywhere, but I am going to make sure that they have to actually think a little every day and know the psychological rewards of hard work.  

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Can you explain what resources you use for your family study? Thanks!

 

Sorry, I just saw this.  Not to derail the derail:

 

artists and composers

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_pg_1?rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Agetting+to+know+the+world%27s+greatest&keywords=getting+to+know+the+world%27s+greatest&ie=UTF8&qid=1460599823

 

And, of course, viewing/listening to their work, recreating some, additional library books/biographies/movies.

 

poets

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=node%3D4&field-keywords=poetry+for+young+people&rh=n%3A283155%2Cn%3A4%2Ck%3Apoetry+for+young+people

 

We also listen to audio versions and sometimes do art while listening.  We have also recreated poetry in a specific poets style.

 

Shakespeare

http://www.amazon.com/Beautiful-Stories-Shakespeare-Edith-Nesbit/dp/1604595752/ref=sr_1_18?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1460600119&sr=1-18&keywords=Shakespeare

 

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Characters-Shakespeare-Paper-Dolls/dp/0486413306/ref=sr_1_47?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1460600205&sr=1-47&keywords=Shakespeare

 

Plus other items I find that go along with the particular work we are studying (coloring books, simpler books, audio versions, movies, etc).

 

We keep it fun and simple.  It isn't super in depth.  We choose one person to study over the course of several weeks, one evening each week.

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As a mother of gifted kids, nothing is more upsetting than the clueless, yet disturbingly judgemental, opinions of other parents.

 

When I started reading this thread I was excited about everyone's plans and saw a few things I might want to explore, but now I'm so insulted that I don't want to participate in the discussion at all.

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As a mother of gifted kids, nothing is more upsetting than the clueless, yet disturbingly judgemental, opinions of other parents.

 

When I started reading this thread I was excited about everyone's plans and saw a few things I might want to explore, but now I'm so insulted that I don't want to participate in the discussion at all.

 

But I think there are quite a few of us who would love to know what your plans are!  Please share, as I'm always on the look out for new avenues to look into as well.

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Bible: The Child's Story Bible by Cathrine Vos; Songs for Saplings, Questions with Answers; Veritas Press' Genesis through Joshua (just the song)

 

English: Finish OP; AAS; FLL; narrations/copy work from literature, history, science

 

Math: Saxon

 

History: SOTW audio book

 

Science: Noeo Biology 1

 

Latin: Song School

 

Classical Conversations 

 

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We started first at the Spring Equinox...

And since then we have totally simplified already... :)

 

Phonics: OPGTR

Language arts: WWE workbook, cause this year we need open and go!

Math: Math Mammoth

sneaky phonics and Handwriting so he thinks it is something different: mcGuffey's Speller

Sneaky handwriting number 2: draw Write Now

History/lit: a lot of the AO reading schedule with SOTW replacing the history

Science: it happens whether I plan it or not, no need to add in.... Although we might start doing some BFsU once every few weeks...

Loads of read alouds, a goal of 3 hours outside in nature every day, our Buddhist stories and meditation, going to try to start ASL and swimming, and as much laughter and snuggles as possible... I have a preKer and a 1st grader... I feel like the next few years are so precious...

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Ok, and also? Whether we advance or wait... We are all on a homeschooling forum in what little spare time we have... So we all obviously adore our kids and are doing our best for them... Breathe...

 

I have friends who get flamed for waiting to teach their kids... I have friends who get flamed for teaching their kids early... I know I flame myself at least once a week for something surely I am doing wrong... Parenting is hard! Education is a complicated issue and every child is different...

 

I think you are all doing great! Because you are engaged... If we disagree on what is best it is only BECAUSE we are engaged... A lot of parents don't care... Ok.. I wanna see more people's plans... :)

 

Education = good

Nature = good

Play = good... How they all work together is more of a painting, and not really a formula...

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Ok, and also? Whether we advance or wait... We are all on a homeschooling forum in what little spare time we have... So we all obviously adore our kids and are doing our best for them... Breathe...

 

I have friends who get flamed for waiting to teach their kids... I have friends who get flamed for teaching their kids early... I know I flame myself at least once a week for something surely I am doing wrong... Parenting is hard! Education is a complicated issue and every child is different...

 

I think you are all doing great! Because you are engaged... If we disagree on what is best it is only BECAUSE we are engaged... A lot of parents don't care... Ok.. I wanna see more people's plans... :)

 

Education = good

Nature = good

Play = good... How they all work together is more of a painting, and not really a formula...

 

 

:hurray: :hurray: :hurray: :iagree: :hurray: :hurray: :hurray:

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I will have a young 1st grader who turns 6 in July.

 

Build Your Library 1

For handwriting, just copywork from BYL

First Language Lessons 1

Explode the Code 3 & 4, Phonics Pathways, Phonics readers

I wasn't going to add formal spelling or writing this year, but I'm leaning towards WriteShop Primary A. Still leaning towards waiting on formal spelling. If we do spelling it will probably be Spelling Workout A or B.

 

Rightstart B

 

Science is nature study as scheduled by BYL, but I'm considering adding RSO or an experiment kit. My daughter loves science!

 

Home Art Studio

Piano

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The turn this thread has taken is somewhat amusing to me. As I mentioned earlier, I am on my 4th 6 year old. If I could give any advice on the topic, I would say to trust yourself and what you know about your child *and* to trust others to know themselves and their children.

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I will have a young 1st grader who turns 6 in July.

 

Build Your Library 1

For handwriting, just copywork from BYL

First Language Lessons 1

Explode the Code 3 & 4, Phonics Pathways, Phonics readers

I wasn't going to add formal spelling or writing this year, but I'm leaning towards WriteShop Primary A. Still leaning towards waiting on formal spelling. If we do spelling it will probably be Spelling Workout A or B.

 

Rightstart B

 

Science is nature study as scheduled by BYL, but I'm considering adding RSO or an experiment kit. My daughter loves science!

 

Home Art Studio

Piano

 

I'm doing BYL too!

 

My plan is:

BYL Prehistory Unit Study + Grade 1

Language supplement tbd

Rightstart

RSO Science or maaaaybe BFSU but RSO looks easier (for me) so far!

Squilt for music

Artistic Pursuits

 

 

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I'm switching from an all-in-one curriculum, so this is my first time in 4 years of homeschooling to pick and choose what we're going to do. My daughter will turn 6 in June and we'll probably start 1st grade work in August:

 

Math: Math Mammoth 1

 

I've been using Math in Focus, but it's expensive (over $250 per year) for what you get. After doing lots of looking around, I decided to switch both my girls (my older daughter will be going into 3rd grade) to Math Mammoth. It's still a mastery approach and I'm excited about it being a worktext!

 

Reading: AAR 1

 

Vocabulary: Vocabulary Connections Level A

 

Writing, Grammar, and Handwriting: IEW PALS Writing

 

Spelling: AAS 1 (This is a maybe for this year. Depends on how fast we get thru AAR1.)

 

History: SOTW 1 (with activity book)

 

Geography: DK Workbooks 1st grade Geography (not sure if we'll need this or if SOTW is enough)

 

Science: Mystery Science

 

I'm excited about this science program. It's a different approach, rather than typical textbook/worksheets. I signed up for the free trial and my girls loved it. They were engaged, the experiment was simple yet informative, and I think there's lots of opportunity for expanding on each topic. I'm not sure there's enough content to last longer than this year, but we'll enjoy it for now.

 

If we have time: I'd like to do Lollipop Logic, Draw Write Now, and maybe some sort of introductory Spanish.

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Yes! It's really about that time! So what are your first grade plans.

 

Here are ours so far.

 

Language Arts: Reading through HOD's emerging readers

RLTL 1/2

ELTL 1

 

Math: Miquon

Possibly start Singapore 1A during 2nd semester

Various math games

 

Handwriting: I'm not sure at all! Probably HWOT but I really have no clue what I want to use.

 

Bible/History/Science: Wayfarer's Ancients

My plan is so similar to yours!  Are you getting HOD's guide or just reading her books on the list? I as well am doing Wayfarers, but I am just struggling with what to have my first grader read himself.

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My plan is so similar to yours! Are you getting HOD's guide or just reading her books on the list? I as well am doing Wayfarers, but I am just struggling with what to have my first grader read himself.

I'm just going to have her read the books. I used the Beyond guide with my oldest daughter and I'm co dissent we will be fine on our own. It was only 3 comprehension questions for each chapter. :)

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Our New Plan:


LA: AAR 2, lots of readers from the library, AAS 1, HWT 1, and copywork


Literature: American Tall Tales, The Classic Tales of Brer Rabbit, Best-Loved Folktales of the World, plus chapter books from various reading lists


Math: Singapore PM 1A & 1B, possibly with some RightStart B added in


History: Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans and Fifty Famous Stories Retold


Geography: might do the family geography suggested by Mater Amabilis


Science: James Herriot's Treasury for Children, Among the Farmyard People (and others by Clara Dillingham Pierson), and Seed Babies along with activities from Janice VanCleave's Big Book of Play And Find Out Science Projects


Religion: Saint Joseph First Communion Catechism, read through a children's Bible, Once Upon a Time Saints & More Once Upon a Time Saints, Just Like Mary, and The Mass Book for Children


 


 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi,

 

My second oldest just decided on his college choice today (just before the may 1st deadline!)...so I thought it would be fun to go through my youngest's first grade plan for next year. :)

 

Thanks to all that have shared so far...here's my plan for next year...

 

Bible tbd

Saxon 2 with RS card games

Lots of easy reader books

AAS 1, Shurley Eng 1, HWT, narration/copy work with sci and history

Elemental science life

American history with older kids, curriculum tbd

Read alouds

Art/music appreciation, drawing

memory work

violin

dance

Edited by sandra in va
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We will be doing:

Genesis Curriculum-Book of Exodus (social studies, language arts, Bible)

Mind for Math (also by Genesis Curriculum)

Apologia Astronomy

Reading (she already reads so just going to keep on keeping on)

Sadlier Phonics for practice/reinforcement

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