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Robin M

Book a Week 2016 - W2: Sahitya Akademi, India's National Academy of Letters

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Timaeus just arrived.  Gulp.

 

Eliana, I'm glad you suggested this edition - the commentary is as long as the dialogue.  That sounds about right to me!  I'll need every word of it, no doubt.  

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I love Once and Future King, it's one of my favorite books.  Sadly, I have not been able to get any of my children to feel the same way.  Maybe someday, my youngest (who just turned 11) will love it.  

 

I bought a copy in September for DS. He hasn't bitten yet, though.

 

Timaeus just arrived.  Gulp.

 

Eliana, I'm glad you suggested this edition - the commentary is as long as the dialogue.  That sounds about right to me!  I'll need every word of it, no doubt.  

 

It's sitting on my nightstand but I covered it with a couple of other books so I won't see it right before I need to be able to sleep.  :p  

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Finished up Captivating again today.  Read it so many years ago... like, at least 8.  

 

It's a conundrum.  The theology is questionable, but the premises aren't incorrect.  So there's always the question of do I keep this book because I agree with what it says about one thing while I think the theology isn't sound?

 

Sigh.  :P

 

 

 

 

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Pam-

 

I,m still not sure what The New Jim Crow will tell me that the people who have been mangled by the system can,t, since I,m not eloquent enough to be able to use its facts and figures to convince the people in power who might be convinced by those means, but I guess I,m going to have to read it to see.

 

It isn,t that I don,t think changing the system isn,t a big part of changing the world. Or that the system, all by itself, gives shape to things and limits the power its administrators have. (My husband deals with the FDA lol.) It,s just that I can,t change it so I prefer to work in places where I can make a difference. Well, I guess that isn,t true. I did get someone in power to sign something once, but the means I used are no longer available to me, and it was something of a fluke, and I rather cheated to do it. I,m more useful in other ways, ways that require less brain power and that don,t overwhelm me to the point that I am useless.

 

As far as faith in the justice system goes, I want to say count your blessings that you have learned about its realities through books rather than your children,s friends, but I am dead positive that you are already doing this. I think whoever said that money can,t buy happiness must not have had teenagers - groan.

 

Syncopation is a kind word. : )

 

Peace, Pam, and many hugs.

 

Nan

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I love Once and Future King, it's one of my favorite books.  Sadly, I have not been able to get any of my children to feel the same way.  Maybe someday, my youngest (who just turned 11) will love it.  

 

Good Omens was such a fun book, 2 authors who I wish could have worked together some more. 

 

I bought a copy in September for DS. He hasn't bitten yet, though.

 

I started Once and Future King, struggling a bit with it, it is a bit silly so far. I guess I hadn't read the reviews close enough, I've heard it referenced so much as the KA book to read but it seems there was scant little work to keep it historically accurate it is a bit hard to swallow, especially after just reading Clark's very well done and serious Arthurian Saga which works very hard to stay in the time period. I did read however that the first part has a different tone than the rest so perhaps that will improve. I'm looking now at versions of Le Morte de Arthur.

 

I'm looking very forward to Good Omens, I need to get my butt in gear with OaFK so I'm ready when it gets here. I've loved everything I've read by Gaiman so far, with the exception of Sandman which was just a bit dark for me. After I finish it I'll have read all of his adult novels- I've yet to read Coraline or Odd of the children's books or any of his short story collections.

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I finished A Brave Vessel, a companion read to The Tempest, which we should finish today. It was enjoyable, but not earthshattering. It chronicled the story William Strachey, an aspiring writer who joined a fleet of colony ships headed to Jamestown which got caught in a hurricane. The flagship was blown off course and ran aground in Bermuda, where the people lived a much more comfortable and plentiful life than they would have had they made it to Jamestown! They built a new ship from the wreckage of the old one and the cedars on the island and made it to Jamestown. Some of the history of that colony was described. Then Strachey returned to England where he was (apparently) bemused to find many echos of his story (told in letters sent back to England) reflected in The Tempest.  

 

The strongest part of the book was the historical stuff, the weakest the retelling of the Tempest and laboriously going through all of the parallels. But maybe it just felt belabored to me because I was reading the two at the same time? It was a perfectly good, readable, popular history book that enhances understanding of the play, of Shakespeare's London, and of the colonial efforts at Jamestown, not to mention being a true castaways-on-a-desert-island story.  It was a good read, and fills up my Nautical square!

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I started Once and Future King, struggling a bit with it, it is a bit silly so far. I guess I hadn't read the reviews close enough, I've heard it referenced so much as the KA book to read but it seems there was scant little work to keep it historically accurate it is a bit hard to swallow, especially after just reading Clark's very well done and serious Arthurian Saga which works very hard to stay in the time period. I did read however that the first part has a different tone than the rest so perhaps that will improve. I'm looking now at versions of Le Morte de Arthur.

 

I'm looking very forward to Good Omens, I need to get my butt in gear with OaFK so I'm ready when it gets here. I've loved everything I've read by Gaiman so far, with the exception of Sandman which was just a bit dark for me. After I finish it I'll have read all of his adult novels- I've yet to read Coraline or Odd of the children's books or any of his short story collections.

 

I think with TOAFK, it's best to think of it in the tradition of storytelling that sets the story in whatever period is most convienient, or feels free to mix them.  It's a mythology here, not a history.  It seems to me that it's a more recent trend to place King Arthur stories in really historically accurate settings, I don't think that was so when TOAFK was written.

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I think with TOAFK, it's best to think of it in the tradition of storytelling that sets the story in whatever period is most convienient, or feels free to mix them.  It's a mythology here, not a history.  It seems to me that it's a more recent trend to place King Arthur stories in really historically accurate settings, I don't think that was so when TOAFK was written.

I'm going back and forth about how much mythology I want  and how much fact(Clark's version went to the other end of reality and I would have liked some more magic but I appreciated her effort to try and present a version of how things could have been true). I generally expect whatever world/time period that is chosen for the setting to be the one the story stays in throughout. My experience is limited I guess not enough to be familiar with similar works with the mixing of various times(it actually strikes me as a newer book trying to be cool and relate-able bringing in newer ideas and themes- I find it jarring trying to get this mental picture going but having it constantly shaken by odd misplaced references that (to me) don't fit. I have Tolkein's Sir Gawain from 1925 which was published 10yrs + before TOAFK and it is more historical, as is the Pyle version(from 1903) I read with ds a couple of years ago. I guess I didn't do my homework as I expected White's version to be a more mature version of Pyle's. I can see my son likely the silliness and the going back and forth, I'm trying to get over it myself.

 

On another note I just watched The Martian last night, I had read the book last month after dh raved about the movie. I found the book enjoyable enough although a bit tedious at times explaining everything. On the other end it seemed that the movie was lacking in explanation. I didn't find the characters as good in the movie as in the book either, I think I would have enjoyed the movie more if I wouldn't have recently read the book.

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I'm going back and forth about how much mythology I want  and how much fact(Clark's version went to the other end of reality and I would have liked some more magic but I appreciated her effort to try and present a version of how things could have been true). I generally expect whatever world/time period that is chosen for the setting to be the one the story stays in throughout. My experience is limited I guess not enough to be familiar with similar works with the mixing of various times(it actually strikes me as a newer book trying to be cool and relate-able bringing in newer ideas and themes- I find it jarring trying to get this mental picture going but having it constantly shaken by odd misplaced references that (to me) don't fit. I have Tolkein's Sir Gawain from 1925 which was published 10yrs + before TOAFK and it is more historical, as is the Pyle version(from 1903) I read with ds a couple of years ago. I guess I didn't do my homework as I expected White's version to be a more mature version of Pyle's. I can see my son likely the silliness and the going back and forth, I'm trying to get over it myself.

 

On another note I just watched The Martian last night, I had read the book last month after dh raved about the movie. I found the book enjoyable enough although a bit tedious at times explaining everything. On the other end it seemed that the movie was lacking in explanation. I didn't find the characters as good in the movie as in the book either, I think I would have enjoyed the movie more if I wouldn't have recently read the book.

 

I really identify TWAFK with a very particular English sort of humour.  Tolkien doesn't seem to have had it in his writing though.  But then, he didn't even like the way Lewis wove things together in the Narnia books.

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So I've picked up THe End of Growth by Jeff Rubin - I was looking for Small Is Beautiful which was checked out - I've put it on hold.  It's about the idea that the economy always needs to grow, particularly in connection with the availability of oil energy.  It's a few years old now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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So I've picked up THe End of Growth by Jeff Rubin - I was looking for Small Is Beautiful which was checked out - I've put it on hold.  It's about the idea that the economy always needs to grow, particularly in connection with the availability of oil energy.  It's a few years old now.

 

Another interesting book along those lines I read recently is The Great Disruption by Paul Gilding, former head of Greenpeace Australia, morphed into a consultant. I haven't read Rubin's book yet, nor Richard Heinberg's book of the same name.

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I always envied Marianne in the scene near the end of the movie version of Sense and Sensibility when Colonel Brandon is reading aloud to her. Of course she finally falls in love with him -- what passionate, romantic woman wouldn't?!

:001_wub:  you are a kindred spirit!

 

Dd18 is on Team Fanny. She finds the character modest and dutiful (not co-incidentally, these are two attributes dd shares with Fanny) and admires the way Fanny doesn't make a fuss. 

 

I am 100% Team Emma and no-one, not even dd, can talk me around to the virtues of Fanny. 

My dd21 is Team Fanny. Similar to your dd, my dd finds that she can relate to Fanny.  Dd is very much a "do the right thing" kind of girl.  She feels that Fanny has an inner strength that far surpasses her physical strength and one that Austen's other characters cannot begin to relate to.  This dd is my aspie.  

 

I love that Emma is so flawed! Yet so lively! So distinctly un-Jane Fairfaxish! So capable of learning ( ultimately, after making lots of mistakes...ahem...perhaps here we have the key to my love of Emma.)

Yes!  Marianne is my favorite character and the one I most identify with but I have to admit that Emma is probably my closest 2nd.  Both Marianne and Emma are young, passionate, and naive (though Emma thinks she is not!), and I find their growth to be more satisfying than the steadiness of an Elizabeth Bennett or an Elinor Dashwood, maybe because I personally know just how much it cost them to find their maturity!

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I've finished Peaches for Father Francis by Joanne Harris (in the Chocolat series).  I enjoyed it more than The Girl With No Shadow.  Quick and light reading.  Also finished Cold Comfort Farm.  I giggled all the way through it.  As much as I liked it, I think this might be one of those rare occasions where I liked the movie better than the book, but I need to re-watch it again since it's been a number of years.

 

Now what to tackle next?  Probably something more serious. Perelandra is sitting on the end table where I left it last month.  The bookmark is in the middle of chapter 4.  Or I could try to tackle Jane Austen yet once again after the discussion.  Who knows?  The fifth or sixth time could be the charm.

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I finished Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe a couple days ago.  I enjoyed it, though I'm not sure why.  I'm glad I read it.  I did not see it in the same light as some others, though.  I found the first missionary to be a true missionary, not pushing his religion on others but there to let them know another option exists.  He specifically wanted to learn the culture and religion of the people. The second "missionary" was not a true missionary, was there in name only and worked closely with the government that had come in to take over.  I saw the government as more of a problem to their society than the missionary.  I cannot condone the changing of their society and the intrusion of the white man's government, at the same time I also cannot find fault with a missionary or a government that would step in to stop some of their more crude practices.  The leaving of twins in the "Evil Forest" to die was abominable and should have been stopped.  Preserving a culture and preserving life are two very radically different things.  Life always wins. The Amazon blurb says that Achebe makes "this cruel man deeply sympathetic." I found Okonkwo to be a harsh, selfish man wrapped up in his own self importance and more concerned with his reputation than his wives and children.  I cannot respect a man like this, and I did not find him deeply sympathetic.  Because of this, and what was done to Ikemefuna, I can see why Okonkwo's son chose a different path. While I was reading I felt a similarity to the movie Apocalypto, the sadness for the destruction of their way of life, but a relief that some of the more heinous practices would be put to an end.  Very thought provoking and I'm glad I read it.  

 

That was #3 for me this year.  I began First Frost, and next week  I will have to reread Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde for Aly's class.  We needed more time for our Frankenstein discussion.  It got quite heated especially with both older siblings coming to join in with our discussion!  I love seeing how kids/young adults take different things from different books.  

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7. The Fifth Floor by Julie Oleszek.  I enjoyed it a lot.  It was very emotional.  Anna is the 9th of 10 kids and when she is 7 her 10 year old sister fell while they were playing on a swingset and then developed headaches and soon after died.  Anna blamed herself and shut down.  For the next several years she was in bad shape, but her parents weren't really noticing, likely because of their own grief.  At 17, Anna quit eating and after 3 weeks is admitted to a psychiatric ward where she stays for quite some time.  She uses food to try to control her world and also refuses to engage with the therapy sessions.  Most of the book follows her stay and very slow recovery.  It was really well written.  It's the author's first book.  She's an elementary school teacher.  It always makes me extra happy when a book by a school teacher includes an excellent grasp of the English language and isn't in need of an editor (that is not the case way too often).  Books like this one is why I "buy" free Kindle books.  Some are awful.  But then there are occasional gems (it's $2.99 now; it was temporarily free when I got it).  These gems are why I give so many freebies a chance.

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:001_wub:  you are a kindred spirit!

 

My dd21 is Team Fanny. Similar to your dd, my dd finds that she can relate to Fanny.  Dd is very much a "do the right thing" kind of girl.  She feels that Fanny has an inner strength that far surpasses her physical strength and one that Austen's other characters cannot begin to relate to.  This dd is my aspie.  

 

Yes!  Marianne is my favorite character and the one I most identify with but I have to admit that Emma is probably my closest 2nd.  Both Marianne and Emma are young, passionate, and naive (though Emma thinks she is not!), and I find their growth to be more satisfying than the steadiness of an Elizabeth Bennett or an Elinor Dashwood, maybe because I personally know just how much it cost them to find their maturity!

 

Exactly! 

 

And yes, it's Fanny's stoic abilities that appeal to dd18 also. 

 

I am pleased to find us like-minded on this :)

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Exactly! 

 

And yes, it's Fanny's stoic abilities that appeal to dd18 also. 

 

I am pleased to find us like-minded on this :)

:hurray:

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I've finished Peaches for Father Francis by Joanne Harris (in the Chocolat series).  I enjoyed it more than The Girl With No Shadow.  Quick and light reading.  Also finished Cold Comfort Farm.  I giggled all the way through it.  As much as I liked it, I think this might be one of those rare occasions where I liked the movie better than the book, but I need to re-watch it again since it's been a number of years.

 

Now what to tackle next?  Probably something more serious. Perelandra is sitting on the end table where I left it last month.  The bookmark is in the middle of chapter 4.  Or I could try to tackle Jane Austen yet once again after the discussion.  Who knows?  The fifth or sixth time could be the charm.

 

I found all of Lewis Space Trilgy hard going, story wise - hard to get into especially.  But I think it was worth it - they are books that theologically still come to my mind all the time.  Perelandra in particular has one of the most horrifying depictions of the nature of evil I have ever come across.

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Marianne is my favorite character and the one I most identify with but I have to admit that Emma is probably my closest 2nd.  Both Marianne and Emma are young, passionate, and naive (though Emma thinks she is not!), and I find their growth to be more satisfying than the steadiness of an Elizabeth Bennett or an Elinor Dashwood, maybe because I personally know just how much it cost them to find their maturity!

 

I identify most with Anne Elliot, but when I write out what about her resonates with me, well it sounds so pathetic! But I am Anne, the one who'd rather be playing the music for the party than have to participate.

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Hmm, I don't like Marieanne much either, and I was always a bit annoyed that Col Brandon was interested in her, because I did like him.  Something about those very emotional characters really turns me off.

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I forgot to mention I did not finish Younger next year, I got half-way through then I started skipping the one guys sections and just read the Dr's part, I couldn't stand his way of writing. I didn't find the anecdotes and stories enjoyable and time is limited. Perhaps I should have read the original one instead of the women's version but the info felt like it stretched out forever for what could have been put into a pamphlet. I started another book alongside Once and Future King- The Lost Art of Walking, I picked it up at the library on a whim, I just puffy heart love walking so I thought it might by interesting, I'm about 50 pages in right now. I finished the very short "book" by Rowling, which is the graduation speech she gave at Harvard for 2008 it is titled Very Good Lives, nice and short inspirational piece.

 

So I've picked up THe End of Growth by Jeff Rubin - I was looking for Small Is Beautiful which was checked out - I've put it on hold.  It's about the idea that the economy always needs to grow, particularly in connection with the availability of oil energy.  It's a few years old now.

I'm looking for some good non-fic titles, sounds interesting, this idea that we most constantly have growth to be "progressing" has always been a bit of a hard one to swallow for me.

 

I really identify TWAFK with a very particular English sort of humour.  Tolkien doesn't seem to have had it in his writing though.  But then, he didn't even like the way Lewis wove things together in the Narnia books.

Ah, yes, I remember reading about how Tolkien was annoyed with how Lewis would pull this and that into his stories, which is nothing compared to White. Lewis' world was at least cohesive with a good flow. White does somewhat remind me of Waterbabies by Kingsley. It also brings to mind Mary Poppins and the movie Bedknobs and Broomsticks, which I enjoyed, I just didn't come in with that expectation so it threw me off. 

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After reading the article that was posted about literary travels, I got sidetracked, thinking about tackling one of the books on the list, but instead I just finally finished The Essays of E.B. White. I had started awhile ago, but then I decided to restart and read this week.

I had gotten the Essays of E.B. White among other books, back when my dad had given me money as a gift to spend just on books for myself. And I thought of him as I read the article about traveling through books and as traveled to Maine and Alaska and New York and Florida, to the country, to the city, & to the sea with E.B. White. I had overheard my dad tell someone of how he could't afford to take us on vacations very far from home but he was happy they always were able to buy books and get me to the library. Then, he knew, I could get a taste of going anywhere. Reading is one of the few things I have ever been good at and I am always happy to remember how my mom read to me and my dad encouraged me to have a lot of books, even if my room was a terrible mess. Anyway, the Essays was all I had hoped it would be and cozy reading during a week too cold.

Books read this year:
Week 1: Greenglass House by Kate Milford, The Help by Kathryn Stockett, Saving Capitalism by Robert B. Reich, Will Sparrow's Road by Karen Cushman
Week 2: Essays of E. B. White. I also finished Notes from a Small Island but I have been picking that up for so long, I don't remember when I started it and only had two chapters to finish this year.

Now to catch back up on this thread, which is, as usual, giving me lots of books to put on my "to read" list. :)

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Hmm, I don't like Marieanne much either, and I was always a bit annoyed that Col Brandon was interested in her, because I did like him.  Something about those very emotional characters really turns me off.

 

Aww, I'm not sure we can be friends  :001_tt2:  You must be an Elinor.  I'm surrounded by them.  

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Who knew Austen could be so divisive ?! :)

 

~

 

Still trudging through Water. Excited that it's the 17th though - I get to read a bit more of The Forest Unseen!

 

 

Edited by StellaM
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I identify most with Anne Elliot, but when I write out what about her resonates with me, well it sounds so pathetic! But I am Anne, the one who'd rather be playing the music for the party than have to participate.

Anne Elliot is always a conundrum to me.  On my first reading through all Austen's works, Persuasion was second to last in my favorites.  On rereading it, I liked it better and it moved up the list.  I don't dislike her, in fact I admire her steadfastness.  But I'm always left wondering why she didn't fight for what she wanted in the beginning.  Three and a half years ago when I did the Jane Austen study with Skye and her friends the group was split.  Half of them thought Anne had done what she was supposed to by obeying her parent and parental figure and not marrying Wentworth.  The other half couldn't figure out why she wouldn't fight for her love, especially since she was mostly surrounded by people who didn't love or care about her.  

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What, no Elizabeth Bennets in the group? Elinor would be my second.  

 

And didn't we have this conversation last year?  :D

:lol:  yes, we did!  Though I'm not sure it started out with Fanny and Mansfield Park.  Wasn't it you, Rose, who said you have too many Marianne's in your life when I said I'm the only Marianne I know?

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Still entranced by Don Quixote... the only Austen contribution I can bring myself to make at the moment is how many times DQ has brought to mind Austen's Northanger Abbey parodying Radcliffe's Mysteries of Udolfo.

 

(To be quite honest, I've had to shield my eyes from some of the Austen posts in this thread, lest I feel faint....  :svengo: ) 

 

Back to DQ while I recover my decorum...  ;)  

 

From The Great Courses, The History of World Literature by Professor Grant L. Voth  Lecture 22  Don Quixote 

 

...the real meaning of anything lies not in the thing itself, but in the way that we interpret it, which will always be based on our own individual experience, history, and choices.

 

As the windmill and fox and sheep and strange lights are to Don Quixote and Sancho, so the book is to us. Each one of us will probably read our own Don Quixote, but we need always to remember that the text is reading us as we are reading the text.

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Anne Elliot is always a conundrum to me.  On my first reading through all Austen's works, Persuasion was second to last in my favorites.  On rereading it, I liked it better and it moved up the list.  I don't dislike her, in fact I admire her steadfastness.  But I'm always left wondering why she didn't fight for what she wanted in the beginning.  Three and a half years ago when I did the Jane Austen study with Skye and her friends the group was split.  Half of them thought Anne had done what she was supposed to by obeying her parent and parental figure and not marrying Wentworth.  The other half couldn't figure out why she wouldn't fight for her love, especially since she was mostly surrounded by people who didn't love or care about her.  

 

Some of it was money, of course.  Marriage among her class was more of a business proposition than starting a life with one's true love. At the time of his proposal, Captain Wentworth was not a captain, nor a man of means or property, nor an oldest brother who would inherit. It was, but the standard of the day and of that class, an imprudent match, certainly not one that could have been proudly entered into Sir Elliot's baronet book. The Anne we see in the book is older and braver, someone who is bold enough to say that a woman should marry for love, should be able to choose her own partner. 

 

And from a psychological standpoint, when a young person is surrounded by an indifferent family, that young person tends to make choices in vain attempts to please, to gain notice. To make a decision that will cut you off from that family, no matter how cold they are, no matter how much sense it makes from an outside perspective, is a terrifying prospect.  It takes some maturity to summon the strength to do what one knows is right.

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:lol:  yes, we did!  Though I'm not sure it started out with Fanny and Mansfield Park.  Wasn't it you, Rose, who said you have too many Marianne's in your life when I said I'm the only Marianne I know?

 

Oh yeah!  I think that was one of our first conversations!!  :lol:

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I finished listening to Paper Towns by John Green.  This was my "Picked by a Friend" category - Shannon has been trying to get me to read this ever since she read it last summer.  For the first section, I was kind of meh, fine YA book.  The second section I didn't like at all - I wanted to smack Quentin upside the head and tell him to get his head out of his a%% and pay attention to his real friends.  But the third section of the book was great - classic road trip story. And the ending was just, exactly right.  So I'm glad I read this book after all, and I see why my teen liked it.  Great, great characters - you can tell John Green remembers what high school was like. Not all adult writers of YA fiction do, IMO.

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Some of it was money, of course.  Marriage among her class was more of a business proposition than starting a life with one's true love. At the time of his proposal, Captain Wentworth was not a captain, nor a man of means or property, nor an oldest brother who would inherit. It was, but the standard of the day and of that class, an imprudent match, certainly not one that could have been proudly entered into Sir Elliot's baronet book. The Anne we see in the book is older and braver, someone who is bold enough to say that a woman should marry for love, should be able to choose her own partner. 

 

And from a psychological standpoint, when a young person is surrounded by an indifferent family, that young person tends to make choices in vain attempts to please, to gain notice. To make a decision that will cut you off from that family, no matter how cold they are, no matter how much sense it makes from an outside perspective, is a terrifying prospect.  It takes some maturity to summon the strength to do what one knows is right.

 

I think we really underestimate the significance of being cut off from family.  Even in a modern context, that can have a much greater effect than people who are inclined to be romantic realize.  But more so when family was really the only social security you had, and it was also the key to social relationships to some degree.  Even true love, if there is such a thing, can't easily stand up to social isolation and financial difficulties over the long term.

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Some of it was money, of course.  Marriage among her class was more of a business proposition than starting a life with one's true love. At the time of his proposal, Captain Wentworth was not a captain, nor a man of means or property, nor an oldest who would inherit. It was, but the standard of the day and of that class, an imprudent match,brother  certainly not one that could have been proudly entered into Sir Elliot's baronet book. The Anne we see in the book is older and braver, someone who is bold enough to say that a woman should marry for love, should be able to choose her own partner. 

 

And from a psychological standpoint, when a young person is surrounded by an indifferent family, that young person tends to make choices in vain attempts to please, to gain notice. To make a decision that will cut you off from that family, no matter how cold they are, no matter how much sense it makes from an outside perspective, is a terrifying prospect.  It takes some maturity to summon the strength to do what one knows is right.

:lol:  to Sir Elliot and his baronet book!!  What a vain and silly man he was!

 

Oh yeah!  I think that was one of our first conversations!!  :lol:

I think maybe so!

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But wasn,t it Anne,s mother,s friend who prevented Anne from marrying? The friend who was being her mother and was her only advocate and who loved her very much? (i like Anne. : ) )

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You know, I feel obliged to point out, as the mother of children who go to sea, that the issue for Anne,s foster mother was probably not just wealth, but lifestyle. Anne wanted to marry a man with no money who, immediately upon marrying her, was probably going to vanish for months or years or forever. Not only was he going to sea, but he was fighting at sea, not exactly a safe, stable job. The boy happened to get lucky, but I can,t exactly blame the foster mother for thinking Anne was too young to know what she was getting into. This is, essentially, a nautical book.

 

Nan

 

Eta - I love that Jane Austen gives us a lovely example of a happy nautical marriage, one that works beautifully and for the time, is amazingly equal. That marriage is one of the only truly happy ones described in the Austen books. Most of the others involve a compromise of some sort.

Edited by Nan in Mass
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You know, I feel obliged to point out, as the mother of children who go to sea, that the issue for Anne,s foster mother was probably not just wealth, but lifestyle. Anne wanted to marry a man with no money who, immediately upon marrying her, was probably going to vanish for months or years or forever. Not only was he going to sea, but he was fighting at sea, not exactly a safe, stable job. The boy happened to get lucky, but I can,t exactly blame the foster mother for thinking Anne was too young to know what she was getting into. This is, essentially, a nautical book.

 

Nan

 

Do you think I could re-read it as my nautical bingo square without cheating ? :)

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But you have to pay attention to the nautical bits - the descriptions of the nautical people. And life at sea. And the ships.

 

Eta Persuasion can be summed up as a description of the difficulties of maintaining a relationship when one person is a sailor.

Edited by Nan in Mass
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You guys talk too fast for me to keep up. I've pushed past the point where I quit If On a Winter's Night a Traveler the last time I tried to read it. I'm determined to finish, but I don't mind saying I'm not feeling the love. The choppiness is too distracting. I find I have to keep going back and reading parts over. The use of language is beautiful, but it doesn't help if I'm just totally lost, and my mind starts to wander very quickly. However, today I was fascinated by the phrase "petroliferous sultana." I had to smile at my automatic thoughts of oily raisins. 😃

 

Re Austen: There is no getting around it, I am an Elinor Dashwood. I watched Sense and Sensibility last night. However, last year I read Mansfield park and was totally irritated with Fanny. Maybe because I was a lot like her when young, a little too good, if you know what I mean. It gave me no satisfaction that she got the guy in the end. He irritated me even more than she did.

 

I feel compelled to say, in this nice safe place, that I absolutely adore everything about Blueberries for Sal. I read the book hundreds of times for my children. It's a very peaceful bedtime story. I've been wild blueberry picking in Maine, and many other places. My father taught us to recognize many kinds of wild fruits. Granted, my own kids are sometimes afraid to eat anything I pick until they see I don't die. But really, they'll be better prepared for the zombie apocalypse if they know what wild raspberries and grapes look like, and that the best persimmons are the ones on the ground. It makes me sad that they don't understand my love for My Side of the Mountain. They are the ones horrified at a child living alone in the woods, lol.

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I had to read a Roald Dahl book after I saw a commercial for "The BFG."  I couldn't find my copy of this book so I picked "Esio Trot" - what a cute story.  My 9yo read picture books of Charles Perrault's fairy tales in honor of his birthday.

 

:)

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You guys talk too fast for me to keep up. I've pushed past the point where I quit If On a Winter's Night a Traveler the last time I tried to read it. I'm determined to finish, but I don't mind saying I'm not feeling the love. The choppiness is too distracting. I find I have to keep going back and reading parts over. The use of language is beautiful, but it doesn't help if I'm just totally lost, and my mind starts to wander very quickly. However, today I was fascinated by the phrase "petroliferous sultana." I had to smile at my automatic thoughts of oily raisins. 😃

 

Re Austen: There is no getting around it, I am an Elinor Dashwood. I watched Sense and Sensibility last night. However, last year I read Mansfield park and was totally irritated with Fanny. Maybe because I was a lot like her when young, a little too good, if you know what I mean. It gave me no satisfaction that she got the guy in the end. He irritated me even more than she did.

 

I feel compelled to say, in this nice safe place, that I absolutely adore everything about Blueberries for Sal. I read the book hundreds of times for my children. It's a very peaceful bedtime story. I've been wild blueberry picking in Maine, and many other places. My father taught us to recognize many kinds of wild fruits. Granted, my own kids are sometimes afraid to eat anything I pick until they see I don't die. But really, they'll be better prepared for the zombie apocalypse if they know what wild raspberries and grapes look like, and that the best persimmons are the ones on the ground. It makes me sad that they don't understand my love for My Side of the Mountain. They are the ones horrified at a child living alone in the woods, lol.

See - Calvino grows on you after a while.

 

And I love Blueberries for Sal.   James and I read that so many times when he will young.  We still have it, hiding in the back of his bookshelf behind the star wars books and comic books.   I think he pulls it out occasionally.   Also One Morning in Maine.  We loved all those old books. So much fun to read. 

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I started reading the intro to that Stephen King book I had, but I found it is Book 5 in a fantasy series.  I don't have the earlier volumes, and they don't sound very interesting anyway.  I will be donating that book.  I will make another trip to the basement and see what else I have.  I might have some James Clavell I haven't read before, or maybe I will start the Lord of the Rings books that my sister gave me decades ago.

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So, Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart was a fun Sunday night read.

 

Fictionalized biography of one of the US's first female sheriffs.

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I feel compelled to say, in this nice safe place, that I absolutely adore everything about Blueberries for Sal. I read the book hundreds of times for my children. It's a very peaceful bedtime story. I've been wild blueberry picking in Maine, and many other places. My father taught us to recognize many kinds of wild fruits. Granted, my own kids are sometimes afraid to eat anything I pick until they see I don't die. But really, they'll be better prepared for the zombie apocalypse if they know what wild raspberries and grapes look like, and that the best persimmons are the ones on the ground. It makes me sad that they don't understand my love for My Side of the Mountain. They are the ones horrified at a child living alone in the woods, lol.

I have many memories of my father teaching me about the woods. Every spring I spent my afterschool hours in the woods hunting morel mushrooms with my dad who could spot them from about a hundred yards and send me after them. He also loved to hunt and fish, really anything outside. No hunting for me ever but I used to love fishing.

 

Nan, he was a Merchant Marine during WW2 so I always read your posts about your boys with great interest. He claimed his experience in MM made him a great fisherman, he was the envy of his friends because he really was good at catching lots of fish when they weren't.

 

It's funny to live in a place where I spend a great deal of time outside and don't really know what every single thing is and if it's safe to eat. We have done a few classes with naturalists but to be honest I wish my dad was here to sort it all out. The berries etc. we eat but mushrooms wild no thank you.

 

I have continued reading my cozy mysteries and finished my Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart. The Murakami was enjoyable but I found I really needed to read it undisturbed so it took me awhile to get a chance to finish it. This one had all of his usual elements, cats, wells, etc. but I thought a bit lighter with them. Possibly a good first Murakami but 1Q84 remains my favourite.

 

I also read the first in a new to me historical series recommended by Kareni, The Perils of Pleasure by Julie Anne Long (Pennyroyal Green). I will be reading more in order. ;) :lol:

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You guys talk too fast for me to keep up. I've pushed past the point where I quit If On a Winter's Night a Traveler the last time I tried to read it. I'm determined to finish, but I don't mind saying I'm not feeling the love. The choppiness is too distracting. I find I have to keep going back and reading parts over. The use of language is beautiful, but it doesn't help if I'm just totally lost, and my mind starts to wander very quickly. However, today I was fascinated by the phrase "petroliferous sultana." I had to smile at my automatic thoughts of oily raisins. 😃

 

Re Austen: There is no getting around it, I am an Elinor Dashwood. I watched Sense and Sensibility last night. However, last year I read Mansfield park and was totally irritated with Fanny. Maybe because I was a lot like her when young, a little too good, if you know what I mean. It gave me no satisfaction that she got the guy in the end. He irritated me even more than she did.

 

I feel compelled to say, in this nice safe place, that I absolutely adore everything about Blueberries for Sal. I read the book hundreds of times for my children. It's a very peaceful bedtime story. I've been wild blueberry picking in Maine, and many other places. My father taught us to recognize many kinds of wild fruits. Granted, my own kids are sometimes afraid to eat anything I pick until they see I don't die. But really, they'll be better prepared for the zombie apocalypse if they know what wild raspberries and grapes look like, and that the best persimmons are the ones on the ground. It makes me sad that they don't understand my love for My Side of the Mountain. They are the ones horrified at a child living alone in the woods, lol.

 

I think One Morning In Maine s my favorite.  I really covet the mom's kitchen.

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I just finished another British (Welsh to be exact) village cozy. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6383980-the-cold-light-of-mourning. The Cold Light of Mourning by Elizabeth Duncan was a fun read. I ended up giving it 5* on Goodreads simply because it did the amateur sleuth (local manicurist) with lots of village colour really well. Lots of little clues that appeared to be missed were tied together at the end. Not much excess which I liked. I loved how a cup of tea kept solving all sorts of catastrophe. That can be pretty accurate and I still find it humorous in real life.

 

Pretty early in our social home ed lives in the UK we were at an art class with a good friend of Ds and his mother when she got a phone call because her dh was being taken to hospital by ambulance because he couldn't breathe ( punctured lung from broken rib). Anyway everyone was scurrying around trying to get her to the hospital to meet him. Then I asked what she wanted me to do? She wanted a fresh cup of tea??? Yes, she calmly set down and drank her tea before telling us what she wanted to do with her dc's. Since then I tend to just offer tea in the face of huge distress to all. Seems to work. :lol: I am more of an action girl myself, notice I offer to make the tea. ;)

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I have many memories of my father teaching me about the woods. Every spring I spent my afterschool hours in the woods hunting morel mushrooms with my dad who could spot them from about a hundred yards and send me after them. He also loved to hunt and fish, really anything outside. No hunting for me ever but I used to love fishing.

 

Nan, he was a Merchant Marine during WW2 so I always read your posts about your boys with great interest. He claimed his experience in MM made him a great fisherman, he was the envy of his friends because he really was good at catching lots of fish when they weren't.

 

It's funny to live in a place where I spend a great deal of time outside and don't really know what every single thing is and if it's safe to eat. We have done a few classes with naturalists but to be honest I wish my dad was here to sort it all out. The berries etc. we eat but mushrooms wild no thank you.

 

...

 

My son has a friend who grew up in a hunting fishing family. He has an amazing knowledge base, one I envy greatly. You are lucky to have gotten some of that! Your dad sounds like a very cool person. I bet he could tell some interesting sea stories, too. My father-in-law did mushrooms. My family just does berries. And eats the occasional leaf, like wintergreen. I know what you mean about it being strange not to know what is around you. I drive my mother-in-law crazy by asking about all the Florida flora and fauna. She knows quite a lot, for someone who grew up in a city in NY, but Florida is so strange to New England eyes. I think Dr. Seuss must have been traumatized by a trip to Florida lol.

 

Nan

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