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Cutting out sugar


DawnM
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So, I am really, really needing to cut out sugar.  

 

Diabetes runs in my family.  I have been told 3 times, by 3 different doctors, that I am pre-diabetic and have metabolic syndrome.

 

It sucks, but it is what it is.

 

My problem?   I eat out a lot.  I have various women's groups and we all go out for dinner, lunch, or whatever.  And my family likes to eat out together at least once per week, often after church.

 

I have been starting to pay attention, or so I thought, to how much sugar is in things.  But it is in EVERYTHING.

 

Look at this:

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/23-restaurant-foods-crazy-high-082834970.html

 

Now, it doesn't seem to state where the sugar is coming from in the shrimp and spinach salad or the grilled chicken salad.  That has to be the dressing????

 

I am now looking at this website:

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/23-restaurant-foods-crazy-high-082834970.htmland it does look like the sugar is in the dressing for the carribean chicken salad, but it still has 53g of carbs......is that the corn?

 

 

I would love to just swear off of restaurant food completely for a while, but I don't see how I can.   

 

 

Edited by DawnM
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It probably is the dressing/marinade and starchy vegetables.

 

It *is* hard.  We're trying to adjust for dh. I'm looking for more places with better choices - wraps instead of sandwiches.  Un-marinated proteins.  Whole grain carbs.  In our area, that's not easy.  We don't eat out as a family very often, but he eats on the road fairly often.

 

We already eat relatively healthy and are pretty aware of added sugars.  But the whole glucose is glucose thing is rather intimidating.

 

:grouphug:

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I know giving up sugar can be frustrating! I was forced to do it over 3 years ago when diagnosed with hypoglycemia and found that reducing sugar just wasn't sufficient in maintaining balanced blood sugar levels. At first, eating out was tough, but the more I learned about hidden sugars in foods, the easier it became. I would recommend reading up on the Glycemic Index, a ranking of the carbohydrates in various foods and how it effects blood sugar. It was eye-opening to me!

 

Now, when I go out to eat, I look for a protein that is prepared without a marinade, however I've also learned to quiz the waiter on the food preparation. It's amazing how many restaurant chefs sprinkle sugar over many foods. I always tell my waiter about my health condition and ask them to talk with the cook/chef to ensure that no added sugar will be included. Also, I avoid foods that contain high amounts of natural sugars or metabolize quickly into glucose. For me that means nothing made with flour even whole grain, carrots, sweet potatoes, potatoes, beets, peas, butternut squash, and high sugar fruits. Fried foods don't work - they have flour, sugar, and sometimes bread crumbs in the batter. Red sauces and even cream sauces almost always have sugar. Rubs on meats usually contain sugar. I've found several restaurants who make their own salad dressings from scratch and don't include sugar or honey. I eat a lot of grilled chicken, fish, and beef and there are many delicious green vegetables to choose from. It takes a while to make the adjustment but once you do, the natural flavors of food are so satisfying.

Edited by jjeepa
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I've had gestational diabetes twice, had pre-diabetes, and even official diabetes for a few months. So I've momitored my sugars a lot.... when going out to eat, I almost mever order salads- way too many carbs, not enough protein. No pasta. No rice.

 

The meals that don't make my blood sugar go overboard are steak, baked potato and veggie type meals. Usually I just get the steak and veggies- but sometimes I can get the potato.

 

So yeah, some kind of sauceless protein (steak, grilled chicken or fish) and veggies are the best way to go. Add in baked potato or mashed potatos if you need some carbs.

 

Also, I am having extremely good luck kicking my sugar habit with the 21 day sugar detox by Diane Sanfilippo. I've lost 5 lbs. this week, just by cutting out carbs and following her plan.

 

And you don't eat like that forever- just 21 days- after that, you have ended (hopefully) the sugar cravings/withdrawals and are able to make better choices from then on out. I love it- it's the only thing that has ever worked for me.

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Also- eating healthy/low carb at chains like Applebees, Olive Garden, Chilis, etc. is pretty much impossible. All that food is just glorified fast food. It's all junk.

 

They don't have "chefs" at these restaurants- they have cooks, who reheat frozen, prepackaged food. Almost everything is premade at a

main facility, then shipped to them- so asking them to leave this off, or that off- usually can't happen....

 

The steaks are coated in chemicals, the vegetables are coated in chemicals- everything is coated in chemicals, laden with sugar in some form, frozen and reheated when you order it.

 

We prefer fast casual places, like Chipotle, Nandos, etc. Or nicer restaurants where actual chefs are in the kitchen, preparing actual real food.

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I agree giving up sugar is hard at first.  I would do it gradually.  (And I haven't given it up completely, I just try and limit it.)  For example, I'd stop ordering desserts at restaurants.  Then even if you get it in a dressing, you know you're already cutting out a lot!  Then you can do little things like asking for your dressing on the side so you can control the amount.  Or asking for lemon juice instead, or oil and vinegar (again on the side).  I stay away from anything fried or with heavy sauces.  Things like grilled chicken and green veggies are usually good.  Sometimes I'll just ask them if they have any broccoli or spinach, even if it's not on the menu, and often they do.  We've also gotten a lot pickier about our restaurants.  In our area, we know the ones that serve fresh, healthy options, and we try and go there.  

 

Another thing I've gotten into doing lately is having a quick, very small bowl of oatmeal (I like them uncooked) with plain nonfat yogurt, raw almonds, and a spoonful of pure fruit jam as an appetizer at home.  Then when I'm at the restaurant, since my hunger craving has kind of been satisfied by my pre-dinner snack, the big plates of food with heavy sauces don't even look appealing.  I'll get a cup of soap and a side salad, or a plate of vegetables, etc.

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We've been doing the 100 Days of Real Food challenge. It's not low carb - but all whole foods. We eat 2 fruit/veg before we eat our meal and that's been helping a ton. We're finding starting with the fruit out veg it's crutical, otherwise were full on our meal and don't want them. We're also focused on no processed stuff - at home or out. Wow our sugar consumption has dropped through the floor!! I highly recommend it. I will say my cravings were nuts for about a week. Now I feel very stable.

 

If I eat out, I'm planning on salad, grilled protein, and oil and vinegar for dressing. With the salad I'll go with cheese, but drop croutons and any fake bacon bits. Last night we went out and I ate the white rolls as my "cheat"... So not worth it.

 

You can do it!!

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Also- eating healthy/low carb at chains like Applebees, Olive Garden, Chilis, etc. is pretty much impossible. All that food is just glorified fast food. It's all junk.

 

They don't have "chefs" at these restaurants- they have cooks, who reheat frozen, prepackaged food. Almost everything is premade at a

main facility, then shipped to them- so asking them to leave this off, or that off- usually can't happen....

 

The steaks are coated in chemicals, the vegetables are coated in chemicals- everything is coated in chemicals, laden with sugar in some form, frozen and reheated when you order it.

 

We prefer fast casual places, like Chipotle, Nandos, etc. Or nicer restaurants where actual chefs are in the kitchen, preparing actual real food.

 

I've found Chili's "lighter choice" menu to be a very good option when eating out if one isn't concerned about sodium.  I had something absolutely delicious last night -- Pasilla Chile Chicken.  Only 410 calories, 43 grams of carbs and 11 grams of sugar.  The carbs mostly came from the quinoa and wheatberry side item, which could easily have been replaced with extra broccoli to lower the net carbs.  For anyone strictly watching their sugar intake there are other choices that keep the sugar grams in the single digits (the Ancho salmon only has 4 grams of sugar).  The 6 oz. sirloin and grilled avocado only has 21 grams of carbs and 7 grams of sugar.  I've also been to various Chili's locations many times with friends who have special dietary needs, and the staff have always been able to accommodate their requests w/o batting an eye.

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If I know where I'm going to be eating out, I often go online beforehand to look at their menu choices, and, if they have them, their nutrition info.  It helps me to make a plan, and to be aware of hidden issues.

Good choices are omelettes,  salmon with veg on the side, green salads (no croutons, no dried fruit, no sugar-coated nuts, etc., and choose dressing wisely and on the side), salads with salmon or chicken, etc.  If there's not a good choice, and it's a good enough restaurant, you should be able to ask for something custom.  For example, I often choose the grilled-whatever-protein (salmon) and then pick two to three veggies offered with other entrees and ask for them.  So if there's salmon with broccoli and potatoes or steak with zucchini and rice, I'll ask for salmon with broccoli and zucchini.  

It's not easy, but it's worth the effort. 

Edited by justasque
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Let me ask this question specific to your meetings with groups of women at restaurants.

 

My experience is if you get 10 women together, at least 8 of them are watching what they eat.  Can you suggest non-restaurant venues for at least some of these groups you are part of?  You would probably get a lot of support from other members.

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Do you usually eat at chain restaurants? If so, most of them have their menus and nutritional info online so it's pretty easy to find choices that will work for you.

 

My doctor recommended a Ketogenic diet to help me lose weight. Although I was eating "healthy" foods and reasonable portions, my carb count was pretty high and I was having a difficult time losing weight. I now eat no more than 25g of carbs per day, and I've lost almost 10lbs in the last 2 weeks. Low-carb, or super low carb/Ketogenic, diets are what you want to look for.

 

As an example of looking up the nutrition content online, I took my daughter to Wendy's and then shopping for a girls' day out yesterday. (She loves French fries and Wendy's is the only place she can eat them due to dietary restrictions, unless I make them at home. If I make them at home, I will want to eat some, and with low carb eating I can't, so Wendy's it was!). I looked at their menu online and determined that if I ate a bun-less Son of Baconator, with no ketchup (or mayo because I don't like it), a side salad without tomatoes and using only half of the Ranch dressing, and a bottled water, I would be eating only around 4g of carbs. It was a very satisfying meal, and a carb-smart meal, which I assume would be good as far as diabetes goes.

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I've found Chili's "lighter choice" menu to be a very good option when eating out if one isn't concerned about sodium. I had something absolutely delicious last night -- Pasilla Chile Chicken. Only 410 calories, 43 grams of carbs and 11 grams of sugar. The carbs mostly came from the quinoa and wheatberry side item, which could easily have been replaced with extra broccoli to lower the net carbs. For anyone strictly watching their sugar intake there are other choices that keep the sugar grams in the single digits (the Ancho salmon only has 4 grams of sugar). The 6 oz. sirloin and grilled avocado only has 21 grams of carbs and 7 grams of sugar. I've also been to various Chili's locations many times with friends who have special dietary needs, and the staff have always been able to accommodate their requests w/o batting an eye.

They must be changing the menu to meet demand- I haven't eaten at one in years.

 

However, I have read many articles online, and had various people who used to work at such places confirm- that unless the request involves a "critical" allergy, many times, they are just lying- as they are told to do- when people ask to leave things off or whatever.... you really can't trust what's being done back in those kitchens 100%.

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If you can get over the initial hump of no added sugar, I think you'll find that many foods you used to eat will start taste excessively and uninvitingly sweet to you soon.  Restaurant desserts and boxed desserts will taste cloyingly sweet.  You will just naturally eat very little of it b/c it all tastes gross.  The hard part is adjusting your palate towards what vinegar and oil as a dressing, for example, is supposed to taste like without all the added salt and sugar.  I had a Smore or two over the holidays, but it really tasted way too sweet and I really don't want them anymore.

 

I stopped bringing the kids to Awanas because all the rewards were based on candy and cookies.  Like by the handful.  I couldn't let get into that habit so I explained and I think their Awanas changed over recently to points for non-food prizes.  Maybe the women's group can meet at the library?

Edited by Samm
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Honestly, the only way to do it is to stop getting food out. Can you just get a coffee (black of course) to sip on while everyone else eats? That is what dh has done. (Only he tends to get a diet soda instead of coffee.)

 

 

That is what I am wondering.

 

I don't always have a say in where we go and I do NOT want to say no.  I love hanging out with my friends.

 

When I do have a say, I suggest places we can order up front and then sit, no real waiter......Pei Wei, Panera, etc.....if we go to those places, I can take a protein shake or something along and get a drink.

 

But sometimes I am with a friend and just out for the day or with only one other person, so it is more awkward.

 

I am starting to check menus and nutrition facts before going, but it is something I have to really think about.

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If you can get over the initial hump of no added sugar, I think you'll find that many foods you used to eat will start taste excessively and uninvitingly sweet to you soon.  Restaurant desserts and boxed desserts will taste cloyingly sweet.  You will just naturally eat very little of it b/c it all tastes gross.  The hard part is adjusting your palate towards what vinegar and oil as a dressing, for example, is supposed to taste like without all the added salt and sugar.  I had a Smore or two over the holidays, but it really tasted way too sweet and I really don't want them anymore.

 

I stopped bringing the kids to Awanas because all the rewards were based on candy and cookies.  Like by the handful.  I couldn't let get into that habit so I explained and I think their Awanas changed over recently to points for non-food prizes.  Maybe the women's group can meet at the library?

 

 

That will go over like a lead balloon.  I know that.  And people DO need to eat, so I fully understand socializing with food.

 

I just need to be better educated.  I am about calories and fat, but haven't ever paid attention to sugar.

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I am starting to check menus and nutrition facts before going, but it is something I have to really think about.

 

When we first changed how we ate I spent a couple of hours looking online at menus from places we usually went to.  Most of our friends live in a town 45 minutes from where we live so like you, we socialized at restaurants. 

 

A list on my phone of restaurants and options from each made it MUCH easier for me when we were out. I usually didn't even look at the menu, just went by what I had on my list. Panda Express? Black Pepper chicken and steamed veggies, 9 grams sugar.   Chick fil-A? Cobb salad has 6 grams sugar, and I bring my own dressing.  Texas Roadhouse usually means garlic shrimp skewer or a ribeye paired w steamed veggies.    

 

If you visit the same places occasionally, it might be worth it to spend some time at home, while you're not starving or under pressure to hurry up and order, and make a list you can live with.  It doesn't always work- like when they pick a place you haven't put on your list, but if you can make good choices half the time, then you've made real progress.  And instead of looking at a menu full of things you CAN'T have, your list lets you choose what you can have without all that temptation. 

 

Three years later...we've changed how we socialize and rarely meet friends at restaurants now. But when we do, my list is there. And honestly, sometimes I choose to splurge and eat that baked potato or that pasta dish. 

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I have found that a salad with no grains or starchy vegs, plain grilled chicken (no marinades/sauces) and vinegar dressing (in other words, just vinegar) is my best bet.  If I'm going to a place where I can't get that basic combination, I'm going to have an unsweetened iced tea or a coffee with cream and eat nuts I bring along or something earlier or later!

 

I've given up sugar and grains.  It's wonderful once you adjust!!!!!!!  

Edited by pehp
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If your groups' socializing revolves around food, can you change to meeting and eating at people's homes? Or at neutral venues and everybody brings food to share?

 

I love hanging out with friends, but I much prefer hosting and cooking at home over going out. (Options in our town are crummy anyway). there can be a social life without restaurant food.

Edited by regentrude
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Waiters are often educated on what is in the food they are serving.  Ask if there is sugar in an item.  A waiter may not know, but he/she can ask the cook/chef; that is part of their job.  If they refuse, ask to see the manager.    

 

You can also ask that items at restaurants be prepared w/o sugar.  Be flexible:  perhaps you can’t have a special salad you love, but the chef might make you a tasty substitute (and/or you might bring a small container of sensible dressing from home). 

 

Edited by yucabird
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My husband's parents both have diabetes and about 15 years ago a doctor told him that he was on the way to getting it (not pre-diabetes yet, but headed that way.)

 

He made huge changes in what he eats, and has continued them pretty much to this day.

 

For socializing he actually does better at restaurants than at people's homes, because there is more selection and less hard feelings if he just doesn't eat much.  He generally orders a big meal sized green salad with added lean meat--steak, shrimp, or chicken breast--and asks for the dressing to be served on the side.  Sometimes he gets a hot meat entree, in which case he asks for extra veggies and no starch--so double the side of sauteed squashes but no new potatoes, for instance.  He carries his own blue sugar free packets with him.  He never orders soda anymore.  He doesn't eat the bread.  Those procedures work pretty well for him.

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I have been off sugar (excepting Xmas eve and day) for awhile. I go the plain salmon, chicken or beef route with an extra veg to replace starch. I tell the waiter,etc. If the best I can do is a plain, undressed salad that's what I do. I have also eaten at home and ordered coffee. I just explain to my friends why. No one has said " Well, don't come then." ;)

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As far as eating out..... My success lies in being "that" customer and tipping well. I order salad with dressing on the side. If my entree has a starch as the side, I ask to have it subbed for something else - steamed veggies or grilled mushrooms. I ask to have the sauce left off or served on the side.

 

W exist finished a seven day cruise and I was able to eat well the whole time. I would try a bite or two of a tempting dessert that DD or DH ordered, but not get my own. Water with lemon or lime, sparkling water in place of soda. Eggs for breakfast are usually a good choice. It helps if the food has lots of flavor so that I don't feel hungry.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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:grouphug: No advice just hugs.  At least you can still enjoy your coffee!

 

Once again, OP, we're paralleling.  (New word of the day.)  I've just cut out sugar, due to prediabetes.  And, yes, I've been told to do it for years, over and over, but just didn't listen.  It's a lot harder than I thought it would be!

 

 

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It is difficult, and honestly you really need to be watching carbs in general because it's only ever so slightly better than sugar for a diabetic (and pre diabetic). 

 

Eating out is a total pain when on low carb.  I usually have steak and veg, but steak is expensive.  Salads work (carry your own dressing or use oil and vinegar).  Fried chicken even with the coating isn't too bad carb wise. 

 

 

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Ok, last night I looked at Pei Wei, a favorite place......and well, we may just have to cut that out completely.  There is nothing but plain salad I can have and I am NOT going to a wonderful Asian place and ordering lettuce and nothing else.   Their lettuce wraps are full of sugar!  ARGH!!!!!!!!!!

 

Another place I go with friends quite frequently is Panera.  And score, there are far more options there with soups and salads don't have a lot of added sugar.

 

I am not going to complain or dictate where we go all the time, but if they ask for my opinion, I will say Panera for now.

 

Need to check some other places.

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focus more on green veggie type salads with some protein - and ask for dressing on the side.  then you can seriously reduce how much dressing you are eating.  most retaurants put 2- 4 TIMES the needed dressing on salads.  you can even just dip your fork in the dressing before stabbing your lettuce, and cut down even further.

 

I was shocked how much sugar is in commercial pasta sauce.  (someone gave me some.  I've made my own for years - and thought the commercial stuff was sickly sweet.)

 

one reason  processors/restaurants do so - sugar changes the brain's ability to determine satiation. eat more sugar - you eat more food, period.

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focus more on green veggie type salads with some protein - and ask for dressing on the side.  then you can seriously reduce how much dressing you are eating.  most retaurants put 2- 4 TIMES the needed dressing on salads.  you can even just dip your fork in the dressing before stabbing your lettuce, and cut down even further.

 

I was shocked how much sugar is in commercial pasta sauce.  (someone gave me some.  I've made my own for years - and thought the commercial stuff was sickly sweet.)

 

one reason  processors/restaurants do so - sugar changes the brain's ability to determine satiation. eat more sugar - you eat more food, period.

 

 

I have always asked for the dressing on the side.  I don't like a lot of dressing on my salad.

 

I really, really DO NOT want to have only salad everywhere I go, and only plain salad.  I want some options.

 

Thankfully we don't do places like McDonald's or cheaper fast food.   Occasionally we do Chick Fil A with friends if the kids are with us.

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focus more on green veggie type salads with some protein - and ask for dressing on the side.  then you can seriously reduce how much dressing you are eating.  most retaurants put 2- 4 TIMES the needed dressing on salads.  you can even just dip your fork in the dressing before stabbing your lettuce, and cut down even further.

 

I was shocked how much sugar is in commercial pasta sauce.  (someone gave me some.  I've made my own for years - and thought the commercial stuff was sickly sweet.)

 

one reason  processors/restaurants do so - sugar changes the brain's ability to determine satiation. eat more sugar - you eat more food, period.

 

I have a case of plain tomato in a can (the kind you use to make your own sauce) from Costco and even that has added sugar.  I cut out all added sugar 8 days ago and was shocked about all the things it is in - table salt (in the form of dextrose), chicken stock, mustard, dill pickles, cold cuts.  Ugh.

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I have a case of plain tomato in a can (the kind you use to make your own sauce) from Costco and even that has added sugar.  I cut out all added sugar 8 days ago and was shocked about all the things it is in - table salt (in the form of dextrose), chicken stock, mustard, dill pickles, cold cuts.  Ugh.

 

yep.  pickles actually have beneficial properties - pickled food (in moderation) is good for your gut flora. they are inhospitable to yeast and help to keep it in check.  and it's not like you're going to gorge on pickles.   we make our own stock, and always have. 

I don't know how much canning you do - one reason to add sugar is to help as a preservative in the canned tomatoes.   and using canned tomatoes (that have sugar in them) to make pasta sauce is still way less sugar than commercially prepared pasta sauce.  (and some of the "total sugar" it gives you on the label is naturally occuring sugars - not all of it is added.) raw carrots have sugar . . .

the absolute worst form - is HFCS.

Edited by gardenmom5
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I have always asked for the dressing on the side. I don't like a lot of dressing on my salad.

 

I really, really DO NOT want to have only salad everywhere I go, and only plain salad. I want some options.

 

Thankfully we don't do places like McDonald's or cheaper fast food. Occasionally we do Chick Fil A with friends if the kids are with us.

Do you have a Nandos Peri-Peri near you? I love that place and it's easy to eat low carb there... also, BGR, the burger place- has lettuce wrapped burgers... at Chipotle you can get a salad bowl... Bonefish Grill is another easy one....

 

I am very lucky in that we live in a huge area that has a large diversity of places to eat.

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yep. pickles actually have beneficial properties - pickled food (in moderation) is good for your gut flora. they are inhospitable to yeast and help to keep it in check. and it's not like you're going to gorge on pickles. we make our own stock, and always have.

I don't know how much canning you do - one reason to add sugar is to help as a preservative in the canned tomatoes. and using canned tomatoes (that have sugar in them) to make pasta sauce is still way less sugar than commercially prepared pasta sauce. (and some of the "total sugar" it gives you on the label is naturally occuring sugars - not all of it is added.) raw carrots have sugar . . .

the absolute worst form - is HFCS.

Bubbies pickles and relish are naturally fermented, and all natural. I get them at Whole Foods or Wegmans.

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So, I am really, really needing to cut out sugar.  

 

Diabetes runs in my family.  I have been told 3 times, by 3 different doctors, that I am pre-diabetic and have metabolic syndrome.

 

It sucks, but it is what it is.

 

My problem?   I eat out a lot.  I have various women's groups and we all go out for dinner, lunch, or whatever.  And my family likes to eat out together at least once per week, often after church.

 

I have been starting to pay attention, or so I thought, to how much sugar is in things.  But it is in EVERYTHING.

 

Look at this:

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/23-restaurant-foods-crazy-high-082834970.html

 

Now, it doesn't seem to state where the sugar is coming from in the shrimp and spinach salad or the grilled chicken salad.  That has to be the dressing????

 

I am now looking at this website:

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/23-restaurant-foods-crazy-high-082834970.htmland it does look like the sugar is in the dressing for the carribean chicken salad, but it still has 53g of carbs......is that the corn?

 

 

I would love to just swear off of restaurant food completely for a while, but I don't see how I can.   

 

There is a difference between the sugar naturally contained in a food and the sugar that is added. And yes, corn is a high-carbohydrate food. All of the grains are, and potatoes (both sweet and white). Many fruits are high in sugar; berries and melons, not so much. In fact, many diabetics do well on Atkins, which is to say that at Panera, you could have soup, and you could have salad if you use oil and vinegar instead of a mixed dressing (yes, even if it's on the side).

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with it being pointed out there is dextrose added to salt (really? REALLY?), one more reason to make the switch to the natural salts (which have far more minerals too) . . . I almost did.  I think I will go ahead and get some and see how it is.  there are several kinds  - I was introduced to himalyan pink salt in a restaurant we patronize.  

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Two suggestions for restaurant eating: 

 

Take your own food and order coffee or tea. So many people are gluten-free etc. these days that I think restaurants are more understanding of brown baggers. Leave a tip the size you would have if you had had a meal. 

 

or 

 

Spend some time online reading the nutrition menus of the places you frequent. You will typically be able to find a choice or two that works for you. Then order that item when you go there. If there are no choices at the favorite restaurants, then look up the menus of others in the area and ask the group if they'd be willing to switch. 

 

Really, restaurant eating isn't particularly good for anyone. If you suggested sometimes meeting for coffee/tea instead of a meal, I bet there would be some other relieved people. 

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I have a case of plain tomato in a can (the kind you use to make your own sauce) from Costco and even that has added sugar.  I cut out all added sugar 8 days ago and was shocked about all the things it is in - table salt (in the form of dextrose), chicken stock, mustard, dill pickles, cold cuts.  Ugh.

 

I do not understand the bolded.

Table salt is sodium chloride, NaCl. Dextrose is a form of glucose, C6H12O6.

How can table salt be "in the form of dextrose"?

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On the salt:  http://www.mortonsalt.com/faqs/food-salt-faqs

 

Dextrose is added to stabilize the iodide. Iodine is vital to the proper functioning of the thyroid gland and the prevention of goiter. Actually, the amount of dextrose in salt is so small that it is dietetically insignificant. Morton® Iodized Table Salt contains 0.04 percent dextrose or 40 milligrams per 100 grams of salt. Morton® Plain Table Salt contains neither iodine nor dextrose. All Morton Salt products containing potassium iodide are labeled as such.

 

 

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One thought about taking your own food to restaurants... We do this fairly often for DS, who has multiple LTFAs.  He simply can't eat safely at most restaurants.  We almost always call ahead and talk to a manager ahead of time, before bringing our own food.  I view it as a courtesy.  There are a few restaurants that know us, and we've done it enough that I don't feel we need to call ahead, but each time we arrive - I check in with a manager and let them know.  

 

I think of it as just being polite.  I wouldn't take food into someone else's home, who is serving dinner, without letting them know (preferably ahead of time).  I know a restaurant is different, we are customers not guests, but still... It feels better.  And that way I know we'll avoid any misunderstandings and we'll be welcome the next time around.

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It is difficult, and honestly you really need to be watching carbs in general because it's only ever so slightly better than sugar for a diabetic (and pre diabetic). 

 

 

 

Agree with the carb comment- different bodies react differently and I found that I can eat cuties (mandarins) and be fine, but pasta, rice, or potatoes can make me groggy.  I'm guessing those things make my blood sugar go wonky.  And furthermore I have discovered that adding fat to things like potatoes makes it less likely to bother me.    Knowing what you can and can't tolerate helps quite a bit.  And I'm not even pre-diabetic- I just know that carb loading means I'm going to feel awful. 

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My problem?   I eat out a lot.  I have various women's groups and we all go out for dinner, lunch, or whatever.  And my family likes to eat out together at least once per week, often after church.

 

 

I would love to just swear off of restaurant food completely for a while, but I don't see how I can.   

 

Oh, whoops, I didn't pay attention to that part.

 

Church usually runs through lunchtime, so everyone gets home cranky and hungry and no food is ready.  That's why eating out is so tempting.  If you prep for Sunday dinner before you leave for church, it is a lot less tempting to go out to eat.  Yesterday, I cooked a big meal before church.  It was great.  I think if your family knew you'd have good food at home, in a timely manner, they would agree to go to restaurants less often.

Edited by Caribbean Queen
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For church meetings where there tends to be sugary treats available, a few times I have brought veggies and dip to share as well, and I've noticed that they get eaten enthusiastically and people comment on how nice it is that they are there.  Most of the time the sugary treats thing is because of habit, or because it's cheap, or because it keeps well at room temperature, but there are LOTS of people who would rather have something else--I was surprised at how many.  And I didn't get any flack either--I thought people would roll their eyes or push the desserts, but pretty much they have been positive.

Edited by Carol in Cal.
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For church meetings where there tends to be sugary treats available, a few times I have brought veggies and dip to share as well, and I've noticed that they get eaten enthusiastically and people comment on how nice it is that they are there.  Most of the time the sugary treats thing is because of habit, or because it's cheap, or because it keeps well at room temperature, but there are LOTS of people who would rather have something else--I was surprised at how many.  And I didn't get any flack either--I thought people would roll their eyes or push the desserts, but pretty much they have been positive.

 

We have adults who bring veggies to our scout events and they don't get eaten!   Everyone wants to try so and so's latest dish.

 

I have stopped eating much at those things anyway, just due to calories and fat.  I just haven't taken sugar into account before.

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Oh, whoops, I didn't pay attention to that part.

 

Church usually runs through lunchtime, so everyone gets home cranky and hungry and no food is ready.  That's why eating out is so tempting.  If you prep for Sunday dinner before you leave for church, it is a lot less tempting to go out to eat.  Yesterday, I cooked a big meal before church.  It was great.  I think if your family knew you'd have good food at home, in a timely manner, they would agree to go to restaurants less often.

 

 

I know how to meal prep and have food ready, they just do like a treat, and Sunday has traditionally been our time together.

 

That is the easiest to cut out really and they will be on board, we just need to do it.  

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We have adults who bring veggies to our scout events and they don't get eaten!   Everyone wants to try so and so's latest dish.

 

Church is different from scouts though.  At church there are more older people who are watching what they eat.  At scouts there are young and teenage children and their parents--a crowd with much higher appetites and much less of a drive/incentive to eat healthy.

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Church is different from scouts though.  At church there are more older people who are watching what they eat.  At scouts there are young and teenage children and their parents--a crowd with much higher appetites and much less of a drive/incentive to eat healthy.

 

 

Yeah, although our weekend Bible Study potluck had veggies leftover too.  I did eat a lot of the salad.  But there were so many yummy things there.....sigh....I stayed away from a lot of it, and didn't have any sugar....

 

And our scouts are families.....not just scouts.  We have about 30 families and for most events, both parents come.

Edited by DawnM
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