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MEmama

How do you clean your cast iron pan?

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I remember my mother used to just pour the grease into the all purpose grease can next to the stove (to eventually be reused) before just wiping it out with a napkin. I'm not very squeamish about sanitation in the kitchen, but perhaps I'm forgetting a crucial step?

 

I'm new to cast iron and want to make sure I'm doing it right. ;)

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I just rinse it out with water.  Do not use soap on it; it will ruin the seasoning of the iron.

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I brush it clean under the hot water tap with no soap.  Then I shake it dry and put it straight back onto the hob - put a fire under it and boil it dry.  Give it a quick wipe with paper towel to get the last moisture off.

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Am I the only one to dd more "fat" to it right away?

 

I clean with water, no soap, dry it and then spray with oil before putting it away.

 

 

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Depending on what I am cooking, sometimes I do use soap. Most times I just use hot water and dry it. I do if the oven is warm, sit in the oven to dry. I use flaxseed oil on my pans to keep them non stick. A very tiny amount goes a long way.

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Am I the only one to dd more "fat" to it right away?

 

I clean with water, no soap, dry it and then spray with oil before putting it away.

 

I don't NOW, because they are so well used and well seasoned. Now it's sufficient to just cook with fat.

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It depends on what I'm cooking and how well seasoned a particular piece is.

 

For something simple and fatty (bacon, ground beef, etc.), I just wipe out.

But I cook anything and everything in my cast iron, including creamy, tomato-ey, and sticky stuff.  Those get a good rub under hot water, scrubbed with salt if needed, then dried and oiled.

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I'll use coarse salt to scrub, then rinse and DRY COMPLETELY, then add a bit more oil + put on the stovetop with heat...still working on re-curing some amazing cast iron pans I found for free. 

 

That said, my grandmother always used soap on her cast iron. 

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I usually rinse/scrub any food debris out with hot water, dry it on the stove, and rub it down with some cooking spray while it's still hot.

 

My brother swears that flaxseed oil gave his a better "season" than anything else he tried and that it made his truly non-stick. I haven't tried it myself yet though.

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Am I the only one to dd more "fat" to it right away?

 

I clean with water, no soap, dry it and then spray with oil before putting it away.

 

I add a touch of oil and wipe it around with a paper towel after it's been washed and dried.  It's how I was taught so it's just my routine...no science behind it. 

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I usually rinse/scrub any food debris out with hot water, dry it on the stove, and rub it down with some cooking spray while it's still hot.

 

My brother swears that flaxseed oil gave his a better "season" than anything else he tried and that it made his truly non-stick. I haven't tried it myself yet though.

The flaxseed oil gives it this slide out of the pan finish like nothing else.

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I scrub with salt and a nylon brush.  Rinse with cool water, and wipe dry right away.  I'll wipe it down with more oil if it looks like it needs it.  

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Hot water and a plastic scrubber. I put it over high heat and wipe the inside with a bit of shortening. I find oil gets too sticky. 

 

If something is stubborn, I use a salt scrub.

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Boil water in it for a few minutes. Anything stuck comes loose. Pour out water. Wipe dry with paper towel. Unless it's already well seasoned, I put a little coconut oil on it after cleaning.

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Same as others--light scrub with water, dry it, oil if needed. Spray (like Pam) makes it sticky. Use something real.

Once in a while, someone in the family will put it in the sink (esp if I haven't gotten to it and I left it on the stove) and fill it with water.

:willy_nilly:

So then I do use a bit of soap, and I reseason by sticking in the oven after rubbing with coconut oil. (I can't remember the exact directions, but I use the Lodge website.) It takes a few days, imo, to get a good season on it that can withstand a little abuse.

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I scrub mine out with a scouring pad (just the rough type - no soap) and hot water.  If I need a bit more cleaning power, I add salt.  Then I put it on my stove top and heat it till dry and get a bit of lard from a small tub I bought for this purpose and give it a wipe for a thin coat.

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Thanks for al, the great cleaning tips.

 

One more question: will all the oil/ fat build up cause much smoking? I'd like to be able to cook at fairly high temps without much extra oil, but I'm wondering how all that extra grease (the seasoning?) will respond.

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Thanks for al, the great cleaning tips.

 

One more question: will all the oil/ fat build up cause much smoking? I'd like to be able to cook at fairly high temps without much extra oil, but I'm wondering how all that extra grease (the seasoning?) will respond.

No issues with smoke on mine. 

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No smoking, here. I can't remember the specifics, but the seasoning grease goes thru a chemical bonding with the metal, and I think that's what makes it not smoke. It probably helps to use a grease/oil with a very high smoke point! lol

 

Smoke points of oils

Edited by Chris in VA
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Thanks for al, the great cleaning tips.

 

One more question: will all the oil/ fat build up cause much smoking? I'd like to be able to cook at fairly high temps without much extra oil, but I'm wondering how all that extra grease (the seasoning?) will respond.

Mine smokes just a bit when I turn the heat to high. It's probably because I don't always wipe out the shortening well from the last use. It quickly dissipates though.

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Scrub it with a chain mail scrubber

 

http://www.amazon.com/Ringer-Cleaner-Stainless-Steel-Chainmail/dp/B00FKBR1ZG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1452205566&sr=8-2&keywords=chain+mail+scrubber

 

Use a of of fat to cook

 

dry immediately on the stove top

 

This.

 

We get out as much grease as possible, then clean it w/ hot water and chain mail. Then back on the burner till the water is gone and we add some fat to it if it needs it. We let the fat melt and swab the pan to spread the fat. 

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I wash mine with hot water (often using a metal scrubber, but NOT an SOS pad--just a metal scrubber), dry it completely and then usually add more fat maybe about 50% of the time.

 

 

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Thanks for al, the great cleaning tips.

 

One more question: will all the oil/ fat build up cause much smoking? I'd like to be able to cook at fairly high temps without much extra oil, but I'm wondering how all that extra grease (the seasoning?) will respond.

No. If you have oil/fat buildup you're putting way too much on the pan. The seasoning is more a of carbon layer than a grease layer.

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Scrub it with a chain mail scrubber

 

http://www.amazon.com/Ringer-Cleaner-Stainless-Steel-Chainmail/dp/B00FKBR1ZG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1452205566&sr=8-2&keywords=chain+mail+scrubber

 

Use a of of fat to cook

 

dry immediately on the stove top

 

 

I got one of these for christmas from Lehman's. Love it.  My cast iron was my grandmothers.  It was probably 50+ years old when I got it almost 20 years ago.

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